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Showing 49,151 through 49,175 of 72,293 results

The Enculturated Gene

by Duana Fullwiley

In the 1980s, a research team led by Parisian scientists identified several unique DNA sequences, or haplotypes, linked to sickle cell anemia in African populations. After casual observations of how patients managed this painful blood disorder, the researchers in question postulated that the Senegalese type was less severe. The Enculturated Gene traces how this genetic discourse has blotted from view the roles that Senegalese patients and doctors have played in making sickle cell "mild" in a social setting where public health priorities and economic austerity programs have forced people to improvise informal strategies of care. Duana Fullwiley shows how geneticists, who were fixated on population differences, never investigated the various modalities of self-care that people developed in this context of biomedical scarcity, and how local doctors, confronted with dire cuts in Senegal's health sector, wittingly accepted the genetic prognosis of better-than-expected health outcomes. Unlike most genetic determinisms that highlight the absoluteness of disease, DNA haplotypes for sickle cell in Senegal did the opposite. As Fullwiley demonstrates, they allowed the condition to remain officially invisible, never to materialize as a health priority. At the same time, scientists' attribution of a less severe form of Senegalese sickle cell to isolated DNA sequences closed off other explanations of this population's measured biological success. The Enculturated Gene reveals how the notion of an advantageous form of sickle cell in this part of West Africa has defined--and obscured--the nature of this illness in Senegal today.

Against Massacre: Humanitarian Interventions in the Ottoman Empire, 1815-1914

by Davide Rodogno

Against Massacre looks at the rise of humanitarian intervention in the nineteenth century, from the fall of Napoleon to the First World War. Examining the concept from a historical perspective, Davide Rodogno explores the understudied cases of European interventions and noninterventions in the Ottoman Empire and brings a new view to this international practice for the contemporary era. While it is commonly believed that humanitarian interventions are a fairly recent development, Rodogno demonstrates that almost two centuries ago an international community, under the aegis of certain European powers, claimed a moral and political right to intervene in other states' affairs to save strangers from massacre, atrocity, or extermination. On some occasions, these powers acted to protect fellow Christians when allegedly "uncivilized" states, like the Ottoman Empire, violated a "right to life." Exploring the political, legal, and moral status, as well as European perceptions, of the Ottoman Empire, Rodogno investigates the reasons that were put forward to exclude the Ottomans from the so-called Family of Nations. He considers the claims and mixed motives of intervening states for aiding humanity, the relationship between public outcry and state action or inaction, and the bias and selectiveness of governments and campaigners. An original account of humanitarian interventions some two centuries ago, Against Massacre investigates the varied consequences of European involvement in the Ottoman Empire and the lessons that can be learned for similar actions today.

The French Way

by Richard F. Kuisel

There are over 1,000 McDonald's on French soil. Two Disney theme parks have opened near Paris in the last two decades. And American-inspired vocabulary such as "le weekend" has been absorbed into the French language. But as former French president Jacques Chirac put it: "The U.S. finds France unbearably pretentious. And we find the U.S. unbearably hegemonic." Are the French fascinated or threatened by America? They Americanize yet are notorious for expressions of anti-Americanism. From McDonald's and Coca-Cola to free markets and foreign policy, this book looks closely at the conflicts and contradictions of France's relationship to American politics and culture. Richard Kuisel shows how the French have used America as both yardstick and foil to measure their own distinct national identity. They ask: how can we be modern like the Americans without becoming like them? France has charted its own path: it has welcomed America's products but rejected American policies; assailed America's "jungle capitalism" while liberalizing its own economy; attacked "Reaganomics'" while defending French social security; and protected French cinema, television, food, and language even while ingesting American pop culture. Kuisel examines France's role as an independent ally of the United States--in the reunification of Germany and in military involvement in the Persian Gulf and Bosnia--but he also considers the country's failures in influencing the Reagan, Bush, and Clinton administrations. Whether investigating France's successful information technology sector or its spurning of American expertise during the AIDS epidemic, Kuisel asks if this insistence on a French way represents a growing distance between Europe and the United States or a reaction to American globalization. Exploring cultural trends, values, public opinion, and political reality, The French Way delves into the complex relationship between two modern nations.

The 1970s

by Thomas Borstelmann

The 1970s looks at an iconic decade when the cultural left and economic right came to the fore in American society and the world at large. While many have seen the 1970s as simply a period of failures epitomized by Watergate, inflation, the oil crisis, global unrest, and disillusionment with military efforts in Vietnam, Thomas Borstelmann creates a new framework for understanding the period and its legacy. He demonstrates how the 1970s increased social inclusiveness and, at the same time, encouraged commitments to the free market and wariness of government. As a result, American culture and much of the rest of the world became more--and less--equal. Borstelmann explores how the 1970s forged the contours of contemporary America. Military, political, and economic crises undercut citizens' confidence in government. Free market enthusiasm led to lower taxes, a volunteer army, individual 401(k) retirement plans, free agency in sports, deregulated airlines, and expansions in gambling and pornography. At the same time, the movement for civil rights grew, promoting changes for women, gays, immigrants, and the disabled. And developments were not limited to the United States. Many countries gave up colonial and racial hierarchies to develop a new formal commitment to human rights, while economic deregulation spread to other parts of the world, from Chile and the United Kingdom to China. Placing a tempestuous political culture within a global perspective, The 1970s shows that the decade wrought irrevocable transformations upon American society and the broader world that continue to resonate today.

The Virtues of Our Vices

by Emrys Westacott

Are there times when it's right to be rude? Can we distinguish between good and bad gossip? Am I a snob if I think that NPR listeners are likely to be better informed than devotees of Fox News? Does sick humor do anyone any good? Can I think your beliefs are absurd but still respect you? In The Virtues of Our Vices, philosopher Emrys Westacott takes a fresh look at important everyday ethical questions--and comes up with surprising answers. He makes a compelling argument that some of our most common vices--rudeness, gossip, snobbery, tasteless humor, and disrespect for others' beliefs--often have hidden virtues or serve unappreciated but valuable purposes. For instance, there are times when rudeness may be necessary to help someone with a problem or to convey an important message. Gossip can foster intimacy between friends and curb abuses of power. And dubious humor can alleviate existential anxieties. Engaging, funny, and philosophically sophisticated, The Virtues of Our Vices challenges us to rethink conventional wisdom when it comes to everyday moral behavior.

Politics and Strategy: Partisan Ambition and American Statecraft

by Peter Trubowitz

Why do some national leaders pursue ambitious grand strategies and adventuresome foreign policies while others do not? When do leaders boldly confront foreign threats and when are they less assertive? Politics and Strategy shows that grand strategies are Janus-faced: their formulation has as much to do with a leader's ability to govern at home as it does with maintaining the nation's security abroad. Drawing on the American political experience, Peter Trubowitz reveals how variations in domestic party politics and international power have led presidents from George Washington to Barack Obama to pursue strategies that differ widely in international ambition and cost. He considers why some presidents overreach in foreign affairs while others fail to do enough.Trubowitz pushes the understanding of grand strategy beyond traditional approaches that stress only international forces or domestic interests. He provides insights into how past leaders responded to cross-pressures between geopolitics and party politics, and how similar issues continue to bedevil American statecraft today. He suggests that the trade-offs shaping American leaders' foreign policy choices are not unique--analogous trade-offs confront Chinese and Russian leaders as well.Combining innovative theory and historical analysis, Politics and Strategy answers classic questions of statecraft and offers new ideas for thinking about grand strategies and the leaders who make them.

Macroeconomics: Theory Through Applications

by Russell Cooper A. Andrew John

This textbook, Macroeconomics: Theory Through Applications, centers around student needs and expectations through two premises: ... Students are motivated to study economics if they see that it relates to their own lives. ... Students learn best from an inductive approach, in which they are first confronted with a problem, and then led through the process of solving that problem. Many books claim to present economics in a way that is digestible for students; Russell and Andrew have truly created one from scratch. This textbook will assist you in increasing students' economic literacy both by developing their aptitude for economic thinking and by presenting key insights about economics that every educated individual should know.

Business Law and the Legal Environment

by Jethro K. Lieberman Don Mayer Daniel M. Warner George J. Siedel

Mayer, Warner, Siedel and Lieberman's Business Law and the Legal Environment is an up-to-date textbook with comprehensive coverage of legal and regulatory issues -- and organized to permit instructors to tailor the materials to their particular approach. The authors take special care to engage students by relating law to everyday events with which they are already familiar with their clear, concise and readable style. Business Law and the Legal Environment provides students with context and essential concepts across the entire range of legal issues with which managers and business executives must grapple. The texts provide the vocabulary and legal acumen necessary for business people to talk in an educated way to their customers, employees, suppliers, government officials -- and to their own lawyers.

The Biggest Snowball Fight!

by Angela Shelf Medearis

A snowball fight leads to a new dance and starts a new town tradition. picture descriptions added.

Slower Than a Snail (A Math Reader)

by Anne Schreiber

A brother and sister argue about her speed and size while running a race. Picture descriptions added.

Lost Cities and Vanished Civilizations

by Robert Silverberg

POMPEII! TROY! BABYLON! ANGKOR! KNOSSOS! CHICHEN ITZA! The fantastic stories of how men lived at the dawn of civilization!POMPEII -- proud city of the Caesars preserved in its last agonized moment of life by a sudden torrent of volcanic ash. TROY -- the golden treasures of a great mythical city discovered hidden beneath a hilly Turkish town. BABYLON-the great tower of Babel rising over the desert like a modern skyscraper. ANGKOR -- its vine-enshrouded towers brooding over the steaming jungles of Cambodia. KNOSSOS-glittering, maze-like palace, home of the Minotaur, where Cretan aristocracy lived in glittering splendor. CHICHEN ITZA-site of the great Mayan pyramid and the Sacred Well of death. Here are Robert Silverberg's fascinating stories of six great civilizations that lived and died as long as 7,000 years ago and the men who helped to rediscover them.

Just like Someone without Mental Illness Only More So: A Memoir

by Mark Vonnegut

More than thirty years after the publication of his acclaimed memoir The Eden Express, Mark Vonnegut continues his remarkable story in this searingly funny, iconoclastic account of coping with mental illness, finding his calling as a pediatrician, and learning that willpower isn't nearly enough. Here is Mark's childhood spent as the son of a struggling writer in a house that eventually held seven children after his aunt and uncle died and left four orphans. And here is the world after Mark was released from a mental hospital to find his family forever altered. At the late age of twenty-eight--and after nineteen rejections--Mark was accepted to Harvard Medical School, where he gained purpose, a life, and some control over his condition. The brilliantly evoked events of Mark Vonnegut's life are at once perfectly unique and achingly relatable. There are the manic episodes, during which he felt burdened with saving the world, juxtaposed against the real-world responsibilities of running a pediatric practice. At times he felt that his parents lives would improve if only they had a few hundred more bucks in their bank account, while at other points his father's fame merely heightened expectations that he be better, funnier (and crazier) than the average person. Ultimately a tribute to the small, daily, and positive parts of a life interrupted by bipolar disorder,Just Like Someone Without Mental Illness Only More So is a wise, unsentimental, and inspiring book that will resonate with generations of readers.

The Ghost Who Fell in Love

by Barbara Cartland

Attempting to regain some of the family fortune that he has lost in gambling, Gerard invites an Earl and his friends to stay at his manor during a horse racing week. The Earl has a terrible reputation with women, so Gerard hides his sister from him while he is staying at the manor. The Earl learns about the Legend of the White Lady, the ghost of the manor and encounters the ghost as he is saved from danger.

Comfort Food Fix: Feel-good Favorites Made Healthy

by Ellie Krieger

Ellie Krieger presents a healthier take on classic American comfort food without sacrificing the comfort part. These 150 soul-satisfying recipes include such hearty favorites as meatloaf, lasagna, chicken potpie, crab cakes, and mashed potatoes, but without all the calories and saturated fat. With simple tricks and tips, Ellie serves up healthy delights like delicious sweet potato casserole with just a third of the calories and amazing buttermilk waffles with just a fraction of the fat. With full nutrition information for every recipe and gorgeous full-color photos that are sure to whet any appetite, Comfort Food Fix is the perfect cookbook for healthy eaters with healthy appetites. Ellie Krieger is the host of the popular show Healthy Appetite, which airs on the Cooking Channel, and the author of the New York Times bestsellers So Easy and The Food You Crave. The book features 150 delicious comfort food recipes that are lower in calories and fat than you would ever guess based on how great they taste. When it comes to healthy cooking, Ellie Krieger is the chef you can trust. In Comfort Food Fix, she takes the guilt out of guilty pleasures.

The End of Growth: Adapting to Our New Economic Reality

by Richard Heinberg

Economists insist that recovery is at hand, yet unemployment remains high, real estate values continue to sink, and governments stagger under record deficits. The End of Growth proposes a startling diagnosis: humanity has reached a fundamental turning point in its economic history. The expansionary trajectory of industrial civilization is colliding with non-negotiable natural limits. Richard Heinberg's latest landmark work goes to the heart of the ongoing financial crisis, explaining how and why it occurred, and what we must do to avert the worst potential outcomes. Written in an engaging, highly readable style, it shows why growth is being blocked by three factors: Resource depletion Environmental impacts Crushing levels of debt These converging limits will force us to re-evaluate cherished economic theories and to reinvent money and commerce. The End of Growth describes what policy makers, communities, and families can do to build a new economy that operates within Earth's budget of energy and resources. We can thrive during the transition if we set goals that promote human and environmental well-being, rather than continuing to pursue the now-unattainable prize of ever-expanding GDP. Richard Heinberg is the author of nine previous books, including The Party's Over, Peak Everything, and Blackout. A senior fellow of the Post Carbon Institute, Heinberg is one of the world's foremost peak oil educators and an effective communicator of the urgent need to transition away from fossil fuels.

Turn Left at Thursday

by Frederik Pohl

Frederik Pohl is a very fine fellow--fondly known in science fiction circles for the social commentary in the satires he has written in collaboration with C. M. Kornbluth, and under his own authorship. Aficionados know also that Pohl's science fiction is strictly non-fantastic--in fact even old-fashioned in its adherence to the rules of the game. But when Pohl does get into fantasy, he goes way out, giving the imagination full rein. And his imagination is rare, rich and ribald. The stories in this collection include: Mars by Moonlight; The Richest Man in Levitown; The Seven Deadly Virtues; The Martian in the Attic; Third Offense; The Hated; I Plinglot, Who You?

Google Power Search

by Stephan Spencer

Behind Google's deceptively simple interface is immense power for both market and competitive research--if you know how to use it well. Sure, basic searches are easy, but complex searches require specialized skills. This concise book takes you through the full range of Google's powerful search-refinement features, so you can quickly find the specific information you need. Learn techniques ranging from simple Boolean logic to URL parameters and other advanced tools, and see how they're applied to real-world market research examples. Incorporate advanced search operators such as filetype:, intitle:, daterange:, and others into your queries Use Google filtering tools, including Search Within Results, Similar Pages, and SafeSearch, among others Explore the breadth of Google through auxiliary search services like Google News, Google Books, Google Blog Search, and Google Scholar Acquire advanced Google skills that result in more effective search engine optimization (SEO)

PHP and MySQL: The Missing Manual

by Brett Mclaughlin

<p>If you can build websites with CSS and JavaScript, this book takes you to the next level&#8212;creating dynamic, database-driven websites with PHP and MySQL. Learn how to build a database, manage your content, and interact with users through queries and web forms. With step-by-step tutorials, real-world examples, and jargon-free explanations, you&#8217;ll soon discover the power of server-side programming.</p>

School Lunch Politics: The Surprising History of America's Favorite Welfare Program

by Susan Levine

Whether kids love or hate the food served there, the American school lunchroom is the stage for one of the most popular yet flawed social welfare programs in our nation's history. School Lunch Politics covers this complex and fascinating part of American culture, from its origins in early twentieth-century nutrition science, through the establishment of the National School Lunch Program in 1946, to the transformation of school meals into a poverty program during the 1970s and 1980s. Susan Levine investigates the politics and culture of food; most specifically, who decides what American children should be eating, what policies develop from those decisions, and how these policies might be better implemented. Even now, the school lunch program remains problematic, a juggling act between modern beliefs about food, nutrition science, and public welfare. Levine points to the program menus' dependence on agricultural surplus commodities more than on children's nutritional needs, and she discusses the political policy barriers that have limited the number of children receiving meals and which children were served. But she also shows why the school lunch program has outlasted almost every other twentieth-century federal welfare initiative. In the midst of privatization, federal budget cuts, and suspect nutritional guidelines where even ketchup might be categorized as a vegetable, the program remains popular and feeds children who would otherwise go hungry. As politicians and the media talk about a national obesity epidemic, School Lunch Politics is a timely arrival to the food policy debates shaping American health, welfare, and equality.

Symmetric Markov Processes, Time Change, and Boundary Theory (LMS-35)

by Zhen-Qing Chen Masatoshi Fukushima

This book gives a comprehensive and self-contained introduction to the theory of symmetric Markov processes and symmetric quasi-regular Dirichlet forms. In a detailed and accessible manner, Zhen-Qing Chen and Masatoshi Fukushima cover the essential elements and applications of the theory of symmetric Markov processes, including recurrence/transience criteria, probabilistic potential theory, additive functional theory, and time change theory. The authors develop the theory in a general framework of symmetric quasi-regular Dirichlet forms in a unified manner with that of regular Dirichlet forms, emphasizing the role of extended Dirichlet spaces and the rich interplay between the probabilistic and analytic aspects of the theory. Chen and Fukushima then address the latest advances in the theory, presented here for the first time in any book. Topics include the characterization of time-changed Markov processes in terms of Douglas integrals and a systematic account of reflected Dirichlet spaces, and the important roles such advances play in the boundary theory of symmetric Markov processes. This volume is an ideal resource for researchers and practitioners, and can also serve as a textbook for advanced graduate students. It includes examples, appendixes, and exercises with solutions.

Bipolar Expeditions: Mania and Depression in American Culture

by Emily Martin

Manic behavior holds an undeniable fascination in American culture today. It fuels the plots of best-selling novels and the imagery of MTV videos, is acknowledged as the driving force for successful entrepreneurs like Ted Turner, and is celebrated as the source of the creativity of artists like Vincent Van Gogh and movie stars like Robin Williams. Bipolar Expeditions seeks to understand mania's appeal and how it weighs on the lives of Americans diagnosed with manic depression. Anthropologist Emily Martin guides us into the fascinating and sometimes disturbing worlds of mental-health support groups, mood charts, psychiatric rounds, the pharmaceutical industry, and psychotropic drugs. Charting how these worlds intersect with the wider popular culture, she reveals how people living under the description of bipolar disorder are often denied the status of being fully human, even while contemporary America exhibits a powerful affinity for manic behavior. Mania, Martin shows, has come to be regarded as a distant frontier that invites exploration because it seems to offer fame and profits to pioneers, while depression is imagined as something that should be eliminated altogether with the help of drugs. Bipolar Expeditions argues that mania and depression have a cultural life outside the confines of diagnosis, that the experiences of people living with bipolar disorder belong fully to the human condition, and that even the most so-called rational everyday practices are intertwined with irrational ones. Martin's own experience with bipolar disorder informs her analysis and lends a personal perspective to this complex story.

Taking on the Local Color

by Cynthia Genser

Cynthia Genser's landscapes, like those of D.H. Lawrence, are analogues of human emotions; her men and women exist in their effects-prototypes one minute, passionate and distinctly visible individuals the next. Person and place invite the reader into an adventure that begins and ends everywhere.The language employed throughout is voluptuous, sensuous, yet precise. The appeal is to all the senses as well as to reason and intelligence: the poems, seamed with a difficult, sweaty beauty, stimulate every pleasure center. But pure language play also leads to hard, intelligent sense.Of her own work, Cynthia Genser has said, "Although I belong to no special school or group, I align my poetry with the work of others aiming their metaphors at the banality and reductionism of our world-at the terror or planned obsolescence, Vogue Magazine, the threat of nuclear warfare. I cannot agree more with the Marxist Henri Lefebvre that poetry is the enemy and eventual victor in the war against 'terrorism' and the terrorist society we now live in."

The Ethics of Parenthood

by Norvin Richards

In The Ethics of Parenthood, Norvin Richards explores the moral relationship between parents and children from slightly before the cradle to slightly before the grave. Richards maintains that biological parents do ordinarily have a right to raise their children, not as a property right but as an instance of our general right to continue whatever we have begun. The contention is that creating a child is a first act of parenthood, hence it ordinarily carries a right to continue as parent to that child. Implications are drawn for a wide range of cases, including those of Baby Jessica and Baby Richard, prenatal abandonment, babies switched at birth and sent home with the wrong parents, and families separated by war or natural disaster. A second contention is that children have a claim of their own to have their autonomy respected, and that this claim is stronger the better the grounds for believing that what the child's actions express is a self of the child's own. A final set of chapters concern parents and their grown children. Views are offered about what duties parents have at this stage of life, about what is required in order to treat grown children as adults, and about what obligations grown children have to their parents. In the final chapter Richards discusses the contention that parents sometimes have an obligation to die rather than permit their children to make the sacrifices needed to keep them alive, arguing that a leading view about this undervalues both love and autonomy.

The Secret of Terror Castle (Alfred Hitchcock and the Three Investigators #1)

by Robert Arthur

[from the back cover] "A deserted old building by day--by night a castle of terror! For more than twenty years no one has slept the night through within the walls of Terror Castle. Ghostly moans and groans, fearful screams and screeches frighten off the bravest soul. What--or who--haunts the castle? The Three Investigators are determined to find out--by visiting it in the dead of night!" This is the first book in the Three Investigators series. Bookshare has the following books in this action packed mystery series with more on the way. In the middle of a junk yard the boys have hidden headquarters where they unravel puzzling clues in mysteries which often lead them to adventure and danger. Bob is the record keeper, Peter is always ready for action and Jupe does the planning and much of the deep thinking. Look for: #1 The Mystery of Terror Castle, #2 The Mystery of the Stuttering Parrot, #3 The Secret of the Whispering Mummy, #5 The Mystery of the Vanishing Treasure, #6 The Secret of Skeleton Island, #7 The Mystery of the Fiery Eye, #8 The Mystery of the Silver Spider, #9 The Mystery of the Screaming Clock, #12 The Mystery of the Laughing Shadow, #15 The Mystery of the Flaming Footprints, #17 The Mystery of the Singing Serpent, #21 The Mystery of the Haunted Mirror, #23 The Mystery of the Invisible Dog, #27 The Mystery of the Magic Circle, and #42 The Mystery of Wrecker's Rock, with many more on the way.

A Theory of Foreign Policy

by Glenn Palmer T. Clifton Morgan

This book presents a general explanation of how states develop their foreign policy. The theory stands in contrast to most approaches--which assume that states want to maximize security--by assuming that states pursue two things, or goods, through their foreign policy: change and maintenance. States, in other words, try both to change aspects of the international status quo that they don't like and maintain those aspects they do like. A state's ability to do so is largely a function of its relative capability, and since national capability is finite, a state must make trade-offs between policies designed to achieve change or maintenance. Glenn Palmer and Clifton Morgan apply their theory to cases ranging from American foreign policy since World War II to Chinese foreign policy since 1949 to the Suez Canal Crisis. The many implications bear upon specific policies such as conflict initiation, foreign aid allocation, military spending, and alliance formation. Particularly useful are the implications for foreign policy substitutability. The authors also undertake statistical analyses of a wide range of behaviors, and these generally support the theory. A Theory of Foreign Policy represents a major advance over traditional analyses of international relations. Not only do its empirical implications speak to a broader range of policies but, more importantly, the book illuminates the trade-offs decision makers face in selecting among policies to maximize utility, given a state's goals.

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