Browse Results What Download Format Should I Choose?

Showing 109,001 through 109,025 of 146,356 results

Of Birds and Beasts

by Ruskin Bond

Eight stories about different birds and beasts.

Of Blood and Sorrow

by Valerie Wilson Wesley

Valerie Wilson Wesley's private investigator, Tamara Hayle, whom the Houston Chronicle calls "smart, sexy, tough but tender," has earned enthusiastic acclaim from reviewers and readers alike. Now Newark, New Jersey's savviest detective confronts the one case she never saw coming-and discovers how ties that bind can easily become a noose. Tamara Hayle can't believe that her life is this good. New York's most powerful businessman wants her to work for him, her new lover seems caring and supportive, and her son, Jamal, is thriving. But as Tamara sardonically observes, "When things stir that easy, there's always something lumpy at the bottom of the pot. " Enter Lilah Love, an old acquaintance who begs Tamara to find her missing child. Tamara, however, is wary of Lilah, who attracts mayhem and murder like an alley cat attracts fleas. Next up is Basil Dupre, Tamara's outlaw ex-lover, who always brings passion-and chaos-when he strolls into Tamara's life. Suddenly Tamara's safe world isn't so secure, especially when Jamal witnesses a brutal murder and becomes the prime suspect. As the body count rises, Tamara and Jamal will follow a long-forgotten secret into a terrifying confrontation with love gone bad, trust turned lethal, and a past hungry to claim more lives. From the Hardcover edition.

Of Bondage

by Amanda Bailey

The late sixteenth-century penal debt bond, which allowed an unsatisfied creditor to seize the body of his debtor, set in motion a series of precedents that would shape the legal, philosophical, and moral issue of property-in-person in England and America for centuries. Focusing on this historical juncture at which debt litigation was not merely an aspect of society but seemed to engulf it completely, Of Bondage examines a culture that understood money and the body of the borrower as comparable forms of property that impinged on one another at the moment of default.Amanda Bailey shows that the early modern theater, itself dependent on debt bonds, was well positioned to stage the complex ethical issues raised by a system of forfeiture that registered as a bodily event. While plays about debt like The Merchant of Venice and The Custom of the Country did not use the language of political philosophy, they were artistically and financially invested in exploring freedom as a function of possession. By revealing dramatic literature's heretofore unacknowledged contribution to the developing narrative of possessed persons, Amanda Bailey not only deepens our understanding of creditor-debtor relations in the period but also sheds new light on the conceptual conditions for the institutions of indentured servitude and African slavery. Of Bondage is vital not only for students and scholars of English literature but also for those interested in British and colonial legal history, the history of human rights, and the sociology of economics.

Of Empires and Citizens

by Amaney A. Jamal

In the post-Cold War era, why has democratization been slow to arrive in the Arab world? This book argues that to understand support for the authoritarian status quo in parts of this region--and the willingness of its citizens to compromise on core democratic principles--one must factor in how a strong U.S. presence and popular anti-Americanism weakens democratic voices. Examining such countries as Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Palestine, and Saudi Arabia, Amaney Jamal explores how Arab citizens decide whether to back existing regimes, regime transitions, and democratization projects, and how the global position of Arab states shapes people's attitudes toward their governments. While the Cold War's end reduced superpower hegemony in much of the developing world, the Arab region witnessed an increased security and economic dependence on the United States. As a result, the preferences of the United States matter greatly to middle-class Arab citizens, not just the elite, and citizens will restrain their pursuit of democratization, rationalizing their backing for the status quo because of U.S. geostrategic priorities. Demonstrating how the preferences of an international patron serve as a constraint or an opportunity to push for democracy, Jamal questions bottom-up approaches to democratization, which assume that states are autonomous units in the world order. Jamal contends that even now, with the overthrow of some autocratic Arab regimes, the future course of Arab democratization will be influenced by the perception of American reactions. Concurrently, the United States must address the troubling sources of the region's rising anti-Americanism.

Of Gardens

by Paula Deitz

Paula Deitz has delighted readers for more than thirty years with her vivid descriptions of both famous and hidden landscapes. Her writings allow readers to share in the experience of her extensive travels, from the waterways of Britain's Castle Howard to the Japanese gardens of Kyoto, and home again to New York City's Central Park. Collected for the first time, the essays in Of Gardens record her great adventure of continual discovery, not only of the artful beauty of individual gardens but also of the intellectual and historical threads that weave them into patterns of civilization, from the modest garden for family subsistence to major urban developments. Deitz's essays describe how people, over many centuries and in many lands, have expressed their originality by devoting themselves to cultivation and conservation.During a visit to the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Garden in Seal Harbor, Maine, Deitz first came to appreciate the notion that landscape architecture can be as intricately conceived as any major structure and is, indeed, the means by which we redeem the natural environment through design. Years later, as she wandered through the gardens of Versailles, she realized that because gardens give structure without confinement, they encourage a liberation of movement and thought. In Of Gardens, we follow Deitz down paths of revelation, viewing "A Bouquet of British Parks: Liverpool, Edinburgh, and London"; the parks and promenades of Jerusalem; the Moonlight Garden of the Taj Mahal; a Tuscan-style villa in southern California; and the rooftop garden at Tokyo's Mori Center, among many other sites.Deitz covers individual landscape architects and designers, including André Le Nôtre, Frederick Law Olmsted, Beatrix Farrand, Russell Page, and Michael Van Valkenburgh. She then features an array of parks, public places, and gardens before turning her attention to the burgeoning business of flower shows. The volume concludes with a memorable poetic epilogue entitled "A Winter Garden of Yellow."

Of Giants and Ice

by Cory Loftis Shelby Bach

When Rory realizes fairy tales are the real deal at Ever After School, she embarks on a classic quest to fulfill her destiny.Rory Landon has spent her whole life being known as the daughter of a famous movie star mom and director dad. So when she begins a new after-school program and no one knows who her family is, Rory realizes something is different. And after she ends up fighting a fire-breathing dragon on her first day, she realizes the situation is more unusual than she could have imagined. It turns out the only fame that matters at Ever After School is the kind of fame earned from stories Rory thought were fictional. But as Rory soon learns, fairy tales are very real--and she is destined to star in one of her own. This first installment of The Ever Afters series reimagines classic fairy tale characters in a modern context, merging familiar fantasy with the everyday realities of middle-grade existence.

Of Grave Concern

by Max Mccoy

In the Old West, legends die hard--and so do witnesses. But that won't stop psychic-turned-detective Ophelia Wylde from finding fresh graves, digging up clues, and catching wanted criminals--with a little help from the dead. . . DEAD MEN TELL NO LIESThe Civil War is over, and many a young widow has turned to spiritualism to contact their husbands on "the other side. " But Ophelia Wylde won't be fooled twice. After wasting her money on a phoney psychic, she decides if she can't beat 'em, join 'em. She leaves New Orleans and heads West, selling her services as a spiritual medium who speaks to the dead. By the time she reaches Dodge City, business is booming. Except for a handsome but skeptical bounty hunter named Jack Calder, no one suspects Ophelia of running a con game--until an unfortunate "reading" of a girl who's still living exposes her to a townfull of angry customers. As punishment, the mob drags Ophelia to Boot Hill and buries her alive in a fresh grave overnight. That's when the dead start speaking. To her. For real. And for dead people, they've got lots to say. . . "An entertaining romp with quirky characters that would make Mark Twain proud. McCoy has a gift for capturing the Old West in all its colorful and outrageous glory. I couldn't put this imaginative page-turner down. " --Margaret Coel, author of Buffalo Bill's Dead Now"Tightly drawn characters, a vile villain. . . satisfying. . . a compelling read. --Publisher's Weekly on The Moon Pool

Of Gravity & Angels

by Jane Hirshfield

A precise and passionate collection by a brave new voice in poetry.

Of Love and Glory

by Evelyn Kennedy

This is about a World War II lesbian romance between an Army nurse and a journalist.

Of Love and Other Demons

by Gabriel García Márquez

Book Description From the Nobel Prize-winning author of Love in the Time of Cholera, a startling new novel -- the story of a doomed love affair between an unruly copper-haired girl and the bookish priest sent to oversee her exorcism. Of Love and Other Demons is set in a South American seaport in the colonial era, a time of viceroys and bishops, enlightened men and Inquisitors, saints and lepers and pirates. Sierra Maria, only child of a decaying noble family, has been raised in the slaves' courtyard of her father's cobwebbed mansion while her mother succumbs to fermented honey and cacao on a faraway plantation. On her twelfth birthday the girl is bitten by a rabid dog, and even as the wound is healing she is made to endure therapies indistinguishable from tortures. Believed, finally, to be possessed, she is brought to a convent for observation. And into her cell stumbles Father Cayetano Delaura, the Bishop's protege, who has already dreamed about a girl with hair trailing after her like a bridal train; who is already moved by this kicking, spitting, emaciated creature strapped to a stone bed. As he tends to her with holy water and sacramental oils, Delaura feels "something immense and irreparable" happening to him. It is love, "the most terrible demon of all." And it is not long before Sierra Maria joins him in his fevered misery. Unsettling and indelible, Of Love and Other Demons haunts us with its evocation of an exotic world while it treats, majestically the most universal experiences known to woman and man.

Of Love and Shadows

by Isabel Allende Margaret Sayers Peden

Isabel Allende transports us to a Latin American country in the grip of a military dictatorship, where Irene Beltran, an upper class journalist, and Francisco Leal, a photographer son of a Marxist professor together discover a hideous crime.

Of Men and Monsters

by William Tenn

WILLIAM TENN may well be the originator of the nonhero. His human beings, in all the short stories which have preceded this his first full-length novel, are all too fallible, exasperated by the effort of keeping up with the Jones's, depressed by feelings of inadequacy, beset by the daily problems of making a living. But withal, endearing. "Making a living," did we say? Well perhaps the problem is that as lords of the planet, humans have had the wrong approach, a mistaken self-image, as it were. Maybe it's not necessary to make a living. It could be that cast in another, not necessarily humbler role, humans could behave admirably. It's a downright encouraging thought. Just what could be the circumstances that might bring out the best in humankind? More, what is best? Mr. Tenn's answer is somewhat unnerving, but never let it be said that man cannot accept a challenge. So read OF MEN AND MONSTERS. We promise you, at the very least, a different view of your world. (Which, heaven knows, needs it.)

Of Nightingales That Weep

by Katherine Paterson

The vain young daughter of a samurai finds her comfortable life ripped apart when opposing warrior clans begin a struggle for imperial control of Japan.

Of Other Worlds

by C. S. Lewis

Reflections on literature and science fiction; three stories; and the beginning chapters of a novel. Edited and with a Preface by Walter Hooper.

Of People: Literature (4th edition)

by Jan Anderson

With an intention to increase the student's appreciation of literature and help him develop a love for reading this edition provides enjoyable prose and poetry for student reading.

Of Such Small Differences

by Joanne Greenberg

In this poetic novel, 25-year-old John Moon, who is deaf-blind, has a job in a sheltered workshop and lives within a small community of friends who are deaf or deaf-blind. Life for John is transformed when he falls in love with Leda, a young actress working as a driver for the workshop. As their relationship develops John learns about his own capacity for joy and suffering, and struggles to find his place in the world of people who hear and se. The novel is written from John's point of view and attempts to convey his perceptions as a deaf-blind person.

Of Tangible Ghosts (Johan Eschbach #1)

by L. E. Modesitt Jr.

Modesitt returns to science fiction with Of Tangible Ghosts, a carefully crafted alternate universe novel. In this world, the Dutch never lost control of the Northeast, and France, Spain, and Chung Kuo are today's superpowers, as is Colombia. And in this universe, the ghosts of the dead linger, sometimes visible, sometimes speaking to the living. Johan Eschbach has retired from service as an agent of the government of Colombia and gone north to teach at a university in his native Dutch territory. Research is being conducted in the university's physics department - research on the control of ghosts - that is of interest to governments worldwide. And Johan is forced by his former employers to work again as a spy. When he discovers too much, he is marked for death. But at least one ghost wants to keep him alive.

Of the Farm

by John Updike

In this short novel, Joey Robinson, a thirty-five-year-old New Yorker, describes a visit he makes, with his second wife and eleven-year-old stepson, to the Pennsylvania farm where he grew up and where his aging mother now lives alone. For three days, a quartet of voices explores the air, making confessions, seeking alignments, quarreling, pleading, and pardoning. They are not entirely alone: ghosts (fathers, lovers, children) press upon them, as do phantoms from the near future (nurses, lawyers, land developers). Of the Farm concerns the places people choose to live their lives, and the strategies they use to stand their ground.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Of the Knowledge of Good and Evil

by Micah Persell

Operation: Middle of the Garden is a top-secret government and military operation running under the nose of the American public in Washington, D. C. Eight years ago, troops in Afghanistan stumbled upon the remains of what looked to be the Garden of Eden. The skeletal remains of two trees peeked through centuries-worth of sand and debris. The soldiers who discovered the trees were coerced into being test subjects for the trees' fruit. The fruit from the supposed Tree of Eternal Life turned the men immortal. Now, the Operation seeks to test the fruit from the second tree: the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.Jericho Edwards was the first test subject at the inception of Operation: Middle of the Garden. When he viewed his nurse Emily Kent for the first time, a mysterious Voice whispered, "The One," to him. Jericho and Emily immediately became soul mates, a phenomenon caused by the fruit that became known as Impulse pairing, but Emily died a short while later due to a complicated pregnancy. Jericho has never been the same. He remains in the compound of the Operation because he has no desire to live, yet no other option but to live. He agrees to test the fruit of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil so he is of some use to the compound.Dahlia Gutierrez is a convicted criminal. When faced with prison or joining Operation: Middle of the Garden, Dahlia immediately chooses to become a test subject for both trees. She has a secret, and she needs the kind of potential freedom to flee at the drop of a hat that prison would impede. One thing's for sure: she's learned a lot from her past, and she's going to do whatever it takes to make sure she never makes those mistakes again. The biggest lesson she's learned? That she can only depend on herself.Sensuality Level: Sensual

Of the People: A History of the United States, Volume 1: To 1877

by James Oakes Jeanne Boydston Jan Ellen Lewis Michael Mcgerr Nick Cullather

Of the People: A History of the United States not only tells the history of America--of its people and places, of its dealings and ideals--but it also unfolds the story of American democracy, carefully marking how this country's evolution has been anything but certain, from its complex beginnings to its modern challenges. This comprehensive survey focuses on the social and political lives of people--some famous, some ordinary--revealing the compelling story of America's democracy from an individual perspective, from across the landscapes of diverse communities, and ultimately from within the larger context of the world. Volume I: to 1877 covers the worlds of the Indian peoples and the arrival of the first Europeans, through emancipation and Reconstruction in the late nineteenth century. Visit the companion website at www.oup.com/us/ofthepeople for more information and resources for instructors and students.

Of Thee I Sing: A Letter to My Daughters

by Barack Obama

In this tender, beautiful letter to his daughters, President Barack Obama has written a moving tribute to thirteen groundbreaking Americans and the ideals that have shaped his nation. From the artistry of Georgia O'Keeffe, to the courage of Jackie Robinson, to the patriotism of George Washington, President Obama sees the traits of these heroes within his own children, and within all children. Breathtaking, evocative illustrations by award-winning artist Loren Long at once capture the personalities and achievements of these great Americans and the innocence and promise of childhood. This beautiful book celebrates the characteristics that unite all Americans, from the nation's founders to generations to come. It is about the potential within each of us to pursue our dreams and forge our own paths.

Of Thee I Zing

by Laura Ingraham Raymond Arroyo

While Laura Ingraham was walking through a Northern Virginia shopping mall one Saturday afternoon, it all became clear to her. Everywhere she turned, she saw signs of the impending disaster: zombie teens texting each other across a cafÉ table; a man having his eyebrows threaded at a kiosk; a fiftyish woman shoe-horned into a tube top and skinny jeans; and a storefront ad featuring a Victoria's Secret model spilling out of her push-up bra and into the faces of young passersby. Ingraham wondered to herself, "Is this it? Is this what our forefathers fought for? What my parents struggled for? I wonder if Victoria's Secret is still having that two-for-one sale?" A menacing force surrounds us. We see it, we feel it, we know it. The country we love is in grave peril. While politicians and "experts" prattle on about the debt crisis at home, and terrorism abroad, a more insidious homegrown threat is emerging. It endangers our future and undermines our present. The uncomfortable truth is: We have become our own worst enemy. The culture we have created is now turning on us. We're on the verge of drowning in our ignorance, arrogance, gluttony . . . can you believe there are only three shots of vanilla in a Caramel Macchiato?!? Now in an act of patriotic intervention the most-listened-to woman in talk radio casts her satirical eye upon all that ails American society. In this sharp-witted, comic romp, Laura Ingraham takes you on a guided tour through ten levels of our cultural hell. You know we're in trouble when . . . * Airplane seats shrink--just as the passengers expand. * Celebrity baby names go from the peculiar (Apple, Stetson, and Daisy Boo) to the pathetic (Bamboo, Blanket, and Bronx). * People meticulously tend their virtual crops on Farmville, while their children eat takeout. * "Breaking News" usually means it happened yesterday. * The weddings last longer than the marriages. * Facebook has become a verb and reading has become an ancient art form. Of Thee I Zing is cultural commentary too funny to ignore, igniting a national conversation long past due. America, your cultural recovery begins here.

Of Time and Place

by Sigurd F. Olson

Of Time and Place is a legacy from one of the best-loved nature writers of our time. In this, his last book, completed just before his death, Sigurd F. Olson guides readers through his wide-ranging memories of a lifetime dedicated to the preservation of the wilderness. Like his other best-selling books, Of Time and Place is filled with beauty, adventure, and wonder. Olson recalls his many friendships of trail and woods and portage, his favorite campsites, the stories behind the artifacts and mementos hanging in his cabin at Listening Point. Whether he is remembering canoe trips with his friends, admiring the playful grace of the otter, or pondering the Earth's great cycles of climatic change, these moving and evocative essays reaffirm Olson's stature as one of the greatest nature writers of this century.

Showing 109,001 through 109,025 of 146,356 results

Help

Select your download format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. For more details, visit the Formats page under the Getting Started tab.

See and hear words read aloud
  • DAISY Text - See words on the screen and hear words being read aloud with the text-to-speech voice installed on your reading tool. Navigate by page, chapter, section, and more. Can also be used in audio-only mode. Compatible with many reading tools, including Bookshare’s free reading tools.
  • DAISY Text with Images - Similar to DAISY Text with the addition of images within the Text. Your reading tool must support images.
  • Read Now with Bookshare Web Reader - Read and see images directly from your Internet browser without downloading! Text-to-speech voicing and word highlighting are available on Google Chrome (extension installation required). Other browsers can be used with limited features. Learn more
Listen to books with audio only
  • DAISY Audio - Listen to books in audio-only mode with the high-quality Kendra voice by Ivona pre-installed. Navigate by page, chapter, section, and more. Must be used with a DAISY Audio compatible reading tool.
  • MP3 - Listen to books in audio-only mode with the high-quality Kendra voice by Ivona pre-installed. Navigate using tracks. Can be used with any MP3 player.
Read in Braille
  • BRF (Braille Ready Format) - Read with any BRF compatible refreshable braille display; navigate using the search or find feature.
  • DAISY Text - Read with any DAISY 3.0 compatible refreshable braille display, navigate by page, chapter, section, and more.
  • Embossed Braille - Use Bookshare’s DAISY Text or BRF formats to generate embossed braille.