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Great Medieval Projects

by Shawn Braley Kris Bordessa

Great Medieval Projects You Can Build Yourself brings the Middle Ages in Europe alive through hands-on activities for kids ages 9-12. Addressing various aspects of medieval life, this book provides historically accurate details of the period leading up to the Renaissance. From monastic life to castle living, villages to towns, each section offers a glimpse into the daily existence of the people who lived in medieval Europe. Sidebars and fun trivia break up the text. Readers will expand their knowledge of this era beyond knights, fair maidens, and castles as they learn about siege warfare, life in a medieval village, medieval clothing, markets and fairs, the Plague, medieval medicine, and the Crusades.

The Great Meow Mystery (Cinnamon Lake Mysteries #3)

by Dandi Daley Mackall

Developing readers join the Cinnamon Lakers as they dig up clues, solve mysteries and see how God helps them live out Christian values. Cats are disappearing from Cinnamon Lake, and the gang helps Molly explore the mystery. When all the clues point to a friend, Molly faces a tough decision. Is honesty the best policy when it means getting a Cinnamon Laker in trouble?

The Great Migration: An American Story

by Jacob Lawrence

A series of paintings chronicles the journey of African Americans who, like the artist's family, left the rural South in the early twentieth century to find a better life in the industrial North.

The Great Mistake

by Mary Roberts Rinehart

Illness, jealousy, and murder poison the atmosphere in an ultrawealthy communityPat comes from the village of Beverly, a charming country suburb whose inhabitants hate everything about the patch of gaudy mansions that have sprung up around it. The gaudiest of all belongs to Maud Wainwright, a bullish old widow whose famous dining room table has room for an even hundred. Orphaned and near destitute, Pat goes to work for Mrs. Wainwright, finding her stubborn, crude, and utterly charming. Even more pleasant is her son, Tony, a clever young rake whose only defect is his vicious, gold-digging wife.It is a happy position, but soon the tragedy that has always haunted Pat returns. First Mrs. Wainwright falls ill, then a servant is nearly murdered by the pool, and finally, someone is found dead on the grounds. When a woman has room at her table for one hundred friends, Pat soon learns, she must also make room for a few enemies.

Great Modern European Short Stories

by Douglas Angus Sylvia Angus

Taken from the Introduction written by Sylvia Angus and Douglas Angus: "All in all, the stories in this collection are of an astonishing variety and range. But this is only to be expected since they cover a unique phase of cultural evolution in which Europe passes through not one but two devastating modern technological wars, as well as the emancipation of the laboring classes and of women, the violent reversion to barbarism of fascism, and an unprecedented revolution in social manners, scientific knowledge, and peacetime technology. These stories are a kind of spiritual record of this remarkable breakthrough in cultural evolution." The authors of the twenty-five stories in this collection are: Anton Chekhov, Katherine Mansfield, James Joyce, Joseph Conrad, Thomas Mann, D. H. Lawrence, W. Somerset Maugham, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Franz Kafka, Isak Dinesen, Isaac Babel, Alberto Moravia, Karel Èapek, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Luigi Pirandello, Wolfgang Hildesheimer, Jakov Lind, Heinz Huber, Heinrich Böll, Tommaso Landolfi, Yuri Kazakov, Alan Sillitoe, Frank O'Connor, and Mary Lavin.

The Great Mom Swap

by Betsy Haynes

MOM, MEET YOUR NEW DAUGHTER. Lorna Markham and Scotti Wheeler are next-door neighbors and best friends. And they each share the same problem: their mothers. Lorna's mother nags her about her schoolwork, wondering why she can't be more like Scotti. And Scotti's mother nags her about her eating habits, telling her to follow Lorna's healthy example. The girls begin to think that, somewhere along the line, they ended up with the wrong mothers. And that gives them a terrific idea. They'll swap moms! What could be more perfect? Both mothers agree, and soon Lorna and Scotti are on a great new adventure with each other's families. Until a surprising thing happens-they each begin to suspect they've made a BIG mistake.

Great Moments in American Auto Racing

by Matt Christopher

The history of auto racing is chock-full of famous moments, with big-name drivers like Mario Andretti and Jeff Gordon. The histories of the Indy 500 and Daytona 500 races are rich with legendary drivers, family dynasties, rivalries, and tragedies. Fans of this sport are truly loyal and fanatical, and readers will eat up all the descriptions of nail-biting moments of tension. Packed with facts and action, this is a book young NASCAR fans will reach for again and again -- and because it comes from Matt Christopher, young readers know they're getting the best sports writing on the shelf.

Great Moments in Baseball History

by Matt Christopher

Capturing the suspense and play-by-play action of nine major league plays and the personalities of the athletes that made them, a fan's treasury includes Willie May's 1954 World Series catch and Jim Abbott's no-hitter.

Great Moments in the Summer Olympics

by Matt Christopher Stephanie Peters

The Summer Olympics are chock full of epic athletic achievements across hundreds of disciplines, especially Track and Field, Gymnastics, and Swimming. These are the sports that gave us Jesse Owens and Carl Lewis, Wilma Rudolph and Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Olga Korbut and Mary Lou Retton -- tremendous athletes whose Olympic accomplishments thrill us now just as much as they did when they occurred. Now readers can relive those moments in this fact-filled volume just right for young sports enthusiasts. And because it's Matt Christopher, young readers know they're getting the best sports writing on the shelf!

The Great Mortality

by John Kelly

A compelling history of the Black Death that scoured Europe in the mid-14th century killing 25 million people. It was one of the worst human disasters in history.

The Great Mortdecai Moustache Mystery: The Fourth Charlie Mortdecai Novel

by Kyril Bonfiglioli

"You couldn't snuggle under the duvet with anything more disreputable and delightful" --Stephen Fry 'She was a Fellow and Tutor of Scone College and the world must learn that Fellows and Tutors of Scone College shall not be done to death with impunity.' The Hon. Charlie Mortdecai, the inspiration for the character in the film Mortdecai, starring Johnny Depp, is invited to Oxford to investigate the cruel and most definitely unusual death of a don who collided with an omnibus. Though her death appears accidental, one or two things don't add up - such as two pairs of thugs who'd been following her just before her death. With more spies than you could shoe horn into a stretch limo and the solving of the odd murder along the way, The Great Mortdecai Moustache Mystery is a criminally comic delight.

Great Negotiations

by Fredrik Stanton

Words as much as weapons have shaped the course of history. Whether to avert, resolve, assist, or secure the outcome of a conflict, diplomacy in the modern age has had great triumphs and bitter failures, from the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, which narrowly spared humanity from a nuclear Armageddon, to the Treaty of Versailles after World War I, which created problems that still confront us today. Drawing on primary sources, transcripts, and interviews, Great Negotiations: Agreements that Changed the Modern World tells the stories of eight key episodes in modern diplomacy. From Benjamin Franklin securing crucial French support for the American revolution to Reagan and Gorbachev laying the groundwork to eliminate an entire class of nuclear weapons, Fredrik Stanton explains what each party brought to the negotiating table, the stakes, the obstacles to success, and how they were overcome.

The Great Neighborhood Book

by Jay Walljasper Project for Public Spaces

Abandoned lots and litter-strewn pathways, or rows of green beans and pockets of wildflowers? Graffiti-marked walls and desolate bus stops, or shady refuges and comfortable seating? What transforms a dingy, inhospitable area into a dynamic gathering place? How do individuals take back their neighborhood?Neighborhoods decline when the people who live there lose their connection and no longer feel part of their community. Recapturing that sense of belonging and pride of place can be as simple as planting a civic garden or placing some benches in a park. The Great Neighborhood Book explains how most struggling communities can be revived, not by vast infusions of cash, not by government, but by the people who live there. The author addresses such challenges as traffic control, crime, comfort and safety, and developing economic vitality. Using a technique called "placemaking"--the process of transforming public space--this exciting guide offers inspiring real-life examples that show the magic that happens when individuals take small steps and motivate others to make change.This book will motivate not only neighborhood activists and concerned citizens but also urban planners, developers, and policymakers. Jay Walljasper is a senior fellow of Project for Public Spaces (PPS), whose mission is to create and sustain enriching public places that build communities. He is a former editor of The Utne Reader and currently executive editor of Ode magazine. Inspired by European cities, The Great Neighborhood Book highlights practical solutions for the revitalization of North American cities.

Great North Road

by Peter F. Hamilton

New York Times bestselling author Peter F. Hamilton's riveting new thriller combines the nail-biting suspense of a serial-killer investigation with clear-eyed scientific and social extrapolation to create a future that seems not merely plausible but inevitable. A century from now, thanks to a technology allowing instantaneous travel across light-years, humanity has solved its energy shortages, cleaned up the environment, and created far-flung colony worlds. The keys to this empire belong to the powerful North family--composed of successive generations of clones. Yet these clones are not identical. For one thing, genetic errors have crept in with each generation. For another, the original three clone "brothers" have gone their separate ways, and the branches of the family are now friendly rivals more than allies. Or maybe not so friendly. At least that's what the murder of a North clone in the English city of Newcastle suggests to Detective Sidney Hurst. Sid is a solid investigator who'd like nothing better than to hand off this hot potato of a case. The way he figures it, whether he solves the crime or not, he'll make enough enemies to ruin his career. Yet Sid's case is about to take an unexpected turn: because the circumstances of the murder bear an uncanny resemblance to a killing that took place years ago on the planet St. Libra, where a North clone and his entire household were slaughtered in cold blood. The convicted slayer, Angela Tramelo, has always claimed her innocence. And now it seems she may have been right. Because only the St. Libra killer could have committed the Newcastle crime. Problem is, Angela also claims that the murderer was an alien monster. Now Sid must navigate through a Byzantine minefield of competing interests within the police department and the world's political and economic elite . . . all the while hunting down a brutal killer poised to strike again. And on St. Libra, Angela, newly released from prison, joins a mission to hunt down the elusive alien, only to learn that the line between hunter and hunted is a thin one.Praise for Peter F. Hamilton's The Evolutionary Void "Satisfying and powerful . . . Space Opera doesn't get much more epic."--SFFWorld "Spiced with plenty of action and intrigue."--San Jose Mercury News

The Great Novels and Short Stories of Somerset Maugham

by W. Somerset Maugham

This compilation contains three complete novels and eight major short stories from the canon of one of the twentieth century's most enduringly popular fiction writers.From London to Hong Kong, from Paris to Pago Pago, in Samoa or Malaya or on a Tahitian tropical isle, the men and women in this collection of masterfully crafted tales inhabit exotic, mysterious worlds-and at their own peril invade the dark territory of the human heart.Somerset Maugham, a noted English novelist, playwright, and author of masterly short stories, spent several months in the Pacific in 1916 and 1917 during an interlude in his service in British intelligence during World War I. Several of his works have been made into movies and plays, including Razor's Edge, Of Human Bondage, Cakes and Ale, Rain, and The Moon and Sixpence.

Great Novels of E. M. Forster

by E. M. Forster Louis Auchincloss

A renaissance of E. M. Forster is certainly under way. The success of the many films based upon his novels demonstrates Forster's appeal to the modern audience and his aptitude for entertaining a mass quantity of readers over several decades. Four of his best novels are brought together here in one volume:Where Angels Fear to TreadThe Longest JourneyA Room with a ViewHowards End"E. M. Forster's characters are the most lifelike we have had since Jane Austen laid down the pen."-Virgina Woolf"[Forster] does not hesitate to kill off a character right after introducing him with a careful description which leads us to anticipate a larger role."-Louis Auchincloss"The shapeliness of his prose and his plotting still satisfies. The width remains piercing and seamlessly painless."-the New York Times"There is no questioning or resisting the charm of Mr. Forster. The Longest Journey steadily attains beauty."-Saturday Review

The Great Omission

by Dallas Willard

The last command Jesus gave the church before he ascended to heaven was the Great Commission, the call for Christians to "make disciples of all the nations." But Christians have responded by making "Christians," not "disciples." This, according to brilliant scholar and renowned Christian thinker Dallas Willard, has been the church's Great Omission."The word disciple occurs 269 times in the New Testament," writes Willard. "Christian is found three times and was first introduced to refer precisely to disciples of Jesus. . . . The New Testament is a book about disciples, by disciples, and for disciples of Jesus Christ. But the point is not merely verbal. What is more important is that the kind of life we see in the earliest church is that of a special type of person. All of the assurances and benefits offered to humankind in the gospel evidently presuppose such a life and do not make realistic sense apart from it. The disciple of Jesus is not the deluxe or heavy-duty model of the Christian -- especially padded, textured, streamlined, and empowered for the fast lane on the straight and narrow way. He or she stands on the pages of the New Testament as the first level of basic transportation in the Kingdom of God."Willard boldly challenges the thought that we can be Christians without being disciples, or call ourselves Christians without applying this understanding of life in the Kingdom of God to every aspect of life on earth. He calls on believers to restore what should be the heart of Christianity -- being active disciples of Jesus Christ. Willard shows us that in the school of life, we are apprentices of the Teacher whose brilliance encourages us to rise above traditional church understanding and embrace the true meaning of discipleship -- an active, concrete, 24/7 life with Jesus.

The Great Omission

by Dallas Willard

The last command Jesus gave the church before he ascended to heaven was the Great Commission, the call for Christians to "make disciples of all the nations." But Christians have responded by making "Christians," not "disciples." This, according to brilliant scholar and renowned Christian thinker Dallas Willard, has been the church's Great Omission."The word disciple occurs 269 times in the New Testament," writes Willard. "Christian is found three times and was first introduced to refer precisely to disciples of Jesus. . . . The New Testament is a book about disciples, by disciples, and for disciples of Jesus Christ. But the point is not merely verbal. What is more important is that the kind of life we see in the earliest church is that of a special type of person. All of the assurances and benefits offered to humankind in the gospel evidently presuppose such a life and do not make realistic sense apart from it. The disciple of Jesus is not the deluxe or heavy-duty model of the Christian -- especially padded, textured, streamlined, and empowered for the fast lane on the straight and narrow way. He or she stands on the pages of the New Testament as the first level of basic transportation in the Kingdom of God."Willard boldly challenges the thought that we can be Christians without being disciples, or call ourselves Christians without applying this understanding of life in the Kingdom of God to every aspect of life on earth. He calls on believers to restore what should be the heart of Christianity -- being active disciples of Jesus Christ. Willard shows us that in the school of life, we are apprentices of the Teacher whose brilliance encourages us to rise above traditional church understanding and embrace the true meaning of discipleship -- an active, concrete, 24/7 life with Jesus.

The Great One

by Sports Illustrated

Sports Illustrated followed The Great One's career right from the very beginning. Starting in 1978, when Gretzky was a young phenom playing for the Soo Greyhounds, they had their best writers cover his rise to fame and subsequent dominance of the sport. His staggering career stats tend to overshadow the struggles he faced in his career -- the early days in Edmonton, when he was establishing himself as the greatest player, but could not lead his team to a cup. The years after the trade that shook the hockey world he spent years trying to lead a new team to glory, only managing to reach the final once more, in 1993, and losing in five games. Covered as well are his forgotten goal-droughts, the thoughts that he had lost his touch in the early nineties. His struggles with injury and playing though his father's near death. The Great One reads not like a sports book, but a biography of one of the greatest athletes of all time.Sports Illustrated's greatest writers all contribute articles, EM Swift, Michael Farber, Jack Kalla, to tell the complete story of Wayne Gretzky's career.

The Great Partnership

by Jonathan Sacks

An impassioned, erudite, thoroughly researched, and beautifully reasoned book from one of the most admired religious thinkers of our time that argues not only that science and religion are compatible, but that they complement each other--and that the world needs both. "Atheism deserves better than the new atheists," states Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, "whose methodology consists of criticizing religion without understanding it, quoting texts without contexts, taking exceptions as the rule, confusing folk belief with reflective theology, abusing, mocking, ridiculing, caricaturing, and demonizing religious faith and holding it responsible for the great crimes against humanity. Religion has done harm; I acknowledge that. But the cure for bad religion is good religion, not no religion, just as the cure for bad science is good science, not the abandonment of science." Rabbi Sacks's counterargument is that religion and science are the two essential perspectives that allow us to see the universe in its three-dimensional depth. Science teaches us where we come from. Religion explains to us why we are here. Science is the search for explanation. Religion is the search for meaning. We need scientific explanation to understand nature. We need meaning to understand human behavior. There have been times when religion tried to dominate science. And there have been times, including our own, when it is believed that we can learn all we need to know about meaning and relationships through biochemistry, neuroscience, and evolutionary psychology. In this fascinating look at the interdependence of religion and science, Rabbi Sacks explains why both views are tragically wrong.

Great Party Dips

by Peggy Fallon Alexandra Grablewski

Dips are the perfect party foods, and this full-color cookbook gives you more than 60 recipes that will add pizzazz to any party?cool dips, hot dips, salsas, spreads, p?t?s, and even recipes for dessert dips. You?ll find recipes for all your favorites, each with a special twist, as well as lots of new and exciting choices like Rockin? Moroccan Salsa, Artichoke-Asiago Dip with Lemon, and Deviled Shrimp with Bacon.

The Great Perhaps: A Novel

by Joe Meno

"This ambitious, adventurous writer . . . recalls Anton Chekhov with his amused appreciation of human foibles."--Wendy Smith, Chicago Tribune The sky is falling for the Caspers, a family of cowards. When the parents decide to separate, this family is forced to appreciate the cloudiness of this modern age.

The Great Persuasion

by Angus Burgin

Just as today's observers struggle to justify the workings of the free market in the wake of a global economic crisis, an earlier generation of economists revisited their worldviews following the Great Depression. The Great Persuasion is an intellectual history of that project. Angus Burgin traces the evolution of postwar economic thought in order to reconsider many of the most basic assumptions of our market-centered world. Conservatives often point to Friedrich Hayek as the most influential defender of the free market. By examining the work of such organizations as the Mont Pèlerin Society, an international association founded by Hayek in 1947 and later led by Milton Friedman, Burgin reveals that Hayek and his colleagues were deeply conflicted about many of the enduring problems of capitalism. Far from adopting an uncompromising stance against the interventionist state, they developed a social philosophy that admitted significant constraints on the market. Postwar conservative thought was more dynamic and cosmopolitan than has previously been understood. It was only in the 1960s and '70s that Friedman and his contemporaries developed a more strident defense of the unfettered market. Their arguments provided a rhetorical foundation for the resurgent conservatism of Barry Goldwater and Ronald Reagan and inspired much of the political and economic agenda of the United States in the ensuing decades. Burgin's brilliant inquiry uncovers both the origins of the contemporary enthusiasm for the free market and the moral quandaries it has left behind.

The Great Philosophers: Ayer

by Oswald Hanfling

Part of the GREAT PHILOSOPHERS series. A.J. Ayer 1910-1989 Ayer is best remembered for Language, Truth and Logic (1936), which introduced British and American readers to the logical positivism of the Vienna circle. Hanfling shows in this introduction to Ayer's work how he turned this philosophy into a form of British empiricism in the tradition of Hume. According to Ayer, philosophy is an activity of analysts. Metaphysical truths can be neither established nor refuted by philosophical enquiry: they are meaningless. In support of this claim, he deployed his 'principle of verifiability'. But he found it difficult to refine the principle 'in such a way as to find a middle ground between [an] over-strict requirement' which would disqualify perfectly ordinary statements as meaningless, and 'the over-indulgent licensing of gibberish' - including that of metaphysics.

The Great Philosophers: The Lives and Ideas of History's Greatest Thinkers

by Stephen Law

Since the beginning of time mankind has struggled with the big questions surrounding our existence. Whilst most people have heard of Socrates, Machiavelli and Nietzsche, many are less clear on their theories and key concepts.In The Great Philosophers, bestselling author Stephen Law condenses and deciphers their fundamental ideas. Avoiding the technical jargon and complex logic associated with most books on philosophy, Law brings the thoughts of these great thinkers, from Confucius and Buddha to Wittgenstein and Sartre, to life.

Showing 101,576 through 101,600 of 191,217 results

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