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The Balloonist

by Macdonald Harris

'The Balloonist' is both an intense love story and a science fiction adventure. It is centred on an attempt by a Swedish scientist, an American journalist and a French speaking adventurer, to become the first people to set foot on the North Pole, to arrive there, and return, borne on the wind by a huge red and white balloon.

The Process

by Brion Gysin

The Process has the dazzling impact of a drug-inspired dream and, since its publication more than 30 years ago, has established itself as a classic of 20th century modernism. Ulys O. Hanson, an African-American professor of the History of Slavery, who is in North Africa on a mysterious foundation grant, sets off across the Sahara on a series of wild adventures.

In the Flesh

by Ane Schmidt

Washing herself as she prepares for the day ahead, a woman falls into dreaming erotic fantasies that lead her back in memory to the early sexual experiences of puberty. Thus begins an exploration of her sexual feelings at various times in her life.

Hunters and Gatherers

by Geoff Nicholson

Steve Geddes is writing about collectors and collecting. His research introduces him to people obsessed by many things, including cars, beer-cans, tape-recordings and jokes. Geddes also gets himself involved in a quest to find a cult novelist. The author also wrote "The Knot Garden".

The English

by Jeremy Paxman

In The English Jeremy Paxman sets out to find about the English. Not the British overall, not the Scots, not the Irish or Welsh, but the English. Why do they seem so unsure of who they are?Jeremy Paxman is to many the embodiment of Englishness yet even he is sometimes forced to ask: who or what exactly are the English? And in setting about addressing this most vexing of questions, Paxman discovers answers to a few others. Like: Why do the English actually enjoy feeling persecuted?What is behind the English obsession with games?How did they acquire their odd attitudes to sex and to food?Where did they get their extraordinary capacity for hypocrisy?Covering history, attitudes to foreigners, sport, stereotypyes, language and much, much more, The English brims over with stories and anecdotes that provide a fascinating portrait of a nation and its people. 'Intelligent, well-written, informative and funny. . . A book to chew on, dip into, quote from and exploit in arguments' Andrew Marr, Observer 'Bursting with good things' Daily Telegraph Jeremy Paxman is a journalist, best known for his work presenting Newsnight and University Challenge. His books include Empire, On Royalty, The English and The Political Animal. He lives in Oxfordshire.

Monster

by Dave Zeltserman

The supernatural, unmissable new novel by the ALA Best Horror award nominee. In nineteenth-century Germany, one young man counts down the days until he can marry his beloved . . . until she is found brutally murdered, and the young man is accused of the crime. Broken on the wheel and left for dead, he awakens on a lab table, transformed into an abomination. Friedrich must go far to take his revenge --only to find his tormentor, Victor Frankenstein, in league with the Marquis de Sade, creating something much more sinister deep in the mountains. Paranormal and gripping in the tradition of the best work of Stephen King and Justin Cronin, Monster is a gruesome parable of control and vengeance, and an ingenious tribute to one of literature's greatest

The Philosopher Prince

by Paul Waters

355AD. In a late-Roman world of ambitious bureaucrats and power-hungry courtiers two young friends of the British nobility, Drusus and Marcellus, have fallen foul of the prevailing authority. There is no place to hide, no turning back. They must face the irresistible might of the Roman state. It seems a fight they cannot win. For Drusus and Marcellus their only ally is the young imperial prince, Julian. But Julian has troubles of his own: his very success has made him hated by his uncle, the emperor. With spies and adversaries all about them, they link their fate with Julian's in a life-or-death struggle that takes them from one end of the empire to the other and set themselves against the forces determined to crush them. A novel of hope, The Philosopher Prince is a story of human values pitted against the cold and calculating machine of an all-powerful tyranny. And at its heart, a victim of the very forces he controls, lies the emperor himself.

The Seventh Gate

by Richard Zimler

A Novel of Berlin, Prophesy, and Unfinished PortraitsIn the Author's Note to his internationally bestselling novel, The Last Kabbalist of Lisbon, Richard Zimler described how he discovered a long-lost 16th-century manuscript in an Istanbul cellar written by a Portuguese kabbalist named Berekiah Zarco. More than 400 years later, Isaac Zarco becomes convinced by the pact between Hitler and Stalin - and other 'signs' - that an apocalyptic prophesy made by his ancestor is about to come terribly true. Is he mad to believe that by decoding these ancient kabbalistic texts he might be the one to save the world?Set in 1930s Berlin, during the Nazis' rise to power, The Seventh Gate brings together Sophie Riedesel, an intelligent, artistic, and sexually adventurous fourteen-yearold with Isaac Zarco and his friends, most of whom are Jews, ex-circus performers and underground activists. When a series of forced sterilizations, brutal murders and 'disappearings' to concentration camps decimates the group, Sophie must fight with all her ingenuity and guile to save all that she loves about Germany - at any cost. In its beautifully shaped portraits and in its chilling but sensuous evocation of Berlin in the 1930s, The Seventh Gate is at one and the same time a love story and tragedy - and a tale of ferocious heroism.

The Dardanelles Disaster

by Dan van der Vat

The British Navy's failed attempt to capture Constantinople and secure a sea route to Russia in 1915 marked a turning point of World War I. Acclaimed naval military historian Dan van der Vat argues that the disaster at the Dardanelles not only prolonged the war for two years and brought Britain to the brink of starvation, but also led to the Russian Revolution and contributed to the rapid destabilization of the Middle East. With a narrative rich in human drama, The Dardanelles Disaster highlights the diplomatic clashes from Whitehall to the Hellespont, Berlin to Constantinople, and St Petersburg to the Bosporus. Van der Vat analyzes then-First Lord of the Admiralty Winston Churchill's response to the obstacles he faced and describes the fateful actions of the Turkish, German, and British governments throughout the Gallipoli Campaign. With detailed analysis of the battle's events and never-before-published information on the German navy's mine laying operations, The Dardanelles Disaster tells a forgotten story from a fresh viewpoint, shedding light on one of World War I's most pivotal moments - and in particular on one avoidable and monumental blunder.

Operation Kronstadt

by Harry Ferguson

Part Blackhawk Down, part The Riddle of the Sands, this is an extraordinarily gripping non-fiction thriller, written by a former MI6 officer. Operation Kronstadt not only reveals the early days of Britain's intelligence services but uncovers a truly dramatic story from the Russian Revolution involving a daring rescue attempt and a 'mission impossible' against the best defended naval target in Russia. By May 1919, when the power struggle between former Tsarists and Bolsheviks hangs in the balance, the only British agent in Russia is trapped and in mortal danger. Mansfield Cumming, the first 'C', dreams up an audacious - probably suicidal - plan to rescue him, and a young naval officer is sent with a specially selected team into the jaws of the Soviet fleet. This is the remarkable story of the spy, Paul Dukes, (the only MI6 officer to be knighted for work in the field), and of Gus Agar, whose extraordinary escapade won him the Victoria Cross.

Scotland: The Autobiography

by Rosemary Goring

A vivid, wide-ranging and engrossing account of Scotland's history, composed of eye-witness accounts by those who experienced it first-hand. Contributors range from Tacitus, Mary Queen of Scots and Oliver Cromwell to Adam Smith, David Livingstone and Billy Connolly. These include key historic moments - ranging from Bannockburn and Flodden to the SNP parliamentary victory in 2007 - along with a vast array of wonderfully readable insights into the everyday life of Scotland through the millennia. This is living, accesible history told by crofters, criminals, servants, house-wives, poets, journalists, nurses, politicians, novelists, prisoners, comedians, sportsmen and many more. Featuring brand new selections from Recent History 'An unqualified triumph, superb, a real page-turner . . . what a stirring, dramatic, poignant story it has been. ' Alexander McCall Smith, Spectator 'A triumph . . . captivating, timely and useful . . . will reward any amount of flipping and dipping. Rigorous and engaging in its sweep, Goring's meticulously edited anthology is full of moving, amusing and revealing detail. What an exemplary reclaiming of Scotland's past. ' Scotland on Sunday 'Goring has an ear for a riveting yarn, the emotion of human experience and the power of the voice to present history at its most striking. ' Sunday Times 'Authoritative yet spellbinding. ' Herald 'Fascinating and very valuable. Goring gives us vivid snapshots of Scottish life and history from Neolithic times . . . should find a place in every Scottish home. ' Allan Massie, Scotsman 'A shrewd selection of historical sources tied together by a strong narrative thread. ' Sunday Herald 'A treasury of a small nation's remarkable over-achievement. ' Financial Times

Bareknuckle

by Bartley Gorman

Born into a community of Irish travelers, Bartley Gorman is known as one of the greatest bare-knuckle fighters of all time. Through Gorman¹s memoirs the reader gets a front row view of the punches exchanged in back parking lots and fair grounds, the gritty characters populating the fight circles, and the hazards facing a sought after champion. .

The Man with the Golden Touch

by Sinclair Mckay

When Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman set out to make what they expected to be the first of three or four movies based on the espionage novels of Ian Fleming they can hardly have dreamt that they were founding a business that would still be going strong nearly half a century later. Yet the role of James Bond, which transformed Sean Connery's career in 1962 when Dr No came out, still retained its star-making power in 2006 when Daniel Craig made his Bond debut in Casino Royale. This is the story of how, with the odd misstep along the way, the owners of the Bond franchise, Eon Productions, have contrived to keep James Bond abreast of the zeitgeist and at the top of the charts for 45 years, through 21 films featuring six Bonds, three M's, two Q's and three Moneypennies Thanks to the films, Fleming's original creation has been transformed from a black sheep of the post-war English upper classes into a figure with universal appeal, constantly evolving to keep pace with changing social and political circumstances. Having interviewed people concerned with all aspects of the films, Sinclair Mckay is ideally placed to describe how the Bond 'brand' has been managed over the years as well as to give us the inside stories of the supporting cast of Bond girls, Bond villains, Bond cars and Bond gadgetry. Sinclair Mckay, formerly assistant features editor of the Daily Telegraph, works as a freelance writer and journalist. He is also the author of A Thing of Unspeakable Horror: The History of Hammer Films, which the Guardian called 'A splendid history' and the Independent on Sunday described as 'Brisk, cheerful and enthusiastic'.

Marathon

by Richard A. Billows

The Battle of Marathon in 490 B. C. E. is not only the most decisive event in the struggle between the Greeks and the Persians-showing the Greeks the seemingly invincible Persians could be defeated-but, arguably a defining event for Western civilization. Richard A. Billows fully creates the atmosphere of the times and the heat of battle. Key players include the Athenian general Miltiades, who was the first to fully utilize an outfitted hoplite phalanx and who developed the groundbreaking tactics that defeated the Persian army. The legend of the Greek messenger Philippides running twenty-six miles from Marathon to Athens with the news of the Greek victory is the inspiration for our modern-day marathon race. Billows suggests, however, that the sources argue it was the entire Greek army, after fierce fighting, which marched at a rapid speed back to defend Athens. Richard A. Billows engrossingly captures the drama of the day of battle and convincingly demonstrates the flowering of classical Greek culture-and its extraordinary influence on Western culture-would almost certainly not have occurred had not the Athenians, against the odds, defeated the Persians at Marathon. Book jacket.

Hot Shot

by Gary Ruffin

Detective Samuel Cooper, "Coop" to all who know him, is the Chief of Police in Gulf Front, Florida, a sleepy little town with nothing to recommend it to tourists save a beautiful beach the locals are happy to keep a secret. Indeed, Chief of Police is quite a title given he is the sole detective on the force. It's a pretty easy gig all and all-in fact, there has never been a serious crime in Gulf Front. Until now. When a young woman's body is found on the shore and an abandoned new Cadillac is found nearby, it causes a furor like nothing the town has ever seen. And that's before they've identified her. She turns out to be the daughter of a Louisiana Senator, and with her passing comes the Feds, the mob, and Agent Shelley Brooke. Things are never going to be the same again. .

The Horses of St Mark's

by Charles Freeman

The Horses of St. Mark's in Venice are among art's finest creations-and certainly one with a story like no other. Celebrated historian Charles Freeman, author of the 2009 surprise hit A. D. 381, explores the mysterious origin of the statues and their turbulent movements through Europe over the centuries: in Constantinople, at both its founding and sacking in the Fourth Crusade; in Venice, at both the height of its greatness and fall in 1797; in the Paris of Napoleon, and the revolutions of 1848; and back in Venice, the most romantic city in the world. In this remarkable new book, Freeman shows how the horses came to stand at the heart of European history time and time again. .

Constantine: Roman Emperor, Christian Victor

by Paul Stephenson

A fascinating survey of the life and enduring legacy of perhaps the greatest and most unjustly ignored of the Roman emperors-written by a richly gifted historian. In 312 A. D. , Constantine-one of four Roman emperors ruling a divided empire-marched on Rome to establish his control. On the eve of the battle, a cross appeared to him in the sky with an exhortation, "By this sign conquer. " Inscribing the cross on the shields of his soldiers, Constantine drove his rivals into the Tiber and claimed the imperial capital for himself. Under Constantine, Christianity emerged from the shadows, its adherents no longer persecuted. Constantine united the western and eastern halves of the Roman Empire. He founded a new capital city, Constantinople. Thereafter the Christian Roman Empire endured in the East, while Rome itself fell to the barbarian hordes. Paul Stephenson offers a nuanced and deeply satisfying account of a man whose cultural and spiritual renewal of the Roman Empire gave birth to the idea of a unified Christian Europe underpinned by a commitment to religious tolerance. .

Windward Passage

by Jim Nisbet

Winner of San Francisco Book Festival's Best Sci Fi Book! From the writer whose work has been called "truly, hellishly gritty" (Los Angeles Times) comes a gnarled mystery with shades of Philip K. Dick and James Ellroy. Jim Nisbet is a cult favorite in Europe and it's easy to see why. He's "a lot more than just good . . . his style has overtones of Walker Percy's smooth southern satin, but his characters--losers, grifters, con men--hark back to the days of James M. Cain's twisted images of morality," writes the Toronto Globe-Mail. In the tradition of Jim Thompson and Damon Runyon, Jim Nisbet is too good to miss and Windward Passage is a masterpiece that raises the bar even for a master like Nisbet. In the parallel near-future, a ship named for a jellyfish sinks into the Caribbean with its captain chained to the mast. Left behind is a logbook missing ten pages, presidential DNA hidden in a brick of smuggled cocaine, and a nearly- completed novel. Tipsy, the dead sailor's sister, and Red Means, his erstwhile employer, travel from San Francisco to the Caribbean and back as they attempt to unravel a mystery that rapidly widens from death at sea to international conspiracy. With verve and humor to match the Illuminati Trilogy, Nisbet has fashioned an engaging facsimile of our modern world, albeit with snappier dialogue, amped-up technology, and even more clearly stated political prejudices. "Neither Norman Mailer nor Truman Capote has in their writing been able to produce such an intensity as Nisbet has achieved," writes Germany's Die Welt. Pick up Windward Passageand see why. .

The Damned Don't Die

by Jim Nisbet

Overlook continues it reissues of the incomparable Jim Nisbit's oeuvre with The Damned Don't Die. This is his first novel and it is a gruesome and dark novel set in suburbia. .

The Error of Our Ways

by David Carkeet

In highly regarded novels like Double Negative and, most recently, From Away David Carkeet has won critical success and a popular audience. With the return of Jeremy Cook, Carkeet has created a modern parable that delineates the fault lines existing between the sexes and running through language itself. .

The Full Catastrophe

by David Carkeet

Linguist Jeremy Cook knows how language works, but he doesn't know how marriage works. In fact, he is strangely hostile to the institution. So Cook is naturally uneasy about his job with the Pillow Agency, a St. Louis firm specializing in "the linguistically troubled marriage. " His assignment is to move in with Dan and Beth Wilson, a prosperous suburban couple with an impoverished relationship, to analyze their verbal problems and help them-if he can. As Cook catalogs the Wilsons' missed signs and missed signals, he becomes increasingly, most unscientifically, involved. .

2017

by Olga Slavnikova

Winner of the Russian Booker Prize, a sensational novel of Russia set exactly 100 years after the revolution In the year 2017 in Russia-exactly 100 years after the revolution-poets and writers are obsolete, class distinctions are painfully sharp, and spirits intervene in the lives of humans from their home high in the mythical Riphean Mountains. Professor Anfilogov, a wealthy and emotionless man, sets out on an expedition to unearth priceless rubies that no one else has been able to locate. Young Krylov, a talented gem cutter who Anfilogov had taken under his wing, is seeing off his mentor at the train station when he is drawn to a mysterious stranger who calls herself Tanya. A scandalous affair ensues, but trouble arises in the shape of Krylov's ex-wife Tamara and a spy who appears at the lovers' every rendezvous. As events unfold, Krylov begins to learn more than he bargained for about the women in his life and realizes why he recognizes the spy from somewhere deep within his past. Meanwhile, Anfilogov's expedition reveals ugly truths about man's disregard for nature and the disasters stemming from insatiable greed. Olga Slavnikova stuns with this engaging and remarkable tale of love, obsession, murder, and the lengths people will go to get what they want. .

The Last Crusaders

by Barnaby Rogerson

An exploration of the later Cruades, written "with the skill of a historian and the flair of a novelist" (The Guardian) The Crusades were the bridge between medievl and modern history, between feudalism and colonialism. In many ways, the lttle explored later Crusades were the most significant of them all, for thy made the crisis truly global. The Last Crusaders is about the perio's last great conflict between East and West, and the titanic contest betwee Habsburg-led Christendom and the Ottoman Empire in the fifteenth and ixteenth centuries. From the great naval campaigns and the ferocious struggl to dominate the North African shore, the conflict spread out along trde routes, consuming nations and cultures, destroying dynasties, and spawing the first colonial empires in South America and the Indian Ocean. The Last Crsaders is narrative history at its richest and most compelling. REVIW: "This is an ambitious project and The Last Crusaders provides narrative history on the grand scale. " --Daily Telegraph "Barnaby Rogerson paints a vivid canvas, sweeping n scope and full of memorable detail. . . The author is especially good at narrating in gripping, andoften grisly, detail the great sieges and battles that punctuated thi struggle. The book is furnished with excellent maps, a useful chronologial chart, numerous illustrations, and a very full bibliography. The wriing is engaging and vivid, never pedantic. Any history buff will find this bok a pleasure. " -ForeWord Review "Rogerson's narrative colorsthe conflicts of the sixteenth century with the derring-do of kings, corsair, and crusaders; this book will keep readers up long past bedtime" -- Foreord Magazine "This thoroughly readable book provides a vibrant ad well-organized account of this tumultuous, lesser-known period of histoy. Highly recommended for both students and general readers. " - Library Jornal STARRED REVIEW "The Last Crusaders is a fascinating istory of the great conflict between Christianity and Islam from the mid-140s to the mid-1500s. . . Rogerson proves himself a skillful storyteller as he recunts the deeds and misdeeds of both sides. " -Internet Review of BooksAUTHORBIO: Barnaby Rogerson is the author of more than a dozen books, ncluding The Heirs of Muhammad: Islam's First Century and the Origins ofthe Sunni-Shia Schism, The Prophet Muhammad: A Biography, and A History of Noth Africa. He has lived and worked in many parts of the Arab world, and currently resides in London. .

To Kill a Tiger

by Jid Lee

An unforgettable memoir weaving the author?s childhood with five generations of Korean history Against the backdrop of modern Korea?s violent and tumultuous history, To Kill A Tiger is a searing portrait of a woman and a society in the midst of violent change. Drawing on Korean legend and myth, as well as an Asian woman?s unique perspective on the United States, Lee weaves her compelling personal narrative with a collective and accessible history of modern Korea, from Japanese colonialism to war-era comfort women, from the genocide of the Korean War to the government persecution and silence of Cold War-era pogroms. The ritual of storytelling, which she shares with the women of her family, serves as a window into a five-generation family saga, and it is through storytelling that Lee comes to appreciate the sacrifices of her ancestors and her own now American place in her family and society. In To Kill A Tiger Lee provides a revelatory look at war and modernization in her native country, a story of personal growth, and a tribute to the culture that formed her. .

From Democrats to Kings

by Michael Scott

Athens, 404 BC. The Democratic city-state has been ravaged by a long and bloody war with neighbouring Sparta. The search for scapegoats begins and Athens, liberty's beacon in the ancient world, turns its sword on its own way of life. Civil war and much bloodshed ensue. Defining moments of Greek history, culture, politics, religion and identity are debated ferociously in Athenian board rooms, back streets and battlefields. By 323 BC, less than 100 years later, Athens and the rest of Greece, not to mention a large part of the known world, has come under the control of an absolute monarch, a master of self-publicity and a model for despots for millennia to come: 'megas alexandros', Alexander the Great. Michael Scott, Finley Fellow in Ancient History at Darwin College, Cambridge, explores the dramatic and little-known story of how the ancient world was turned on its head from Democratic Athens to King Alexander the Great in this superb example of popular history writing. "From Democrats to Kings" also gives us a fresh take on the similar challenges we face today in the 21st century - a world in which many democracies - old and new - fight for survival, in which war-time and peace-time have become indistinguishable and in which the severity of the economic crisis is only matched by a crisis in our own sense of self.

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