Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 47,776 through 47,800 of 120,883 results

The Logical Leap: Induction in Physics

by David Harriman

A groundbreaking solution to the problem of induction, based on Ayn Rand's theory of concepts. Inspired by and expanding on a series of lectures presented by Leonard Peikoff, David Harriman presents a fascinating answer to the problem of induction-the epistemological question of how we can know the truth of inductive generalizations. Ayn Rand presented her revolutionary theory of concepts in her book Introduction to Objectivist Epistemology. As Dr. Peikoff subsequently explored the concept of induction, he sought out David Harriman, a physicist who had taught philosophy, for his expert knowledge of the scientific discovery process. Here, Harriman presents the result of a collaboration between scientist and philosopher. Beginning with a detailed discussion of the role of mathematics and experimentation in validating generalizations in physics-looking closely at the reasoning of scientists such as Galileo, Kepler, Newton, Lavoisier, and Maxwell-Harriman skillfully argues that the inductive method used in philosophy is in principle indistinguishable from the method used in physics. .

Sister India

by Peggy Payne

The exotic and suspenseful New York Times Notable Book that tells the story of an eccentric guest-house keeper in Varanasi, India, and the passions evoked by her sacred city along the Ganges The Lonely Planet recommends the Saraswati Guest House, and meeting Madame Natraja, "a one-woman blend of East and West," as well worth a side trip. Over the course of a weekend, several guests turn up, shocked to encounter a three-hundred-some-pound, surly white woman in a sari. Then a series of Hindu-Muslim murders leads to a citywide curfew, and they unwittingly become her captives. So begins a period of days blending into nights as Natraja and her Indian cook become entangled in a web of religious violence, and their guests fall under the spell of this ancient kingdom--at once enthralled and repelled by the begging children, the public funeral pyres, the holy men bathing in the Ganges at dawn. This is a traveler's tale, a story about the strange chemistry that develops from unexpected intimacies on foreign ground. And Peggy Payne's extraordinary talent vividly conjures up the smells of the perfume market, the rhythms of holy men chanting at dawn, the claustrophobic feel of this ancient city's tiny lanes, and the magic of the setting sun over the holy Ganges. For anyone who has harbored a secret desire to go to India and be transformed, Sister India, called "mesmerizing" by Gail Harris and "a modern version of E. M. Forster's classic A Passage to India" by Dan Wakefield, takes you on this journey without ever leaving home. .

The Witches of Eileanan (Witches of Eileanan #1)

by Kate Forsyth

Named Best First Novel by Locus<P> 'Twas a time when dragons left their lair and evil shadowed the land....<P> On the Day of Reckoning, the witches of Eileanan were outlawed--and violations of the new order were punishable by death. Eileanan's Great Towers, once meccas of magic and learning, were left in ruins. And now, the entire land trembles in fear....<P> Yet deep in the mountains, in the shadow of Dragonclaw, a young girl is being tutored in the old ways. Ignorant of her past, uncertain of her future, the foundling Isabeau will soon be forced down a dangerous path of prophesy, conspiracy, and magic. It is a world where dragons possess the key to ancient mysteries...where a lost prince will discover a strange and wondrous destiny...and where the ultimate battle between good and evil will be waged....<P> A new Day of Reckoning is at hand....

They Cage the Animals at Night

by Jennings Michael Burch

Burch was left at an orphanage and never stayed at any of the foster homes long enough to make friends. This is the story of how he grew up and gained the courage to reach out for love.

Cognitive Therapy and the Emotional Disorders

by Aaron T. Beck

Beck describes both theory and therapeutic techniques for anxiety neuroses, depressions, obsessions, phobias, and psychosomatic disorders and demonstrates the wide range of applicability of the cognitive approach

Great Jones Street

by Don Delillo

'Brilliant, deeply shocking' New York Review of Books Bucky Wunderlick is a rock and roll star. Dissatisfied with a life that has brought fame and fortune, he suddenly decides he no longer wants to be a commodity. He leaves his band mid-tour and holes up in a dingy, unfurnished apartment in Great Jones Street. Unfortunately, his disappearing act only succeeds in inflaming interest . . . DeLillo's third novel is more than a musical satire: it probes the rights of the individual, foreshadows the struggle of the artist within a capitalist world and delivers a scathing portrait of our culture's obsession with the lives of the few. 'DeLillo has the force and imagination of Thomas Pynchon or John Barth, with a sense of proportion and style which these would-be giants often lack' Irish Times

End Zone

by Don Delillo

'Nobody, it seems, could write better than this. No one could have a clearer vision of the micro-circuitry of post-modern life' Evening Standard Ostensibly, DeLillo's blackly comic second novel is about Gary Harkness, a football player and student at Logos College, west Texas. During a season of unprecedented success, Gary becomes increasingly fixated on the threat of nuclear war. Both frightened and fascinated by the prospect, he listens to his team-mates discussing match tactics in much the same terms as generals might contemplate global conflict. But as the terminologies of football and nuclear war - the language of end zones - become interchanged, the polysemous nature of words emerges, and DeLillo forces us to see beyond the sterile reality of substitution. This clever and playful novel is a timeless and topical study of human beings' obsession with conflict and confrontation. 'Powerfully funny, oblique, testy, and playful, tearing along in dazzling cinematic spurts . . . A masterful novel' Washington Post

Americana

by Don Delillo

His first novel, Don DeLillo's Americana passionately articulates the neurotic landscape of contemporary American life through a disintegrating embodiment of the American dream. Prosperous, good-looking and empty inside, 28-year-old advertising executive David Bell appears on the surface to have everything. But he is a man on the brink of losing his sanity. Trapped in a Manhattan office with soulless sycophants as his only company, he makes an abrupt decision to leave New York for America's mid-west. His plan: to film the small-town lives of ordinary people and make contact with the true heart of his homeland. But as Bell puts his films together in his hotel room, he grows increasingly convinced that there is no heart to find. Modern America has become a land that has reached the end of its reel. . . Don DeLillo (b. 1936) was born and raised in New York City. Americana (1971), his first novel, announced the arrival of a major literary talent, and the novels that followed confirmed his reputation as one of the most distinctive and compelling voices in late-twentieth-century American fiction. DeLillo's comic gifts come to the fore in White Noise (1985), which won the National Book Award, Underworld (1997), hailed by Martin Amis as 'the ascension of a great writer', Cosmopolis (2003), adapted into a film by David Cronenberg, due to be released later this year, and Falling Man (2007), a novel about the aftereffects of the 9/11 terrorist attacks in New York. If you enjoyed Americana, you might like DeLillo's Libra, also available in Penguin Modern Classics. 'He's a writer who, once you read him, makes you want to read everything he's done'Martin Amis, Sunday Times 'Witty, clever and incisive . . . a marvellously realized plot'Time Out 'Nearly every sentence of Americana rings true . . . DeLillo is a man of frightening perception'Joyce Carol Oates

Sister Noon

by Karen Joy Fowler

Lizzie Hayes, a member of the San Francisco elite, is a seemingly docile, middle-aged spinster praised for her volunteer work with the Ladies Relief and Protection Society Home, or "The Brown Ark". All she needs is the spark that will liberate her from the ruling conventions. When the wealthy and well-connected, but ill-reputed Mary Ellen Pleasant shows up at the Brown Ark, Lizzie is drawn to her. It is the beautiful, but mysterious Mary Ellen, an outcast among the women of the elite because of her notorious past and her involvement in voodoo, who will eventually hold the key to unlocking Lizzie's rebellious nature. Loosely based in historical fact, Sister Noon is a wryly funny, playfully mysterious, and totally subversive novel from this "fine writer" whose "language dazzles" (San Francisco Chronicle). .

The Red Pony

by John Steinbeck

Tells a story of a young boy and his life on his father's California ranch, raising a sorrel colt.

The Pearl

by John Steinbeck

From the author of Of Mice and Men John Steinbeck's The Pearl is a flawless parable about wealth and the evil it can bring, published with an introduction by Linda Wagner-Martin and drawings by José Clemente Orozco in Penguin Modern Classics. When Kino, an Indian pearl-diver, finds 'the Pearl of the world' he believes that his life will be magically transformed. He will marry Juana in church and their little boy, Coyotito, will be able to attend school. Obsessed by his dreams, Kino is blind to the greed, fear and even violence the pearl arouses in him and his neighbours. Written with haunting simplicity and lyrical simplicity, The Pearl sets the values of the civilized world against those of the primitive and finds them tragically inadequate. John Steinbeck (1902-68), winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the Nobel Prize for literature, is remembered as one of the greatest and best-loved American writers of the twentieth century. During the Second World War Steinbeck served as a war correspondent, his journalism later collected in Once There Was a War (1958), and he was awarded the Norwegian Cross of Freedom for his portrayal in The Moon is Down (1942) of Resistance efforts in northern Europe. His best-known works include the epics The Grapes of Wrath (1939) and East of Eden (1952), and his tragic novella Of Mice and Men (1937). John Steinbeck's complete works are published in Penguin Modern Classics. If you enjoyed The Pearl, you might like Steinbeck's The Winter of our Discontent, also available in Penguin Modern Classics. 'There is no more impressive writer on either side of the Atlantic'Time and Tide

Friends and Lovers

by Eric Jerome Dickey

"Recommended. . . . Dickey uses humor, poignancy and a fresh, creative writing style. . . . The reader is hooked from the first sentence. " --USA Today In this sexy, soulful tale of love, betrayal, and friendship set in modern-day Los Angeles, the lives of four young African Americans--two men and two women--are chronicled through the love and the laughter, as well as the heartache and pain of not-so-everyday life. A witty, honest portrait of contemporary mores and humanity in which the gender gap isn't merely investigated but celebrated.

Good Night, Henry

by Jennifer Olds

On a horse ranch in the sun-drenched hills of Southern California, Mel Brown and her family must face their past before they can move into the future. Melvina Brown has become an expert at holding it together. She's raising two boys-smart, tough Archie and sweet Theo, who dreams of playing baseball and doesn't let the fact that he has only one arm stop him. A perfect PTA mom Mel is not-her boots are too dirty for that. She's just taking it one day at a time, with a little help from her boyfriend, her twin sister, and her dad. It's a life that works pretty well-until her estranged husband shows up at their door, wanting to make up for lost time with his sons.

Reclaiming Your Life: A Step-by-Step Guide to Using Regression Therapy to Overcome the Effects of Childhood Abuse

by Alice Miller M. S. W. Jean C. Jenson

This book lays out a powerful program for healing the effects of childhood abuse. Provides practical and compassionate guidance on dismantling the childhood defenses of repression and denial in order to access buried experiences and emotions -- and by re-experiencing the pain to finally heal. Using examples from her private practice over the last 14 years, Jenson shows that 12-step and similar programs, as well as traditional therapies, do not fully deal with the phenomenon of repressed pain. Until this pain is "processed"-- retrieved from the unconscious, fully experienced, and grieved over -- she believes adults will be trapped in the patterns of childhood.

Leaves of Grass: The First (1855) Edition

by Walt Whitman

This is the original and complete 1855 edition of one of the greatest masterpieces of American literature, including Whitman's own introduction to the work. .

Savannah or A Gift for Mr. Lincoln: A Novel

by John Jakes

Georgia, 1864: Sherman's army marches inexorably from Atlanta to the sea. In its path: the charming old city of Savannah, where the Lester ladies-attractive widowed Sara and her feisty twelve-year-old daughter Hattie-struggle to save the family rice plantation. When Sherman offers the conquered city to President Lincoln as "a Christmas gift," Hattie and the feared general find themselves on a collision course that will astonish both of them. In this rousing new tale, "the godfather of the historical novel" (Los Angeles Times) tells a story of battlefield danger, wartime romance, and indomitable courage. The rich cast of characters includes a corrupt judge who positively exudes Dickensian wickedness; a fast-talking, piano-playing reporter from New York; a pair of thwarted young lovers; a raffish Indiana cavalryman; a valiant former slave who practices birdcalls with surprising results; and a whole carpet-bagful of rascals, rebels, and real soldiers who marched with Sherman. Together they bring to life an almost forgotten moment in the Civil War-a season of simmering hostilities, rising hopes, and empty stockings-perhaps the most strife-torn yet heartwarming Christmas in all of American history.

Emma

by Jane Austen

The timeless romance starring one of Jane Austen's most unforgettable characters Emma Woodhouse is a privileged young woman whose greatest pleasure in life lies in matchmaking for anyone but herself. Written, by Austen's own admission, as "a heroine whom no one but myself will much like," Emma's charm and wit exist in constant tension with her capacity for selfishness and vanity. Despite her intelligence, Emma stumbles from one catastrophe to the next--from a misguided attempt at securing a husband for her friend Harriet Smith to her disastrous meddling in the affairs of new arrivals Frank Churchill and Jane Fairfax--before ultimately falling into her own unexpected happy ending. Both a discerning look at the strictures of Regency England and an enchanting comedy of errors, Emma remains a classic two centuries since it was first published.

The Promised Land

by Werner Sollors Mary Antin

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

The Tunnel

by Margaret Sayers Peden Colm Tóibín Ernesto Sábato

One of the great short novels of the twentieth century--in an edition marking the 100th anniversary of the author's birth. An unforgettable psychological novel of obsessive love, The Tunnel was championed by Albert Camus, Thomas Mann, and Graham Greene upon its publication in 1948 and went on to become an international bestseller. At its center is an artist named Juan Pablo Castel, who recounts from his prison cell his murder of a woman named María Iribarne. Obsessed from the moment he sees her examining one of his paintings, Castel fantasizes for months about how they might meet again. When he happens upon her one day, a relationship develops that convinces him of their mutual love. But Castel's growing paranoia leads him to destroy the one thing he truly cares about. .

Elizabeth I, CEO: Strategic Lessons from the Leader Who Built an Empire

by Alan Axelrod

A Business Week bestseller-- now in paperback. Unlike other leadership books using historical figures (and mostly men) as models for business people, this highlights a famous woman leader. Hers was a surprising time for a woman to emerge as such a strong leader-- that her time was as troubled as ours is now an apt comparison. Here are business and management lessons for today's corporate leaders based on Elizabeth's leadership. The life of Elizabeth has much to say to those beginning their climb up the corporate ladder as well as to those who, having attained the top rung, do not want to slip from it. This title, like Axlerod's Patton on Leadership, will appeal to business book readers as well as history buffs. The hardcover edition of Elizabeth I, CEO has sold 55,000 copies.

The Planets

by Dava Sobel

After the huge national and international success of LONGITUDE and GALILEO'S DAUGHTER, Dava Sobel tells the human story of the nine planets of our solar system. This groundbreaking new work traces the lives of each member of our solar family, from myth and history, astrology and science fiction, to the latest data from the modern era's robotic space probes. Whether revealing what hides behind Venus's cocoon of acid clouds, describing Neptune's 'complex beauty in subtle stripes and spots of royal to navy blue, azure, turquoise, and aquamarine', or capturing first-hand the excitement at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory when the first pictures from Cassini at Saturn were recently beamed to earth, Dava Sobel's unique tour of the solar system is filled with fascination and beauty. In lyrical prose interspersed with poems by Tennyson, Blake and others, The Planets gives a breathtaking, intimate view of those heavenly bodies that have captured the imagination since humanity's first glimpse of the glittering night skies. This extraordinary book of science, history, biography and storytelling will engage and delight. It is at once timely and timeless, and of infinite relevance to this age in which new planets are being discovered elsewhere in our galaxy, around stars other than the Sun.

Tao Te Ching

by Lao Tzu

Traditionally attributed to Lao Tzu, an older contemporary of Confucius (551 - 479 BC), it is now thought that the work was compiled in about the fourth century BC. An anthology of wise sayings, it offers a model by which the individual can live rather than explaining the human place in the universe. The moral code it encourages is based on modesty and self-restraint, and the rewards reaped for such a life are harmony and flow of life.

The Eye of the Hunter

by Dennis L. Mckiernan

The Prophecy:When Spring comes upon the land Yet Winter grips with icy hand And the Eye of the Hunter stalks night skies Bane and blessing alike will rise. Lastborn Firstborns of those who were Stand at thy side in the light of the Bear Hunter and hunted who can say Which is which on a given day? A thousand years have passed since the portentous comet called The Eye of the Hunter glared in the sky above Mithgar. A thousand years since the immortal Elfess Riatha, in league with the Warrows Tomlin and Petal, vowed to hunt down and defeat the evil Baron Stoke. A thousand years since Baron Stoke took with him to death a beloved companion, locked in combat, plunged into an icy chasm. But now, The Eye of the Hunter rides once more, and the creatures of darkness await Baron Stoke's return. The prophecy again gathers five brave souls to combat the powers of evil: Riatha and the Elf Aravan; Gwylly and Faeril, the last Warrow descendents; and a fifth, restored to them from Death's chill grasp...

Laughter: A Scientific Investigation

by Robert R. Provine

Why do we laugh? Laughter has surprisingly little to do with jokes and funny stories. It is an ancient, unconsciously controlled vocal relic that co-exists with our relatively modern speech - a social, psychological and biological act which predates humour and is sharedwith our primate cousins, the great apes. In this fascinating book Robert Provine uses laughter as a powerful probe into human social relationships, revealing that tickling is a form of tactilecommunication, not a reflex; that women laugh more at men than vice-versa; that speakers laugh more than their audiences; and that laughter is mostly about relationships, not jokes. Using the latest evidence, Provine describes laughter using sonic analysis and opera scores, evaluates whether you can 'laugh you way to health', considers what laughter shows about neuropathology, and suggests how to change environments to increase laughter. The first book to establish laughter as a topic of scientific worth, Laughter also includes such esoterica as the history of holy laughter, laughing gas, canned laughter, and a description of the Tanganyikan laughter epidemic that immobilized an entire school district in 1962.

The Boy He Left Behind: A Man's Search for His Lost Father

by Mark Matousek

"""I was four years old when my father came back to kidnap me,"" begins this gripping memoir about Matousek's search for James Matousek, the drifter father he never knew. Described by the New York Times as ""part reminiscence, part detective story, part spiritual musing,"" this memoir is more than the story of one man's search for his father; it is also a look at the meaning of life and how fathers contribute to that meaning. Growing up in a family of troubled women (Matousek's sister committed suicide when the author was 29), he describes the turmoil of growing up ""fatherless in America"" - an experience shared by millions of children in what sociologists have called the Age of the Absent Father - and the difficult, ultimately successful, struggle to figure out what being a man really means in an age of shifting definitions, evolving sexuality, and ""breaking out the man box"" of stereotyping and patriarchy. With the tension of a mystery story, the climax occurs when Matousek meets a man he believes to be his father. But is he? And does Matousek, who has reconciled with his mother as she lay dying, really care? These are just two questions leading to this memoir's surprising conclusion. "

Showing 47,776 through 47,800 of 120,883 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.