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Showing 57,026 through 57,050 of 72,063 results

Wannabe U: Inside the Corporate University

by Gaye Tuchman

Gaye Tuchman paints a candid portrait of wannabe corporate managers and the new regime of revenue streams, mission statements, and five-year plans they've ushered in. Wannabe U is a hard-hitting account of how higher educations misguided pursuit of success fails us all.

The Journey to the West, Volume I

by Anthony C. Yu

This volume comprises the first twenty-five chapters of Anthony C. Yu's four-volume translation of Hsi-yu Chi, one of the most beloved classics of Chinese literature. It recounts the sixteen-year pilgrimage of the monk Hsan-tsang who journeyed to India in quest of Buddhist scriptures.

The New Welfare Bureaucrats: Entanglements of Race, Class, and Policy

by Celeste Watkins-Hayes

A behind-the-scenes look at bureaucracy's human face, The New Welfare Bureaucrats is a compelling study of welfare officers and how they navigate the increasingly tangled political and emotional terrain of their jobs.

Chicago: A Biography

by Dominic A. Pacyga

Dominic Pacyga gives his hometown the magisterial biography it has long deserved.

Not by Genes Alone: How Culture Transformed Human Evolution

by Peter J. Richerson Robert Boyd

A groundbreaking theory of the role of culture in evolution, this book offers a radical interpretation of human evolution, arguing that our ecological dominance and our singular social systems stem from a psychology uniquely adapted to create complex culture.

Duck! Rabbit!

by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

There's an adorable duck in this book. No, there isn't. It's a cute little rabbit. What? Just look at the cover! That's a duck! No, it's a rabbit! Duck! Rabbit! Duck! Rabbit! Decide for yourself in this playful take on a classic visual puzzle, which proves that when it comes to ducks and rabbits (and a few other things), it all depends on how you look at it.

Iron Man 2

by Alexander Irvine

"I am Iron Man." With those words, billionaire industrialist Tony Stark revealed his secret identity. Now a famous high-tech superhero, he uses his powers to protect mankind. Yet things are not going well for Tony Stark. The U.S. military demands control of the most powerful weapon on earth--the Iron Man suit. His beautiful new assistant has a strange, mysterious agenda, while his best friend, Rhodey, has betrayed him. And Tony is hunted by a vengeful Russian criminal armed with a lethal technology that may be stronger than Tony's suit. But even as he fights his demons, the hero faces his greatest threat--one that no armor can defend against...

Mystery on Makatunk Island (Hardy Boys Mystery Stories #125)

by Franklin W. Dixon

When Frank and Joe accompany their friend Chet to vacation on a small undeveloped island, they uncover a plan to steal and develop the land.

The Riddle, The Second Book of Pellinor

by Alison Croggon

A young woman embraces her power -- and her destiny -- as the thrilling quest begun in THE NAMING continues! Maerad is a girl with a tragic and bitter past, but her powers grow stronger by the day. Now she and her mentor, Cadvan, hunted by both the Light and the Dark, must unravel the Riddle of the Treesong before their fractured kingdom erupts in chaos. The quest leads Maerad over terrifying seas and vast stretches of glacial wilderness, ever closer to the seductive Winterking -- ally of her most powerful enemy, the Nameless One. Trapped in the Winterking's icy realm, Maerad must confront what she has suspected all along: that she is the greatest riddle of all. A sequel to THE NAMING, this second book in a captivating quartet about the ancient world of Edil-Amarandh is a sweeping epic readers won't soon forget.

The Crow: The Third Book Of Pellinor

by Alison Croggon

In this third installment of Croggon's saga, the orphaned Hem is reunited with his lost sister, Maerad. When the forces of the Dark threaten, Hem discovers his own hidden gift and the role he must play in Maerad's quest to solve the Riddle of the Treesong.

The Singing: The Fourth Book Of Pellinor

by Alison Croggon

The climactic volume of the epic quartet follows Merad and Hem, the Bards of Edil-Amarandh, on a vital quest to merge their powers against a nameless evil. Can brother and sister find each other before all is lost?

Golden Sovereign (Connie McGuire #3)

by Dorothy Lyons

Connie McGuire, glowing with pride in her two mares, Silver Birch and Midnight Moon, is equally happy with Silver Birch's first colt Sliver, soon named Golden Sovereign, for his beautiful palomino coat. Connie hasn't given up rescuing horses however, as when she goes into town to buy a dress for a Valentine's Day party she comes home with a battered, worn down neglected mare, which she bought at an auction to save from further abuse. Connie knows that this horse, though not pretty now, has beautiful breeding and must have at one time been quite a beauty, but how could she and Pete find out about Lady Luck's past? Her dreams and hopes of her new stable, Shamrock Stables, hinge on finding out about Lady Luck's past and on having Golden Sovereign as a gentle and majestic horse. But Sliver has developed bouts where he is anything but gentle, and at times is so dangerous even Connie fears he is turning into a killer. What is turning Golden Sovereign into a mean horse? Connie and Peter must work against a frightening deadline to solve the problem ... and to save their future! Can she pull off her dreams?

Swamp: Bayou Teche, Louisiana 1851 (Survival!)

by Kathleen Duey Karen A. Bale

Bayou Teche, 1851No one in Lily LeGrand's Cajun community is willing to help search for Paul Courville, missing in the bayou along with his mean-spirited older brothers, William and Mark. Why should they? Paul's wealthy plantation-owner father has made no secret of his disdain for Cajuns like Lily's family. But Paul has always been kind to Lily, defending her against his brothers' merciless taunts and humiliating pranks -- and Lily refuses to turn her back on him when his life is in danger. On her own in the maze of the snake- and alligator-infested bayou, Lily knows she has more to fear than her father's wrath. Her treacherous journey will test both her knowledge of the swamp and her courage. Can she find Paul in time?

I'll Be Short: Essentials for a Decent Working Society

by Robert B. Reich

The get-rich-quick exuberance of the late 1990s may have temporarily blinded people to how dependent they are on each other, muses Reich (economics, Brandeis U.). He points out the bonds on which rest the strength of the economy and the security of society. He wrote while running for governor of Massachusetts. The treatise has no index or bibliography. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR. (booknews.com)

China's Growing Role in World Trade

by Robert C. Feenstra Shang-Jin Wei

In less than three decades, China has grown from playing a negligible role in world trade to being one of the world's largest exporters, a substantial importer of raw materials, intermediate outputs, and other goods, and both a recipient and source of foreign investment. Not surprisingly, China's economic dynamism has generated considerable attention and concern in the United States and beyond. While some analysts have warned of the potential pitfalls of China's rise--the loss of jobs, for example--others have highlighted the benefits of less expensive goods and services purchased by U.S. consumers along with new market and investment opportunities for U.S. firms. Bringing together an expert group of contributors, China's Growing Role in World Trade undertakes an empirical investigation of the effects of China's new status. The essays collected here provide detailed analyses of the microstructure of trade, the macroeconomic implications, sector-level issues, and foreign direct investment. This volume's careful examination of micro data in light of established economic theories clarifies a number of misconceptions, overturns some conventional wisdom, and documents data patterns that enhance our understanding of issues related to China's trade.

Chicago Neighborhoods and Suburbs: A Historical Guide

by Ann Durkin Keating

"Which neighborhood?" It's one of the first questions you're asked when you move to Chicago. And the answer you give--be it Bucktown, Bronzeville, or Bridgeport--can give your inquisitor a good idea of who you are, especially in a metropolis with 230 very different neighborhoods and suburbs to choose from. Many of us, in fact, know little of the neighborhoods beyond those where we work, play, and live. This is especially true in Chicagoland, a region that spans over 4,400 square miles and is home to more than 9. 5 million residents. In Chicago Neighborhoods and Suburbs, historian Ann Durkin Keating sheds new light on twenty-first-century Chicago by providing a captivating yet compact guide to the Midwest's largest city. Keating charts Chicago's evolution with comprehensive, cross-referenced entries on all seventy-seven community areas, along with many suburbs and neighborhoods both extant and long forgotten, from Albany Park to Zion. Thoughtful interpretive essays by urban historians Michael Ebner, Henry Binford, Janice Reiff, Susan Hirsch, and Robert Bruegmann explore how the city's communities have changed and grown throughout the years, and sixty historic and contemporary photographs and additional maps add depth to each entry. From the South Side to the West Side to the North Side, just about every local knows how distinctive Chicago's neighborhoods are. Few of us, however, know exactly how they came to be. Chicago Neighborhoods and Suburbs brings the city--its inimitable neighborhoods, industries, and individuals--to life, making it the perfect guidebook for anyone with an interest in Chicago and its history.

Measuring the Subjective Well-being of Nations: National Accounts of Time Use and Well-being

by Alan B. Krueger

Surely everyone wants to know the source of happiness, and indeed, economists and social scientists are increasingly interested in the study and effects of subjective well-being. Putting forward a rigorous method and new data for measuring, comparing, and analyzing the relationship between well-being and the way people spend their time-across countries, demographic groups, and history-this book will help set the agenda of research and policy for decades to come. It does so by introducing a system of National Time Accounting (NTA), which relies on individuals' own evaluations of their emotional experiences during various uses of time, a distinct departure from subjective measures such as life satisfaction and objective measures such as the Gross Domestic Product. A distinguished group of contributors here summarize the NTA method, provide illustrative findings about well-being based on NTA, and subject the approach to a rigorous conceptual and methodological critique that advances the field. As subjective well-being is topical in economics, psychology, and other social sciences, this book should have cross-disciplinary appeal.

The Ghosts of Berlin: Confronting German History in the Urban Landscape

by Brian Ladd

In this compelling work, Brian Ladd examines the ongoing conflicts radiating from the remarkable fusion of architecture, history, and national identity in Berlin. Ladd surveys the urban landscape, excavating its ruins, contemplating its buildings and memorials, and carefully deconstructing the public debates and political controversies emerging from its past. "Written in a clear and elegant style, The Ghosts of Berlin is not just another colorless architectural history of the German capital. . . . Mr. Ladd's book is a superb guide to this process of urban self-definition, both past and present. "--Katharina Thote, Wall Street Journal "If a book can have the power to change a public debate, then The Ghosts of Berlin is such a book. Among the many new books about Berlin that I have read, Brian Ladd's is certainly the most impressive. . . . Ladd's approach also owes its success to the fact that he is a good storyteller. His history of Berlin's architectural successes and failures reads entertainingly like a detective novel. "--Peter Schneider, New Republic "[Ladd's] well-written and well-illustrated book amounts to a brief history of the city as well as a guide to its landscape. "--Anthony Grafton, New York Review of Books

Truth Machine: The Contentious History of DNA Fingerprinting

by Michael Lynch Simon A. Cole Kathleen Jordan Ruth Mcnally

DNA profiling--commonly known as DNA fingerprinting--is often heralded as unassailable criminal evidence, a veritable "truth machine" that can overturn convictions based on eyewitness testimony, confessions, and other forms of forensic evidence. But DNA evidence is far from infallible. It is subject to the same possibilities for error--in sample collection, forensic analysis, and clerical record keeping--as any other aspect of criminal justice practice. Truth Machine traces the controversial history of DNA fingerprinting by looking at court cases in the United States and United Kingdom beginning in the mid-1980s, when the practice was invented, and continuing until the present. Using interviews, observations of courtroom trials and laboratory processes, and documentary reconstruction, the authors provide a nuanced, theoretically sophisticated, and original ethnographic account of DNA fingerprinting and its evolution. Ultimately, Truth Machine presents compelling evidence of the obstacles and opportunities at the intersection of science, technology, sociology, and law.

Cracking the Einstein Code: Relativity and the Birth of Black Hole Physics

by Fulvio Melia

Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity describes the effect of gravitation on the shape of space and the flow of time. But for more than four decades after its publication, the theory remained largely a curiosity for scientists; however accurate it seemed, Einstein's mathematical code--represented by six interlocking equations--was one of the most difficult to crack in all of science. That is, until a twenty-nine-year-old Cambridge graduate solved the great riddle in 1963. Roy Kerr's solution emerged coincidentally with the discovery of black holes that same year and provided fertile testing ground--at long last--for general relativity. Today, scientists routinely cite the Kerr solution, but even among specialists, few know the story of how Kerr cracked Einstein's code. Fulvio Melia here offers an eyewitness account of the events leading up to Kerr's great discovery. Cracking the Einstein Code vividly describes how luminaries such as Karl Schwarzschild, David Hilbert, and Emmy Noether set the stage for the Kerr solution; how Kerr came to make his breakthrough; and how scientists such as Roger Penrose, Kip Thorne, and Stephen Hawking used the accomplishment to refine and expand modern astronomy and physics. Today more than 300 million supermassive black holes are suspected of anchoring their host galaxies across the cosmos, and the Kerr solution is what astronomers and astrophysicists use to describe much of their behavior. By unmasking the history behind the search for a real world solution to Einstein's field equations, Melia offers a first-hand account of an important but untold story. Sometimes dramatic, often exhilarating, but always attuned to the human element, Cracking the Einstein Code is ultimately a showcase of how important science gets done.

The Chicago Guide to Writing about Numbers

by Jane E. Miller

People who work well with numbers are often stymied by how to write about them. Those who don't often work with numbers have an even tougher time trying to put them into words. For instance, scientists and policy analysts learn to calculate and interpret numbers, but not how to explain them to a general audience. Students learn about gathering data and using statistical techniques, but not how to write about their results. And readers struggling to make sense of numerical information are often left confused by poor explanations. Many books elucidate the art of writing, but books on writing about numbers are nonexistent. Until now. Here, Jane Miller, an experienced research methods and statistics teacher, gives writers the assistance they need. The Chicago Guide to Writing about Numbers helps bridge the gap between good quantitative analysis and good expository writing. Field-tested with students and professionals alike, this book shows writers how to think about numbers during the writing process. Miller begins with twelve principles that lay the foundation for good writing about numbers. Conveyed with real-world examples, these principles help writers assess and evaluate the best strategy for representing numbers. She next discusses the fundamental tools for presenting numbers--tables, charts, examples, and analogies--and shows how to use these tools within the framework of the twelve principles to organize and write a complete paper. By providing basic guidelines for successfully using numbers in prose, The Chicago Guide to Writing about Numbers will help writers of all kinds clearly and effectively tell a story with numbers as evidence. Readers and writers everywhere will be grateful for this much-needed mentor.

Imperial City: Rome Under Napoleon

by Susan Vandiver Nicassio

In 1798, the armies of the French Revolution tried to transform Rome from the capital of the Papal States to a Jacobin Republic. For the next two decades, Rome was the subject of power struggles between the forces of the Empire and the Papacy, while Romans endured the unsuccessful efforts of Napoleon's best and brightest to pull the ancient city into the modern world. Against this historical backdrop, Nicassio weaves together an absorbing social, cultural, and political history of Rome and its people. Based on primary sources and incorporating two centuries of Italian, French, and international research, her work reveals what life was like for Romans in the age of Napoleon. "A remarkable book that wonderfully vivifies an understudied era in the history of Rome. . . . This book will engage anyone interested in early modern cities, the relationship between religion and daily life, and the history of the city of Rome. "--Journal of Modern History "An engaging account of Tosca's Rome. . . . Nicassio provides a fluent introduction to her subject. "--History Today "Meticulously researched, drawing on a host of original manuscripts, memoirs, personal letters, and secondary sources, enabling [Nicassio] to bring her story to life. "--History

Black Visions: The Roots of Contemporary African-American Political Ideologies

by Michael C. Dawson

This stunning book represents the most comprehensive analysis to date of the complex relationships between black political thought and black political identity and behavior. Ranging from Frederick Douglass to rap artist Ice Cube, Michael C. Dawson brilliantly illuminates the history and current role of black political thought in shaping political debate in America.

Darwin's Cathedral: Evolution, Religion, and the Nature of Society

by David Sloan Wilson

One of the great intellectual battles of modern times is between evolution and religion. Until now, they have been considered completely irreconcilable theories of origin and existence. David Sloan Wilson's Darwin's Cathedral takes the radical step of joining the two, in the process proposing an evolutionary theory of religion that shakes both evolutionary biology and social theory at their foundations. The key, argues Wilson, is to think of society as an organism, an old idea that has received new life based on recent developments in evolutionary biology. If society is an organism, can we then think of morality and religion as biologically and culturally evolved adaptations that enable human groups to function as single units rather than mere collections of individuals? Wilson brings a variety of evidence to bear on this question, from both the biological and social sciences. From Calvinism in sixteenth-century Geneva to Balinese water temples, from hunter-gatherer societies to urban America, Wilson demonstrates how religions have enabled people to achieve by collective action what they never could do alone. He also includes a chapter considering forgiveness from an evolutionary perspective and concludes by discussing how all social organizations, including science, could benefit by incorporating elements of religion. Religious believers often compare their communities to single organisms and even to insect colonies. Astoundingly, Wilson shows that they might be literally correct. Intended for any educated reader, Darwin's Cathedral will change forever the way we view the relations among evolution, religion, and human society.

From Mesopotamia to Iraq: A Concise History

by Hans J. Nissen Peter Heine

A sweeping account of the rich history that has played out between these chronological poles, From Mesopotamia to Iraq looks back through 10,000 years of the regions deeply significant yet increasingly overshadowed past.

Showing 57,026 through 57,050 of 72,063 results

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