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Diversity and Inclusion in Early Childhood

by Chandrika Devarakonda

Covering a wide range of concepts and taking a broader perspective of what inclusion entail, this book offers an overview of current research, policy and practice in diversity and inclusion in the early years. It is a clear introduction to what inclusive practice means for those working with young children in the early stages of their lives. With case studies and activities designed to help students relate to diverse situations, the author discusses the main issues surrounding: - race - gender - culture - disability and Special Educational Needs - English as an Additional Language - Traveller children - the contexts of inclusion and exclusion - good practice in early childhood settings - different perspectives of inclusion This is essential reading for students studying inclusion and diversity on early childhood or early years courses, and those seeking to promote good practice and enable all children to develop to their full potential irrespective of their background. 'The success of this book is in its ability to explore inclusion from a wide perspective. Offering a range of thought-provoking material, such as reflective questions, debates and controversies, practitioner, parent and children's views, legislation, activities, and examples of good practice, will keep readers interested and actively engaged throughout the book'-Dr Anna Kilderry, Senior Lecturer, Early Childhood Education, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia Chandrika Devarakonda is a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Education and Children's Services at the University of Chester.

Diversity as Strategy

by David A. Thomas

FeatureArticle

Diversity, Equality and Achievement in Education

by Gianna Knowles Vini Lander

Knowles and Lander (educational studies and primary education, U. of Chichester, UK) explore the intersection of diversity, equality, and achievement in education in Britain. They discuss how understanding of self, identity, values, attitudes, and beliefs can affect how teachers approach diversity and their professional practice, why it is important to consider identity alongside diversity, how children need to form secure family attachments, how Britain has become an increasingly diverse society, the meaning of ethnicity and how it is linked to achievement, and class and gender issues. They consider the educational debate related to Gypsy, Roma, and Traveller people; what refugee status and asylum seeking means for learning and achievement; the vulnerability of looked-after children or children in care to underachievement; and how to enable equality and achievement for children with disability. Annotation ©2012 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Diversity Explosion

by William H. Frey

At its optimistic best, America has embraced its identity as the world's melting pot. Today it is on the cusp of becoming a country with no racial majority, and new minorities are poised to exert a profound impact on U.S. society, economy, and politics. The concept of a "minority white" may instill fear among some Americans, but William H. Frey, the man behind the demographic research, points out that demography is destiny, and the fear of a more racially diverse nation will almost certainly dissipate over time.Through a compelling narrative and eye-catching charts and maps, eminent demographer Frey interprets and expounds on the dramatic growth of minority populations in the United States. He finds that without these expanding groups, America could face a bleak future: this new generation of young minorities, who are having children at a faster rate than whites, is infusing our aging labor force with vitality and innovation. In contrast with the labor force-age population of Japan, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom, the U.S. labor force-age population is set to grow 5 percent by 2030. Diversity Explosion shares the good news about diversity in the coming decades, and the more globalized, multiracial country that the U.S. is becoming.ContentsA Pivotal Period for Race in AmericaOld versus Young: Cultural Generation GapsAmerica's New Racial MapHispanics Fan Out: Who Goes Where?Asians in America: The Newest Minority SurgeThe Great Migration of Blacks-In ReverseWhite Population Shifts-A Zero-SumMelting Pot Cities and SuburbsNeighborhood Segregation: Toward a New Racial ParadigmMultiracial Marriages and Multiracial AmericaRace and Politics: Expanding the BattlegroundAmerica on the Cusp

Diversity Explosion

by William H. Frey

At its optimistic best, America has embraced its identity as the world's melting pot. Today it is on the cusp of becoming a country with no racial majority, and new minorities are poised to exert a profound impact on U.S. society, economy, and politics. In April 2011 a New York Times headline announced, "Numbers of Children of Whites Falling Fast." As it turns out, that year became the first time in American history that more minority babies than white babies were born. The concept of a "minority white" may instill fear among some Americans, but William H. Frey, the man behind the demographic research, points out that demography is destiny, and the fear of a more racially diverse nation will almost certainly dissipate over time.Through a compelling narrative and eye-catching charts and maps, eminent demographer Frey interprets and expounds on the dramatic growth of minority populations in the United States. He finds that without these expanding groups, America could face a bleak future: this new generation of young minorities, who are having children at a faster rate than whites, is infusing our aging labor force with vitality and innovation.In contrast with the labor force-age population of Japan, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom, the U.S. labor force-age population is set to grow 5 percent by 2030. Diversity Explosion shares the good news about diversity in the coming decades, and the more globalized, multiracial country that U.S. is becoming.Contents1. A Pivotal Period for Race in America2. Old versus Young: Cultural Generation Gaps3. America's New Racial Map4. Hispanics Fan Out: Who Goes Where?5. Asians in America: The Newest Minority Surge6. The Great Migration of Blacks--In Reverse7. White Population Shifts--A Zero-Sum Game8. Melting Pot Cities and Suburbs9. Neighborhood Segregation: Toward a New Racial Paradigm10. Multiracial Marriages and Multiracial America11. Race and Politics: Expanding the Battleground12. America on the Cuspics Fan Out: Who Goes Where? 5. Asians in America: Where They Matter Most 6. The Great Migration in Reverse 7. Zero-Sum Game: White Gains and Losses 8. Melting Pot Cities and Suburbs 9. Neighborhood Segregation-Delayed Declines 10. Mixed-Race Marriages and Multicultural America 11. Race and Politics: Red, Blue, and Purple States 12. New Racial Demographics and the Nation's Future

Diversity in America (4th Edition)

by Vincent N. Parrillo

The author takes the reader through different American eras, beginning with the indigenous populations and continuing through colonial times, the early national period, the age of expansion, the industrial age, the information age, and today.

Diversity in Career Preferences of Future Health Workers in Rwanda: Where, Why, and For How Much?

by Tomas Lievens Pieter Serneels Agnes Soucat Jean Damascene Butera

Relying on unique survey data, this paper analyzes the career preferences of future health workers in Rwanda, focusing on their sector preferences, their willingness to work in rural areas, their likelihood to migrate abroad, and their readiness to work in a high HIV prevalence environment. The findings show that health workers are not as uniform as is often thought, and can have very different preferences regarding wages, intrinsic motivation, and attitudes toward risk. But there are commonalities among future health workers, and the results highlight the importance of intrinsic motivation. To improve health policies, many governments have identified human resources in the health field as a policy priority. To improve policies, this paper provides evidence on health workers' choices and behavior, and it will be a valuable resource for government officials to design effective human resource policies. This working paper was produced as part of the World Bank's Africa Region Health Systems for Outcomes (HSO) Program. The Program, funded by the World Bank, the Government of Norway, the Government of the United Kingdom, and the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI), focuses on strengthening health systems in Africa to reach the poor and achieve tangible results related to Health, Nutrition, and Population. The main pillars and focus of the program center on knowledge and capacity building related to Human Resources for Health, Health Financing, Pharmaceuticals, Governance and Service Delivery, and Infrastructure and ICT.

Diversity in Coaching

by Jonathan Passmore Association for Coaching

Diversity in Coaching explores the impact and implication of difference in coaching. The book looks at how coaches can respond to issues of gender, generational, cultural, national and racial difference. Understanding how diversity impacts upon coaching is a crucial element to coaching effectively in today's diverse society and can give coaches the edge when responding to their coachees need. Written by an international team of coaching professionals, the book provides guidance on understanding diversity and how coaches can adapt coaching styles and techniques to meet individual needs, local demands and cultural preferences.It explores the impact and implication of difference in coaching, providing practical information to help coaches respond effectively to issues of diversity.

Diversity in Sport Organizations

by George B. Cunningham

Writing for undergraduate and graduate students, Cunningham (sport management, Texas A&M U.) discusses how diversity affects sports organizations, devoting attention to aspects of race, sex and gender, age, disability, obesity, religion, sexual orientation, and social class. Following an overview of diversity, approaches to its study, and an examination of prejudice and discrimination, he details compositional and relational types, and ways to manage workplace diversity. Both author and subject indexes are included. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Diversity Matters

by Susan B. Haire Laura P. Moyer

Until President Jimmy Carter launched an effort to diversify the lower federal courts, the U. S. courts of appeals had been composed almost entirely of white males. But by 2008, over a quarter of sitting judges were women and 15 percent were African American or Hispanic. Underlying the argument made by administration officials for a diverse federal judiciary has been the expectation that the presence of women and minorities will ensure that the policy of the courts will reflect the experiences of a diverse population. Yet until now, scholarly studies have offered only limited support for the expectation that judges' race, ethnicity, or gender impacts their decision making on the bench. In Diversity Matters, Susan B. Haire and Laura P. Moyer employ innovative new methods of analysis to offer a fresh examination of the effects of diversity on the many facets of decision making in the federal appellate courts. Drawing on oral histories and data on appellate decisions through 2008, the authors' analyses demonstrate that diversity on the bench affects not only individual judges' choices but also the overall character and quality of judicial deliberation and decisions. Looking forward, the authors anticipate the ways in which these process effects will become more pronounced as a result of the highly diverse Obama appointment cohort.

Diversity of Hydrothermal Systems on Slow Spreading Ocean Ridges, 1st Edition

by Peter A. Rona Bramley J. Murton Jérôme Dyment Colin W. Devey

Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Geophysical Monograph Series, Volume 188.Diversity of Hydrothermal Systems on Slow Spreading Ocean Ridges presents a multidisciplinary overview of the remarkable emerging diversity of hydrothermal systems on slow spreading ocean ridges in the Atlantic, Indian, and Arctic oceans. When hydrothermal systems were first found on the East Pacific Rise and other Pacific Ocean ridges beginning in the late 1970s, the community consensus held that the magma delivery rate of intermediate to fast spreading was necessary to support black smoker-type high-temperature systems and associated chemosynthetic ecosystems and polymetallic sulfide deposits. Contrary to that consensus, hydrothermal systems not only occur on slow spreading ocean ridges but, as reported in this volume, are generally larger, exhibit different chemosynthetic ecosystems, produce larger mineral deposits, and occur in a much greater diversity of geologic settings than those systems in the Pacific. The full diversity of hydrothermal systems on slow spreading ocean ridges, reflected in the contributions to this volume, is only now emerging and opens an exciting new frontier for ocean ridge exploration, includingProcesses of heat and chemical transfer from the Earth's mantle and crust via slow spreading ocean ridges to the oceansThe major role of detachment faulting linking crust and mantle in hydrothermal circulationChemical reaction products of mantle involvement including serpentinization, natural hydrogen, abiotic methane, and hydrocarbon synthesisGeneration of large polymetallic sulfide deposits hosted in ocean crust and mantleChemosynthetic vent communities hosted in the diverse settingsThe readership for this volume will include schools, universities, government laboratories, and scientific societies in developed and developing nations, including over 150 nations that have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.

The Diversity Of Life

by Edward O. Wilson

View a collection of videos on Professor Wilson entitled "On the Relation of Science and the Humanities" "In the Amazon Basin the greatest violence sometimes begins as a flicker of light beyond the horizon. There in the perfect bowl of the night sky, untouched by light from any human source, a thunderstorm sends its premonitory signal and begins a slow journey to the observer, who thinks: the world is about to change. " Watching from the edge of the Brazilian rain forest, witness to the sort of violence nature visits upon its creatures, Edward O. Wilson reflects on the crucible of evolution, and so begins his remarkable account of how the living world became diverse and how humans are destroying that diversity. Wilson, internationally regarded as the dean of biodiversity studies, conducts us on a tour through time, traces the processes that create new species in bursts of adaptive radiation, and points out the cataclysmic events that have disrupted evolution and diminished global diversity over the past 600 million years. The five enormous natural blows to the planet (such as meteorite strikes and climatic changes) required 10 to 100 million years of evolutionary repair. The sixth great spasm of extinction on earth--caused this time entirely by humans--may be the one that breaks the crucible of life. Wilson identifies this crisis in countless ecosystems around the globe: coral reefs, grasslands, rain forests, and other natural habitats. Drawing on a variety of examples such as the decline of bird populations in the United States, the extinction of many species of freshwater fish in Africa and Asia, and the rapid disappearance of flora and fauna as the rain forests are cut down, he poignantly describes the death throes of the living world's diversity--projected to decline as much as 20 percent by the year 2020. All evidence marshaled here resonates through Wilson's tightly reasoned call for a spirit of stewardship over the world's biological wealth. He makes a plea for specific actions that will enhance rather than diminish not just diversity but the quality of life on earth. Cutting through the tangle of environmental issues that often obscure the real concern, Wilson maintains that the era of confrontation between forces for the preservation of nature and those for economic development is over; he convincingly drives home the point that both aims can, and must, be integrated. Unparalleled in its range and depth, Wilson's masterwork is essential reading for those who care about preserving the world biological variety and ensuring our planet's health.

Diversity of Living Things

by Mcdougal Littell

In this book you will see how scientific knowledge keeps growing and changing as scientists ask new questions and rethink what was known before.

Diversity, Oppression, and Social Functioning: Person-in-Environment Assessment and Intervention (3rd Edition)

by George A. Appleby Julia Hamilton Edgar Colon

Using the "Person-In-Environment" (PIE) theoretical framework, this diversity practice text teaches students how to think about their personal reactions and assumptions about diversity and what constitutes cultural competent "assessment" and "intervention" when working with a broad range of diverse populations. The diverse populations presented in the text are described within an ecological, strengths perspective. The authors' thesis is that, in order to work effectively with diverse populations, it is necessary to take into consideration the complex dynamics of social functioning and social oppression. The "Person-In-Environment" theoretical framework provides a basis for analysis of the social, economic, and political reality of these diverse populations. The text presents an affirmative practice approach and builds on the available diversity practice literature. This text can be used in diversity practice courses, courses on working with oppressed populations, and other practice courses (such as advanced practice) that focus on diversity issues.

The Divide

by Nicholas Evans

Between every man and every woman there is a wilderness called the divide

Divide, The

by Nicholas Evans

Two backcountry skiers find the body of a young woman embedded in the ice of a remote mountain creek. All through the night police work with arc lights and chainsaws to prise her out. Identifying her doesn't take so long. Abbie Cooper is wanted for murder and her picture is on law enforcement computers all across America. But how did she die? And what was the trail of events that led this golden child of a loving family so tragically astray?From the number one bestselling author of The Horse Whisperer, master storyteller Nicholas Evans, comes this powerful new novel, an epic thriller of the human heart. In a journey of discovery and redemption, from the streets of New York to the daunting grandeur of the Rocky Mountains, it tells the heart-rending tale of a family fractured by divorce. As both parents and children struggle in search of lost happiness, some devastating truths unravel. The Divide is the story of a great love betrayed and of the yearnings and needs, the dashed hopes and disillusionments that connect and separate all men and women.

The Divide (The Divide #1)

by Elizabeth Kay

While spending his vacation in Costa Rica, Felix stumbles into The Divide, a magical world where mythical creatures are real and human beings are only a legend.

Divide the Wind

by Mary Carroll

Silhouette romance

Divided

by David Cay Johnston

The issue of inequality has irrefutably returned to the fore, riding on the anger against Wall Street following the 2008 financial crisis and the concentration of economic and political power in the hands of the super-rich. The Occupy movement made the plight of the 99 percent an indelible part of the public consciousness, and concerns about inequality were a decisive factor in the 2012 presidential elections.How bad is it? According to Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Cay Johnston, most Americans, in inflation-adjusted terms, are now back to the average income of 1966. Shockingly, from 2009 to 2011, the top 1 percent got 121 percent of the income gains while the bottom 99 percent saw their income fall. Yet in this most unequal of developed nations, every aspect of inequality remains hotly contested and poorly understood.Divided collects the writings of leading scholars, activists, and journalists to provide an illuminating, multifaceted look at inequality in America, exploring its devastating implications in areas as diverse as education, justice, health care, social mobility, and political representation. Provocative and eminently readable, here is an essential resource for anyone who cares about the future of America--and compelling evidence that inequality can be ignored only at the nation's peril.

Divided Allegiance (Deed of Paksenarrion #2)

by Elizabeth Moon

Once a sheep farmer's daughter, now a seasoned veteran. Paksenarrion has proven herself a fighter. Years with Duke Phelan's Company taught her weaponry, discipline, and how to react as part of a military unit. Now, though, Paks feels spurred to a solitary destiny. Against all odds she is accepted as a paladin-candidate by the Fellowship of Gird. Years of study will follow, for a paladin must be versed in diplomacy and magic as well as the fighting arts. But before she is fully trained. Paks is called to her first mission: to seek out the fabled stronghold of Luap far to the west. The way is long, the dangers many -- and not even the Marshal-General of Gird can say whether glory or ruin awaits.

Divided America: The Ferocious Power Struggle in American Politics

by Earl Black Merle Black

Divided America tells the biggest story in American politics today. It's the story behind the emergence of a ferocious power struggle between conservative Republicans and liberal Democrats that is tearing the country's politics apart. Drawing on extensive polling data and close analyses of presidential, senatorial, and congressional elections over the past fifty years, two eminent political scientists show, for the first time, how partisan warfare has reduced both major parties to minority status and locked them into fierce power struggles in each election cycle, thereby making America less stable and more difficult to govern. Because the two major parties are now evenly balanced in the national electorate, control of the White House and Congress can shift dramatically with each election. Neither Republicans nor Democrats operate with any "lock" on the presidency, House of Representatives, or Senate, as demonstrated by the 2006 congressional elections. Earl Black and Merle Black examine the party battles as they've played themselves out in the nation's five principal geographic areas. Each party has developed two important regional strongholds, as exemplified in the 2004 elections, when Republicans won all the electoral votes and sizable majorities of House and Senate seats in the South and Mountain/Plains states while the Democrats won almost all the electoral votes and large majorities in the Northeast and the Pacific Rim states. The Midwest is the perennial swing region. The authors describe the enormous changes that have occurred in the electorates of each region over the past fifty years -- with emphasis on how the size and partisan affiliations of key groups have changed -- and show how these transformations have generated today's unstable two-party battles. Although the relentlessly competitive nature of modern American politics is generally appreciated, the regional causes underlying this new state of affairs are not well understood. Because neither Democrats nor Republicans can produce national majorities simply by sweeping their regional strongholds, they are locked in a fierce power struggle in each election. Divided America tells the story of these remarkable developments in clear, vigorous prose and provides a pragmatic understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of each party. For the foreseeable future, each party will be within striking distance of winning -- or losing -- political power in every national institution. Understanding the party battles in America's regions is vital to understanding how today's losers can become tomorrow's winners

Divided by Borders: Mexican Migrants and Their Children

by Joanna Dreby

Since 2000, approximately 440,000 Mexicans have migrated to the United States every year. Tens of thousands have left children behind in Mexico to do so. For these parents, migration is a sacrifice. What do parents expect to accomplish by dividing their families across borders? How do families manage when they are living apart? More importantly, do parents' relocations yield the intended results? Probing the experiences of migrant parents, children in Mexico, and their caregivers, Joanna Dreby offers an up-close and personal account of the lives of families divided by borders. What she finds is that the difficulties endured by transnational families make it nearly impossible for parents' sacrifices to result in the benefits they expect. Yet, paradoxically, these hardships reinforce family members' commitments to each other. A story both of adversity and the intensity of family ties, "Divided by Borders " is an engaging and insightful investigation of the ways Mexican families struggle and ultimately persevere in a global economy.

Divided By A Common Language: A Guide To British And American English

by Christopher Davies

Puzzled by signs warning you to "mind the gap" in the London Underground? Wondering what will be on your plate if you order "toad in the hole" in a London café? In Divided by a Common Language, Christopher Davies explains these expressions and discusses the many differences in pronunciation, spelling, and vocabulary between British and American English. He compares the customs, manners, and practical details of daily life in the United Kingdom and the United States, and American readers will enjoy his account of American culture as seen through an Englishman's eyes. Davies tops it off with an amusing list of expressions that sound innocent enough in one country but make quite the opposite impression in the other. Two large glossaries help travelers translate from one variety of English to the other, and additional lists explain the distinctive words of Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. Divided by a Common Language is the ideal travel companion for both British visitors to the U. S. and American visitors to the U. K. It is also the perfect book for Britons interested in American culture and Americans enjoying British novels, movies, and television at home.

Divided By Faith: Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe

by Benjamin J. Kaplan

As religious violence flares around the world, we are confronted with an acute dilemma: Can people coexist in peace when their basic beliefs are irreconcilable? Benjamin Kaplan responds by taking us back to early modern Europe, when the issue of religious toleration was no less pressing than it is today. Divided by Faith begins in the wake of the Protestant Reformation, when the unity of western Christendom was shattered, and takes us on a panoramic tour of Europe's religious landscape--and its deep fault lines--over the next three centuries. Kaplan's grand canvas reveals the patterns of conflict and toleration among Christians, Jews, and Muslims across the continent, from the British Isles to Poland. It lays bare the complex realities of day-to-day interactions and calls into question the received wisdom that toleration underwent an evolutionary rise as Europe grew more "enlightened. " We are given vivid examples of the improvised arrangements that made peaceful coexistence possible, and shown how common folk contributed to toleration as significantly as did intellectuals and rulers. Bloodshed was prevented not by the high ideals of tolerance and individual rights upheld today, but by the pragmatism, charity, and social ties that continued to bind people divided by faith. Divided by Faith is both history from the bottom up and a much-needed challenge to our belief in the triumph of reason over faith. This compelling story reveals that toleration has taken many guises in the past and suggests that it may well do the same in the future.

The Divided Dominion

by Ethan A. Schmidt

In The Divided Dominion, Ethan A. Schmidt examines the social struggle that created Bacon's Rebellion, focusing on the role of class antagonism in fostering violence toward native people in seventeenth-century Virginia. This provocative volume places a dispute among Virginians over the permissibility of eradicating Native Americans for land at the forefront in understanding this pivotal event.Myriad internal and external factors drove Virginians to interpret their disputes with one another increasingly along class lines. The decades-long tripartite struggle among elite whites, non-elite whites, and Native Americans resulted in the development of mutually beneficial economic and political relationships between elites and Native Americans. When these relationships culminated in the granting of rights--equal to those of non-elite white colonists--to Native Americans, the elites crossed a line and non-elite anger boiled over. A call for the annihilation of all Indians in Virginia united different non-elite white factions and molded them in widespread social rebellion.The Divided Dominion places Indian policy at the heart of Bacon's Rebellion, revealing the complex mix of social, cultural, and racial forces that collided in Virginia in 1676. This new analysis will interest students and scholars of colonial and Native American history.

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