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Urban Pollution

by Eveline Da¼rr Rivke Jaffe

Re-examining Mary Douglas' work on pollution and concepts of purity, this volume explores modern expressions of these themes in urban areas, examining the intersections of material and cultural pollution. It presents ethnographic case studies from a range of cities affected by globalization processes such as neoliberal urban policies, privatization of urban space, continued migration and spatialized ethnic tension. What has changed since the appearance of Purity and Danger? How have anthropological views on pollution changed accordingly? This volume focuses on cultural meanings and values that are attached to conceptions of 'clean' and 'dirty', purity and impurity, healthy and unhealthy environments, and addresses the implications of pollution with regard to discrimination, class, urban poverty, social hierarchies and ethnic segregation in cities.

Weimar Publics/weimar Subjects

by Kristin Mcguire Kathleen Canning Kerstin Barndt

In spite of having been short-lived, "Weimar" has never lost its fascination. Until recently the Weimar Republic's place in German history was primarily defined by its catastrophic beginning and end - Germany's defeat in 1918 and the Nazi seizure of power in 1933; its history seen mainly in terms of politics and as an arena of flawed decisions and failed compromises. However, a flourishing of interdisciplinary scholarship on Weimar political culture is uncovering arenas of conflict and change that had not been studied closely before, such as gender, body politics, masculinity, citizenship, empire and borderlands, visual culture, popular culture and consumption. This collection offers new perspectives from leading scholars in the disciplines of history, art history, film studies, and German studies on the vibrant political culture of Germany in the 1920s. From the traumatic ruptures of defeat, revolution, and collapse of the Kaiser's state, the visionaries of Weimar went on to invent a republic, calling forth new citizens and cultural innovations that shaped the republic far beyond the realms of parliaments and political parties.

Tommy Douglas

by Vincent Lam

Douglas was sombre and brief in addressing the members of his own party regarding the use of the War Measures Act. He said, ôMy position is to oppose it. ö I know that some of you may not support me, and IÆll understand that. ThereÆs no question about it: if the Prime Minister calls an election over this, it may devastate the party. You have your own political careers to think about. IÆm going back upstairs now. I have to speak at 11 oÆclock. IÆm against it, period. ö Book jacket.

The Raven's Gift

by Don Rearden

Winner, Alaskan Novel of the Year, 2011 Shifting from contemporary Eskimo village life to a gripping post-apocalyptic nightmare, The Raven's Gift dares to confront the terrifying possibility of an impending catastrophic loss of human life--and love. Lured north to a Yup'ik village on the Alaskan tundra in search of adventure, John Morgan and his wife Anna can barely contain their excitement. But something is about to go terribly wrong. What happens when an epidemic strikes--and no one comes to help? Don Rearden lives in the mountain community of Bear Valley, Alaska, and is an Associate Professor of Developmental Studies at the University of Alaska, Anchorage, where he teaches young writers how to develop their creative voices. textpublishing. com. au 'The Raven's Gift has a winning plot, characters we've never met before, and intriguing details of a world most of us will never venture to--creating a read that opens our eyes and finds the fault lines of a heart in one breathless sitting. ' Jodi Picoult 'Don Rearden has created a kind of allegory for a people and place at risk, a generous and honest portrait of Yup'ik communities. His Alaska is one you won't yet have seen. ' David Vann, author of bestselling novels Legend of a Suicide and Caribou Island 'The book is fantastic, one of the best books about Alaska I have ever read. It calls to mind Cormac McCarthy and Stephen King, but at the same time it is all its own. The Raven's Gift is the story of a couple teaching in a remote Alaskan village when a epidemic sweeps through. People are dying in isolation, and others descending into savage violence. It is a survival story and an edge-of-the-seat thriller. ' Eoywyn Ivy, author of The Snow Child 'The Raven's Gift is a disturbingly believable tale of a world on the edge, given the slight push to send it over. Rearden knows his Alaska, his snow and cold, the isolation in these pages enough to make you pull up the blankets and wonder what you'd do without rescue, without communication, with no one to go to for help, no one coming to the rescue. Like McCarthy's The Road, there are pages in here you might shy away from reading, but hang on, once you start, you'll be along for the ride. ' Pete Fromm author of Indian Creek Chronicles and How This All Started. An epic adventure, a work of mythical proportions, never to be forgotten. ' Daniel Quinn, author of bestselling novels Ishmael and The Story of B 'A post-apocalyptic novel that will set your hair on end. ' Sun Times 'The Raven's Gift is both thriller and love story, a tale full of anthropological suspense and with a stunning geographical tour of Alaska thrown in for good measure It is exciting and fascinating, completely compelling and some of the most original writing I have read in a very long time. Snuggle up on a cold winter's night and enjoy!' ABC Queensland, Weekend Bookworm

Fly Boy

by Eric Walters

Robbie's father is a spitfire pilot who was shot down during World War II and is now a POW. At only seventeen, Robbie lies about his identity to enlist in the Royal Canadian Air Force under the guise of going to a boarding school so that his mother doesn't find out. He starts training in Brandon, Manitoba, but after acing all his classes, he's dealt a disappointing blow when he's assigned to be a navigator on a Lancaster. He wanted to be a pilot, just like his father, but the commanders of the air force have other ideas. Robbie is soon on his way to England, where he completes his training on missions bombing German targets in enemy territory. It is during one of these missions that his Lancaster is fired upon and the pilot and many of the crew are shot. It's up to Robbie and his limited piloting experience to save the crew. . . and himself.

Rilla of Ingleside

by L. M. Montgomery

'One of the most extraordinary writers of her generation'The AgeHenry and Muriel Bell lead a relatively harmonious life on a housing estate with their two small daughters, despite a critical mother-in-law and vulgar neighbours. However, the unexpected visit one Sunday afternoon of Muriel's student, Mr Hawthorne, brings surprising turmoil to the little household. A man of respectable breeding and refined conversation, Mr H. has something to offer both Henry and Muriel, but his posting to London at the outbreak of war disturbs the delicate balance of personal affairs in the family. If only he were able to visit more often, surely everything would be all right. In this, her last novel, Elizabeth Jolley explores issues of innocence and guilt, passion and possession, while carefully exposing the social mores of the time in restrained and sensuous prose.

The Poisoned Pawn

by Peggy Blair

The gripping, fast-paced sequel to the critically acclaimed The Beggar's Opera Detective Mike Ellis returns home after he is cleared in the death of a young boy while on vacation in Cuba, only to discover that his estranged wife, Hilary, is dead, and that he's the main suspect. Meanwhile, Inspector Ramirez, head of the Havana Major Crimes Unit, is dispatched to Ottawa to take custody of a Cuban priest apprehended by authorities while in possession of a laptop full of child pornography. Ramirez will uncover a web of deceit and depravity that extends from the corridors of power in Ottawa to the hallowed halls of the Vatican#151;and back again.

Belle Falls

by Sherri Vanderveen

Sherri Vanderveen's compelling debut novel is the first-person account of Belle Dearing, accused of molesting a little boy who lives across the street in her quiet suburban neighbourhood. Belle is a character familiar to many of us: the local crazy lady, the dishevelled woman whose house has fallen into disrepair, who strikes fear in local children and disgust among her neighbours. But within the crazy lady is a life derailed, unmoored. Who is Belle Dearing? And what has made her the way she is? Belle Falls poses these questions and, as the story unfolds, answers them deeply and indelibly. From a Newfoundland childhood tragically cut short to her present-day troubles, Belle's life has been anything but ordinary. But through it all - the heartbreak, the bad choices - stands an indomitable and irrepressible spirit you'll not soon forget.

Lawyers Gone Bad

by Philip Slayton

In this shocking and delicious expose, Philip Slayton, a respected corporate lawyer and former dean of law, sheds light on those who betrayed clients and committed crimes-sometimes for very little personal gain. While recounting actual cases of Canadian lawyers who ran afoul of the law, using one-on-one interviews with the offenders and their families, Slayton searches for what drives a respected professional to corruption. Sharp and insightful, this book is a call for reform of the legal profession as well as an entertaining, eyebrow-raising look at the few who give lawyers a bad name.

House of Dreams

by Pauline Gedge

In the tiny hamlet of Aswat, far to the south of the royal capital, a beautiful young girl wants more than the meagre prospects her village offers. Determined and resourceful, she is quick to leap upon an opportunity when the great seer Hui, who is also physician to Pharaoh, visits Aswat to commune with its god, Wepwawet. Taken under Hui's wing to become a healer, she has no idea of his real plans for her - plans that will bring her close to Pharaoh as his favourite concubine, but will ultimately enmesh her in court intrigue of the most dangerous kind.

Class, Contention, And A World In Motion

by Winnie Lem Pauline Gardiner Barber

Prevailing scholarship on migration tends to present migrants as the objects of history, subjected to abstract global forces or to concrete forms of regulation imposed by state and supra state organizations. In this volume, by contrast, the focus is on migrants as the subjects of history who not only react but also act to engage with and transform their worlds. Using ethnographic examples from Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and the Middle East, contributors question how and why particular forms of political struggle and collective action may, or indeed may not, be carried forward in the context of geographic and social border crossings. In doing so, they bring the dynamic relationship between class, gender, and culture to the forefront in each distinctive migration setting.

Historical Memory In Africa

by Mamadou Diawara Bernard Lategan Ja¶rn Ra¼sen

A vast amount of literature--both scholarly and popular--now exists on the subject of historical memory, but there is remarkably little available that is written from an African perspective. This volume explores the inner dynamics of memory in all its variations, from its most destructive and divisive impact to its remarkable potential to heal and reconcile. It addresses issues on both the conceptual and the pragmatic level and its theoretical observations and reflections are informed by first-hand experiences and comparative reflections from a German, Indian, and Korean perspective. A new insight is the importance of the future dimension of memory and hence the need to develop the ability to 'remember with the future in mind'. Historical memory in an African context provides a rich kaleidoscope of the diverse experiences and perspectives--and yet there are recurring themes and similar conclusions, connecting it to a global dialogue to which it has much to contribute, but from which it also has much to receive.

Post-communist Nostalgia

by Zsuzsa Gille Maria Todorova

Although the end of the Cold War was greeted with great enthusiasm by people in the East and the West, the ensuing social and especially economic changes did not always result in the hoped-for improvements in people's lives. This led to widespread disillusionment that can be observed today all across Eastern Europe. Not simply a longing for security, stability, and prosperity, this nostalgia is also a sense of loss regarding a specific form of sociability. Even some of those who opposed communism express a desire to invest their new lives with renewed meaning and dignity. Among the younger generation, it surfaces as a tentative yet growing curiosity about the recent past. In this volume scholars from multiple disciplines explore the various fascinating aspects of this nostalgic turn by analyzing the impact of generational clusters, the rural-urban divide, gender differences, and political orientation. They argue persuasively that this nostalgia should not be seen as a wish to restore the past, as it has otherwise been understood, but instead it should be recognized as part of a more complex healing process and an attempt to come to terms both with the communist era as well as the new inequalities of the post-communist era.

News As Culture

by Ursula Rao

At the turn of the millennium, Indian journalism has undergone significant changes. The rapid commercialization of the press, together with an increase in literacy and political consciousness, has led to swift growth in the newspaper market but also changed the way news makers mediate politics. Positioned at a historical junction where India is clearly feeling the effects of market liberalization, this study demonstrates how journalists and informants interactively create new forms of political action and consciousness. The book explores English and Hindi newsmaking and investigates the creation of news relations during the production process and how they affect political images and leadership traditions. It moves beyond the news-room to outline the role of journalists in urban society, the social lives of news texts and the way citizens bring their ideas and desires to bear on the news discourse. This important volume contributes to an emerging debate about the impact of the media on Indian society. Furthermore, it convincingly demonstrates the inseparable link between media related practices and dynamic cultural repertoires.

The Early Morning Phonecall

by Anna Lindley

As migration from poverty-stricken and conflict-affected countries continues to hit the headlines, this book focuses on an important counter-flow: the money that people send home. Despite considerable research on the impact of migration and remittances in countries of origin - increasingly viewed as a source of development capital - still little is known about refugees' remittances to conflict-affected countries because such funds are most often seen as a source of conflict finance. This book explores the dynamics, infrastructure, and far-reaching effects of remittances from the perspectives of people in the Somali regions and the diaspora. With conflict driving mass displacement, Somali society has become progressively transnational, its vigorous remittance economy reaching from the heart of the global North into wrecked cities, refugee camps, and remote rural areas. By 'following the money' the author opens a window on the everyday lives of people caught up in processes of conflict, migration, and development. The book demonstrates how, in the interstices of state disruption and globalisation, and in the shadow of violence and political uncertainty, life in the Somali regions goes on, subject to complex transnational forms of social, economic, and political innovation and change.

Cultural Diversity In Russian Cities

by Cordula Gdaniec

Cultural diversity -- the multitude of different lifestyles that are not necessarily based on ethnic culture -- is a catchphrase increasingly used in place of multiculturalism and in conjunction with globalization. Even though it is often used as a slogan it does capture a widespread phenomenon that cities must contend with in dealing with their increasingly diverse populations. The contributors examine how Russian cities are responding and through case studies from Moscow, St. Petersburg, Novosibirsk, and Sochi explore the ways in which different cultures are inscribed into urban spaces, when and where they are present in public space, and where and how they carve out their private spaces. Through its unique exploration of the Russian example, this volume addresses the implications of the fragmented urban landscape on cultural practices and discourses, ethnicity, lifestyles and subcultures, and economic practices, and in doing so provides important insights applicable to a global context.

Morality, Hope And Grief

by Ute Luig Hansjorg Dilger

The HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa has been addressed and perceived predominantly through the broad perspectives of social and economic theories as well as public health and development discourses. This volume however, focuses on the micro-politics of illness, treatment and death in order to offer innovative insights into the complex processes that shape individual and community responses to AIDS. The contributions describe the dilemmas that families, communities and health professionals face and shed new light on the transformation of social and moral orders in African societies, which have been increasingly marginalised in the context of global modernity.

The Ethnographic Self As Resource

by Peter Collins Anselma Gallinat

It is commonly acknowledged that anthropologists use personal experiences to inform their writing. However, it is often assumed that only fieldwork experiences are relevant and that the personal appears only in the form of self-reflexivity. This book takes a step beyond anthropology at home and auto-ethnography and shows how anthropologists can include their memories and experiences as ethnographic data in their writing. It discusses issues such as authenticity, translation and ethics in relation to the self, and offers a new perspective on doing ethnographic fieldwork.

Godless Intellectuals?

by Alexander Tristan Riley

The Durkheimians have traditionally been understood as positivist, secular thinkers, fully within the Enlightenment project of limitless reason and progress. In a radical revision of this view, this book persuasively argues that the core members of the Durkheimian circle (Durkheim himself, Marcel Mauss, Henri Hubert and Robert Hertz) are significantly more complicated than this. Through his extensive analysis of large volumes of correspondence as well as historical and macro-sociological mappings of the intellectual and social worlds in which the Durkheimian project emerged, the author shows the Durkheimian project to have constituted a quasi-religious quest in ways much deeper than most interpreters have thought. Their fascination, both personal and intellectual, with the sacred is the basis on which the author reconstructs some important components of modern French intellectual history, connecting Durkheimian thought to key representatives of French poststructuralism and postmodernism: Bataille, Foucault, Derrida, Baudrillard, and Deleuze.

Understanding Tahrir Square

by Stephen R. Grand

Amid the current turmoil in the Middle East, Understanding Tahrir Square sounds a rare optimistic note. Surveying countries in other parts of the world during their transitions to democracy, author Stephen Grand argues that the long-term prospects in many parts of the Arab world are actually quite positive. If the current polarization and political violence in the region can be overcome, democracy will eventually take root. The key to this change will likely be ordinary citizens--foremost among them the young protestors of the Arab Spring who have filled the region's public spaces--most famously, Egypt's Tahrir Square.The book puts the Arab Spring in comparative perspective. It reveals how globalization and other changes are upending the expectations of citizens everywhere about the relationship between citizen and state. Separate chapters examine the experiences of countries in the former Eastern bloc, in the Muslim-majority states of Asia, in Latin America, and in Sub-Saharan Africa during the recent Third Wave of democratization. What these cases show is that, at the end of the day, democracy requires democrats.Many complex factors go into making a democracy successful, such as the caliber of its political leaders, the quality of its constitution, and the design of its political institutions. But unless there is clear public demand for new institutions to function as intended, political leaders are unlikely to abide by the limits those institutions impose. If American policymakers want to support the brave activists struggling to bring democracy to the Arab world, helping them cultivate an effective political constituency for democracy--in essence, growing the Tahrir Square base--should be the lodestar of U.S. assistance.

House Of Illusions

by Pauline Gedge

Pauline Gedge is a master at recreating the golden age in Egypt. Her heroin, Thu, a peasant girl from the village of Aswat, possesses both beauty and intelligence. To her good fortune Thu is found and brought to the center of society. She is chosen and trained for the court of Pharaoh Ramses. Her talent and guile win her a post in the harem. || Thu rises in favor, is betrayed in a court intrigue that threatens her life and falls from grace. Pharaoh spares her life but banishes her to serve the priests at the lowly temple of Wepwawet near the first cataract. || House of Illusions opens on Gedge's vividly recreated Egypt, sixteen years after Thu's banishment. During her exile she writes an account of her court life and the betrayal for which she seeks revenge. These events took place three thousand years ago. Daily life and custom are woven into the story. In a world without soap and little water, natron serves quite well. Gedge is able to get into the mind of the courtiers and their attitudes to their servants. While beneath them, these inferior beings are very much a part of the family of the house. || The mysterious Hathor, Thoth, Amun and Ma'at are part of the Egyptian pantheon. They enter the daily life of the characters and the mystery begins to make sense. Never again will the reader scoff at these queer religious notions. The harmony and truth Ma'at embodies is the guiding principal Thu believes in seeking her revenge.

Scroll of Saqqara

by Pauline Gedge

Prince Khaemwaset is a powerful man. The son of Ramses II and a revered physician, his wisdom is respected throughout Egypt. But Khaemwaset harbours a strong and secret desire - to find the mysterious Scroll of Thoth and receive the power to raise the dead. When Khaemwaset hears of the discovery of a hidden tomb on the plain of Saqqara, he is quick to break its seal and take its secrets - secrets that he soon learns he should never have disturbed. Richly detailed with the exotic realities of Ancient Egypt, Scroll of Saqqara is a compelling tale of power, lust, and obsession.

The Oasis

by Pauline Gedge

Using subtle means of political power and economic control, a foreign power known as the "Rulers of the Upland" has taken over Egypt to plunder its riches and eradicate its religion and culture. In "The Hippopotamus Marsh", the stunning first volume of Pauline Gedge's Lords of the Two Lands trilogy, the family of the last true King of Egypt chose to end 200 years of submission to King Apepa, and attempted to resurrect a dynasty, Seqenenra Tao began a courageous and tragic revolt that almost led to the destruction of his family. In this thrilling second volume, Seqenenra's surviving son Kamose refuses an inheritance of failure, and chooses instead to continue his father's fight for the freedom of Egypt and his family. He begins his desperate sweep north, collecting fighting men from the loyal towns and villages he passes. Will his savage brilliance bring him victory or defeat? And will his acts redeem him or drive him to the brink of madness?

Invisible Chains

by Benjamin Perrin

JUST OUTSIDE TORONTO, A FOURTEEN-YEAR-OLD CANADIAN GIRL IS AUCTIONED ON CRAIGSLIST-THIS IS ONLY ONE OF THE HORRIFYING STORIES OCCURRING IN OUR OWN COMMUNITIES. WHAT CAN CANADA DO TO STOP MODERN-DAY SLAVERY?While other countries have been actively protecting victims and prosecuting traffickers for more than a decade, Canada's response to the global problem of human trafficking has been shockingly lethargic. Victims are often left to fend for themselves and their exploiters are rarely charged. Author Benjamin Perrin works with government, police officers, social workers, and survivors to expose this hidden national tragedy. In Invisible Chains, he shares heart rending cases of human trafficking, reveals the tactics used by traffickers, and passionately advocates what we can do to stop it. 'Invisible Chains is a powerful indictment of human trafficking in Canada. 'DEPA MEHTA, FILMMAKER'Manu Canadians think they are far removed from issues like human trafficking and sexual exploitation. This book proves otherwise by explaining exactly how these types of serious human rights violations occur on a day-to-day basis at home and aboard. 'ROMÉO DALLAIRE, LIEUTENANT GENERAL (RET'D), SENATOR'It's impossible not to be moved by the gut-wrenching yet true stories of human slavery recounted by Perrin. 'WINNIPEG FREE PRESSwww. invisiblechains. ca

Flexible Firm

by Jakob Krause-Jensen

Bang & Olufsen, the famous Danish producer of high-end home electronics, is well known as an early exponent of value-based management: the idea that there should be consistency in what the organisation does, a certain continuity between what the company develops and sells, and the beliefs and practices of the employees. This study investigates how company values are communicated and the collective identity is articulated through the use of such concepts as 'culture', 'fundamental values', and 'corporate religion', as well as how employees negotiate these ideas in their daily working lives. As this book reveals, the identification of values, meant to create cohesion and solidarity among employees, came to symbolise and engender a split between the staff and the other parts of the company. By examining the rise and fall of the value-based management approach, this volume offers the indispensible insight of anthropological enquiry to expose how social realities challenge conventional management strategies and therefore must be considered in the development of new management techniques.

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