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OS X Mavericks Portable Genius

by Dwight Spivey

Plenty of tips, tricks, and shortcuts help you make the most of Apple's newest OS XOS X Mavericks is Apple's newest operating system, with great new ways to enhance your digital lifestyle. This hip, straightforward guide focuses on helping you get everything you want from your Mac. You'll discover how to customize your computer and workspace, troubleshoot and maintain OS X, and have fun browsing and manipulating images and multimedia. You'll listen to music and podcasts, discover how to work with and connect peripherals, copy music to an iPod, add a printer, sync your Mac to other devices, and much more.OS X Mavericks is the newest version of the Mac operating system, and this guide fills you in on how to use all the cool new featuresPortable Genius guides are packed with tips and techniques to help you make the most of your Apple digital lifestyleCovers such essentials as getting started and customizing OS X, browsing and manipulating images and multimedia, listening to music and podcasts, and using Game Center, Messages, and NotificationsShows how to connect peripherals, copy music to an iPod, add a printer, sync your Mac to other devices, troubleshoot problems, and maintain OS XOS X Mavericks Portable Genius is like having an Apple genius at your side whenever you want one.

OS X Mountain Lion: The Missing Manual

by David Pogue

What do you get when you cross a Mac with an iPad? OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion. Its 200 new features include iPaddish goodies like dictation, Notification Center, and Reminders--but not a single page of instructions. Fortunately, David Pogue is back, with the expertise and humor that have made this the #1 bestselling Mac book for over 10 years straight. Big-ticket changes. Twitter and Facebook intgration. Air-Play TV mirroring. Power Nap. Game Center. Documents in the Cloud. iMessages. Gatekeeper. If Apple wrote it, this book covers it. Mountain Lion Watch. This book demystifies the hundreds of smaller enhancements, too, in all 50 programs that come with the Mac: Safari, Mail, Messages, Preview... Shortcuts. This must be the tippiest, trickiest Mac book ever written. Undocumented surprises await on every page. Power users. Security, accounts, networking, build-your own Services, file sharing with Windows--this one witty, expert guide makes it all crystal clear. There's something new on practically every page of this new edition, and David Pogue brings his celebrated wit and expertise to every one of them. Apple's brought a new cat to town, and Mac OS X Mountain Lion: The Missing Manual is the best way to tame it.

Oscar And The Cricket: A Book About Moving And Rolling

by Geoff Waring

Start with Science books introduce kids to core science concepts through engaging stories, fresh illustrations, and supplemental activities. <P> One day Oscar sees a ball in the grass. "Try pushing it!" says Cricket. Oscar learns that the ball rolls slowly in grass and faster on a path, until it bounces off a tree and changes direction. Some things need a push to move, and others use their muscles to move themselves -- and to move plenty of other things, too.

Oscar, Cat-About-Town

by James Herriot

Oscar, a sad and starved gray kitten, arrived in James Herriot's clinic one day. The little girl who brought him in said he was lost. James and his family adopt the cat, but one day Oscar goes missing. When they search for Oscar, they discover that he loves to be a socialite, going about the town to all the social events.

Oscar Wilde and the Dead Man’s Smile (Oscar Wilde #3)

by Gyles Brandreth

Playwright and raconteur Oscar Wilde embarks on another adventure as he sets sail for America in the 1880s on a roller coaster of a lecture tour. But the adventure doesn't truly begin until Oscar boards an ocean liner headed back across the Atlantic and joins a motley crew led by French impresario Edmond La Grange. As Oscar becomes entangled with the La Grange acting dynasty, he suspects that all is not as it seems. What begins with a curious death at sea soon escalates to a series of increasingly macabre tragedies once the troupe arrives in Paris to performHamlet. A strange air of indifference surrounds these seemingly random events, inciting Oscar to dig deeper, aided by his friends Robert Sherard and the divine Sarah Bernhardt. What he discovers is a horrifying secret -- one that may bring him closer to his own last chapter than anyone could have imagined. As intelligent as it is beguiling, this third installment in the richly historical mystery series is sure to captivate and entertain.

Oscar Wilde and the Murders at Reading Gaol

by Gyles Brandreth

In this new installment in the engaging mystery series Booklist called "pitch-perfect" and "enthralling"--currently in development as a BBC television series--the incomparable playwright, novelist, raconteur, and now ex-convict Oscar Wilde faces his most fiendishly puzzling case yet.It is 1897, France. Oscar Wilde has fled the country after his release from Reading Gaol. Tonight he is sharing a drink and the story of his cruel imprisonment with a mysterious stranger. Oscar has endured a harsh regime: the treadmill, solitary confinement, censored letters, no writing materials. Yet even in the midst of such deprivation, his astonishing detective powers remain undiminished--and when first a brutal warder and then the prison chaplain are found murdered, who else should the Governor turn to for help other than Reading Gaol's most celebrated inmate?

Oscar Wilde and the Vatican Murders

by Gyles Brandreth

Oscar Wilde and the Vatican Murders opens in 1892, as an exhausted Arthur Conan Doyle retires to a spa in Germany with a suitcase full of fan mail. But his rest cure does not go as planned. The first person he encounters is Oscar Wilde, and the two friends make a series of macabre discoveries among the letters--a finger; a lock of hair; and, finally, an entire severed hand. The trail leads the intrepid duo to Rome, and to a case that involves miracles as well as murder. Pope Pius IX has just died--these are uncertain times in the Eternal City. To uncover the mystery and discover why the creator of Sherlock Holmes has been summoned in this way, Wilde and Conan Doyle must penetrate the innermost circle of the Catholic Church and expose the deadly secrets of the six men closest to the pope. In Gyles Brandreth's captivating and richly atmospheric novel, Wilde's powers as a detective are put to the test in his most compelling case yet.

Oscar's Day

by Jenny Vaughan Cynthia Benjamin

Complete Classroom Library includes one each of the following: Math LibraryScience LibrarySocial Studies LibraryContent Area Classroom Libraries include: 1 display box containing 10 6-packs (60 little books)1 Teacher Resource Portfolio1 Assessment Book (where available)Big Book Collection includes: 10 Big Books for Science10 Big Books for Social Studies10 Big Books for MathClassroom Library Add-on Packs include 1 copy of each title from the social studies, science, and math libraries. Add-On Packs include 1 copy of each title.

Osceola: Memories of a Sharecropper's Daughter

by Alan Govenar Shane W. Evans Osceola Mays

Osceola Mays was born in East Texas in 1909, the daughter of a sharecropper and the granddaughter of slaves. She survives fear, poverty, and the loss of loved ones by recalling memories of her childhood, and the stories, songs, and poems she learned from her mother and grandmother. Like a patchwork quilt, this collection pieces together Osceola's life into a vivid and profound mosaic. Osceola is a poignant and powerful oral history, a collection that will touch readers' hearts as it informs them of the legacy of slavery and the past conditions of African Americans in the South.

Oskar Schindler

by David Crowe

Spy, businessman, bon vivant, Nazi Party member, Righteous Gentile. This was Oskar Schindler, the controversial savior of almost 12,000 Jews during the Holocaust who struggled afterwards to rebuild his life and gain international recognition for his wartime deeds. Author David Crowe examines every phase of the subject's life in this landmark biography, presenting a figure of mythic proportions that one prominent Schindler Jew described as "an extraordinary man in extraordinary times."

Oskar Schindler: The Untold Account of His Life, Wartime Activities, and the True Story Behind the List

by David M. Crowe

Spy, businessman, bon vivant, Nazi Party member, Righteous Gentile. This was Oskar Schindler, the controversial savior of almost 12,000 Jews during the Holocaust who struggled afterwards to rebuild his life and gain international recognition for his wartime deeds. Author David Crowe examines every phase of the subject's life in this landmark biography, presenting a figure of mythic proportions that one prominent Schindler Jew described as "an extraordinary man in extraordinary times."

Osman's Dream

by Caroline Finkel

According to the Ottoman chronicles, the first sultan, Osman, had a dream in which a tree emerged fully formed from his navel "and its shade compassed the world"-symbolizing the vast empire he and his descendants were destined to forge. His vision was soon realized: At its height, the Ottoman realm extended from Hungary to the Persian Gulf, from North Africa to the Caucasus. The Ottoman Empire was one of the largest and most influential empires in world history. For centuries, Europe watched with fear as the Ottomans steadily advanced their rule across the Balkans. Yet travelers and merchants were irresistibly drawn toward Ottoman lands by their fascination with the Orient and the lure of profit. Although it survived for over six centuries, the history of the Ottoman Empire is too often colored by the memory of its bloody final throes. In this magisterial work Caroline Finkel lucidly recounts the epic story of the Ottoman Empire from its origins in the thirteenth century through its destruction on the battlefields of World War I.

Ossianic Unconformities

by Eric Gidal John Tallmadge

In a sequence of publications in the 1760s, James Macpherson, a Scottish schoolteacher in the central Highlands, created fantastic epics of ancient heroes and presented them as genuine translations of the poetry of Ossian, a fictionalized Caledonian bard of the third century. In Ossianic Unconformities Eric Gidal introduces the idiosyncratic publications of a group of nineteenth-century Scottish eccentrics who used statistics, cartography, and geomorphology to map and thereby vindicate Macpherson's controversial eighteenth-century renderings of Gaelic oral traditions. Although these writers primarily sought to establish the authenticity of Macpherson's "translations," they came to record, through promotion, evasion, and confrontation, the massive changes being wrought upon Scottish and Irish lands by British industrialization. Their obsessive and elaborate attempts to fix both the poetry and the land into a stable set of coordinates developed what we can now perceive as a nascent ecological perspective on literature in a changing world.Gidal examines the details of these imaginary geographies in conjunction with the social and spatial histories of Belfast and the River Lagan valley, Glasgow and the Firth of Clyde, and the Highlands and Western Isles of Scotland, regions that form both the sixth-century kingdom of Dál Riata and the fabled terrain of the Ossianic poems. Combining environmental and industrial histories with the reception of the poems of Ossian, Ossianic Unconformities unites literary history and book studies with geography, cartography, and geology to present and consider imaginative responses to environmental catastrophe.

The Osterman Weekend

by Robert Ludlum

In Zurich. . . in Moscow. . . in Washington. The machinery was already set in motion, while in a quiet suburb an odd assortment of men and women gathered for a momentous weekend. At stake was the very existence of the United States of America . . . and the future of the entire free world. BONUS: This edition includes an excerpt from Robert Ludlum's The Bourne Identity.


by Matt Greene

A brilliant and moving coming-of-age story in the tradition of Wonder by R. J. Palacio and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon--this debut novel is written with tremendous humor and charm. This is Alex's story. But he doesn't know exactly what it's about yet, so you probably shouldn't either. Instead, here are some things that it's sort of about (but not really): It's sort of (but not really) about brain surgery. It's sort of (but not really) about a hamster named Jaws 2 (after the original Jaws (who died), not the movie Jaws 2). It's sort of (but actually quite a lot) about Alex's parents. It's sort of (but not really) about feeling ostrichized (which is a better word for excluded (because ostriches can't fly so they often feel left out)). It's sort of (but not really (but actually, the more you think about it, kind of a lot)) about empathy (which is like sympathy only better), and also love and trust and fate and time and quantum mechanics and friendship and exams and growing up. And it's also sort of about courage. Because sometimes it actually takes quite a lot of it to bury your head in the sand.Advance praise for Ostrich "Irresistible! Ostrich is loaded with wit, charm, and wisdom. Alex is one of the sweetest and most inspiring narrators I've ever encountered. I dare you not to laugh, cry, and fall utterly in love."--Maria Semple, New York Times bestselling author of Where'd You Go, Bernadette?"One of the bravest novels I've read in a very long time. Matt Greene lets the reader become detective, and clue by clue we uncover not only the truth of Alex's world, but the deepest truths of what it means to love and lose."--Carol Rifka Brunt, author of Tell the Wolves I'm Home "Ostrich has given me the most enjoyable reading experience I've had all year and has one of the funniest and most engaging young narrators I've had the pleasure of reading. Matt Greene is seriously funny and in Ostrich proves comedy can be the finest of arts."--Matt Haig, author of The HumansFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

An Ostrich a Day

by Nancy J. Farrier

A Christian romance set in Arizona ranch country, Blaire inherits an ostrich ranch. Reeling from a broken engagement, will Blaire allow God to be the Lord of her life and lead her to a decision about selling the ranch and finding the love of her life?

Ostriches (Nature's Children)

by Merebeth Switzer

Describes the physical details, habitat, and lifestyle of the ostrich, the largest bird on earth.

The Other

by Thomas Tryon

Holland and Niles Perry are identical thirteen-year-old twins. They are close, close enough, almost, to read each other's thoughts, but they couldn't be more different. Holland is bold and mischievous, a bad influence, while Niles is kind and eager to please, the sort of boy who makes parents proud. The Perrys live in the bucolic New England town their family settled centuries ago, and as it happens, the extended clan has gathered at its ancestral farm this summer to mourn the death of the twins' father in a most unfortunate accident. Mrs. Perry still hasn't recovered from the shock of her husband's gruesome end and stays sequestered in her room, leaving her sons to roam free. As the summer goes on, though, and Holland's pranks become increasingly sinister, Niles finds he can no longer make excuses for his brother's actions. Thomas Tryon's best-selling novel about a homegrown monster is an eerie examination of the darkness that dwells within everyone. It is a landmark of psychological horror that is a worthy descendent of the books of James Hogg, Robert Louis Stevenson, Shirley Jackson, and Patricia Highsmith.

The Other Adam Smith

by Warren Montag Mike Hill

The Other Adam Smith represents the next wave of critical thinking about the still under-examined work of this paradigmatic Enlightenment thinker. Not simply another book about Adam Smith, it allows and even necessitates his inclusion in the realm of theory in the broadest sense. Moving beyond his usual economic and moral philosophical texts, Mike Hill and Warren Montag take seriously Smith's entire corpus, his writing on knowledge, affect, sociability and government, and political economy, as constituting a comprehensive#151;though highly contestable#151;system of thought. We meet not just Smith the economist, but Smith the philosopher, Smith the literary critic, Smith the historian, and Smith the anthropologist. Placed in relation to key thinkers such as Hume, Lord Kames, Fielding, Hayek, Von Mises, and Agamben, this other Adam Smith, far from being localized in the history of eighteenth-century economic thought or ideas, stands at the center of the most vibrant and contentious debates of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

The Other Americans in Paris: Businessmen, Countesses, Wayward Youth, 1880-1941

by Nancy L. Green

While Gertrude Stein hosted the literati of the Left Bank, Mrs. Bates-Batcheller, an American socialite and concert singer in Paris, held sumptuous receptions for the Daughters of the American Revolution in her suburban villa. History may remember the American artists, writers, and musicians of the Left Bank best, but the reality is that there were many more American businessmen, socialites, manufacturersOCO representatives, and lawyers living on the other side of the River Seine. a Be they newly minted American countesses married to foreigners with impressive titles or American soldiers who had settled in France after World War I with their French wives, they provide a new view of the notion of expatriates. Nancy L. Green thus introduces us for the first time to a long-forgotten part of the American overseas populationOCopredecessors to todayOCOs expatsOCowhile exploring the politics of citizenship and the business relationships, love lives, and wealth (and poverty for some) of Americans who staked their claim to the City of Light. "The Other Americans in Paris" shows that elite migration is a part of migration "tout court "and that debates over OC AmericanizationOCO have deep roots in the twentieth century. "

The Other Blacklist

by Mary Helen Washington

Mary Helen Washington recovers the vital role of 1950s leftist politics in the works and lives of contemporary African American writers and artists. While most histories of McCarthyism focus on the devastation of the black list and the intersection of leftist politics and American culture, few include the activities of radical writers and artists from the Black Popular Front. Washington's work incorporates these black intellectuals back into our understanding of twentieth-century African American literature and art and expands our understanding of the creative ferment energizing all of America during this period.Mary Helen Washington reads four representative writers: Lloyd Brown, Paule Marshall, Alice Childress, and Gwendolyn Brooks, and surveys the work of visual artist Charles White. She traces resonances of leftist ideas and activism in their artistic achievements and follows their balanced critique of mainstream liberal and conservative political and literary spheres. Her study recounts the targeting of African American as well as white writers during the McCarthy era, reconstructs the events of the 1959 Black Writers' Conference in New York, and argues for the ongoing influence of the Black Popular Front decades after it folded. Defining the contours of a distinctly black modernism and its far-ranging radicalization of American politics and culture, Washington fundamentally reorients scholarship on African American and Cold War literature and life.

The Other Boleyn Girl (Boleyn #1)

by Philippa Gregory

Two sisters competing for the greatest prize: the love of a king When Mary Boleyn comes to court as an innocent girl of fourteen, she catches the eye of Henry VIII. Dazzled by the king, Mary falls in love with both her golden prince and her growing role as unofficial queen. However, she soon realizes just how much she is a pawn in her familys ambitious plots as the kings interest begins to wane and she is forced to step aside for her best friend and rival: her sister, Anne. Then Mary knows that she must defy her family and her king, and take her fate into her own hands. A rich and compelling tale of love, sex, ambition, and intrigue, The Other Boleyn Girl introduces a woman of extraordinary determination and desire who lived at the heart of the most exciting and glamorous court in Europe and survived by following her own heart.

The Other Brother

by Lena Nelson Dooley

Christian romance set in Minnesota in 1891.

The Other Child

by Charlotte Link Stefan Tobler

With more than fifteen million copies of her novels sold in Europe, Charlotte Link makes her chillingly psychological American debut, now in English for the first timeA suspenseful, atmospheric new psychological crime novel from Germany's most successful living female authorAn old farm, a deserted landscape, a dark secret from times past with fatal consequences for the present. In the tranquil northern seaside town of Scarborough, a student is found cruelly murdered. For months, the investigators are in the dark, until they are faced with a copy-cat crime. The investigation continues as they struggle to establish a connection between the two victims. Ambitious detective Valerie Almond clings to the all too obvious: a rift within the family of the second victim. But there is far more to the case than first appears, and Valerie is led toward a dark secret inextricably linked to the evacuation of children to Scarborough during World War II. Horrified at her last-minute discovery, Valerie realizes that she may be too late to save the next victim.

Showing 104,501 through 104,525 of 137,400 results


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