Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 169,701 through 169,725 of 349,112 results

Justice and the Politics of Difference

by Iris Marion Young Danielle S. Allen

In this classic work of feminist political thought, Iris Marion Young challenges the prevailing reduction of social justice to distributive justice. It critically analyzes basic concepts underlying most theories of justice, including impartiality, formal equality, and the unitary moral subjectivity. The starting point for her critique is the experience and concerns of the new social movements about decision making, cultural expression, and division of labor--that were created by marginal and excluded groups, including women, African Americans, and American Indians, as well as gays and lesbians. Iris Young defines concepts of domination and oppression to cover issues eluding the distributive model. Democratic theorists, according to Young do not adequately address the problem of an inclusive participatory framework. By assuming a homogeneous public, they fail to consider institutional arrangements for including people not culturally identified with white European male norms of reason and respectability. Young urges that normative theory and public policy should undermine group-based oppression by affirming rather than suppressing social group difference. Basing her vision of the good society on the differentiated, culturally plural network of contemporary urban life, she argues for a principle of group representation in democratic publics and for group-differentiated policies.Danielle Allen's new foreword contextualizes Young's work and explains how debates surrounding social justice have changed since--and been transformed by--the original publication of Justice and the Politics of Difference.

Justice at Cardwell Ranch

by B. J. Daniels

Six years ago, Dana Cardwell found her mother's will in a cookbook and became sole owner of the Cardwell Ranch in Big Sky, Montana. Now happily married, Dana is surprised when her siblings, Stacy and Jordan, show up on the ranch...and trouble isn't too far behind.As danger draws closer to the ranch, deputy marshal Liza Turner quickly realizes that Jordan Cardwell isn't the man the town made him out to be.

Justice at Cardwell Ranch & Crime Scene at Cardwell Ranch

by B. J. Daniels

Cardwell charm was all he'd ever needed... Until nowSix years ago, Dana Cardwell found her mother's will in a cookbook and became sole owner of the Cardwell Ranch in Big Sky, Montana. Now happily married, Dana is surprised when her siblings, Stacy and Jordan, show up on the ranch...and trouble isn't too far behind.As danger draws closer to the ranch, deputy marshal Liza Turner quickly realizes that Jordan Cardwell isn't the man the town made him out to be.This special collector's edition includes the story that started it all, Crime Scene at Cardwell Ranch!

Justice at Dachau

by Joshua Greene

The world remembers Nuremberg, where a handful of Nazi policymakers were brought to justice, but nearly forgotten are the proceedings at Dachau, where hundreds of Nazi guards, officers, and doctors stood trial for personally taking part in the torture and execution of prisoners inside the Dachau, Mauthausen, Flossenburg, and Buchenwald concentration camps. In Justice at Dachau, Joshua M. Greene, maker of the award winning documentary film Witness: Voices from the Holocaust, recreates the Dachau trials and reveals the dramatic story of William Denson, a soft-spoken young lawyer from Alabama whisked from teaching law at West Point to leading the prosecution in the largest series of Nazi trials in history. In a makeshift courtroom set up inside Hitler's first concentration camp, Denson was charged with building a team from lawyers who had no background in war crimes and determining charges for crimes that courts had never before confronted. Among the accused were Dr. Klaus Schilling, responsible for hundreds of deaths in his "research" for a cure for malaria; Edwin Katzen-Ellenbogen, a Harvard psychologist turned Gestapo informant; and one of history's most notorious female war criminals, Ilse Koch, "Bitch of Buchenwald," whose penchant for tattooed skins and human bone lamps made headlines worldwide. Denson, just thirty-two years old, with one criminal trial to his name, led a brilliant and successful prosecution, but nearly two years of exposure to such horrors took its toll. His wife divorced him, his weight dropped to 116 pounds, and he collapsed from exhaustion. Worst of all was the pressure from his army superiors to bring the trials to a rapid end when their agenda shifted away from punishing Nazis to winning the Germans' support in the emerging Cold War. Denson persevered, determined to create a careful record of responsibility for the crimes of the Holocaust. When, in a final shocking twist, the United States used clandestine reversals and commutation of sentences to set free those found guilty at Dachau, Denson risked his army career to try to prevent justice from being undone.From the Hardcover edition.

Justice At Risk: War Crimes Trials In Croatia, Bosnia And Herzegovina, And Serbia And Montenegro

by Human Rights Watch

The armed conflicts in the former Yugoslavia during the 1990s were characterized by widespread violations of human rights and humanitarian law. The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) will have adjudicated only a relatively small number of cases involving the most serious crimes by the time it ceases operating. All other war crimes cases -whether initiated domestically or referred back from the ICTY-will have to be tried by national courts in the states of the former Yugoslavia. Human Rights Watch has carried out extensive monitoring of domestic war crimes trials in the states of the former Yugoslavia. The monitoring indicates that, as a rule, the ordinary national courts of Bosnia and Herzegovina (particularly in Republika Srpska, one of the two "entities" in Bosnia and Herzegovina), Croatia, and Serbia and Montenegro are not currently equipped to hear war crimes cases-which are often politically and emotionally charged, as well as legally complex-in a fair manner. Key obstacles include: bias on the part of judges and prosecutors, poor case preparation by prosecutors, inadequate cooperation from the police in the conduct of investigations, poor cooperation between the states on judicial matters, and ineffective witness protection mechanisms.

Justice Brennan

by Seth Stern Stephen Wermiel

A sweeping insider look at the life of William Brennan, champion of free speech and widely considered the most influential Supreme Court justice of the twentieth century Before his death, William Brennan granted Stephen Wermiel access to volumes of personal and court materials that are sealed to the public until 2017. These are what Jeffrey Toobin has called "a coveted set of documents" that includes Brennan's case histories--in which he recorded strategies behind all the major battles of the past half century, including Roe v. Wade, affirmative action, the death penalty, obscenity law, and the constitutional right to privacy--as well as more personal documents that reveal some of Brennan's curious contradictions, like his refusal to hire female clerks even as he wrote groundbreaking women's rights decisions; his complex stance as a justice and a Catholic; and details on Brennan's unprecedented working relationship with Chief Justice Earl Warren. Wermiel distills decades of valuable information into a seamless, riveting portrait of the man behind the Court's most liberal era.

The Justice Cascade: How Human Rights Prosecutions Are Changing World Politics (The Norton Series in World Politics)

by Kathryn Sikkink

Acclaimed scholar Kathryn Sikkink examines the important and controversial new trend of holding political leaders criminally accountable for human rights violations. Grawemeyer Award winner Kathryn Sikkink offers a landmark argument for human rights prosecutions as a powerful political tool. She shows how, in just three decades, state leaders in Latin America, Europe, and Africa have lost their immunity from any accountability for their human rights violations, becoming the subjects of highly publicized trials resulting in severe consequences. This shift is affecting the behavior of political leaders worldwide and may change the face of global politics as we know it. Drawing on extensive research and illuminating personal experience, Sikkink reveals how the stunning emergence of human rights prosecutions has come about; what effect it has had on democracy, conflict, and repression; and what it means for leaders and citizens everywhere, from Uruguay to the United States. The Justice Cascade is a vital read for anyone interested in the future of world politics and human rights.

Justice Deferred

by Len Williams

Billy Ray had a tough childhood, no matter how hard he tried, he couldn't keep out of trouble. His friends got him involved in small-time thefts and burglaries, which led to three felony charges.

Justice Denied

by Marci A. Hamilton

There is a silent epidemic of childhood sexual abuse in the United States and a legal system that is not effectively protecting children from predators. Recent coverage of widespread abuse in the public schools and in churches has brought the once-taboo subject of childhood sexual abuse to the forefront. The problem extends well beyond schools and churches, though: the vast majority of survivors are sexually abused by family or family acquaintances with 90 percent of abuse never reported to the authorities. Marci A. Hamilton proposes a comprehensive yet simple solution: eliminate the arbitrary statutes of limitations for childhood sexual abuse so that survivors past and present can get into court. In Justice Denied, Hamilton predicts a coming civil rights movement for children and explains why it is in the interest of all Americans to allow victims of childhood sexual abuse this chance to seek justice when they are ready.al abuse this chance to seek justice when they are ready.

Justice Denied

by James Morton

An incisive examination by the bestselling author of The Mammoth Book of Gangs of some of the many miscarriages of justice of this and the previous century, which have seen innocent men and women found guilty, and sometimes executed. This shocking 'manual of injustice' exposes wrongful convictions and acquittals as a result of the chicanery of some forensic scientists, over-zealous or negligent police officers under pressure to get results, incompetent lawyers, lying witnesses, bribed juries, judicial blunders and feeble politicians. Sometimes, however, it is truculent and uncooperative defendants who prove their own worst enemies. It shows the mistakes that can be made in the face of a baying public and a rabid press, mistakes which have seen innocent men and women found guilty, and sometimes executed, while others have served lengthy sentences. It reveals critical flaws in criminal justice systems throughout the world (it is estimated, for example, that two per cent of felony cases in America result in wrongful convictions). Morton explores folk devils and moral panics, both historical such as the 'witches' of Salem and and much more recent cases like that of the West Memphis Three. It considers cases of race hatred, the impact of DNA, fit-ups, fake 'experts', doubtful science and the long road to the court of appeal. He also looks at what happens to the victims of miscarriages of justice, whether they go on to prosper or, as is sadly so often the case, never really recover. How did the boxer Rubin 'The Hurricane' Carter come to be wrongly convicted of a triple homicide? The alibi of Joe Hill, the Industrial Workers of the World activist wrongly executed for the murder of a Utah grocer and his son, came too late to save him from execution. On the other hand, Lindy Chamberlain (famously portrayed by Meryl Streep in A Cry in the Dark), has finally, over thirty years after the fact, had her claim that her baby Azaria was taken by a dingo at Ayers Rock in the Australian Outback upheld by a coroner. Among many other cases, Morton also considers the 1910 case of two men convicted of the murder of a man still alive in 1926, and case of the West Memphis Three, who were convicted as teenagers in 1994 of the murders of three boys in Arkansas and released in 2011 in a plea bargain after eighteen years, though the prosecution still refuses to accept their innocence.

Justice Denied (Butch Karp and Marlene Ciampi #6)

by Robert K. Tanenbaum

Book Seven of the bestselling Butch Karp legal thriller series: a diplomat's murder reveals a world of genocide and retribution <P>A Turkish diplomat in New York City is gunned down in broad daylight, and all signs point to an ancient blood feud. The suspected gunman is Armenian. His alleged motive: to avenge the Turkish slaughter of Armenians generations before. But prosecutor Butch Karp has never accepted the easy answer, and he soon realizes the facts of this murder are more complicated than they seem. To close the case, Karp and his investigator wife, Marlene, must infiltrate a cross-section of New York society, while fending off crooks and madmen from every corner of the Big Apple and the world beyond.

Justice Denied (J. P. Beaumont Series #18)

by J. A. Jance

The murder of an ex-drug dealer ex-con--gunned down on his mother's doorstep--seems just another turf war fatality. Why then has Seattle homicide investigator J.P. Beaumont been instructed to keep this assignment hush-hush? Meanwhile, Beau's lover and fellow cop, Mel Soames, is involved in her own confidential investigation. Registered sex offenders from all over Washington State are dying at an alarming rate--and not all due to natural causes. A metropolis the size of Seattle holds its fair share of brutal crime, corruption, and dirty little secrets. But when the separate trails they're following begin to shockingly intertwine, Beau and Mel realize that they have stumbled onto something bigger and more frightening than they anticipated--a deadly conspiracy that's leading them to lofty places they should not enter . . . and may not be allowed to leave alive.

Justice Done

by Jan Burke

The fifth of six e-short story collections from New York Times bestselling suspense author Jan Burke, including three stories from the highly acclaimed print anthology Eighteen, praised as "Astonishing...wry...these stories are sure to delight" (Jeffery Deaver, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Kill Room).Justice Done is a mini-anthology containing a brand-new short story, with an added bonus of three stories from Eighteen: "Miscalculation," "Two Bits," and "An Unsuspected Condition of the Heart." New York Times bestselling author Jonathan Kellerman says of the anthology, "A delightful collection of page-turners. At turns chilling, funny, poignant--and always insightful. With these stories, Jan Burke's at the top of her game."

Justice for a Ranger

by Rita Herron

Rugged Texas Ranger Cole McKinney, abandoned by his father, hated the thought of helping his half brothers. Also Rangers, they'd called him back to Justice, Texas, to help solve two murder cases. . . cases with their father as the prime suspect. Solving these crimes could help mend the wounds of Cole's past. Maybe even clear his so-called father's name. . . Gorgeous, curvy and whip-smart, Joey Hendricks came to Justice as the governor's special investigator. Working the cases with Cole caused their emotions to burn so hot, a fi ery night in bed might be their only release. But Joey's own family secrets in Justice could blow her one chance for love-and these murders-sky high.

Justice for All

by Joanna Wayne

A pattern emerges in a string of "accidental deaths" involving criminals who've escaped the law. Police chief Max Zirinsky suspects that someone is doling out their own form of justice. . . murder. Police chief Max Zirinsky's hunt for a serial killer leads him to the rarefied circles of Courage Bay's social elite. He needs a way to infiltrate their ranks, and turns to socially prominent hospital chief of staff Callie Baker. Her solution: pretend they're dating. But the attraction is all too real, and neither of them can "pretend" for long. Then the killer sees through their relationship. Callie is helping Max's investigation. And for that, she'll have to die. . . .

Justice for All: Earl Warren and the Nation He Made

by Jim Newton

In Justice for All, Jim Newton, an award-winning journalist for the Los Angeles Times, brings readers the first truly comprehensive consideration of Earl Warren, the politician-turned-Chief Justice who refashioned the place of the court in American life through landmark Supreme Court cases whose names have entered the common parlance -- Brown v. Board of Education, Griswold v. Connecticut, Miranda v. Arizona, to name just a few. Drawing on unmatched access to government, academic, and private documents pertaining to Warren's life and career, Newton explores a fascinating angle of U. S. Supreme Court history while illuminating both the public and the private Warren. One of the most acclaimed and best political biographies of its time, Justice for All is a monumental work dedicated to a complicated and principled figure that will become a seminal work of twentieth-century U. S. history. .

Justice for Bonnie

by I. J. Schecter Karen Foster

When Karen Foster was told that something had happened to her eighteen-year-old daughter, Bonnie Craig, she knew what it meant. The Alaska State Troopers investigating the scene ruled it a hiking accident, but for Karen, the pieces didn't add up. Bonnie would never have ditched class to go hiking. And she didn't drive--so how would she have reached McHugh Creek, miles out of town, in the first place? Armed with little more than her own conviction, Karen set out to find the truth behind her daughter's death. After a long series of false leads and dead ends, it seemed the case would forever go unsolved. Then, after twelve years of public campaigning, private despair, and increasingly tense dealings with the detectives working the case, Karen received an e-mail that would change everything; the system, at long last, had produced a match for the unknown DNA in the case--from a man in a jail all the way across the country. Here is the chilling tale of a mother's unflagging fight to track down the monster who stole her daughter's life--and the battle to ensure that he, and others like him, would no longer be able to evade justice. INCLUDES PHOTOS

Justice For The Damned

by Priscilla Royal

It is May of 1272, and Prioress Eleanor, recovering from a near-fatal winter fever, returns to Amesbury Priory to visit her aunt in time for the Feast of Saint Melor. Although Eleanor hopes to regain her strength in the midst of pleasant childhood memories, Death reveals a most troublesome fondness for her company, thwarting her desire for peace.

Justice for Earthlings

by David Miller

In the past few decades social changes have impacted how we understand justice, as societies become both more multicultural and more interconnected globally. Much philosophical thought, however, seems to proceed in isolation from these developments. While philosophers from Plato onwards have portrayed justice as an abstract, universal ideal, Miller argues that principles of justice are always rooted in particular social contexts, and connects these ideas to the changing conditions of human life. In this important contribution to political philosophy, it is argued that philosophers need to pay more attention to the way that people actually think about what's fair, and only defend principles that are feasible to apply in the real world. To understand equality of opportunity, for example, we must explore the cultural constraints that people face when presented with life choices. Justice for Earthlings also explains how national boundaries make justice at global level different from social justice.

Justice for Emily

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

Emily Hasbrouck saw her 11-year-old friend die, and she knows the people responsible. But nobody will believe her as she is an orphan and the accused are the richest in town. Emily is determined to speak the truth. She refuses to let her friend's death be called an "accident." Reaching out to Emily are a few people who believe her, and with their help, Emily must tell--in front of the powerful men who want to send her away--what really happened.

Justice for Hedgehogs

by Ronald Dworkin

The fox knows many things, the Greeks said, but the hedgehog knows one big thing. In his most comprehensive work, Dworkin argues that value in all its forms is one big thing; that what truth is, life means, morality requires, and justice demands are different aspects of the same large question.

Justice for Sara

by Erica Spindler

A woman determined to uncover the truth. A killer who will stop at nothing to keep the truth buried. When rebellious seventeen-year-old Katherine McCall awakened one morning to find her sister, Sara, viciously murdered, her whole life changed in the blink of an eye. Kat was named the prime suspect, charged and tried--and found innocent. But not everyone agreed with the verdict, and Kat's only choice was to go into hiding. She left her hometown behind, but she carried a dark secret with her, one that made her worry she might actually have had something to do with Sara's death. Although Kat has tried to move on with her life, she is still haunted by her sister's unsolved murder. On the tenth anniversary of Sara's death, she receives an anonymous letter that makes the past impossible to ignore: "What about justice for Sara?" What about justice for Sara? And for herself? Kat realizes that going back to Liberty, Louisiana, is the only way to move her life forward. There's a whole town that still thinks she's a killer--but the true culprit is out there somewhere, never found. As she digs into the past, investigating the days surrounding her sister's death, Kat begins to learn that the cost of justice may be too high. Her search for the truth has put her in the murderer's sights--a murderer who seems never to have left Liberty. In a town filled with suspicion and secrets, Kat has one ally: Sergeant Luke Tanner, son of Liberty's former police chief, the very man who led the rush to judgment against her. With no one to trust and a killer determined to keep a dark secret from coming to light, Kat must decide if justice is worth fighting--and dying--for.

The Justice Game

by Randy Singer

After the target of an investigative report storms a Virginia Beach television station, he kills one of the anchors before the SWAT team takes him down. Following the victim's funeral, her family files a lawsuit against the gun company who manufactured the killer's weapon of choice. The lawyers for the plaintiff and defendant-- Kelly Starling and Jason Noble-- are young, charismatic, and successful. They're also easy blackmail targets, both harboring a personal secret so devastating it could destroy their careers. Millions of dollars-- and more than a few lives-- are at stake. But as Kelly and Jason battle each other, they discover that the real fight is with unseen forces intent on controlling them both.

Justice Globalism

by James Goodman Professor Manfred B. Steger Dr Erin K. Wilson

Are political activists connected to the global justice movement simplistically opposed to neoliberal globalization? Is their political vision 'incoherent' and their policy proposals 'naïve' and 'superficial' as is often claimed by the mainstream media? Drawing on dozens of interviews and rich textual analyses involving nearly fifty global justice organizations linked to the World Social Forum, the authors of this pioneering study challenge this prevailing view. They present a compelling case that the global justice movement has actually fashioned a new political ideology with global reach: 'justice globalism'. Far from being incoherent, justice globalism possesses a rich and nuanced set of core concepts and powerful ideological claims. The book investigates how justice globalists respond to global financial crises, to escalating climate change, and to the global food crisis. It finds justice globalism generating new political agendas and campaigns to address these pressing problems. Justice globalism, the book concludes, has much to contribute to solving the serious global challenges of the 21st century. Justice Globalism will prove a stimulating read for undergraduate and graduate students in the social sciences and humanities who are taking courses on globalization, global studies and global justice.

Justice Hall (Mary Russell #6)

by Laurie R. King

BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Laurie R. King's Pirate King.Only hours after Holmes and Russell return from solving one murky riddle on the moor, another knocks on their front door...literally. It's a mystery that begins during the Great War, when Gabriel Hughenfort died amidst scandalous rumors that have haunted the family ever since. But it's not until Holmes and Russell arrive at Justice Hall, a home of unearthly perfection set in a garden modeled on Paradise, that they fully understand the irony echoed in the family motto, Justicia fortitudo mea est: A trail of ominous clues comprise a mystery that leads from an English hamlet to the city of Paris to the wild prairie of the New World. The trap is set, the game is afoot; but can Holmes and Russell catch an elusive killer--or has the murderer caught them?

Showing 169,701 through 169,725 of 349,112 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.