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The Possession of Mr. Cave

by Matt Haig

With his characteristic black humour, Matt Haig tells a story of distorted love. It is a nightmare of gothic proportions, with chilling resonance for anyone who has been a parent or a frustrated teenager. Terence Cave, intellectual, music-lover and owner of Cave Antiques, has experienced more than his share of tragedies. His mother's suicide and his young wife's death at the hands of burglars left him to bring up his young twins alone. And now one of them has died in a grotesque accident as a result of bullying. Bryony, the remaining twin, has always been the family's great hope: a golden teenager, in love with her cello and her pony, clever, sweet and eager to please. Now that she is all Terence has left, he realizes that his one duty in life is to keep her safe from the world's malign forces, whatever that may take. As he starts to follow his grieving daughter's movements, and enforces a draconian set of rules purely for her own safety, the voices in his head convince him to protect her innocence at any cost. In this compulsive novel, the characteristic black humour of The Last Family in England and The Dead Fathers Club moves even further to the dark side. Matt Haig lays bare the process by which Terence's love for Bryony becomes a possessive force that will lead to destruction and, ultimately, murder. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Why Manners Matter

by Lucinda Holdforth

You know what it's like: whether it's the leafblower blaring at 7am or the queue-jumper cutting in at the cinema, there's nothing like an act of rudeness to spoil the day. But why do so many of us get worked up about these examples of incivility? Isn't that just life? Do manners really matter, anyway? Yes! says Lucinda Holdforth in this passionate and elegant essay, drawing on history's great writers and thinkers to argue, unashamedly, that manners are absolutely essential to civilisation. Holdforth wrests the case for good manners away from the knife-and-fork snobs, the exclusivist bores and the corporate fakers, to show how courtesy protects our rights and freedoms, strengthens our communities, and adorns our individual humanity. She shows us that privacy can co-exist with neighbourliness, that intellectual freedom can flourish within agreed social rules, and that civility saves us from over-legislation. Bold, brimming with anecdote and brilliantly conceived, Why Manners Matter is as witty as it is timely, and as forceful as it is charming. This important yet thoroughly entertaining little book will ensure you never take courtesy for granted again.

An American Gospel

by Erik Reece

From the award-winning author of Lost Mountain, a stirring work of memoir, spiritual journey, and historical inquiry. At the age of thirty-three, Erik Reece's father, a Baptist minister, took his own life, leaving Erik in the care of his grandmother and his grandfather-also a fundamentalist Baptist preacher, and a pillar of his rural Virginia community. While Erik grew up with a conflicted relationship with Christianity, he unexpectedly found comfort in the Jefferson Bible. Inspired by the text, he undertook what would become a spiritual and literary quest to identify an "American gospel" coursing through the work of both great and forgotten American geniuses, from William Byrd to Walt Whitman to William James to Lynn Margulis. The result of Reece's journey is a deeply intimate, stirring book about personal, political, and historical demons-and the geniuses we must call upon to combat them. .

Seeking Peace

by Mary Pipher

In this thoughtful and inspiring memoir, the author of the New York Times bestsellers Reviving Ophelia, The Shelter of Each Other, and Another Country explores her personal search for understanding, tranquility, and respect through her work as a psychologist and seeker. "There are three kinds of secrets," Mary Pipher says in Seeking Peace: Chronicles of the Worst Buddhist in the World. "Those we keep from everyone, those we keep from certain people, and those we keep from ourselves. Writing this book forced me to deal with all three. " After decades of exploring the lives of others through her writing and therapy, Mary Pipher turns her attention to herself-culling insights from her own life to highlight the importance of the journey, not just the destination. Like most lives, Pipher's is filled with glory and tragedy, chaos and clarity, love and abandonment. She spent her childhood in small Nebraska towns, the daughter of a doctor mother and a restless jack-of-all-trades father. Often both of her parents were away and Pipher and her siblings lived as what she calls "feral children. " Later, as an adult and a therapist, Pipher was able to do what she most enjoyed: learn about the world and help others. After the surprising success of Reviving Ophelia, she was overwhelmed by the attention and demands on her time. In 2002, after a personal crisis, Pipher realized that success and fame were harming her, and she began working to find a quieter, more meditative life that would carry her toward self-acceptance and joy. In Seeking Peace, Mary Pipher tells her own remarkable story, and in the process reveals truths about our search for happiness and love. While her story is unique, "the basic map and milestones of my story are universal," she writes. "We strive to make sense of our selves and our environments. " In Seeking Peace, Pipher reflects on her life in a way that allows readers to reimagine theirs.

The Potato Chip Puzzles

by Eric Berlin

Read Eric Berlin's posts on the Penguin Blog. When puzzle addict Winston Breen and his best friends head to an all-day puzzle hunt with a $50,000 grand prize, they're pumped. But the day is not all fun and games: not only do they have a highstrung and highly competitive teacher along for the ride, but the puzzles are hard even for Winston, the other schools' teams are no joke, and someone in the contest is playing dirty in order to win. Trying to stop this mystery cheater before it's too late takes an already tough challenge to a whole other level. . . . Packed with a variety of fun puzzles to solve, this fast-paced sequel will pull readers right into the action from start to finish. .

Marie Curie

by Kathleen Krull

Marie Curie, the woman who coined the term radioactivity, won not just one Nobel Prize but two?in physics and chemistry, both supposedly girl-phobic sciences. .

So Enchanting

by Connie Brockway

The Scottish hamlet of Little Firkin has one important industry: the guardianship of Amelie Chase, a witchling banished by the ton for her alleged supernatural powers, and entrusted by her benefactor to Fanny Walcott. But the scheme is hitting a snag: Little Firkin is cramping Amelie's style, anonymous notes are threatening her life, and now, two handsome travelers arrive with tantalizing links to the pasts of both women. And what's happening in Little Firkin is so enchanting, it's going to take a leap of faith to believe it.

Speak of the Devil

by Shari Shattuck

She could see what they couldn't. . . And it was going up in flames. . Greer Sands has a unique talent for seeing glimpses of the future and reading auras-especially those of her friends and neighbors. . . . While at her friend Jenny's baby shower, Greer has a terrifying premonition of a devastating wildfire. The frightening vision is interrupted by Jenny, asking Greer to predict the gender of her unborn child. Greer envisions a lovely baby girl, but she also sees that the mother may be in mortal danger. Now Greer needs to follow the clues-and her visions-before everything she loves goes up in flames.

The King's Rose

by Libby Alisa M.

Life in the court of King Henry VIII is a complex game. When fifteen-year-old Catherine Howard catches the king?s eye, she quickly transforms from pawn to queen. But even luxury beyond imagination loses its luster as young Catherine finds her life?and her heart?threatened by the needs of an aging king and a family hungry for power. Will their agendas deliver Catherine to the same fate as her infamous cousin, Anne Boleyn?sacrificed at the altar of family ambition? Engaging historical fiction with a throbbing YA heartbeat, this thrilling novel will draw readers into the intrigues and dangers of the Tudor court. .

Special-Needs Kids Eat Right

by Judy Converse

Good news for parents of special- needs kids: a proven approach to everyday meals that fosters learning and development. Any parent of a child with autism, Asperger's, ADHD, sensory processing disorder, or other developmental disabilities knows that special-needs kids often have food sensitivities and can be very fussy eaters. Plus, they've been told to avoid such common ingredients as gluten and casein, making it even harder to give them the balanced, healthy meals all children need. Now, Judy Converse, a registered, licensed dietitian, offers new advice and guidance on how to use food as an essential tool for development. Based on the latest research, Special-Needs Kids Eat Right includes: bull; Simple substitutions that can be easily customized to suit any child's needs bull; Advice for helping the whole family-along with school staff and caregivers-adjust and take part bull; Strategies and tips for staying on track at restaurants, holiday gatherings, school parties and lunches, and overcoming obstacles bull; Shopping and resource guides bull; A long-term program for measuring progress and making adjustments

Petit Appetit: Eat, Drink, and Be Merry

by Lisa Barnes

Delicious organic recipes from an award-winning organic-foods cookbook author and nutrition expert. As kids get older, parents get busier, and they all need simple, creative, healthy ideas and recipes for school lunches, snacks, drinks and the seemingly endless round of parties, playdates, and special occasions. This all-new collection of recipes from Petit Appetit is just what they need. These nutritious, organic, and easy-to-prepare snacks, drinks, and celebration foods are the perfect alternative to processed store-bought items laden with high fructose corn syrup, trans fats, additives, and preservatives. Chef and mother Lisa Barnes? simple, delicious recipes enable parents to think ?outside the bag? (of processed chips, crackers, and cookies) and learn how to create new family favorites with healthy, organic ingredients. Petit Appetit: Eat, Drink, and Be Merry features: ? Expert advice, tips, and stories ? Nutritional, dietary, and allergy information Throughout ? Best methods for packing and storage ? More than 150 recipes .

Guilty

by Karen Robards

Pawley's Island, South Carolina, seemed an idyllic place, until an unsolved murder - the grisly stabbing of teenager Tara Mitchell and the disappearance of her two friends - disturbed the peace. In the 15 years since the murders, all who have lived in the mansion where it happened has left in fear, claiming that the dead girls haunt the house. TV reporter Nicky Sullivan believes this story could be her big break, and arranges for a live television séance in an attempt to contact the girls. But it all goes horribly wrong when, during the show, a young woman is murdered in exactly the same way as Tara was all those years ago. Nicky's producers order her to continue, and in doing so she meets enigmatic police chief Joe Franconi. But, as the tension between them grows, another identical murder occurs. This time, there is a menacing note warning that the original killer has come back to claim three more lives. Two down, one to go. . . Could Nicky be the killer's third victim?

Pursuit

by Karen Robards

From the New York Times bestselling author of Guilty When the First Lady dies in a fiery car crash, rookie attorney Jessica Ford is the only survivor of the tragedy. As the nation mourns, Ford has reason to believe it wasn't an accident. One by one, others in the First Lady's inner circle are being killed. Jessica must find out why- before she's next. .

Imagining India

by Nandan Nilekani

Indian software entrepreneur Nandan Nilekani has written the definitive book about modern India. Nilekani gives us a fascinating new perspective for the twenty-first century, defying received and imported wisdom, and showing us what is really at stake in the world's largest democracy. He reveals why India's huge population has now become her greatest strength; how information technology is bringing the benefits of globalization; why rapid urbanization is transforming social and political life; and how we can learn from India's difficult journey towards a single internal market. He also gets to the heart of debates about labour reform, the social security system, higher education and the role of the state. And he asks the key questions of the future: how will India as a global power avoid the mistakes of earlier development models? Will further access to the open market continue to stimulate such extraordinary growth? And how will all this affect - and be shaped by - her young people?

Escape from Bellevue

by Campion Christopher John

Read Christopher John Campion's posts on the Penguin Blog. Indie rock raconteur Chris Campion-one of the few patients ever to escape from Bellevue's locked ward-recalls his band's tumultuous ride, his plummet into addiction, and the strange road back to sobriety Chronicling more than twenty years in the life of a Long Island kid who became a hardcore fixture of Manhattan's indie rock scene, Escape from Bellevue is a coming-of-age tale like no other. As the lead singer of New York-based indie rock band Knockout Drops, Campion got a taste of fame (but, alas, no fortune) on a wild ride that lasted from the early 1980s through the 1990s. Escape from Bellevue puts the spotlight on the collective psychosis of twenty years spent in a rolling bacchanal. Just as the Knockout Drops reached the height of their success, Campion began his downward spiral. After finally coming to grips with his addictions, Campion molded his songs and stories into a sold-out off-Broadway musical. Now, presenting these tales in a memoir of madness and redemption, Campion once again proves to possess the creative genius of a die-hard front man. .

Uranium: War, Energy, and the Rock That Shaped the World

by Tom Zoellner

Uranium is a common element in the earth's crust and the only naturally occurring mineral with the power to end all life on the planet. After World War II, it reshaped the global order - whoever could master uranium could master the world. Marie Curie gave us hope that uranium would be a miracle panacea, but the Manhattan Project gave us reason to believe that civilization would end with apocalypse. Slave labor camps in Africa and Eastern Europe were built around mine shafts, and America would knowingly send more than 600 uranium miners to their graves in the name of national security. Fortunes have been made from this yellow dirt; massive energy grids have been run from it. Fear of it panicked the American people into supporting a questionable war with Iraq, and its specter threatens to create another conflict in Iran. Now, some are hoping it can help avoid a global warming catastrophe. In Uranium, Tom Zoellner takes readers around the globe in this intriguing look at the mineral that can sustain life or destroy it.

The Inaugural Address 2009

by Barack Obama

Celebrate the inauguration of America's 44th president with this New York Times bestseller Tying into the official theme for the 2009 inaugural ceremony, "A New Birth of Freedom" from Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, Penguin presents a keepsake edition commemorating the inauguration of President Barack Obama with words of the two great thinkers and writers who have helped shape him politically, philosophically, and personally: Abraham Lincoln and Ralph Waldo Emerson. Having Lincoln and Emerson's most influential, memorable, and eloquent words along with Obama's historic inaugural address will be a gift of inspiration for every American for generations to come. .

Tracktown Summer

by Elizabeth Ann Holmes

Jake has felt fatherless ever since his parents separated, and so he can't wait to spend the summer with his dad. But the house Dad rented is a shabby place next to the railroad tracks, with no friends and nothing to do. Then, through a pickup game of hoops, Jake befriends a neighbor boy. Adrian is charming at first, but soon Jake starts to sense a streak of desperation in him. Jake gets sucked into Adrian's bizarre life, in which recklessness escalates to danger. Witnessing Adrian's highly dysfunctional, sometimes violent, family gives Jake new perspective on his own situation.

Two-Minute Drill

by Mike Lupica

Chris Conlan is the coolest kid in sixth grade?the golden-armed quarterback of the football team, and the boy all the others look up to. Scott Parry is the new kid, the boy with the huge brain, but with feet that trip over themselves daily. These two boys may seem like an odd couple, but each has a secret that draws them together as friends, and proves that the will to succeed is even more important than raw talent. #1 New York Times bestseller Mike Lupica scores from downtown with this new series for young middle-grade readers. .

The Ex-Mrs. Hedgefund

by Jill Kargman

The year is 2006, the apex of excess. Married to the founder of Comet Capital, Holly Talbott is slowly becoming a reluctant Mrs. Hedgefund. Sure, it's great to live in a world that is seemingly sheltered from the threat of economic collapse and the risk of having to downsize from new Roger Viviers to consignment Manolos. Holly loves being a stay-at-home mom to her son, Miles, keeping house accounts at all the best places in town, and having a Rolodex of eager donors for her fund-raisers for the local hospital, but there are some downsides to this world of excess and secluded luxury. For starters, there are endless black tie functions where the hedgie men vie to show up their competition with bids at charity auctions on matzoh ball soup cooked by Rachael Ray ($675,000) and fifteen minutes with Warren Buffett ($700,000). Holly and her sister-in-law, Kiki, joke that lunches are called luncheons because they take eons, that even BOTOX can't stop their mother-in-law's withering stares, and that their husbands are away so often it almost feels like they are single again. When an adventure with Kiki to trendy Williamsburg leads to a shocking discovery, Holly soon learns that not all of her husband's trips have been for business. Forced to choose between compromising her integrity and living honestly, Holly begins to navigate a new New York existence. And while being a divorcée may make her a pariah to the other moms on the Upper East Side, below Fifty-seventh Street there is a world of new career and dating prospects to explore. Holly soon finds that sometimes exes have all the fun, and in the most unexpected places. . . .

City Kid

by Nelson George

A candid, colorful memoir about a nerd from the Brooklyn projects who made it big Nelson George grew up in the Tilden housing project in the crime- and despair-ridden Brownsville section of Brooklyn during the 1960s and 70s. In this tough neighborhood, Nelson was the nerdy kid who, in between stickball and street games, devoured Captain America comics, Ernest Hemingway novels, and album liner notes. City Kidintroduces us to Nelson's family: his absent wanna-be-hustler father; his tough-minded sister, who is seduced by the streets; and his mother, who dreams of becoming a teacher and returning to the South. Amid the struggles of his family, Nelson finds himself drawn into the world of black pop culture, first as a writer and then as a filmmaker, eventually collaborating with some of the major figures of the era-Spike Lee, Russell Simmons, Chris Rock, and many others. Nelson's story is ultimately one of triumph, but it is not saccharine, sentimental, or full of false inspiration. Seeking transcendence through art and loving New York City, Nelson creates an insightful portrait of the emergence of black artists in the 1980s and 90s and illuminates how the pain of life can be turned into thoughtful books and cinema.

Mark Twain and the River

by Sterling North

Tom Sawyer is among the best-known, most-loved characters in American fiction. As everyone remembers, he and Huck Finn camped on an island, got lost in a cave, and visited an old graveyard at midnight. These adventures were based upon the author's real boyhood experiences along the Mississippi River. Trace Mark Twain's life from 1835, when his birth was heralded by Halley's Comet, to 1910, when the comet returned upon his death, in this fascinating biography by Newbery Honor author Sterling North. .

Young Thomas Edison

by Sterling North

Unable to hear, Thomas Edison seemed unlikely to become one of America?s greatest inventors, but as a hardworking young man, he wasn?t about to let a minor obstacle stop him. He invented the phonograph, the incandescent lightbulb, and motion pictures, to name but three of his many important inventions. Eventually he was named ?the greatest living American. ? Follow Thomas Edison?s life from losing his sense of hearing to losing his hard-earned fortune, in this intriguing biography by Newbery Honor author Sterling North. .

The Third Reich at War

by Evans Richard J.

The final volume in Richard J. Evans's masterly trilogy on the history of Nazi Germany traces the rise and fall of German military might, the mobilization of a "people's community" to serve a war of conquest, and Hitler's campaign of racial subjugation and genocide Already hailed as "a masterpiece" (William Grimes in The New York Times) and "the most comprehensive history. . . of the Third Reich" (Ian Kershaw), this epic trilogy reaches its terrifying climax in this volume. Evans interweaves a broad narrative of the war's progress with viscerally affecting personal testimony from a wide range of people-from generals to front-line soldiers, from Hitler Youth activists to middle-class housewives. The Third Reich at War lays bare the dynamics of a nation more deeply immersed in war than any society before or since. Fresh insights into the conflict's great events are here, from the invasion of Poland to the Battle of Stalingrad to Hitler's suicide in the bunker. But just as important is the re-creation of the daily experience of ordinary Germans in wartime, staggering under pressure from Allied bombing and their own government's mounting demands upon them. At the center of the book is the Nazi extermination of Europe's Jews, set in the context of Hitler's genocidal plans for the racial restructuring of Europe. Blending narrative, description and analysis, The Third Reich at War creates an engrossing picture-at once sweeping and precise-of a society rushing headlong to self-destruction and taking much of Europe with it. It is the culmination of a historical masterwork that will remain the most authoritative work on Nazi Germany for years to come.

Response

by Paul Volponi

Noah and his friends go to a predominantly white neighborhood with a plan: steal a car, sell it to a chop shop, and make some fast cash. But that never happens. Instead, Noah, a teen father, is the victim of a vicious beating that leaves him with a fractured skull. Was the attacker just protecting his turf, or did he assault Noah because he's black? Awardwinning author Paul Volponi, known for his brutally honest portrayals of the moral complexities of urban life, uses alternating perspective to give readers a fascinating and chilling insight into the minds of those on both sides of a hate crime.

Showing 52,726 through 52,750 of 119,954 results

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