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Anything Goes

by Lucy Moore

'Absolutely fizzing . . . I could not put it down . . . Moore has the most wonderful eye for detail and a brilliant sense of human character. The Most entertaining work of history you are likely to read in a long while. 'A. N. WilsonBracketed by the catastrophes of the Great War and the Wall Street Crash, 1920s America was a place of drama, tension and hedonism. It glittered as it seduced: jazz musicians, flappers, wild all-night parties, the birth of Hollywood, and a glamorous world of gangsters all flourished under prohibition. But the period was also punctuated by momentous historical events - the political show trials of Sacco and Vanzetti; the huge Ku Klax Klan march down Washington DC's Pennsylvania Avenue - and produced a sparkling array of writers, musicians and film stars, from F. Scott Fitzgerald to Bessie Smith, Charlie Chaplin to Mary Pickford. 'A varied and dazzling portrait gallery of crooks and film stars, boxers and presidents, each brilliantly delineated and coloured in by a historian with a novelist's relish for human foibles. 'Christopher Hart, Sunday Times'Like the champagne-immersed age she portrays, Moore's book effervesces with the detail of this fascinating story. 'Juliet Nicolson, Evening Standard

The Grand Turk

by John Freely

Sultan Mehmet II, the Grand Turk, known to his countrymen as Fatih, `the Conqueror¿, and to much of Europe as `the present Terror of the World¿, was once the most feared and powerful ruler in the world. The seventh of his line to rule the Ottoman Turks, Mehmet was barely 21 when he conquered Byzantine Constantinople, which became Istanbul and the capital of his mighty empire. Mehmet reigned for 30 years, during which time his armies extended the borders of his empire halfway across Asia Minor and as far into Europe as Hungary and Italy. Three popes called for crusades against him as Christian Europe came face to face with a new Muslim empire. Mehmet himself was an enigmatic figure. Revered by the Turks and seen as a cruel and brutal tyrant by the west, he was a brilliant military leader but also a renaissance prince who had in his court Persian and Turkish poets, Arab and Greek astronomers and Italian scholars and artists. In this, the first biography of Mehmet for 30 years, John Freely vividly brings to life the world in which Mehmet lived and illuminates the man behind the myths, a figure who dominated both East and West from his palace above the Golden Horn and the Bosphorus, where an inscription still hails him as, 'Sultan of the two seas, shadow of God in the two worlds, God's servant between the two horizons, hero of the water and the land, conqueror of the stronghold of Constantinople. ''

A Dangerous Liaison

by Carole Seymour-Jones

A revelatory new biography of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre. A Dangerous Liaison tells the intense, passionate and sometimes painful story of how these two brilliant free-thinkers -- and rivals -- came to share a relationship that was to last over fifty years. Moving from the corridors of the Sorbonne and the chestnut groves in the Limousin, to the cafés of Paris's Left Bank, we discover how the strikingly beautiful and gifted young Simone came to fall in love with the squinting, arrogant, hard-drinking Jean-Paul. Seymour-Jones describes that first summer of 1929: the heated debates that went on long into the night, the sexual rivalry and betrayal, the dangerous ideas that led people to experiment with new ways of behaving, and the deep love that this perhaps unlikely couple shared. We hear how Sartre clandestinely compromised with the Nazis and fell into a Soviet honey-trap. And, thanks to recently discovered letters written by de Beauvoir, the darker, more dangerous side to their philosophy of free love is revealed, including Simone's lesbianism and her pimping for younger girls for Jean-Paul, in order to keep his love. This is a compelling and fascinating account of what lay behind the legend that this brilliant, tempestuous couple created.

Lady Gaga: Behind the Fame

by Emily Herbert

In little over a year Lady Gaga has rocketed from struggling as a performer in New York to the glamorous life of a worldwide phenomenon. From her outrageous outfits to elaborate live shows and out-spoken politics, her life is one grand performance. In Lady Gaga: Behind the Fame, Emily Herbert goes behind the costumes and the gossip to find out how Stefani Germanotta, the self-confessed "weird-girl" in school transformed herself into the most talked about pop figure of the new decade. Well-researched and filled with color photos documenting Gaga from her gogo dancer days to the release of her second album, The Fame Monster, Lady Gaga is an essential source for anyone wanting to get the behind the scenes scoop on this fascinating performer. Both an inspiring story of self- actualization and a comment on today's celebrity obsessed culture, Gaga's tale, whether she's beloved or reviled, is one of pop history in the making.

Susan Boyle: Dreams Can come True

by Alice Montgomery

On Britain¹s Got Talent on 11 April 2009, 48-year-old spinster Susan Magdalane Boyle stepped out onto the stage to jeers and sniggers. As she announced she was going to sing I Dreamed a Dream, the judges Simon Cowell, Amanda Holden and Piers Morgan didn't bother to hide their amusement. One minute later they, and very soon the world, were giving Susan Boyle a standing ovation. She had the voice of an angel and her story was to become a modern day fairytale, a dream come true. In hours the news of Susan's extraordinary, heartbreaking performance had spread around the globe. She was an instant international star. And today she holds the record for the fastest selling female debut album of all time. In this, the first book to explore Susan's amazing rags to riches story, we follow her from her humble West Lothian background to topping the charts and performing for millions worldwide on TV. Whether it was bullying or nearly not entering Britain's Got Talent because "it was a young person's game", when faced with the toughest challenges, Susan never gave up. The memory of her mother inspired her to give her dream one last chance. .

The Warrior Prophet

by Bakker R. Scott

With his spectacularly powerful debut The Darkness That Comes Before, a fantasy epic that rewrote that conventions of the fantasy genre and garnered thunderous praise from both reviewers and peers such as Steven Erikson, R. Scott Bakker introduced readers to his richly imagined world of myth, violence, and sorcery. In The Warrior Prophet, the second volume of the Prince of Nothing trilogy, the thrilling story of the powerful logician-monk Anasurimbor Kellhus and the apocalyptic Holy War is continued, as readers are invited further into the darkly enchanting, horrifyingly threatening battlescape upon which the war will be decided. As the crusade plunges violently southward, struggling with both the enemy and internecine turmoil, the enigmatic Kellhus finds himself ever closer to the elusive goal of meeting his father, gaining further mastery of the ancient knowledge he will need for the encounter. And amid the brewing apocalypse, his swift-rising career has aroused more than curiosity from his enemies. With each step south, the challenges and perils mount, as the enigmas surrounding Kellhus and his quest envelop both characters and readers. Boldly imaginative, wickedly suspenseful, tantalizingly adventurous, The Warrior Prophet furthers Bakker's claim to highest ranks of the fantasy genre.

The Darkness that Comes Before

by Bakker R. Scott

Strikingly original in its conception, ambitious in scope, with characters engrossingly and vividly drawn, the first book in R. Scott Bakker's The Prince of Nothing series creates a remarkable world from whole cloth-its language and classes of people, its cities, religions, mysteries, taboos, and rituals-the kind of all-embracing universe that calls up comparison to the worlds of such contemporary fantasy masterworks as George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series and Stephen R. Donaldson's Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever. It's a world scarred by an apocalyptic past, evoking a time both two thousand years past and two thousand years into the future, as untold thousands gather for a crusade. Among them, two men and two women are ensnared by a mysterious traveler, Anasurimbor Kellhus-part warrior, part philosopher, part sorcerous, charismatic presence-from lands long thought dead. The Darkness that Comes Before is a history of this great holy war, and like all histories, the survivors write its conclusion. With this stunning debut, R. Scott Bakker is poised to become one of the next great fantasy writers of his generation. The Darkness that Comes Before proves again that epic fantasy can be intelligent, majestic, and terrifying.

The Tears of Autumn

by Charles Mccarry

The Tears of Autumn, McCarry's riveting novel of espionage and foreign affairs, was a major bestseller upon its first publication. Spun with unsettling plausibility from the events surrounding the assassination of John F Kennedy, and featuring secret agent Paul Christopher, it is a tour de force of action and enigma. Paul Christopher the legendary spy, at the height of his powers, believes he knows who arranged the assassination, and why. But his theory is so destructive of the legend of the dead president, and so dangerous to the survival of foreign policy, that Christopher is ordered to desist from further investigation. Christopher resigns from the Agency and embarks upon a tour of investigation that takes him from Paris to Rome, Zurich, the Congo and Saigon. Pursued by Kennedy's assassins and by his own government, Christopher follows the scent of his suspicion - one breath behind the truth, one step ahead of discovery and death.

The Secret History of the World

by Mark Booth

The amazing surprise New York Times bestseller, filled with "breathtaking glimpses into worlds that heretofore have been little explored" (Foreward) They say that history is written by the victors. But what if history-or what we come to know as history-has been written by the wrong people? What if everything we've been told is only part of the story? In this groundbreaking and now famous work, Mark Booth embarks on an enthralling tour of our world's secret histories. Starting from a dangerous premise-that everything we've known about our world's past is corrupted, and that the stories put forward by the various cults and mystery schools throughout history are true-Booth produces nothing short of an alternate history of the past 3,000 years. From Greek and Egyptian mythology to Jewish folklore, from Christian cults to Freemasons, from Charlemagne to Don Quixote, from George Washington to Hitler- Booth shows that history needs a revolutionary rethink, and he has 3,000 years of hidden wisdom to back it up. .

Inside Central Asia

by Dilip Hiro

From the Publisher: From a critically acclaimed author-a comprehensive history of the part of the world currently making headlines. The former Soviet republics of Central Asia comprise a sprawling, politically pivotal, densely populated, and richly cultured area of the world that is nonetheless poorly represented in libraries and mainstream media. Since their political incorporation in Stalin's Soviet era, these countries have gone through a flash of political and economical evolution. But despite these rapid changes, the growth of oil wealth and U. S. jockeying, and the opening of the region to tourists and businessmen, the spirit of Central Asia has remained untouched at its core. In this comprehensive new treatment, renowned political writer and historian Dilip Hiro offers us a narrative that places the modern politics, peoples, and cultural background of this region firmly into the context of current international focus. Given the strategic location of Central Asia, its predominantly Muslim population, and its hydrocarbon and other valuable resources, it comes as no surprise that the five Central Asian republics are emerging in the twenty-first century as one of the most potentially influential-and coveted-patches of the globe.

The Miernik Dossier

by Charles Mccarry

An unlikely touring party of five friends embark on a road trip to deliver a brand new Cadillac, from Switzerland to the Sudan. All five are attached to the U. N. in Geneva, and all five are more than they claim to be. Among the travellers are Kalash el Khatar, a seven-foot-tall Muslim prince; British intelligence agent Nigel Collins and his beautiful half-English, half-Hungarian girlfriend Ilona Bentley; Paul Christopher; and Tadeusz Miernik, a shy and bumbling Polish scientist who just might also be the leader of a terrorist cell that could set the Cold War alight. Related as a collection of intelligence reports, wire taps, surveillance notes, and conversation transcripts written and recorded by the five characters, the novel reveals a complicated web in which each character spins his or her own deception. From the elegance and refinement of political intrigue in Geneva, to the palaces and terrorist camps of Dar es Salaam, The Miernik Dossier moves through a world of the subtlest plots and the most brutal acts of violence.

When Autumn Leaves

by Foster Amy S.

In Avening, a tiny town on the Pacific coast, it's hard not to believe in magic. This is a town where the shoes in the window always fit, where you can buy a love potion at the corner shop, and where the woods at the outskirts of town just might be the door to another world. And, of course, there's Autumn, Avening's beloved resident witch. From what's known of its mythical founding, Avening has always been a haven for people who are a little bit different, a place where they can come to discover what makes them so special. When Autumn receives news that she's been promoted to a higher coven, she also learns she has to replace herself. But who in Avening is in tune enough with her own personal magic to take over the huge responsibility of town witch? Autumn has a list of thirteen women and men who just might have what it takes-but how can she get them to open their eyes to the magic in their lives? This endlessly surprising and heart-warming debut is the story of coming to terms with the magical things we take for granted every day-our friends, our community, and, most of all, ourselves. .

Fire in the East

by Harry Sidebottom

'War is hell . . . 'The year is AD 255 - the Roman Imperium is stretched to breaking point, its authority and might challenged along every border. The greatest threat lies in Persia to the east, where the massing forces of the Sassanid Empire loom with fiery menace. There the isolated Roman citadel of Arete awaits inevitable invasion. One man is sent to marshal the defences and shore up crumbling walls. A man whose name itself means war: a man called Ballista. Alone, Ballista is called to muster the forces and the courage to stand first and to stand hard against the greatest enemy ever to confront the Imperium. This is part one of Warrior of Rome: an epic of empire, of heroes, of treachery, of courage, and most of all, a story of brutal bloody warfare. 'An exceptionally gifted storyteller' Tim Severin'The best sort of red-blooded historical fiction' Andrew Taylor'A well-constructed, well-paced and gripping account' TLS

Return to the Little Kingdom

by Michael Moritz

In 1984, The Little Kingdom told the story of Apple's first decade alongside the histories of Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak. Now Moritz revisits his classic biography in light of what Apple has become, offering for the first time in paperback the only from the ground up account of Apple's early years. .

The Dancer Within

by Rose Eichenbaum Aron Hirt-Manheimer

The Dancer Within is a collection of photographic portraits and short essays based on confessional interviews with forty dancers and entertainers, many of them world-famous. Well-known on the concert stage, on Broadway, in Hollywood musicals, and on television, the personalities featured in this book speak with extraordinary candor about all stages of the dancer's life--from their first dance class to their signature performances and their days of reflection on the artist's life. The Dancer Within reveals how these artists triumphed, but also how they overcame adversity, including self-doubt, injuries, and aging. Most of all, this book is about the courage, commitment, love, and passion of these performers in their quest for artistic excellence. The reader will quickly realize that "the dancer within" is a metaphor of the human spirit.

The Kip Brothers

by Jules Verne Arthur B. Evans Stanford L. Luce Jean-Michel Margot

Castaways on a barren island in the South Seas, Karl and Pieter Kip are rescued by the brig James Cook. After helping to quell an onboard mutiny, however, they suddenly find themselves accused and convicted of the captain's murder. In this story, one of his last Voyages Extraordinaires, Verne interweaves an exciting exploration of the South Pacific with a tale of judicial error reminiscent of the infamous Dreyfus Affair. This Wesleyan edition brings together the first English translation with one of the first detailed critical analyses of the novel, and features all the illustrations from the original 1902 publication.

Funny Boys

by Warren Adler

A comedian in the Catskills circa 1937 interacts with the gangsters from Murder Inc. The author takes on the New York of his childhood in this darkly funny comedy of errors about success, the mob, and finding true love. Mikey Fine is a young man with a promising future in comedy. Attracted to the crowd applause at a lavish hotel casino in the Catskills, he gets a job as a tumler--part entertainer, part host, all funny boy. But he is naive to the more sinister side of his audience, made up of mobsters and other power players of New York's underbelly. When Mutzie Feder, a Jean Harlow-esque gangster girlfriend with dreams of escaping her brutal reality, gets into the act with Mickey, the sparks begin to fly. But as their circumstances start catching up with them and the body counts start mounting, Mickey and Mutzie start angling for a way out. That, of course, isn't as easy as it sounds.

The Stranger

by Max Frei

Max Frei, and the Labyrinth of Echo series, is a multi-million copy selling Russian literary sensation appearing in English for the first time in 2009. Intriguing, original, remarkable and wry . . . THE STRANGER is a piece of absolute enchantment. ` "Splash a bit of enchantment into my glass" . . . there is no better phrase to describe the state that a reader may find themselves in when exposed to this strong, absolutely legal, literary narcotic which goes by the name of Max Frei. ' - Stolichniye Novosti If it weren't for bad luck, Max Frei wouldn't have any luck at all. A self-described twenty-something `classic loser', an insomniac, hardened smoker, a glutton and a loafer, there's nothing much going for Max Frei . . . at least not until he arrives in the magical city of Echo. Summoned to the city by the head of the Department of Absolute Order, Sir Juffin Halli, Max's dreams are becoming a reality. But as with all dreams-come-true its not quite the reality Max expected; he's about to become a secret agent, tasked to solve extravagant, impossible crimes with nothing but his wits and a handful of unexplained magical abilities to recommend him. Max is going to be thrown into the fray - and he can't even have a cigarette first . . .

Band of Angels

by Kate Cooper

In Band of Angels, Kate Cooper tells the surprising story of early Christianity from the women's point of view. Though they are often forgotten, women from all wallks of life played an invaluable role in Christianity's growth to become a world religion. Peasants, empresses, and independent businesswomen contributed what they could to an emotional revolution unlike anything the ancient world had ever seen. By mobilizing friends and family to spread the word from household to household, they created a wave of change not unlike modern 'viral' marketing. For the most part, women in the ancient world lived out their lives almost invisibly in a man's world. Piecing together their history from the few contemporary accounts that have survived requires painstaking detective work. Yet a careful re-reading of ancient sources yields a vivid picture, and shows how daily life and the larger currents of history shaped one another. This remarkable book tells the story of how a new way of understanding relationships took root in the ancient world. By sharing the ideas that had inspired them, ancient women changed their own lives. But they did something more: they changed the world around them, and in doing so, they created an enduring legacy. Their story is a testament to what invisible people can achieve, and to how the power of ideas can change history.

Hello World

by Alice Rawsthorn

Hello World is Alice Rawsthorn's definitive guide to design and modern life Design is one of the most powerful forces in our lives. When deployed wisely, it can bring us pleasure, choice, strength, decency and much more. But if its power is abused, the outcome can be wasteful, confusing, humiliating, even dangerous. None of us can avoid being affected by design, whether or not we wish to. It is so ubiquitous that it determines how we feel and what we do, often without our noticing. Hello World explores design's influence on our lives. Written by the renowned design critic Alice Rawsthorn and designed by the award-winning book designer Irma Boom, it describes how warlords, scientists, farmers, hackers, activists and designers have used design to different ends throughout history: from the macabre symbol invented by 18th century pirates to terrorise their victims into surrender, to one woman's quest for the best possible prosthetic legs and the evolution of the World Cup ball. At a time when we face colossal changes, unprecedented in their speed, scale and intensity - from the deepening environmental crisis, to giant leaps in science and technology - Hello World explains how design can help us to make sense of them andto turn them to our advantage. 'Hello World is a new book by Alice Rawsthorn, the one and only, the best design critic in the entire world. She keeps the banner of design flying high. Irma Boom designed it, and Irma is simply the best book designer alive' Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art, New YorkPraise for Alice Rawsthorn's Yves Saint Laurent'As gripping as a thriller, packed with plot, character and atmosphere' The Times'Rawsthorn's excellent biography isn't merely a story about clothes, but of crises, comebacks and drug clinics, and as a document of the time it is compulsive' Evening Standard'The best book I have ever read about the mesmerising cruelty of fashion' The Spectator'Intelligent and pragmatic. . . this is a page-turner of a book' New Statesman'What a story! A skilful interweaving of the artistic, business and emotional life of a great couture house' Mail on SundayAlice Rawsthorn is the design critic of the International Herald Tribune, the global edition of the New York Times. Her weekly Design column is syndicated worldwide. A trustee of Arts Council England and the Whitechapel Gallery in London, she is chair of trustees at the Chisenhale Gallery and the author of an acclaimed biography of Yves Saint Laurent.

Those Feet

by David Winner

In this playful, witty and highly original look at English soccer, David Winner, author of the acclaimed Brilliant Orange, journeys to the heart of an essential English pastime and sheds new light on the true nature of a rapidly changing game that was never really meant to be beautiful. With the same insightful eye he brought to his bestselling study of Dutch soccer, Winner shows how Victorian sexual anxiety underlies England's many World Cup failures. He reveals the connection between Roy Keane and a soldier who never lived but died in the Charge of the Light Brigade. And he demonstrates how thick mud and wet leather shaped the contours of the English soul. .

Without a Dowry and Other Plays

by Alexander Ostrovsky

One of the most important Russian playwrights of the nineteenth century, Alexander Ostrovsky (1823-1886) is credited with bringing realism to the Russian stage. Contemporary of Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy and precursor to Chekhov, he was a keen sociological observer, often exposing abuses of power, landing him in trouble with the censors again and again. He wrote 47 original plays and began the tradition of acting today associated with Stanislavsky. Ostrovsky's plays were written with performance in mind and with a masterful use of colloquial language. To this day they are a much-performed part of the Russian repertory. This volume collects four of Ostrovsky's key plays, each from a different decade-A Profitable Position, An Ardent Heart, Without a Dowry, and Talents and Admirers, and is rounded out by the translator's introduction, an afterword for each play, an extensive bibliography, and complete list of Ostrovsky's works. .

The Tooth Fairy

by Clifford Chase

The Tooth Fairy is an extraordinarily honest, shockingly funny memoir of a man torn between isolation and connection. In shimmering prose that weaves between intimate confessions, deadpan asides, and trenchant reflections on the fear and turmoil that defined the long decade after 9/11, Clifford Chase tells the stories that have shaped his adulthood. There are his aging parents, whose disagreements sharpen as their illnesses looms larger; and his beloved brother, lost tragically to AIDS; and his long-term boyfriend-always present, but always kept at a distance. There is also the revelatory, joyful music of the B-52s, Chase's sexual confusion in his twenties, and more recently, the mysterious appearance in his luggage of weird objects from Iran the year his mother died. In the midst of all this is Chase's singular voice-incisive, wry, confiding, by turns cool and emotional, always engaging. The way this book is written-in pitch-perfect fragments-is crucial to Chase's deeper message: that we experience and remember in short bursts of insight, terror, comedy, and love. As ambitious in its form as it is in its radical candor, The Tooth Fairy is the rare memoir that can truly claim to remake the genre. .

The Rome Prophecy

by Sam Christer

Praised by critics and readers alike for his international bestseller The Stonehenge Legacy, Sam Christer continues to weave an irresistible plot of conspiracies and murder in one of the world's most captivating cities. A woman has been arrested in the streets of Rome. She's young. She's beautiful. She's covered in blood. And she claims to be an ancient prophet in search of a mystical amulet hidden somewhere within the city. Ex-priest Tom Shaman teams up with a headstrong policewoman to unravel the mystery. But within Rome's churches and corridors of power, stealthy enemies are conspiring against them. And soon, the woman's deadly visions begin to come true. Tightly plotted and relentlessly suspenseful, The Rome Prophecy is a satisfying, electrifying thriller, which will continue to build Christer's name in the hit-thriller genre. .

The Amber Road

by Harry Sidebottom

Warrior of Rome: The Amber Road is the sixth book in Harry Sidebottom's Warrior of Rome series. AD 264 - The Roman Empire is torn in two. The western provinces - Gaul, Spain and Britain - have been seized by the pretender Postumus. To the east, on the plains of northern Italy, the armies of the emperor Gallienus muster. War is coming. Everyone must choose a side. On a mission shrouded in secrecy and suspicion, Ballista must journey The Amber Road to the far north to Hyperborea, back to his original home and the people of his birth. A fearsome, masked warlord attacks, bringing fire and sword against the Angles. Yet not all welcome Ballista`s return. Does treachery pose the greatest danger?Dr Harry Sidebottom is a leading authority on ancient warfare - he applies his knowledge with a spectacular flair for sheer explosive action and knuckle-whitening drama. Fans of Bernard Cornwell will love Sidebottom's recreation of the ancient world. Praise for Harry Sidebottom:'Sidebottom's prose blazes with searing scholarship' The Times'The best sort of red-blooded historical fiction' Andrew Taylor, author of The American BoyDr. Harry Sidebottom is Fellow of St Benets Hall, and Lecturer at Lincoln College, Oxford - where he specializes in ancient warfare and classical art.

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