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The Secret Admirer Mystery (Walker High Mystery #8)

by Eleanor Robins

Walker High is a typical high school. The students of Walker attend classes, participate in sports and drama, cram for exams and go on field trips. Topics are involving and pertinent to young adult readers: romance, sports, friendship, exams, work, and family but with a twist of mystery. In just 48 pages, even your struggling readers can easily finish these novels!

Emma Goldman: Revolution as a Way of Life

by Vivian Gornick

Emma Goldman is the story of a modern radical who took seriously the idea that inner liberation is the first business of social revolution. Her politics, from beginning to end, was based on resistance to that which thwarted the free development of the inner self. The right to stay alive in one's senses, to enjoy freedom of thought and speech, to reject the arbitrary use of power--these were key demands in the many public protest movements she helped mount. Anarchist par excellence, Goldman is one of the memorable political figures of our time, not because of her gift for theory or analysis or even strategy, but because some extraordinary force of life in her burned, without rest or respite, on behalf of human integrity--and she was able to make the thousands of people who, for decades on end, flocked to her lectures, feel intimately connected to the pain inherent in the abuse of that integrity. To hear Emma describe, in language as magnetic as it was illuminating, what the boot felt like on the neck, was to experience the mythic quality of organized oppression. As the women and men in her audience listened to her, the homeliness of their own small lives became invested with a sense of drama that acted as a catalyst for the wild, vagrant hope that things need not always be as they were. All you had to do, she promised, was resist. In time, she herself would become a world-famous symbol for the spirit of resistance to the power of institutional authority over the lone individual. In Emma Goldman, Vivian Gornick draws a surpassingly intimate and insightful portrait of a woman of heroic proportions whose performance on the stage of history did what Tolstoy said a work of art should do: it made people love life more.

Elizabeth and Hazel: Two Women of Little Rock

by David Margolick

The names Elizabeth Eckford and Hazel Bryan Massery may not be well known, but the image of them from September 1957 surely is: a black high school girl, dressed in white, walking stoically in front of Little Rock Central High School, and a white girl standing directly behind her, face twisted in hate, screaming racial epithets. This famous photograph captures the full anguish of desegregation--in Little Rock and throughout the South--and an epic moment in the civil rights movement. In this gripping book, David Margolick tells the remarkable story of two separate lives unexpectedly braided together. He explores how the haunting picture of Elizabeth and Hazel came to be taken, its significance in the wider world, and why, for the next half-century, neither woman has ever escaped from its long shadow. He recounts Elizabeth's struggle to overcome the trauma of her hate-filled school experience, and Hazel's long efforts to atone for a fateful, horrible mistake. The book follows the painful journey of the two as they progress from apology to forgiveness to reconciliation and, amazingly, to friendship. This friendship foundered, then collapsed--perhaps inevitably--over the same fissures and misunderstandings that continue to permeate American race relations more than half a century after the unforgettable photograph at Little Rock. And yet, as Margolick explains, a bond between Elizabeth and Hazel, silent but complex, endures.

Egypt on the Brink: From Nasser to Mubarak

by Tarek Osman

Famous until the 1950s for its religious pluralism and extraordinary cultural heritage, Egypt is now seen as an increasingly repressive and divided land, home of the Muslim Brotherhood and an opaque regime headed by the aging President Mubarak. In this immensely readable and thoroughly researched book, Tarek Osman explores what has happened to the biggest Arab nation since President Nasser took control of the country in 1954. He examines Egypt's central role in the development of the two crucial movements of the period, Arab nationalism and radical Islam; the increasingly contentious relationship between Muslims and Christians; and perhaps most important of all, the rift between the cosmopolitan elite and the mass of the undereducated and underemployed population, more than half of whom are aged under thirty. This is an essential guide to one of the Middle East's most important but least understood states.

Edward Bancroft: Scientist, Author, Spy

by Thomas J. Schaeper

A man of as many names as motives, Edward Bancroft is a singular figure in the history of Revolutionary America. Born in Massachusetts in 1745, Bancroft moved to England as a young man in the 1760s and began building a respectable résumé as both a scientist and a man of letters. In recognition of his works in natural history, Bancroft was unanimously elected to the Royal Society, and while working to secure French aid for the American Revolution, he became a close associate of such luminaries as Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane, and John Adams. Though lauded in his time as a staunch American patriot, when the British diplomatic archives were opened in the late nineteenth century, it was revealed that Bancroft led a secret life as a British agent acting against French and American interests. In this book, the first complete biography of Bancroft, historian Thomas J. Schaeper reveals the full extent of the agent's deception during the crucial years of the American Revolution. Operating under aliases, working in ciphers, and leaving coded messages in the trees of Paris's Tuileries Gardens, Bancroft filtered information from unsuspecting figures including Franklin and Deane back to his contacts in Britain, navigating a complicated web of political allegiances. Through Schaeper's keen analysis of Bancroft's correspondence and diplomatic records, this biography reveals whether Bancroft should ultimately be considered a traitor to America or a patriot to Britain.

Education's End: Why Our Colleges and Universities Have Given Up on the Meaning of Life

by Anthony T. Kronman

The question of what living is for-of what one should care about and why-is the most important question a person can ask. Yet under the influence of the modern research ideal, our colleges and universities have expelled this question from their classrooms, judging it unfit for organized study. In this eloquent and carefully considered book, Tony Kronman explores why this has happened and calls for the restoration of life's most important question to an honored place in higher education. The author contrasts an earlier era in American education, when the question of the meaning of life was at the center of instruction, with our own times, when this question has been largely abandoned by college and university teachers. In particular, teachers of the humanities, who once felt a special responsibility to guide their students in exploring the question of what living is for, have lost confidence in their authority to do so. And they have lost sight of the question itself in the blinding fog of political correctness that has dominated their disciplines for the past forty years. Yet Kronman sees a readiness for change--a longing among teachers as well as students to engage questions of ultimate meaning. He urges a revival of the humanities' lost tradition of studying the meaning of life through the careful but critical reading of great works of literary and philosophical imagination. And he offers here the charter document of that revival.

Muktibodh

by Nandkishore Nawal

This books deals with the life, thoughts and creations of Muktibodh. He was a composer as well as a thinker. He has given his thoughts on the poetry and the society. This book explains briefly the works of Muktibodh.

Gyarah Turki Kahaniyaan

by Ali Alparsalaan Mastram Kapur

The eleven stories in the collection are the living document of contemporary life and blighted surroundings in modern Turkey. Despite paying the high prices of changeover in the society it has not recovered from its memories. These stories disturb the readers as well as enrich them in universal terms. Truly one of the best collections depicting modern Turkey.

Ghalib

by Muhammad Mujib

Ghalib has emerged as one of the most prominent Urdu poets. He has given new heights to the Urdu poetry tradition. Ghalib has summed up his innermost thoughts in the most influential style.

Aasmaan Bahut Dur Hau

by Ramola Ruth Lal

Poetry that touches the land of romantic poetry. The poems of Ramola are signs of new age poetry. Her usage of words indicates the deepness of sensation. The style of writing of the poet changes quite frequently in the collection which facilitates her aims in the poems.

Paatdeyi

by Veenapani Mohanti Deepti Prakash

Stories in Paatdeyi are the result of the contemporary social conditions of the lower middle and middle classes in Odisha. Veenapani shows the deep understanding of the neglected sections of the society.

Nagarjun Rachna Sanchayan

by Rajesh Joshi

After Nirala, Nagarjun is the only poet who has used so many verses, forms and poetic styles. His expression is very proper and direct. His poems and stories mostly tell us about the part of the country where he stayed. In his style, one would find both the independence of wanderlust and speed.

Aahuti

by Harikrishna Premi

Aahuti is a historical play. Cultural and national unity comes naturally to this play and it is very simple to be staged. The king of Ranthamborgarh, Hammirsingh Chauhan, gives shelter to one enemy of Allauddin Khilji and loses everything by this.

Apna Paraya

by Radhika ramaya prasad singh

A marvelous play written by Singh. The play is woven around the love story where a boy and a girl of different religions meet. The play shows the existing problem in the Indian society which was quite divided on religious lines. The pathetic condition of women folks is shown very clearly to the readers.

Aakul Antar

by Harivansh Rai Bachchan

Aakul Antar is a collection of poems written by the famous poet. The poems have shadowism as their characteristics. Signs of romanticism and decorative language can clearly be seen in the poems.

Grim Bandhuo Ki Kahaniya Bhag-Ek

by Jacob W. Grimm Harikrishna Devsare Willhem K. Grimm

The Grimm brothers were language scientists and the parents of folk literature. Their main aim was to study the literature and understand the traditional tones behind it. Through these stories they wanted the growth of German language. The Grimm brothers penned down all the stories told all over the countries by the elders. The book has many of those stories which will keep the children enthralled.

Stepping Up

by John B. Izzo

More people need to step up. When we take responsibility for making change wherever we can, not only does it make our companies, communities, and the world better, but we are happier and more successful and have more fulfilling relationships. But all too often, we stop ourselves before we start. The problems seem too daunting, it's another department's responsibility, other people are the issue and we can't change them, and so on. And so nothing ever changes. With his distinctive mix of inspiring storytelling and practical advice, John Izzo compassionately demolishes the most typical excuses, helps us see a way through common roadblocks, and enables anyone, anywhere, anytime to effectively bring about positive change by simply stepping up. Through numerous examples, Izzo shows that when one person steps up, it creates a wave of energy that encourages others to join in. Take Silvana Fucito, the middle-aged shopkeeper who fought back against the Italian Mafia, leading her neighbors, and eventually the national government, to do the same. Or the teenagers in Nova Scotia who decided to stand up to bullying when a classmate was beaten for wearing a pink shirt, ultimately spawning "pink shirt" days around the world. Or Joanne Beaton, who took over a business division in danger of being outsourced away and, by challenging her people to step up, turned it into a service provider other companies outsourced to. Rather than regaling us with stories of extraordinary people and extraordinary deeds, Izzo tells us about regular people who see problems and decide--sometimes hesitantly, often uncertainly--to take that first step. Like them, each one of us can claim our power to change the world.

Mastering Algorithms with Perl

by Jon Orwant Jarkko Hietaniemi John Macdonald

Many programmers would love to use Perl for projects that involve heavy lifting, but miss the many traditional algorithms that textbooks teach for other languages. Computer scientists have identified many techniques that a wide range of programs need, such as: Fuzzy pattern matching for text (identify misspellings!) Finding correlations in data Game-playing algorithms Predicting phenomena such as Web traffic Polynomial and spline fitting Using algorithms explained in this book, you too can carry out traditional programming tasks in a high-powered, efficient, easy-to-maintain manner with Perl. This book assumes a basic understanding of Perl syntax and functions, but not necessarily any background in computer science. The authors explain in a readable fashion the reasons for using various classic programming techniques, the kind of applications that use them, and -- most important -- how to code these algorithms in Perl. If you are an amateur programmer, this book will fill you in on the essential algorithms you need to solve problems like an expert. If you have already learned algorithms in other languages, you will be surprised at how much different (and often easier) it is to implement them in Perl. And yes, the book even has the obligatory fractal display program. There have been dozens of books on programming algorithms, some of them excellent, but never before has there been one that uses Perl. The authors include the editor of The Perl Journal and master librarian of CPAN; all are contributors to CPAN and have archived much of the code in this book there. "This book was so exciting I lost sleep reading it." Tom Christiansen

Fundamentals of the Stem Cell Debate

by Ronald Miller Kristen Renwick Monroe Jerome Tobis

Few recent advances in science have generated as much excitement and controversy as human embryonic stem cells. The potential of these cells to replace diseased or damaged cells in virtually every tissue of the body heralds the advent of an extraordinary new field of medicine. Controversy arises, however, because current techniques required to harvest stem cells involve the destruction of the human blastocyst. This even-handed, lucidly written volume is an essential tool for understanding the complex issues--scientific, religious, ethical, and political--that currently fuel public debate about stem cell research. One of the few books to provide a comprehensive overview for a wide audience, the volume brings together leading scientists, ethicists, political scientists, and doctors to explain this new scientific development and explore its ramifications.

Goddesses and the Divine Feminine

by Rosemary Ruether

This landmark work presents the most illuminating portrait we have to date of goddesses and sacred female imagery in Western culture--from prehistory to contemporary goddess movements. Beautifully written, lucidly conceived, and far-ranging in its implications, this work will help readers gain a better appreciation of the complexity of the social forces-- mostly androcentric--that have shaped the symbolism of the sacred feminine. At the same time, it charts a new direction for finding a truly egalitarian vision of God and human relations through a feminist-ecological spirituality. Rosemary Radford Ruether begins her exploration of the divine feminine with an analysis of prehistoric archaeology that challenges the popular idea that, until their overthrow by male-dominated monotheism, many ancient societies were matriarchal in structure, governed by a feminine divinity and existing in harmony with nature. For Ruether, the historical evidence suggests the reality about these societies is much more complex. She goes on to consider key myths and rituals from Sumerian, Babylonian, Egyptian, and Anatolian cultures; to examine the relationships among gender, deity, and nature in the Hebrew religion; and to discuss the development of Mariology and female mysticism in medieval Catholicism, and the continuation of Wisdom mysticism in Protestanism. She also gives a provocative analysis of the meeting of Aztec and Christian female symbols in Mexico and of today's neo-pagan movements in the United States.

At Risk (Steve Cline Series #1)

by Kit Ehrman

Stubbornness has its price. So does pride.... Stephen Cline will pay heavily for both when he drops out of college against his father's wishes and lands a job as barn manager at Foxdale Farm, one of Maryland's premiere equestrian facilities. An obnoxious trainer and difficult, demanding boarders are all part of the job, but Steve will need every bit of his smarts when he interrupts a bunch of thieves very early one morning and is hijacked along with the horses. In making his escape, he unwittingly jeopardizes a lucrative scam and challenges a sadistic killer. When the police investigation stalls, Steve uses his connections in the horse industry and launches his own fact-finding campaign. As he moves closer to uncovering the rustlers' ring, he learns that nearly everyone else around him also runs risks.

When They Severed Earth from Sky

by Elizabeth Wayland Barber Paul T. Barber

Why were Prometheus and Loki envisioned as chained to rocks? What was the Golden Calf? Why are mirrors believed to carry bad luck? How could anyone think that mortals like Perseus, Beowulf, and St. George actually fought dragons, since dragons don't exist? Strange though they sound, however, these "myths" did not begin as fiction. This absorbing book shows that myths originally transmitted real information about real events and observations, preserving the information sometimes for millennia within nonliterate societies. Geologists' interpretations of how a volcanic cataclysm long ago created Oregon's Crater Lake, for example, is echoed point for point in the local myth of its origin. The Klamath tribe saw it happen and passed down the story--for nearly 8,000 years. We, however, have been literate so long that we've forgotten how myths encode reality. Recent studies of how our brains work, applied to a wide range of data from the Pacific Northwest to ancient Egypt to modern stories reported in newspapers, have helped the Barbers deduce the characteristic principles by which such tales both develop and degrade through time. Myth is in fact a quite reasonable way to convey important messages orally over many generations--although reasoning back to the original events is possible only under rather specific conditions. Our oldest written records date to 5,200 years ago, but we have been speaking and mythmaking for perhaps 100,000. This groundbreaking book points the way to restoring some of that lost history and teaching us about human storytelling.

Volcanoes in Human History

by Jelle Zeilinga de Boer Donald Theodore Sanders Robert D. Ballard

When the volcano Tambora erupted in Indonesia in 1815, as many as 100,000 people perished as a result of the blast and an ensuing famine caused by the destruction of rice fields on Sumbawa and neighboring islands. Gases and dust particles ejected into the atmosphere changed weather patterns around the world, resulting in the infamous ''year without a summer'' in North America, food riots in Europe, and a widespread cholera epidemic. And the gloomy weather inspired Mary Shelley to write the gothic novel Frankenstein.This book tells the story of nine such epic volcanic events, explaining the related geology for the general reader and exploring the myriad ways in which the earth's volcanism has affected human history. Zeilinga de Boer and Sanders describe in depth how volcanic activity has had long-lasting effects on societies, cultures, and the environment. After introducing the origins and mechanisms of volcanism, the authors draw on ancient as well as modern accounts--from folklore to poetry and from philosophy to literature. Beginning with the Bronze Age eruption that caused the demise of Minoan Crete, the book tells the human and geological stories of eruptions of such volcanoes as Vesuvius, Krakatau, Mount Pelée, and Tristan da Cunha. Along the way, it shows how volcanism shaped religion in Hawaii, permeated Icelandic mythology and literature, caused widespread population migrations, and spurred scientific discovery.From the prodigious eruption of Thera more than 3,600 years ago to the relative burp of Mount St. Helens in 1980, the results of volcanism attest to the enduring connections between geology and human destiny.

The Zen of Magic Squares, Circles, and Stars

by Clifford A. Pickover

Humanity's love affair with mathematics and mysticism reached a critical juncture, legend has it, on the back of a turtle in ancient China. As Clifford Pickover briefly recounts in this enthralling book, the most comprehensive in decades on magic squares, Emperor Yu was supposedly strolling along the Yellow River one day around 2200 B.C. when he spotted the creature: its shell had a series of dots within squares. To Yu's amazement, each row of squares contained fifteen dots, as did the columns and diagonals. When he added any two cells opposite along a line through the center square, like 2 and 8, he always arrived at 10. The turtle, unwitting inspirer of the ''Yu'' square, went on to a life of courtly comfort and fame.Pickover explains why Chinese emperors, Babylonian astrologer-priests, prehistoric cave people in France, and ancient Mayans of the Yucatan were convinced that magic squares--arrays filled with numbers or letters in certain arrangements--held the secret of the universe. Since the dawn of civilization, he writes, humans have invoked such patterns to ward off evil and bring good fortune. Yet who would have guessed that in the twenty-first century, mathematicians would be studying magic squares so immense and in so many dimensions that the objects defy ordinary human contemplation and visualization?Readers are treated to a colorful history of magic squares and similar structures, their construction, and classification along with a remarkable variety of newly discovered objects ranging from ornate inlaid magic cubes to hypercubes. Illustrated examples occur throughout, with some patterns from the author's own experiments. The tesseracts, circles, spheres, and stars that he presents perfectly convey the age-old devotion of the math-minded to this Zenlike quest. Number lovers, puzzle aficionados, and math enthusiasts will treasure this rich and lively encyclopedia of one of the few areas of mathematics where the contributions of even nonspecialists count.

Petrels, Albatrosses, and Storm-Petrels of North America

by Steve N. Howell

Petrels, albatrosses, and storm-petrels are among the most beautiful yet least known of all the world's birds, living their lives at sea far from the sight of most people. Largely colored in shades of gray, black, and white, these enigmatic and fast-flying seabirds can be hard to differentiate, particularly from a moving boat. Useful worldwide, not just in North America, this photographic guide is based on unrivaled field experience and combines insightful text and hundreds of full-color images to help you identify these remarkable birds. The first book of its kind, this guide features an introduction that explains ocean habitats and the latest developments in taxonomy. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features such as flight manner, plumage variation related to age and molt, seasonal occurrence patterns, and migration routes. Species accounts are arranged into groups helpful for field identification, and an overview of unique identification challenges is provided for each group. The guide also includes distribution maps for regularly occurring species as well as a bibliography, glossary, and appendixes.The first state-of-the-art photographic guide to these enigmatic seabirds Includes hundreds of full-color photos throughout Features detailed species accounts that describe flight, plumage, distribution, and more Provides overviews of ocean habitats, taxonomy, and conservation Offers tips on how to observe and identify birds at sea

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