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Foe

by J. M. Coetzee

'A small miracle of a book ... of marvellous intricacy and overwhelming power' - The Washington Post Book World. Coetzee reinvents the story of Robinson Crusoe, directing our attention to the seduction and tyranny of storytelling itself.

The Foe of Barnabas Collins

by Marilyn Ross

Barnabas Collins is trying to protect Paula Jennings, a lovely young heiress, from her new husband, Christopher. Barnabas fears that Christopher is a werewolf, and as such can inflict deadly, unmentionable harm on Paula. Barnabas knows he has the power to defeat Christopher. But then he suddenly discovers that Christopher has joined forces with Melissa Henry-the reincarnation of the beautiful Angelique. Though the fate of Paula Jennings is at stake, Barnabas's faith in his powers is seriously shaken.This is the ninth in the series based on the TV series, Dark Shadows.

The Fog

by James Herbert

OUT OF THE YELLOWISH FOG A MAN EMERGED. HIS EYES WERE FIXED STRAIGHT AHEAD AND HIS LIPS WERE FROZEN IN A SMILE. IN HIS HANDS HE CARRIED THE STILL-BLEEDING HEAD OF HIS WIFE.... In an exclusive private school, students sexually assaulted and mutilated their teachers, then savagely turned on one another. In a lonely room, an old lady was shredded and eaten by her beloved pet cats...in the streets of the city, mass copulation and insane slaying spread from block to block... From the depths of the earth the fog had come- to poison the deepest recesses of the human mind and soul. A group of scientists in an insulated underground laboratory worked around the clock to find out what the fog was and how to stop it, but time was running out for mankind...

Fog

by Caroline B. Cooney

Will Maine's historic Schooner Inne Bed and Breakfast be a safe haven for the island kids boarding during the school year--or the end of them all?Christina Romney is thirteen, with a personality that matches her unruly but charming tri-colored hair. She is about to start seventh grade, and for kids from Maine's Burning Fog Island, that means leaving their little white schoolhouse for regular classrooms and life on the mainland. Everyone assures Christina it will be a fantastic year. Mainland school offers great advantages, after all: extracurricular activities other than boating and fishing, a gym, a cafeteria, and more kids her age. Best of all, this year the boarding students will live at the historic Schooner Inne, a former sea captain's house (and now a bed and breakfast) recently bought by the school's charismatic new principal and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. Shevvington.But Christina is apprehensive. She adores the wildness and excitement of her island life. Boarding with her island friends will surely help: Anya, a beautiful senior, fifteen-year-old Benji, the aspiring lobsterman, and his crush-worthy younger brother Michael. But Christina's apprehension sharpens when Benji and Michael aren't as friendly as they used to be on the island, and Anya starts acting so strangely it seems she is slowly losing her mind. Christina is increasingly certain the Shevvingtons are behind all of these changes. But no one else can see the Shevvingtons' eerie behavior--not other teachers, not her parents, not even her fellow island kids. Is Anya the one going crazy in the Schooner Inne--or is it Christina? This ebook features an illustrated biography of Caroline B. Cooney including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the author's personal collection.

The Fog Diver

by Joel Ross

Joel Ross debuts a thrilling adventure series in which living in the sky is the new reality and a few determined slum kids just might become heroes. Perfect for fans of Rick Riordan and Brandon Mull, this fantasy is filled with daring and hope and a wonderfully imaginative world.Once the Fog started rising, the earth was covered with a deadly white mist until nothing remained but the mountaintops. Now humanity clings to its highest peaks, called the Rooftop, where the wealthy Five Families rule over the lower slopes and floating junkyards.Thirteen-year-old Chess and his friends Hazel, Bea, and Swedish sail their rickety air raft over the deadly Fog, scavenging the ruins for anything they can sell to survive. But now survival isn't enough. They must risk everything to get to the miraculous city of Port Oro, the only place where their beloved Mrs. E can be cured of fogsickness. Yet the ruthless Lord Kodoc is hot on their trail, for Chess has a precious secret, one that Kodoc is desperate to use against him. Now Chess will face any danger to protect his friends, even if it means confronting what he fears the most.

Fog Facts

by Larry Beinhart

Everyone in the world knows what Bill Clinton did with Monica Lewinsky, or what happened to Brad and Jennifer, Katie and Tom. These factoids mysteriously capture the world's attention. But there's a flip side to this: fog facts. Fog facts are known but not known, the sort of things that journalists and political junkies know, but somehow the world does not. The "Downing Street Memo" is a fine example. This document revealed that the head of British intelligence had been informed by his Washington counterparts that the White House was cooking the books on the information it was using to justify a war in Iraq. Yet this was not big news in America. Why? In Fog Facts, Larry Beinhart tackles this question and shows how soft-core, public relations-style political lying has been raised to an art form.

Fog Hounds, Wind Cat, Sea Mice

by Joan Aiken Peter Bailey

A trio of fantasy and adventure tales by the award-winning author of the beloved Wolves Chronicles In "Fog Hounds," Tad and his sister, Ermina, know better than to venture outside after dusk. Twilight is the time when huge misty creatures roam the land on silent feet, their eyes glittering like red pennies. No one who is chased by the hounds lives to tell the tale--that is, until the night Tad meets an unusual stranger. . . . In "Wind Cat," Lukey Web has come to live with Aunt Mildrith, who used to be a witch and is writing a book about the history of magic mirrors while studying footprints in the sky. When their neighbors go on vacation, a striped cat named Tib is left in Lukey and her aunt's care. It isn't until 1 of Tib's 9 lives is threatened that Lukey discovers her own awesome gifts. In "Sea Mice," Hella looks out her window every night at the northern lights and her very own plum tree, which has just produced its 1st perfect crystal plum. It's a special tree, a gift from her sea captain father, who warns Hella not to pick any fruit until she turns 12. When her dad's ship sinks, everyone says that sea mice caught him and his crew. But Hella is not afraid; she has a different vision of these mystical creatures that will transform her life in the years to come. This ebook features illustrations by Peter Bailey and a personal history of Joan Aiken including rare images from the author's estate.

The Fog (Losing Christina #1)

by Caroline B. Cooney

You can get lost in the fog. In the fog things can happen that no one sees. Mr. Shevvington, the handsome principal. Mrs. Shevvington, the dedicated teacher. Who better for Christina and Anya to board with while attending school on the mainland? But something evil is happening at the Shevvington's house. Anya is slowly losing her mind, and Christina knows that the Shevvingtons are behind it. Now they are turning their attention to her. "You don't know yourself, Christina", they tell her. "You cannot admit that you are a very disturbed child".

Fog of Doubt

by Christianna Brand

Inspector Cockrill is called in to solve the murder of a most unpopular BelgianFew were disappointed when Raoul Vernet was found with his head bashed in, dead in a pool of his own blood. On vacation in England, the Belgian seducer comes to visit Matilda, an old flame from a few years before. She agrees despite suspicions that Vernet has been deploying his legendary charm on another member of the family: young Rosie, who has returned from her Swiss boarding school carrying a child. None of the family members were in the house when Raoul was killed, but all were within a fog-choked London mile. Rosie calls in the brilliant Inspector Cockrill to clear the family's name, but what he finds is a twisted clan of seven people, each as likely to laugh at a murder as commit one.

The Fog of Peace

by Jean-Marie Guéhenno

At the beginning of the 1990s, the world exited the cold war and entered an era of great promise for peace and security.Guided by an invigorated United Nations, the international community set out to end conflicts that had flared into vicious civil wars and to unconditionally champion human rights and hold abusers responsible. The stage seemed set for greatness. Today that optimism is shattered. The failure of international engagement in conflict areas ranging from Afghanistan to Congo and Lebanon to Kosovo has turned believers into skeptics. The Fog of Peace is a firsthand reckoning by Jean-Marie Guéhenno, the man who led UN peacekeeping efforts for eight years and has been at the center of all the major crises since the beginning of the 21st century. Guéhenno grapples with the distance between the international community's promise to protect and the reality that our noble aspirations may be beyond our grasp.The author illustrates with personal, concrete examples--from the crises in Afghanistan, Iraq, Congo, Sudan, Darfur, Kosovo, Ivory Coast, Georgia, Lebanon, Haiti, and Syria--the need to accept imperfect outcomes and compromises. He argues that nothing is more damaging than excessive ambition followed by precipitous retrenchment. We can indeed save many thousands of lives, but we need to calibrate our ambitions and stay the course.

The Fog of Peace

by Jean-Marie Guéhenno

No small number of books laud and record the heroic actions of those at war. But the peacekeepers? Who tells their stories?At the beginning of the 1990s, the world exited the cold war and entered an era of great promise for peace and security. Guided by an invigorated United Nations, the international community set out to end conflicts that had flared into vicious civil wars and to unconditionally champion human rights and hold abusers responsible. The stage seemed set for greatness. Today that optimism is shattered. The failure of international engagement in conflict areas ranging from Afghanistan to Congo and Lebanon to Kosovo has turned believers into skeptics. The Fog of Peace is a firsthand reckoning by Jean-Marie Guéhenno, the man who led UN peacekeeping efforts for eight years and has been at the center of all the major crises since the beginning of the 21st century. Guéhenno grapples with the distance between the international community's promise to protect and the reality that our noble aspirations may be beyond our grasp.The author illustrates with personal, concrete examples-from the crises in Afghanistan, Iraq, Congo, Sudan, Darfur, Kosovo, Ivory Coast, Georgia, Lebanon, Haiti, and Syria-the need to accept imperfect outcomes and compromises. He argues that nothing is more damaging than excessive ambition followed by precipitous retrenchment. We can indeed save many thousands of lives, but we need to calibrate our ambitions and stay the course.

The Fog of War

by Mark Bourrie

The Canadian government censored the news during World War II for two main reasons: to keep military and economic secrets out of enemy hands and to prevent civilian morale from breaking down. But in those tumultuous times - with Nazi spies landing on our shores by raft, U-boat attacks in the St. Lawrence, army mutinies in British Columbia and Ontario and pro-Hitler propaganda in the mainstream Quebec press - censors had a hard time keeping news events contained.Now, with freshly unsealed World War II press-censor files, many of the undocumented events that occurred in wartime Canada are finally revealed. In Mark Bourrie's illuminating and well-researched account, we learn about the capture of a Nazi spy-turned-double agent, the Japanese-Canadian editor who would one day help develop Canada's medicare system, the curious chiropractor from Saskatchewan who spilled atomic bomb secrets to a roomful of people and the use of censorship to stop balloon bomb attacks from Japan. The Fog of War investigates the realities of media censorship through the experiences of those deputized to act on behalf of the public and reveals why press censorship in wartime Canada was, at best, a hit-and-miss game.

Foggy Mountain Breakdown and Other Stories

by Sharyn Mccrumb

"In an earlier life, McCrumb must have been a balladeer, singing of restless spirits, star-crossed lovers, and the consoling beauty of nature. . . . The overall effect is spellbinding."--The Washington Post Bestselling author Sharyn McCrumb is "a born storyteller" (Mary Higgins Clark) who astonishes readers and reviewers with the power and scope of her talent, prompting the San Diego Union-Tribune to declare: "There is no one quite like her among present-day writers. No one better, either."Foggy Mountain Breakdown, the first-ever collection of Sharyn McCrumb's short fiction, is a literary quilting of old and new, humorous and heartfelt, offering award-winning works--and two stories never before published, contrasting mountain childhoods past and present.Chilling tales of suspense alternate with evocative character portraits and compelling narratives that embrace the southern Appalachian locales and themes of McCrumb's acclaimed Ballad Novels. Within this cornucopia of two dozen stories, Old Rattler, a mountain healer, skirmishes with a serial killer . . . Princess Di investigates long-kept secrets within the House of Windsor . . . A reincarnated murder victim seeks delicious revenge . . . And while honeymooning in the bridegroom's ancestral hilltop homeplace, two newlyweds harbor second thoughts.The author's perfect-pitch ear for dialogue and ability to illuminate the dark side of human nature merge with her brilliant artistry to make Foggy Mountain Breakdown a virtuoso collection for devotees of Sharyn McCrumb--and for the legion of new readers who will find themselves caught under her spell. From the Hardcover edition.

Fogtown

by Peter Plate

One foggy day in San Francisco brings together bloody ghosts, a dandyish thug, capricious cops, a suicidal punk rocker, a hyperliterate slumlord, and a sweet old lady sent by God to hand out cash from a hijacked armored car. In Fogtown, Peter Plate uses a loving hand to carve his characters out of hallucination, perversity, and tenacity. Plate's noir sensibility gives him special fluency with the weary souls of urban America's down and out; Fogtown describes a new age unmistakably built on the twentieth century of Nelson Algren and Charles Bukowski.

The Foie Gras Wars

by Mark Caro

In announcing that he had stopped serving the fattened livers of force-fed ducks and geese at his world-renowned restaurant, influential chef Charlie Trotter heaved a grenade into a simmering food fight, and the Foie Gras Wars erupted. He said his morally minded menu revision was meant merely to raise consciousness, but what was he thinking when he also suggested -- to Chicago Tribune reporter Mark Caro -- that a rival four-star chef 's liver be eaten as "a little treat"? The reaction to Caro's subsequent front-page story was explosive, as Trotter's sizable hometown moved to ban the ancient delicacy known as foie gras while an international array of activists, farmers, chefs and politicians clashed forcefully and sometimes violently over whether fattening birds for the sake of scrumptious livers amounts to ethical agriculture or torture. "Take a dish with a funny French name, add ducks, top it all off with celebrity chefs eating each other's livers, and that's entertainment," Caro writes. Yet as absurd as battling over bloated waterfowl organs might seem, the controversy struck a serious chord even among those who had never tasted the stuff. Reporting from the front lines of this passionate dining debate, Caro explores the questions we too often avoid: What is an acceptable amount of suffering for an animal that winds up on our plate? Is a duck that lives comfortably for twelve weeks before enduring a few weeks of periodic force-feedings worse off than a supermarket broiler chicken that never sees the light of day over its six to seven weeks on earth? Why is the animal-rights movement picking on such a rarefied dish when so many more chickens, pigs and cows are being processed on factory farms? Then again, how could the treatment of other animals possibly justify the practice of feeding a duck through a metal tube down its throat? In his relentless yet good-humored pursuit of clarity, Caro takes us to the streets where activists use bullhorns, spray paint, Superglue and/or lawsuits as their weapons; the government chambers where politicians weigh the ducks' interests against their own; the restaurants and outlaw dining clubs where haute cuisine preparations coexist with Foie-lipops; and the U.S. and French farms whose operators maintain that they are honoring tradition, not abusing animals. Can foie gras survive after 5,000 years? Are we on the verge of a more enlightened era of eating? Can both answers be yes? Our appetites hang in the balance.

Foiled Again (Sarah Deane Mystery #13)

by J. S. Borthwick

The Drama School at Bowmouth College is staging its annual Halloween masquerade, known for being a little unusual. This year it's Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet with a twist---Romiette and Julio instead. English professor and sometime amateur sleuth Sarah Deane has been recruited to assist backstage with the complicated costume changes. Drama students are known for being mischievous and high-strung, but this year things are a little more serious: During rehearsals a couple of the student actors pass the time by taking whacks at each other with the stage props, and their horseplay leaves Todd Mancuso, the brilliant actor playing Mercutio, wounded. And when Sarah stumbles upon a badly injured student hidden away in a stockroom on Halloween night, events take a turn for the worse. By the time the production is finally staged, a member of the faculty has been badly injured and a student has been killed. Talk about drama! Sarah gets involved, of course, to sort out a mess that involves academic politics, angry actors, and student activities gone horribly wrong. Look for more books in this intricately plotted cozy mystery series filled with clearly drawn diverse and believable characters/suspects. Most are set in Maine and surrounding New England states and are liberally strewn with enjoyable literary quotes as the main character is an English teacher. The author also delves into interesting background topics as settings for these mysteries which adds to their appeal to readers who enjoy fascinating true trivia within their fiction such as gardening, sailing, and literary scholarship. Check out #1 The Case of the Hook-Billed Kites, #2 The Down East Murders, #3 The Student Body, #4 Bodies of Water, #5 Dude on Arrival, #6 The Bridled Groom, #7 Dolly is Dead, #8 The Garden Plot. #9 My Body Lies Over The Ocean and #10 Coup de Grâce, #11 Murder in the Rough and #12 Intensive Scare Unit.

Fokker D.XXI Aces of World War 2

by Chris Davey Kari Stenman

Entering service with the Dutch air force from early 1938, the aircraft was also built under license in Denmark and Finland. Production was also scheduled to commence in Spain too but Nationalist forces overran the factory before this commenced. The Dutch D.XXIs saw less than a week of action following the German invasion of the west on 10 May 1940, with many of the country's 28 fighters being destroyed on the ground. However, those that survived the initial onslaught inflicted losses on the Luftwaffe, 15 pilots sharing in the destruction of 14 German aircraft (fighters, bombers and transports). By then, however, the D.XXI had found everlasting fame in Finland during the Winter War of 1939-40. Proving itself a real thorn in the side of the Soviets, the fighter, operating in primitive conditions and against vastly superior numbers, Finnish D.XXIs racked up an incredible score against the Red Air Force, and in particular its bomber units. No fewer than ten pilots became aces during this brief, but bloody, campaign, with a similar number claiming four victories and subsequently 'making ace' in later types. The sturdy D.XXI was highly rated by the leading Finnish pilots of the time, boasting a good rate of climb and the ability to break off combat when required thanks to its high speed in a dive. The D.XXI also has the distinction of producing the first 'ace in a single mission' in World War 2, when then 1Lt Jorma Sarvanto shot down six Ilyushin DB-3 bombers on 6 January 1940. After spending a year providing home defence and flying coastal patrols during the early stages of the Continuation War in 1941, all surviving Finnish Fokker D.XXIs were relegated to the reconnaissance role, which they performed through to the end of hostilities in September 1944.

The Fold

by Peter Clines

STEP INTO THE FOLD.IT'S PERFECTLY SAFE. The folks in Mike Erikson's small New England town would say he's just your average, everyday guy. And that's exactly how Mike likes it. Sure, the life he's chosen isn't much of a challenge to someone with his unique gifts, but he's content with his quiet and peaceful existence. That is, until an old friend presents him with an irresistible mystery, one that Mike is uniquely qualified to solve: far out in the California desert, a team of DARPA scientists has invented a device they affectionately call the Albuquerque Door. Using a cryptic computer equation and magnetic fields to "fold" dimensions, it shrinks distances so that a traveler can travel hundreds of feet with a single step. The invention promises to make mankind's dreams of teleportation a reality. And, the scientists insist, traveling through the Door is completely safe. Yet evidence is mounting that this miraculous machine isn't quite what it seems--and that its creators are harboring a dangerous secret. As his investigations draw him deeper into the puzzle, Mike begins to fear there's only one answer that makes sense. And if he's right, it may only be a matter of time before the project destroys...everything. A cunningly inventive mystery featuring a hero worthy of Sherlock Holmes and a terrifying final twist you'll never see coming, The Fold is that rarest of things: a genuinely page-turning science-fiction thriller. Step inside its pages and learn why author Peter Clines has already won legions of loyal fans.

The Folded Clock

by Heidi Julavits

A raucous, stunningly candid, deliriously smart diary of two years in the life of the incomparable Heidi JulavitsLike many young people, Heidi Julavits kept a diary. Decades later she found her old diaries in a storage bin, and hoped to discover the early evidence of the person (and writer) she'd since become. Instead, "The actual diaries revealed me to possess the mind of a paranoid tax auditor." The entries are daily chronicles of anxieties about grades, looks, boys, and popularity. After reading the confessions of her past self, writes Julavits, "I want to good-naturedly laugh at this person. I want to but I can't. What she wanted then is scarcely different from what I want today." Thus was born a desire to try again, to chronicle her daily life as a forty-something woman, wife, mother, and writer. The dazzling result is The Folded Clock, in which the diary form becomes a meditation on time and self, youth and aging, betrayal and loyalty, friendship and romance, faith and fate, marriage and family, desire and death, gossip and secrets, art and ambition. Concealed beneath the minute obsession with "dailiness" are sharply observed moments of cultural criticism and emotionally driven philosophical queries. In keeping with the spirit of a diary, the tone is confessional, sometimes shockingly so, as the focus shifts from the woman she wants to be to the woman she may have become. Julavits's spirited sense of humor about her foibles and misadventures, combined with her ceaseless intelligence and curiosity, explode the typically confessional diary form. The Folded Clock is as playful as it is brilliant, a tour de force by one of the most gifted prose stylists in American letters.From the Hardcover edition.

The Folded Leaf

by William Maxwell

Here is a classic novel from one of our most honored writers--the author of such acclaimed works as So Long, See You Tomorrow and All the Days and Nights." The Folded Leaf is the serenely observed yet deeply moving story of two boys finding one another in the Midwest of the 1920s, when childhood lasted longer than it does today and even adults were more innocent of what life could bring.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Foley is Good

by Mick Foley

Autobiography of the wrestling champion, bestselling author, and father of 3.

Folk and Fairy Tales

by Martin Hallett Barbara Karasek

This anthology is designed to provide a solid foundation for courses in Children's Literature, Folklore, and the Literature of Fantasy. The editors offer a broad selection of tales, grouped by theme and era, as well as variants of individual tales that invite cross-cultural and comparative analysis.

Folk Arts of Japan

by Hugo Munsterberg Soetsu Yanagi

This edition was originally published in print form by Tuttle Publishing in 1958.The Folk Arts of Japan by Dr. Hugo Munsterberg deals with a rediscovered branch of Japanese art which, in straightfoward beauty of its products, is currently delighting the Western world. Although these folkcraft creations have their roots in the country's ancient and colorful art tradition, their unassuming grace makes them unmistakably in harmony with modern functional design.Here Dr. Munsterberg bringing to his work the fruits of four years of study in Japan and a deep knowledge of Oriental culture, makes available for the first time in English a comprehensive guide and commentary on this significant branch of Japan's varied arts.

Folk Culture in the Digital Age

by Trevor J. Blank

Smart phones, tablets, Facebook, Twitter, and wireless Internet connections are the latest technologies to have become entrenched in our culture. Although traditionalists have argued that computer-mediated communication and cyberspace are incongruent with the study of folklore, Trevor J. Blank sees the digital world as fully capable of generating, transmitting, performing, and archiving vernacular culture. Folklore in the Digital Age documents the emergent cultural scenes and expressive folkloric communications made possible by digital "new media" technologies.New media is changing the ways in which people learn, share, participate, and engage with others as they adopt technologies to complement and supplement traditional means of vernacular expression. But behavioral and structural overlap in many folkloric forms exists between on- and offline, and emerging patterns in digital rhetoric mimic the dynamics of previously documented folkloric forms, invoking familiar social or behavior customs, linguistic inflections, and symbolic gestures. Folklore in the Digital Age provides insights and perspectives on the myriad ways in which folk culture manifests in the digital age and contributes to our greater understanding of vernacular expression in our ever-changing technological world.

Folk Hats

by Vicki Square

With 30 completely original patterns for fun and functional hats, this globe-trotting collection presents clear illustrations and step-by-step instructions for knitters of all skill levels. History and folklore from the hat's country of origin accompany each project. Included are felted cowboy hats, festive hats from Cameroon and Japan, historic derbies from around Europe, a beaded cloche from Afghanistan, warm cossacks from Russia, and darling baby bonnets from Nigeria and China. Each unique topper is an item of style and of substance. The imaginative and versatile designs and range of yarns and techniques put a new spin on the standard hat pattern and reinterpret these folk classics for modern knitters.

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