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A Legacy of Innovation

by Ethan G. Sribnick

From La Follette to Faubus, from Rockefeller to Reagan, U.S. governors have addressed some of the most contentious policy questions of the twentieth century. In doing so, they not only responded to dramatic changes in the political landscape, they shaped that landscape. The influence of governors has been felt both within the states and across the nation. It is telling that four of the last five U.S. Presidents were former state governors.A Legacy of Innovation: Governors and Public Policy examines the changing role of the state governor during the "American Century." In this volume, top political scientists, historians, and journalists track the evolution of gubernatorial leadership as it has dealt with critical issues, including conservation, transportation, civil rights, education, globalization, and health care. As the most visible state officials, twentieth-century governors often found themselves at the center of America's conflicting political tendencies. A Legacy of Innovation describes how they negotiated the tensions between increasing democratization and the desire for expert control, the rise of interest groups and demise of political parties, the pull of regionalism against growing nationalism, and the rising demand for public services in a society that fears centralized government. In their responses to these conflicts, governors helped shape the institutions of modern American government.As state governments face new policy challenges in the twenty-first century, A Legacy of Innovation will serve as a valuable source of information for political scientists and policy makers alike.

A Legacy of Leadership

by Clayton Mcclure Brooks

In A Legacy of Leadership, top scholars and journalists create a new framework for understanding the contributions governors have made to defining democracy and shaping American history.Structured chronologically, A Legacy of Leadership places governors in contrast and comparison with one another as well as within the context of their times to show how a century of dramatic developments--war and peace, depression and prosperity--led governors to rethink and expand their positions of leadership. The nine chapters of compelling new scholarship presented here connect the experiences of dynamic individual governors and the evolution of the gubernatorial office to the broader challenges the United States has faced throughout the turbulent twentieth century. Taken together, they demonstrate how interstate cooperation became essential as governors increasingly embraced national and international perspectives to promote their own states' competitiveness.Published for the centennial of the National Governors Association, A Legacy of Leadership is an eloquent demonstration of how, to a great extent, we live in a country that governors created.

New Netherland and the Dutch Origins of American Religious Liberty

by Evan Haefeli

The settlers of New Netherland were obligated to uphold religious toleration as a legal right by the Dutch Republic's founding document, the 1579 Union of Utrecht, which stated that "everyone shall remain free in religion and that no one may be persecuted or investigated because of religion." For early American historians this statement, unique in the world at its time, lies at the root of American pluralism.New Netherland and the Dutch Origins of American Religious Liberty offers a new reading of the way tolerance operated in colonial America. Using sources in several languages and looking at laws and ideas as well as their enforcement and resistance, Evan Haefeli shows that, although tolerance as a general principle was respected in the colony, there was a pronounced struggle against it in practice. Crucial to the fate of New Netherland were the changing religious and political dynamics within the English empire. In the end, Haefeli argues, the most crucial factor in laying the groundwork for religious tolerance in colonial America was less what the Dutch did than their loss of the region to the English at a moment when the English were unusually open to religious tolerance. This legacy, often overlooked, turns out to be critical to the history of American religious diversity.By setting Dutch America within its broader imperial context, New Netherland and the Dutch Origins of American Religious Liberty offers a comprehensive and nuanced history of a conflict integral to the histories of the Dutch republic, early America, and religious tolerance.

Empires of God

by Linda Gregerson Susan Juster

Religion and empire were inseparable forces in the early modern Atlantic world. Religious passions and conflicts drove much of the expansionist energy of post-Reformation Europe, providing both a rationale and a practical mode of organizing the dispersal and resettlement of hundreds of thousands of people from the Old World to the New World. Exhortations to conquer new peoples were the lingua franca of Western imperialism, and men like the mystically inclined Christopher Columbus were genuinely inspired to risk their lives and their fortunes to bring the gospel to the Americas. And in the thousands of religious refugees seeking asylum from the vicious wars of religion that tore the continent apart in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, these visionary explorers found a ready pool of migrants--English Puritans and Quakers, French Huguenots, German Moravians, Scots-Irish Presbyterians--equally willing to risk life and limb for a chance to worship God in their own way.Focusing on the formative period of European exploration, settlement, and conquest in the Americas, from roughly 1500 to 1760, Empires of God brings together historians and literary scholars of the English, French, and Spanish Americas around a common set of questions: How did religious communities and beliefs create empires, and how did imperial structures transform New World religions? How did Europeans and Native Americans make sense of each other's spiritual systems, and what acts of linguistic and cultural transition did this entail? What was the role of violence in New World religious encounters? Together, the essays collected here demonstrate the power of religious ideas and narratives to create kingdoms both imagined and real.

Killing Red

by Henry Perez

Hes Been Waiting. . . On death row, serial killer Kenneth Lee Grubb has six days to live. His last request? An interview with reporter Alex Chapa. What begins as a dream story soon turns into a nightmare for Alex. For amidst Grubbs taunts and boasts lies the horrific claim that someone is carefully repeating his past crimes. . . For The Moment. . . When nine people suddenly turn up dead, Alex realizes Grubb is telling the truth. Now the copycat killer is ready to pay his ultimate tribute to his idol. Hes set his sights on Annie Sykes--or "Red" as Grubb calls her--the only survivor of his bloodlust fifteen years ago. . . To Commit The Perfect Murder. . . In a desperate race against time, Alex must find Annie and rescue her from the same fate she escaped a decade earlier. But what Alex doesnt know is that "Red" isnt the only one whose life is in danger. . . "A riveting thriller. Killing Red demands to be read in one sitting. " --James Rollins, New York Times bestselling author "Fascinating! Dark and disturbing, Killing Red is not for the faint of heart. It kept me turning pages long into the night. " --Lisa Jackson, New York Times bestselling author"Killing Red heralds a meteoric debut! Compulsively readable, crafted with surgical skill, Henry Perezs first novel tells a decade-spanning story of how evil can plant its seeds in the most mundane of all places and then spread like kudzu. Not since Thomas Harris burst onto the scene with Black Sunday has a debut thriller come along that sinks its hooks this deep into a reader from page one. Heres a public service message to all thriller lovers: Do not start this book at night if you want to get any sleep, because you will be up until you cross the finish line pulse racing, skin sweaty but happy as hell you decided to go on this magnificent thrill ride. Highest recommendation!" --Jay Bonansinga, National Bestselling Author of Perfect Victim"Taut, provocative, and unforgettable. Henry Perezs Killing Red is the one debut novel you need to read this year. " --Tasha Alexander, author of A Fatal Waltz "Killing Red is an intense, smart read, and Alex Chapa is a character of flesh and blood. A terrific debut--bravo!" --Marcus Sakey, author of The Blade Itself

Bloodshed of Eagles

by William W. Johnstone J. A. Johnstone

Strike Like An Eagle Stand Like A Man Falcon MacCallister never thought hed wear army brass. But Colorado is about to join the Union--and the would-be state has just made him Lt. Colonel in its Home Guard. Then, before his military career can take off, Falcon loses one of his men and two deadly new Gatling guns to a murderous ambush. Falcon is going to get those Gatling guns back--before they kill the wrong people. Tracing the missing guns to Eastern Montana, Falcon teams up with a scout named Isiah Dorman. Falcon and Dorman are spearheading a battle against the Sioux--in the shadow of the disastrous Little Big Horn slaughter. For the two men, survival along the Little Bighorn is going to mean breaking rules, standing strong, standing together--and holding off a deadly onslaught with only a few guns against many. . .

Revenge of the Dog Team

by William W. Johnstone J. A. Johnstone

William W. Johnstone'sDog Teamnovels of combat shine a searing light on the Army's most secret lethal force. Now, these heroes are once again called into battle-right on U. S. soil. . . In the Southwest, a legendary Vietnam-era aircraft disappears-and officials call it a crash in accessible terrain. On the other side of the country, a deadly shipment of nerve gas is loaded onto a secret train-so that no citizen will ever know. . . Now, these two seemingly unconnected events are bringing out the Army's deep "black op" Dog Team. The mysterious operative "Colonel Kilroy" has been working with American Apache trackers to neutralize Iranian agents coming over the Mexican border. While Captain Steve Ireland, the grandson of a Dog Team great, is on a train bound for hell. . . From two sides of the country, one murderous, terrifying plot is closing in like a vice. Once it does, America's only hope will be precision lethal force-aimed hard into the heart of darkness. . .

Sidewinders: Cutthroat Canyon

by William W. Johnstone J. A. Johnstone

William Johnstones towering Mountain Man and The Last Gunfighter series are epics of the frontier. Now, with J. A. Johnstone, he has created Sidewinders, a wild, rollicking ride alongside two hardheaded cowboys with a knack for staying on the wrong side of the law--but for all the right reasons. . . Heres Your Gold. Now Fight For It. . . Sometimes, its bad to be good. Thats what happens when Scratch Morton and Bo Creel are rewarded with a gold mine for saving a rich mans bacon. The catch: this mine is a magnet for marauding Mexican banditos. Budding capitalists, Scratch and Bo fight back. Thats when they discover that the thieves arent who they thought they were, some really bad guys are on the way, and a beautiful woman might just be the most dangerous bandit of all--the kind that can steal your heart. For Scratch and Bo, this gold mine might make them rich. But its more likely to get them killed--just as soon as they can figure out who wants them dead. . .

Six Ways From Sunday

by William W. Johnstone J. A. Johnstone

Cotton Pickens, the unforgettable hero of William Johnstones classic Blood Valley, returns in a tale of a lawless Montana mining district, a 16-year-old widow, and a man who always finds new ways of laying down the law. . . Six Ways To Sunday--And Seven Days To Die Cotton Pickens parents had a cussed sense of humor, but theres nothing funny about the way the man can draw a gun. Now hes in the middle of a mining camp district slowly being crushed under the iron fist of another misnamed, hardheaded fellow, Carter Scruples. With Cotton facing off against Scruples, a beautiful young woman caught in-between, and a band of outlaws living high and mighty in a dry-docked Pullman Palace Car, the town of Swamp Creek is surely going to get blown sky high. And when time comes to put the pieces back together again--Cotton will do his picking one bullet at a time. . .

Cornered

by Brandon Massey

With Nowhere To Run. . . Corey Webb is living the American dream--successful business, beautiful wife, gifted daughter--but the dream he worked so hard to achieve is about to become a nightmare. When a chance encounter brings him face to face with the dark past he'd long since left behind, Corey knows the threat to his life and family could be deadly. . . . It's Do Or Die Unpredictable, intelligent, and terrifyingly ruthless, Corey's stalker will settle for nothing less than complete submission. He'll stop at nothing, and sacrifice anyone, to get what he wants. There's no point in running, no chance of hiding, and no hope for Corey and his family to escape unscathed. . .

Dead Man's Song (Pine Deep Trilogy #2)

by Jonathan Maberry

From the powerful imagination of a new horror master comes a bone-chilling tale set in a small town where good and evil are joined in a terrifying, deadly battle. . . --Evil Endures-- Once an idyllic Pennsylvania village, Pine Deep awoke one morning to find itself bathed in a massive bloodletting. Twice in thirty years the townsfolk have endured the savage hungers of a murderous madman. . . but if the residents think the death of serial killer Karl Ruger put an end to the carnage, they're dead wrong. The Nightmare Never Ends Bodies mutilated beyond description, innocents driven to acts of vicious madness. A monstrous evil is preying on the living--and the dead--and turning the quiet little town into hell on earth. Their only hope is to find the source. But the secrets that lurk in the heart of Pine Deep are twisted into its very roots. This time the townspeople aren't just fighting for their lives, but for their very souls. . .

Ghost Road Blues (Pine Deep Trilogy #1)

by Jonathan Maberry

The cosy little town of Pine Deep buried the horrors of its past a long time ago. Thirty years have gone by since the darkness descended and the Black Harvest began, a time when a serial killer sheared a bloody swath through the quiet Pennsylvania village. The evil that once coursed through Pine Deep has been replaced by cheerful tourists getting ready to enjoy the country's largest Halloween celebration in what is now called "The Spookiest Town in America: But then-a month before Halloween-it begins. Unspeakably desecrated bodies. Inexplicable insanity. And an ancient evil walking the streets, drawing in those who would fall to their own demons and seeking to shred the very soul of this rapidly fracturing community. Yes, the residents of Pine Deep have drawn together and faced a killer before. But this time, evil has many faces-and the lust and will to rule the earth. This struggle will be epic.

Blood Bond: Deadly Road to Yuma

by William W. Johnstone J. A. Johnstone

Young Matt Bodine and Sam Two Wolves became blood brothers on the day the rancher's son saved the half breed's life, forging a bond no one could ever break. As years passed, a legend grew of the half breed and the white man who rode together--and pulled iron faster than anyone in the West. . . A madman and a killer, Preacher Joshua Shade is on a long journey to Yuma Prison and a date with the hangman. But Matt Bodine and Sam Two Wolves doubt that Shade will ever keep that date. The outlaw has a legion of fanatical, bloodthirsty followers. Matt and Sam are shadowing Shade's convoy--just in case. . . The blood brothers are dead right--and wrong as hell. When the time comes, Shade is sprung, a beautiful young woman is taken with him, and it's up to Matt and Sam to hunt them to a heavily guarded hideout. But they don't know that the case of Joshua Shade reaches into the highest level of the federal government . . . Or that they're now facing a deadly trap designed to kill anyone in pursuit--no matter how far you've come, or how fast you draw your gun. . .

German Students' War Letters

by Jay Winter A. F. Wedd Philipp Witkop

Originally appearing at the same time as the pacifist novel All Quiet on the Western Front, this powerful collection provides a glimpse into the hearts and minds of an enemy that had been thoroughly demonized by the Allied press. Composed by German students who had left their university studies in order to participate in World War I, these letters reveal the struggles and hardships that all soldiers face.The stark brutality and surrealism of war are revealed as young men from Germany describe their bitter combat and occasional camaraderie with soldiers from many nations, including France, Great Britain, and Russia. Like its companion volume, War Letters of Fallen Englishmen, these letters were carefully selected for their depth of perception, the intensity of their descriptions, and their messages to future generations. "Should these letters help towards the establishment of justice and better understanding between nations," the editor reflects in his introduction, "their deaths will not have been in vain." This edition contains a new foreword by the distinguished World War I historian Jay Winter.

The Conversion of Herman the Jew

by Jean-Claude Schmitt Alex J. Novikoff

Sometime toward the middle of the twelfth century, it is supposed, an otherwise obscure figure, born a Jew in Cologne and later ordained as a priest in Cappenberg in Westphalia, wrote a Latin account of his conversion to Christianity. Known as the Opusculum, this book purportedly by "Herman, the former Jew" may well be the first autobiography to be written in the West after the Confessions of Saint Augustine. It may also be something else entirely.In The Conversion of Herman the Jew the eminent French historian Jean-Claude Schmitt examines this singular text and the ways in which it has divided its readers. Where some have seen it as an authentic conversion narrative, others have asked whether it is not a complete fabrication forged by Christian clerics. For Schmitt the question is poorly posed. The work is at once true and fictional, and the search for its lone author--whether converted Jew or not--fruitless. Herman may well have existed and contributed to the writing of his life, but the Opusculum is a collective work, perhaps framed to meet a specific institutional agenda.With agility and erudition, Schmitt examines the text to explore its meaning within the society and culture of its period and its participation in both a Christian and Jewish imaginary. What can it tell us about autobiography and subjectivity, about the function of dreams and the legitimacy of religious images, about individual and collective conversion, and about names and identities? In The Conversion of Herman the Jew Schmitt masterfully seizes upon the debates surrounding the Opusculum (the text of which is newly translated for this volume) to ponder more fundamentally the ways in which historians think and write.

Jeremiah's Scribes

by Meredith Marie Neuman

New England Puritan sermon culture was primarily an oral phenomenon, and yet its literary production has been understood mainly through a print legacy. In Jeremiah's Scribes, Meredith Marie Neuman turns to the notes taken by Puritan auditors in the meetinghouse in order to fill out our sense of the lived experience of the sermon. By reconstructing the aural culture of sermons, Neuman shifts our attention from the pulpit to the pew to demonstrate the many ways in which sermon auditors helped to shape this dominant genre of Puritan New England.Tracing the material transmission of sermon texts by readers and writers, hearers and notetakers, Jeremiah's Scribes challenges the notion of stable authorship by individual ministers. Instead, Neuman illuminates a mode of textual production that pervaded communities and occurred in the overlapping media of print, manuscript, and speech. Even printed sermons, she demonstrates, bore the traces of their roots in the oral culture of the meetinghouse.Bringing material considerations to bear on anxieties over the perceived relationship between divine and human language, Jeremiah's Scribes broadens our understanding of all Puritan literature. Neuman examines the controlling logic of the sermon in relation to nonsermonic writing--such as conversion narrative--ultimately suggesting the fundamental permeability among disparate genres of Puritan writing.

A Knight's Own Book of Chivalry

by Richard W. Kaeuper Geoffroi De Charny Elspeth Kennedy

On the great influence of a valiant lord: "The companions, who see that good warriors are honored by the great lords for their prowess, become more determined to attain this level of prowess."On the lady who sees her knight honored: "All of this makes the noble lady rejoice greatly within herself at the fact that she has set her mind and heart on loving and helping to make such a good knight or good man-at-arms."On the worthiest amusements: "The best pastime of all is to be often in good company, far from unworthy men and from unworthy activities from which no good can come."Enter the real world of knights and their code of ethics and behavior. Read how an aspiring knight of the fourteenth century would conduct himself and learn what he would have needed to know when traveling, fighting, appearing in court, and engaging fellow knights.Composed at the height of the Hundred Years War by Geoffroi de Charny, one of the most respected knights of his age, A Knight's Own Book of Chivalry was designed as a guide for members of the Company of the Star, an order created by Jean II of France in 1352 to rival the English Order of the Garter.This is the most authentic and complete manual on the day-to-day life of the knight that has survived the centuries, and this edition contains a specially commissioned introduction from historian Richard W. Kaeuper that gives the history of both the book and its author, who, among his other achievements, was the original owner of the Shroud of Turin.

Slavery's Borderland

by Matthew Salafia

In 1787, the Northwest Ordinance made the Ohio River the dividing line between slavery and freedom in the West, yet in 1861, when the Civil War tore the nation apart, the region failed to split at this seam. In Slavery's Borderland, historian Matthew Salafia shows how the river was both a physical boundary and a unifying economic and cultural force that muddied the distinction between southern and northern forms of labor and politics.Countering the tendency to emphasize differences between slave and free states, Salafia argues that these systems of labor were not so much separated by a river as much as they evolved along a continuum shaped by life along a river. In this borderland region, where both free and enslaved residents regularly crossed the physical divide between Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky, slavery and free labor shared as many similarities as differences. As the conflict between North and South intensified, regional commonality transcended political differences. Enslaved and free African Americans came to reject the legitimacy of the river border even as they were unable to escape its influence. In contrast, the majority of white residents on both sides remained firmly committed to maintaining the river border because they believed it best protected their freedom. Thus, when war broke out, Kentucky did not secede with the Confederacy; rather, the river became the seam that held the region together.By focusing on the Ohio River as an artery of commerce and movement, Salafia draws the northern and southern banks of the river into the same narrative and sheds light on constructions of labor, economy, and race on the eve of the Civil War.

Imperial Entanglements

by Gail D. Macleitch

Imperial Entanglements chronicles the history of the Haudenosaunee Iroquois in the eighteenth century, a dramatic period during which they became further entangled in a burgeoning market economy, participated in imperial warfare, and encountered a waxing British Empire. Rescuing the Seven Years' War era from the shadows of the American Revolution and moving away from the political focus that dominates Iroquois studies, historian Gail D. MacLeitch offers a fresh examination of Iroquois experience in economic and cultural terms. As land sellers, fur hunters, paid laborers, consumers, and commercial farmers, the Iroquois helped to create a new economic culture that connected the New York hinterland to a transatlantic world of commerce. By doing so they exposed themselves to both opportunities and risks.As their economic practices changed, so too did Iroquois ways of making sense of gender and ethnic differences. MacLeitch examines the formation of new cultural identities as men and women negotiated challenges to long-established gendered practices and confronted and cocreated a new racialized discourses of difference. On the frontiers of empire, Indians, as much as European settlers, colonial officials, and imperial soldiers, directed the course of events. However, as MacLeitch also demonstrates, imperial entanglements with a rising British power intent on securing native land, labor, and resources ultimately worked to diminish Iroquois economic and political sovereignty.

The Last Landscape

by William H. Whyte Tony Hiss

The remaining corner of an old farm, unclaimed by developers. The brook squeezed between housing plans. Abandoned railroad lines. The stand of woods along an expanded highway. These are the outposts of what was once a larger pattern of forests and farms, the "last landscape." According to William H. Whyte, the place to work out the problems of our metropolitan areas is within those areas, not outside them. The age of unchecked expansion without consequence is over, but where there is waste and neglect there is opportunity. Our cities and suburbs are not jammed; they just look that way. There are in fact plenty of ways to use this existing space to the benefit of the community, and The Last Landscape provides a practical and timeless framework for making informed decisions about its use. Called "the best study available on the problems of open space" by the New York Times when it first appeared in 1968, The Last Landscape introduced many cornerstone ideas for land conservation, urging all of us to make better use of the land that has survived amid suburban sprawl. Whyte's pioneering work on easements led to the passage of major open space statutes in many states, and his argument for using and linking green spaces, however small the areas may be, is a recommendation that has more currency today than ever before.

The Listener's Voice

by Elena Razlogova

During the Jazz Age and Great Depression, radio broadcasters did not conjure their listening public with a throw of a switch; the public had a hand in its own making. The Listener's Voice describes how a diverse array of Americans--boxing fans, radio amateurs, down-and-out laborers, small-town housewives, black government clerks, and Mexican farmers--participated in the formation of American radio, its genres, and its operations.Before the advent of sophisticated marketing research, radio producers largely relied on listeners' phone calls, telegrams, and letters to understand their audiences. Mining this rich archive, historian Elena Razlogova meticulously recreates the world of fans who undermined centralized broadcasting at each creative turn in radio history. Radio outlaws, from the earliest squatter stations and radio tube bootleggers to postwar "payola-hungry" rhythm and blues DJs, provided a crucial source of innovation for the medium. Engineers bent patent regulations. Network writers negotiated with devotees. Program managers invited high school students to spin records. Taken together, these and other practices embodied a participatory ethic that listeners articulated when they confronted national corporate networks and the formulaic ratings system that developed.Using radio as a lens to examine a moral economy that Americans have imagined for their nation, The Listener's Voice demonstrates that tenets of cooperation and reciprocity embedded in today's free software, open access, and filesharing activities apply to earlier instances of cultural production in American history, especially at times when new media have emerged.

Deadly Encounters

by Richard D. Altick

In July 1861 London newspapers excitedly reported two violent crimes, both the stuff of sensational fiction. One involved a retired army major, his beautiful mistress and her illegitimate child, blackmail and murder. In the other, a French nobleman was accused of trying to kill his son in order to claim the young man's inheritance. The press covered both cases with thoroughness and enthusiasm, narrating events in a style worthy of a popular novelist, and including lengthy passages of testimony. Not only did they report rumor as well as what seemed to be fact, they speculated about the credibility of witnesses, assessed character, and decided guilt. The public was enthralled.Richard D. Altick demonstrates that these two cases, as they were presented in the British press, set the tone for the Victorian "age of sensation." The fascination with crime, passion, and suspense has a long history, but it was in the 1860s that this fascination became the vogue in England. Altick shows that these crimes provided literary prototypes and authenticated extraordinary passion and incident in fiction with the "shock of actuality." While most sensational melodramas and novels were by lesser writers, authors of the stature of Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, Trollope, Hardy, and Wilkie Collins were also influenced by the spirit of the age and incorporated sensational elements in their work.

Last Things

by Caroline Walker Bynum Paul Freedman

When the medievals spoke of "last things" they were sometimes referring to events, such as the millennium or the appearance of the Antichrist, that would come to all of humanity or at the end of time. But they also meant the last things that would come to each individual separately--not just the place, Heaven, Hell, or Purgatory, to which their souls would go but also the accounting, the calling to reckoning, that would come at the end of life. At different periods in the Middle Ages one or the other of these sorts of "last things" tended to be dominant, but both coexisted throughout. In Last Things, Caroline Walker Bynum and Paul Freedman bring together eleven essays that focus on the competing eschatologies of the Middle Ages and on the ways in which they expose different sensibilities, different theories of the human person, and very different understandings of the body, of time, of the end. Exploring such themes as the significance of dying and the afterlife, apocalyptic time, and the eschatological imagination, each essay in the volume enriches our understanding of the eschatological awarenesses of the European Middle Ages.

All the Pretty Dead Girls

by John Manning

ONE By ONE... Two decades ago, at a private women's college in upstate New York, a student was brutally attacked in her dorm room. Her assailant was never found... THEY DISAPPEAR... Sue Barlow arrives at Wilbourne College twenty years later. When a classmate disappears, Sue thinks it's an isolated incident. But then two other girls vanish... AND DIE... As fear grows on campus, Sue begins to sense she's being watched. And as the body count rises, she soon realizes that it twisted psychopath is summoning her to play a wicked game--a game that only will end when she dies...

Heart of Ice

by Gregg Olsen

"Gregg Olsen is one of the best. "--Allison Brennan "Olsen brings his vast knowledge of the criminal mind to the fictional stage. "--Anne Frasier Three bodies, three different towns. Each victim was a sorority girl--pretty, privileged, and brutally murdered. There are no fingerprints, no clues. He is scrupulously careful, craving those exquisite seconds when the light fades from his victims eyes. But the rush never lasts, and the killing wont stop--not until one special woman has been made to suffer. . . Praise for Gregg Olsens Novels. . . "Grabs you by the throat. " --Kay Hooper "Wickedly clever! Genuinely twisted. "--Lisa Gardner "As good as it gets. "--Lee Child "An irresistible page-turner. "--Kevin OBrien

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