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Blood Kin

by Ceridwen Dovey

A barber, a chef and a portraitist are held hostage in a sparsely-furnished room, in a grand summer residence perched on a hill overlooking the capital city of a nameless hot country. They have been seized in a bloody coup to depose the President, their boss. In the city streets below them, chaos reigns. With the old order ruined, the moral landscape ravaged and venality widespread, human relationships - personal and political, between lovers and within families - are being dissected, fought over, abandoned. As the tension builds and the story reaches its devastating climax, Blood Kin lays bare humanity's most animalistic and mercenary impulses: lust, vanity, ambition, artifice, betrayal, obsession and vengeance. The locations are lavish, the detail is scrupulous, and the scope and themes are nothing short of Shakespearean. Blood Kin is a masterful, thrilling and deeply affecting debut.

The Accident Man

by Tom Cain

Meet the Accident Man, Samuel Carver Carver is a good guy who makes bad things happen to bad people. Drug-baron's helicopter develops mechanical failure mid-flight: Samuel Carver. Terrorist blown-up in his own bomb factory: Samuel Carver. Ex-SAS, now freelance mercenary he is the frontline weapon of the 'Consortium', a black-ops British government outfit, or is it? Carver is called to do a hit at very short notice. Do this job for us and be paid very well. Refuse and you better run and hide. He believes the target to be a high-ranking Pakistani terrorist. The job is to organise a car crash in a Paris underpass. But Carver is being set up. When he discovers the real identity of his target, and more importantly the identity of the target's female companion, he knows one thing - his life is over. This is a secret too big to let him live, unless he can track down the real villains before they get to him. Combining the plotting of Robert Ludlum, with the pace and tension of Frederick Forsyth, Tom Cain is a major new thriller writer and The Accident Man is a classic in the making and launches Samuel Carver straight into the top rank of action heroes.

Miss Julia Paints the Town

by Ann B. Ross

Development threatens Abbotsville, but not for long when Miss Julia takes on the cause When developers threaten to bulldoze the old courthouse to make way for condominiums, Miss Julia is dismayed. She enlists the help of Etta Mae Wiggins in a plot to scare off the money by exposing the towns many eccentric characters. Abbotsville has plenty of local color of the kind not usually listed in brochures for upscale condos: Tonyas sex change, Julias stint as a biker chick, Brother Verns evangelistic passion, and a mysterious apparition on a church wall. As if this isnt enough to keep Miss Julia busy, she soon also discovers that several of her friends husbands have vanishedand her own husband seems to be as scarce as hens teeth. Marriages, divorces, fraud charges, and reconciliations all play out against a backdrop of Miss Julias struggle to save Abbotsvilles historic courthouse, her marriage, and her sanity. "Miss Julia Paints the Town" is another rollicking good ride for fans of the winning series.

The Thief at the End of the World

by Joe Jackson

"At the height of the Victorian era, Henry Wickham - a man with no formal education, little funding, and limited experience - went adventuring in the darkest jungles of Venezuela and Brazil. He had learned of a particular kind of rubber tree that produced the strong and durable rubber that scientists and entrepreneurs in England craved. After repeated brushes with death, disease, and madness that awaited the unwary in the Amazon valley, he emerged exhausted, ragged, and transformed, with 70,000 illegally obtained rubber tree seeds. It was the first case of massive biopiracy in the modern era, and it would change the world. " "The Thief at the End of the World is the story of the use and misuse of nature in the quest for global dominance, and of how one ordinary man's obsessions drove him to extraordinary lengths. Wickham's seeds were transported successfully to London's famous Kew Gardens, and biologists there quickly shipped them off to colonial outposts throughout the far-flung British Empire. Within a few years, those seeds produced the trees that yielded the rubber used in everything from trains and airplanes to condoms and baby bottles. It is no exaggeration to say that rubber was the oil of its day - an incredibly valuable resource found in only a few remote places that powerful governments would go to great lengths to get their hands on. " "Henry Wickham and his wife Violet were gradually shut out of the wealth and glory of the rubber boom by the very government they had hoped to serve, and they wandered further and further from the new world they had helped to create. Joe Jackson draws from their letters and journals and the innumerable records left behind to paint a vivid, fascinating portrait of the man known in Great Britain as "the father of the rubber trade" and in Brazil as the "Executioner of Amazonas. "" "Ultimately, Wickham's tale is also the story of Victorian England's adventures in the Amazon with all the characteristics of the era: idealistic patriotism, ambitious colonialism, and a colossal greed rivaled only by fanatic industry. "--BOOK JACKET.

Come to Think of It

by Daniel Schorr

Peerless commentary on recent politics and history from one of the preeminent reporters of our time?now with new material AN INSTITUTION at CBS for decades and a twenty-year mainstay of NPR, Daniel Schorr is a legend in journalism. Come to Think of It collects in one place, for the first time, Schorr?s observations on politics and American life during the past two decades. His essays reveal his mastery of pithy, get-to-the-point analysis, and his experience gives him an authority and range that permeate every page. In these essays we get his on-the-spot reactions to the major and minor events around the turn of the millennium?from the shock of 9/11 to the mainstreaming of Yiddish. Come to Think of It is an unparalleled account of political analysis and personal memory. .

Why Kerouac Matters

by John Leland

Legions of youthful Americans have taken On the Road as a manifesto for rebellion and an inspiration to hit the road. But there is much more to the book than that. In Why Kerouac Matters, John Leland embarks on a wry, insightful, and playful discussion of the novel, arguing that it still matters because it lays out an alternative road map to growing up. Along the way, Leland overturns many misconceptions about On the Road as he examines the lessons that Kerouac?s alter ego, Sal Paradise, absorbs and dispenses on his novelistic journey to manhood, and how those lessons?about work and money, love and sex, art and holiness? still reverberate today.

Sacco and Vanzetti

by Bruce Watson

Commemorating the eightieth anniversary of Sacco and Vanzetti's execution- with a new cover and new foreword Electrocuted in 1927 for the murder of two guards in Massachusetts, the Italian- American anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti defied the verdict against them, maintaining their innocence to the end. Whether they were guilty continues to be the subject of debate today. First published in 1928, Sacco and Vanzetti's letters represent one of the great personal documents of the twentieth century: a volume of primary source material as famous for the splendor of its impassioned prose as for the brilliant light it sheds on the characters of the two dedicated anarchists who became the focus of worldwide attention. .

Museum

by Danny Danziger

An ?intriguing? oral portrait of the people behind the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Entertainment Weekly) Using more than fifty interviews, award-winning writer Danny Danziger creates a fascinating mosaic of the people behind New York?s magnificent Metropolitan Museum of Art. From the aristocratic, acerbic director of the museum, Philippe de Montebello, to the curators who have a deep knowledge and passionate appreciation of their collections, from the security guards to the philanthropists who keep the museum?s financial life blood flowing, Danziger brings to life this extraordinary world through the words of those who are devoted to making the Met the American institution it surely is. .

Broken Government

by John W. Dean

The concluding volume of The New York Times bestselling trilogy One of today?s most outspoken and respected political commentators asks: How can our democracy function when the key institutions of government no longer operate as intended by the Constitution? Stepping back to assess three decades of nearly continuous Republican rule, John W. Dean surveys the damage done to the three branches of government and traces their decline through the presidencies of Nixon, Ford, Reagan, Bush I , and Bush II. Speaking to what the average moderate citizen can do to combat extremism, authoritarianism, incompetence, and the Republicans? deliberate focus on polarizing social issues, Broken Government is a must-have book for voters this election year. .

Independents Day

by Lou Dobbs

From The New York Times bestselling author of War on the Middle Class, a powerful look at the critical issues facing America on the eve of the 2008 Presidential election With up to a million viewers each day, Lou Dobbs Tonight has become one of the most popular news programs in the nation. Now Dobbs, whose last book, War on the Middle Class, captured the plight of working Americans, asks the question: What has happened to the American dream? By examining the disastrous pubic policy choices that have eroded individual liberties, reduced workers rights and pay, and led our nation into division at home as well as into conflict around the world, Dobbs charts a determined course that will restore the fundamental equality of rights and opportunity for all Americans. I n a time of acute political turmoil, this is a book of vital importance from a revered independent. .

A Life Decoded

by J. Craig Venter

The triumphant memoir of the man behind one of the greatest feats in scientific historyOf all the scientific achievements of the past century, perhaps none can match the deciphering of the human genetic code, both for its technical brilliance and for its implications for our future. In A Life Decoded, J. Craig Venter traces his rise from an uninspired student to one of the most fascinating and controversial figures in science today. Here, Venter relates the unparalleled drama of the quest to decode the human genome-a goal he predicted he could achieve years earlier and more cheaply than the government-sponsored Human Genome Project, and one that he fulfilled in 2001. A thrilling story of detection, A Life Decoded is also a revealing, and often troubling, look at how science is practiced today.

Rumpole Misbehaves

by John Mortimer

The next novel in the Rumpole series from the beloved and bestselling master of the court The Rumpole novels have garnered legions of fans who show no sign of abandoning their favorite curmudgeonly British barrister. Now in Rumpole Misbehaves, our hero takes on nothing less than the New Labour government when their ridiculous new Anti- Social Behavior Orders land a Timson child in front of the bench for playing soccer on a posh London street. However, Rumpole quickly discovers that the complainant is hiding some nefarious secrets of her own. As he investigates the murder of a prostitute with links to white slavery and unscrupulous dealings in a government department, Rumpole must also wrangle with his fellow barristers as they threaten him with an ASBO for bringing food, wine, and small cigars into his room in chambers. .

Pontoon

by Garrison Keillor

A fresh and funny Lake Wobegon novel about a woman with a secret life Evelyn was a Sanctified Brethren woman of good standing, a devoted mother, a serious quilter. Only after she dies in her sleep, as she always wished she would, do we find out that she has been living a secret life. For years she has been in love with Raoul, a Las Vegas man who took her dancing and showed her the joys of life outside Lake Wobegon. Evelyn's stunned daughter Barbara finds she's inspired by her mother's secret commitment to pleasure. She decides to finally stop drinking and thumb her nose at the Wobegon establishment by carrying out Evelyn's final wish-to be cremated and have her ashes scattered over Lake Wobegon from a pontoon boat. It is also a time of homecoming for Debbie Detmer, a veterinary aromatherapy millionaire who has returned to Wobegon from California with her uncommitted fiancé in the hope that a lavish wedding with Moët and shrimp shish kabob will save them. But Debbie's plans for a pontoon boat wedding go terribly wrong. A novel about courage and transformation in a town stuck in its ways, Eve in Wobegonis a heartfelt and comic novel by one of our greatest storytellers. Garrison Keillor's Lake Wobegon stories have captured the imagination of millions and become an American institution. The critically acclaimed 2006 feature film A Prairie Home Companion, written by Keillor and directed by Robert Altman, introduced new fans to the beloved and iconic Lake Wobegon.

Head and Heart: American Christianities

by Garry Wills

A landmark examination of Christianity's place in American life across the broad sweep of this country's history, from the Puritans to the presidential administration of George W. Bush.

Cheating at Canasta

by William Trevor

A new collection from ?the greatest living writer of short stories in the English language? (The New Yorker) The publication of a new book by William Trevor is a true literary event. One of our finest chroniclers of the human condition, Trevor?s precise and unflinching insights into the lives of ordinary people are evidenced once again in this stunning collection of twelve stories. Subtle yet powerful, these exquisitely nuanced tales of regret, deception, adultery, aging, and forgiveness are a rare pleasure, and they confirm Trevor?s reputation as a master of the form. From a chance encounter between two childhood friends to memories of a newly widowed man to a family grappling with the sale of ancestral land, Trevor examines with grace and skill the tenuous bonds of our relationships, the strengths that hold us together, and the truths that threaten to separate us. .

The Art of Woo

by G. Richard Shell Mario Moussa

Selling ideas-especially the kinds of ideas that make organizations work-is a skill shrouded in mystery. In The Art of Woo, Professors G. Richard Shell and Mario Moussa offer a self-assessment to determine which persuasion role fits you best and discuss how to make the most of your natural strengths.

Closing the Leadership Gap

by Marie C. Wilson

The defining examination of the new role of women in America?now fully revised When first published in 2004, Marie Wilson?s Closing the Leadership Gap finally drew attention to what everyone knew but no one talked about?the lack of women in America?s leadership positions, even though compelling research shows that women enhance the top decision-making process dramatically. And yet, even as our nation sits on a world spinning with crises, we have barely begun to tap that most critical natural resource. With the possibility of America?s first woman president looming large, now is the time to revisit this inspiring call to action. .

Hitler's Pope

by John Cornwell

The "explosive" (The New York Times) bestseller-now with a new introduction by the author When Hitler's Pope, the shocking story of Pope Pius XII that "redefined the history of the twentieth century" (The Washington Post ) was originally published, it sparked a firestorm of controversy both inside and outside the Catholic Church. Now, award-winning journalist John Cornwell has revisited this seminal work of history with a new introduction that both answers his critics and reaffirms his overall thesis that Pius XII, now scheduled to be canonized by the Vatican, weakened the Catholic Church with his endorsement of Hitler-and sealed the fate of the Jews in Europe. .

The Shawnees and the War for America

by Colin G. Calloway

With the courage and resilience embodied by their legendary leader Tecumseh, the Shawnees waged a war of territorial and cultural resistance for half a century. Noted historian Colin G. Calloway details the political and legal battles and the bloody fighting on both sides for possession of the Shawnees? land, while imbuing historical figures such as warrior chief Tecumseh, Daniel Boone, and Andrew Jackson with all their ambiguity and complexity. More than defending their territory, the Shawnees went to war to preserve a way of life and their own deeply held vision of what their nation should be. .

The Pursuit of Glory

by Tim Blanning

In The Pursuit of Glory Tim Blanning brings to life one of the most extraordinary and dynamic periods in Europe's history: from the desolate, battered and introvert continent of the end of the Thirty Years War to the overwhelmingly dynamic one that experienced the French Revolution and the wars of Napoleon. How did people really live their lives? How did they understand their world? What did they buy? What did they eat? How did they pray? What were their loyalties and their values? From the lives of ordinary farmers and soldiers to great kings, princes and bishops and the dominant personalities of the age (Louis XIV, Frederick the Great, Napoleon); from art, leisure pursuits and garden design to the strange sport of fox-tossing, Blanning explores this era of immense change, and cultural, political and technological ferment. This was a world in which the elite were obsessed with the pursuit of glory: their own glory, that of their families and that of their countries. It was a time of immense expenditure - as much on clothes, banquets and palaces as on fortresses and artillery - which shaped the societies and economies of entire countries.

Partners in Command

by Mark Perry

A unique look at the complex relationship between two of America?s foremost World War II leaders The first book ever to explore the relationship between George Marshall and Dwight Eisenhower, Partners in Command eloquently tackles a subject that has eluded historians for years. As Mark Perry charts the crucial impact of this duo on victory in World War II and later as they lay the foundation for triumph in the Cold War, he shows us an unlikely, complex collaboration at the heart of decades of successful American foreign policy?and shatters many of the myths that have evolved about these two great men and the issues that tested their alliance. As exciting to read as it is vitally informative, this work is a signal accomplishment. .

Justinian's Flea: The First Great Plague and the End of the Roman Empire

by William Rosen

The epic story of the collision between one of nature?s smallest organisms and history?s mightiest empire During the golden age of the Roman Empire, Emperor Justinian reigned over a territory that stretched from Italy to North Africa. It was the zenith of his achievements and the last of them. In 542 AD, the bubonic plague struck. In weeks, the glorious classical world of Justinian had been plunged into the medieval and modern Europe was born. At its height, five thousand people died every day in Constantinople. Cities were completely depopulated. It was the first pandemic the world had ever known and it left its indelible mark: when the plague finally ended, more than 25 million people were dead. Weaving together history, microbiology, ecology, jurisprudence, theology, and epidemiology, Justinian?s Flea is a unique and sweeping account of the little known event that changed the course of a continent. .

Gut Feelings

by Gerd Gigerenzer

Why is split second decision-making superior to deliberation? Gut Feelings delivers the science behind Malcolm Gladwell?s Blink Reflection and reason are overrated, according to renowned psychologist Gerd Gigerenzer. Much better qualified to help us make decisions is the cognitive, emotional, and social repertoire we call intuition?a suite of gut feelings that have evolved over the millennia specifically for making decisions. ?Gladwell drew heavily on Gigerenzer?s research. But Gigerenzer goes a step further by explaining just why our gut instincts are so often right. Intuition, it seems, is not some sort of mystical chemical reaction but a neurologically based behavior that evolved to ensure that we humans respond quickly when faced with a dilemma? (BusinessWeek). .

The First Word

by Christine Kenneally

An accessible exploration of a burgeoning new field: the incredible evolution of language The first popular book to recount the exciting, very recent developments in tracing the origins of language, The First Word is at the forefront of a controversial, compelling new field. Acclaimed science writer Christine Kenneally explains how a relatively small group of scientists that include Noam Chomsky and Steven Pinker assembled the astounding narrative of how the fundamental process of evolution produced a linguistic ape?in other words, us. Infused with the wonder of discovery, this vital and engrossing book offers us all a better understanding of the story of humankind. .

Fateful Choices

by Ian Kershaw

Ian Kershaw's Fateful Choices: Ten Decisions that Changed the World, 1940-41 offers a penetrating insight into a series of momentous political decisions that shaped the course of the Second World War. The hurricane of events that marked the opening of the Second World War meant that anything could happen. For the aggressors there was no limit to their ambitions; for their victims a new Dark Age beckoned. Over the next few months their fates would be determined. In Fateful Choices Ian Kershaw re-creates the ten critical decisions taken between May 1940, when Britain chose not to surrender, and December 1941, when Hitler decided to destroy Europe's Jews, showing how these choices would recast the entire course of history. 'Powerfully argued . . . important . . . this book actually alters our perspective of the Second World War' Andrew Roberts 'This fascinating, closely-argued book adds to our understanding of a terrible war' Alan Massie 'A compelling re-examination of the conflict . . . Kershaw displays here those same qualities of scholarly rigour, careful argument and sound judgement that he brought to bear so successfully in his life of Hitler' Richard Overy 'A splendidly lucid and impeccably argued exposition of the greatest political decisions of the Second World War' Max Hastings 'How fortunate that it is Ian Kershaw bringing his immense knowledge and clarity of thought to the task . . . brilliantly explained . . . an immensely wise book' Anthony Beevor Ian Kershaw (b. 1943) was Professor of Modern History at the University of Sheffield from 1989-2008, and is one of the world's leading authorities on Hitler. His books include The 'Hitler Myth', his two volume biography Hitler 1889-1936: Hubris and Hitler 1936-1945: Nemesis, and Fateful Choices: Ten Decisions that Changed the World, 1940-1941. He was knighted in 2002.

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