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The Humanistic Tradition Book 5: Romanticism, Realism, and the Nineteenth-Century World

by Gloria K. Fiero

The Humanistic Tradition explores the political, economic, and social contexts of human culture, providing a global and multicultural perspective which helps students better understand the relationship between the West and other world cultures.

The Humanitarian Enterprise: Dilemmas and Discoveries

by Larry Minear John Hammock Jan Eliasson

International humanitarian activities have grown enormously in scale over the past ten years. A longside this greater experience, the complex links between humanitarian work and the worlds of politics and military engagement have become ever more contested. Through the lens of the Humanitarianism and War Project, Larry Minear explores what international humanitarians - from the UN and national governments, to the Red Cross and the many private relief and development agencies - have learned about how to do humanitarian work well, and the arguments which remain unresolved. With an epilogue on the issues highlighted by the international response to the terrorist attacks of 2001 and the war in Afghanistan, this book will be of interest to anyone wishing to understand the future of humanitarianism in the twenty-first century.

Humanitarian Logistics

by Martin Christopher Peter Tatham

Humanitarian Logistics examines the key challenges facing those whose role it is to organize and distribute resources in the most difficult of situations. This multi-contributor title includes insights from some of the world's leading experts in humanitarian logistics. It examines key issues including, warehousing, procurement and funding.With particular focus on pre-disaster preparation, rather than post-disaster assistance, Humanitarian Logistics provides current thinking as well as best practice for those who need to understand the many challenges and ways to respond effectively in this crucial area.

Humanitarian Reason: A Moral History of the Present

by Didier Fassin

In the face of the world's disorders, moral concerns have provided a powerful ground for developing international as well as local policies. Didier Fassin draws on case materials from France, South Africa, Venezuela, and Palestine to explore the meaning of humanitarianism in the contexts of immigration and asylum, disease and poverty, disaster and war. He traces and analyzes recent shifts in moral and political discourse and practices -- what he terms "humanitarian reason"-- and shows in vivid examples how humanitarianism is confronted by inequality and violence. Deftly illuminating the tensions and contradictions in humanitarian government, he reveals the ambiguities confronting states and organizations as they struggle to deal with the intolerable. His critique of humanitarian reason, respectful of the participants involved but lucid about the stakes they disregard, offers theoretical and empirical foundations for a political and moral anthropology.

Humanitarianism and Suffering: The Mobilization of Empathy

by Richard Ashby Wilson Richard D. Brown

Humanitarian sentiments have motivated a variety of manifestations of pity, from nineteenth-century movements to end slavery to the creation of modern international humanitarian law. While humanitarianism is clearly political, Humanitarianism and Suffering addresses the ways in which it is also an ethos embedded in civil society, one that drives secular and religious social and cultural movements, not just legal and political institutions. As an ethos, humanitarianism has a strong narrative and representational dimension that can generate humanitarian constituencies for particular causes. The emotional nature of compassion is closely linked to visual and literary images of suffering and innocence. Essays in the volume analyze the character, form, and voice of private or public narratives themselves and explain how and why some narratives of suffering energize political movements of solidarity, whereas others do not. Humanitarianism and Suffering explores when, how, and why humanitarian movements become widespread popular movements. It shows how popular sentiments move political and social elites to action and, conversely, how national elites appropriate humanitarian ideals for more instrumental ends.

The Humanities: Culture, Continuity and Change, Book 6: Modernism and the Globalization of Cultures, 1900 to the Present (2nd Edition)

by Henry M. Sayre

The Humanities by Henry M. Sayre helps the reader see the context and make the connections across the humanities by tying together the entire cultural experience through a narrative storytelling approach. For an undergraduate introductory level course in the humanities.

Humanity

by Jonathan Glover

This fascinating and profound book is about the psychology that made possible Hiroshima, the Nazi genocide, the Gulag, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, Pol Pot's Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and many other atrocities. The author reveals common patterns - how the distance and fragmented responsibility of technological warfare gave rise to Hiroshima; how the tribalism resulted in mutual fear and hatred in Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia; how the systems of belief made atrocities possible in Stalin's Russia, in Mao's China and in Cambodia; and how the powerful combination of tribalism and belief enabled people to do otherwise unimaginable things in Nazi Germany. The common patterns suggest weak points in our psychology. The resulting picture is used as a guide for the ethics we should create if we hope to overcome them.

Humanity: An Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

by James Peoples Garrick Bailey

Using engaging stories and clear writing, HUMANITY: AN INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Tenth Edition, introduces cultural anthropology within a solid framework centered on globalization and culture change. Peoples and Bailey focus on the social and cultural consequences of globalization, emphasizing culture change and world problems. The book's engaging narrative provides new ways of looking at many of the challenges facing the world in this century. As you explore contemporary issues including recent debates on gay marriage, cultural and economic globalization, population growth, hunger, and the survival of indigenous cultures, you will gain a better understanding of the cultural information you need to successfully navigate in today's global economy. The authors emphasize the diversity of humanity and reveal why an appreciation and tolerance of cultural differences is critical in the modern world.

Humanity's End

by Nicholas Agar

Proposals to make us smarter than the greatest geniuses or to add thousands of years to our life spans seem fit only for the spam folder or trash can. And yet this is what contemporary advocates of radical enhancement offer in all seriousness. They present a variety of technologies and therapies that will expand our capacities far beyond what is currently possible for human beings. In Humanity's End, Nicholas Agar argues against radical enhancement, describing its destructive consequences. Agar examines the proposals of four prominent radical enhancers: Ray Kurzweil, who argues that technology will enable our escape from human biology; Aubrey de Grey, who calls for anti-aging therapies that will achieve "longevity escape velocity"; Nick Bostrom, who defends the morality and rationality of enhancement; and James Hughes, who envisions a harmonious democracy of the enhanced and the unenhanced. Agar argues that the outcomes of radical enhancement could be darker than the rosy futures described by these thinkers. The most dramatic means of enhancing our cognitive powers could in fact kill us; the radical extension of our life span could eliminate experiences of great value from our lives; and a situation in which some humans are radically enhanced and others are not could lead to tyranny of posthumans over humans.

Humankind: How Biology and Geography Shape Human Diversity

by Alexander H. Harcourt

An innovative and illuminating look at how the evolution of the human species has been shaped by the world around us, from anatomy and physiology, to cultural diversity and population density. Where did the human species originate? Why are tropical peoples much more diverse than those at polar latitudes? Why can only Japanese peoples digest seaweed? How are darker skin, sunlight, and fertility related? Did Neanderthals and Homo Sapiens ever interbreed? In Humankind, U. C. Davis professor Alexander Harcourt answers these questions and more, as he explains how the expansion of the human species around the globe and our interaction with our environment explains much about why humans differ from one region of the world to another, not only biologically, but culturally. What effects have other species had on the distribution of humans around the world, and we, in turn, on their distribution? And how have human populations affected each other's geography, even existence? For the first time in a single book, Alexander Harcourt brings these topics together to help us understand why we are, what we are, where we are. It turns out that when one looks at humanity's expansion around the world, and in the biological explanations for our geographic diversity, we humans are often just another primate. Humanity's distribution around the world and the type of organism we are today has been shaped by the same biogeographical forces that shape other species.

Humans Are Underrated: What High Achievers Know That Brilliant Machines Never Will

by Geoff Colvin

As technology races ahead, what will people do better than computers?<P><P>What hope will there be for us when computers can drive cars better than humans, predict Supreme Court decisions better than legal experts, identify faces, scurry helpfully around offices and factories, even perform some surgeries, all faster, more reliably, and less expensively than people?<P>It's easy to imagine a nightmare scenario in which computers simply take over most of the tasks that people now get paid to do. While we'll still need high-level decision makers and computer developers, those tasks won't keep most working-age people employed or allow their living standard to rise. The unavoidable question--will millions of people lose out, unable to best the machine?--is increasingly dominating business, education, economics, and policy.The bestselling author of Talent Is Overrated explains how the skills the economy values are changing in historic ways. The abilities that will prove most essential to our success are no longer the technical, classroom-taught left-brain skills that economic advances have demanded from workers in the past. Instead, our greatest advantage lies in what we humans are most powerfully driven to do for and with one another, arising from our deepest, most essentially human abilities--empathy, creativity, social sensitivity, storytelling, humor, building relationships, and expressing ourselves with greater power than logic can ever achieve. This is how we create durable value that is not easily replicated by technology--because we're hardwired to want it from humans.These high-value skills create tremendous competitive advantage--more devoted customers, stronger cultures, breakthrough ideas, and more effective teams. And while many of us regard these abilities as innate traits--"he's a real people person," "she's naturally creative"--it turns out they can all be developed.<P> They're already being developed in a range of far-sighted organizations, such as: * the Cleveland Clinic, which emphasizes empathy training of doctors and all employees to improve patient outcomes and lower medical costs; * the U.S. Army, which has revolutionized its training to focus on human interaction, leading to stronger teams and greater success in real-world missions; * Stanford Business School, which has overhauled its curriculum to teach interpersonal skills through human-to-human experiences. As technology advances, we shouldn't focus on beating computers at what they do--we'll lose that contest. Instead, we must develop our most essential human abilities and teach our kids to value not just technology but also the richness of interpersonal experience. They will be the most valuable people in our world because of it. Colvin proves that to a far greater degree than most of us ever imagined, we already have what it takes to be great.From the Hardcover edition.

Humans, Beasts, and Ghosts: Stories and Essays

by Qian Zhongshu Christopher G. Rea

Qian Zhongshu was one of twentieth-century China's most ingenious literary stylists, one whose insights into the ironies and travesties of modern China remain stunningly fresh. Between the early years of the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) and the Communist takeover in 1949, Qian wrote a brilliant series of short stories, essays, and a comedic novel that continue to inspire generations of Chinese readers. With this long-awaited translation, English-language readers can immerse themselves in the invention and satirical wit of one of the world's great literary cosmopolitans. This collection brings together Qian's best short works, combining his iconoclastic essays on the "book of life" from Written in the Margins of Life(1941) with the four masterful short stories of Human, Beast, Ghost(1946). His essays elucidate substantive issues through deceptively simple subjects-the significance of windows versus doors, for example, or the blind spots of literary critics-and assert the primacy of critical and creative independence. His stories blur the boundaries between humans, beasts, and ghosts as they struggle through life, death, and resurrection. Christopher G. Rea situates these works within China's wartime politics and Qian's literary vision, highlighting significant changes that Qian Zhongshu made to different editions of his writings and providing unprecedented insight into the author's creative process.

Humans (Neanderthal Parallax #2)

by Robert J. Sawyer

second in the neanderthal parallax trilogy, which was begun with Hominids.

The Humanure Handbook : A Guide to Composting Human Manure (Third Edition)

by Joseph Jenkins

This well researched handbook brings experts with over two decades of experience on the topic of composting human manure available anywhere. It reviews the various issues pertaining to human waste including potential health risks and how to eliminate those dangers in order to safely convert humanure into garden soil.

The Humble Essay (Second Edition)

by Roy K. Humble

This composition textbook introduces college writing in everyday language so that non-majors are more likely to actually read these chapters, understand the ideas, and then put those ideas to good use.

Humble Pie

by Gordon Ramsay

Everyone thinks they know the real Gordon Ramsay: rude, loud, pathologically driven, stubborn as hell. But this is his real story... This is Gordon Ramsay's autobiography - the first time he has told the full story of how he became the world's most famous and infamous chef: his difficult childhood, his brother's heroin addiction and his failed first career as a footballer: all of these things have made him the celebrated culinary talent and media powerhouse that he is today. Gordon talks frankly about: * his tough childhood: his father's alcoholism and violence and the effects on his relationships with his mother and siblings * his first career as a footballer: how the whole family moved to Scotland when he was signed by Glasgow Rangers at the age of fifteen, and how he coped when his career was over due to injury just three years later * his brother's heroin addiction. * Gordon's early career: learning his trade in Paris and London; how his career developed from there: his time in Paris under Albert Roux and his seven Michelin-starred restaurants. * kitchen life: Gordon spills the beans about life behind the kitchen door, and how a restaurant kitchen is run in Anthony Bourdain-style. * and how he copes with the impact of fame on himself and his family: his television career, the rapacious tabloids, and his own drive for success.

Humbled

by Patricia Haley

Exhausted by constant fighting, the Mitchell family is basking in the midst of an unexpected truce. Joel has fled to Chicago to escape his failed marriage and business ventures. Excited about climbing out of his pit of despair, Joel is eager to get divorced and start over. Tranquility is fleeting when he finds out that his wife, Zarah, is pregnant. Now he's faced with doing the right thing, but the only problem is he doesn't know what that is. Meanwhile, Zarah is willing to pine over Joel until he returns, certain the baby is going to solve their problems. Tamara, the fiery Mitchell heir who's obsessed with empowering women, refuses to watch Zarah grovel for the affection of an undeserving man, even if it is her brother. As Joel teeters with a decision, Tamara prods Zarah to take the reins. Tamara's commitment isn't purely altruistic. She wants to buddy up, gain allegiance, and ultimately undermine the family business. Is there hope for the Mitchell family as layers of strife begin to shed? Will God be able to soften their hearts?

Humbled

by Patricia Haley

Exhausted by constant fighting, the Mitchell family is basking in the midst of an unexpected truce. Joel has fled to Chicago to escape his failed marriage and business ventures. Excited about climbing out of his pit of despair, Joel is eager to get divorced and start over. Tranquility is fleeting when he finds out that his wife, Zarah, is pregnant. Now he's faced with doing the right thing, but the only problem is he doesn't know what that is.Meanwhile, Zarah is willing to pine over Joel until he returns, certain the baby is going to solve their problems. Tamara, the fiery Mitchell heir who's obsessed with empowering women, refuses to watch Zarah grovel for the affection of an undeserving man, even if it is her brother. As Joel teeters with a decision, Tamara prods Zarah to take the reins. Tamara's commitment isn't purely altruistic. She wants to buddy up, gain allegiance, and ultimately undermine the family business.Is there hope for the Mitchell family as layers of strife begin to shed? Will God be able to soften their hearts?

The Humbling

by Philip Roth

Everything is over for Simon Axler, the protagonist of Philip Roth's startling new book. One of the leading American stage actors of his generation, now in his sixties, he has lost his magic, his talent, and his assurance. His Falstaff and Peer Gynt and Vanya, all his great roles, "are melted into air, into thin air." When he goes onstage he feels like a lunatic and looks like an idiot. His confidence in his powers has drained away; he imagines people laughing at him; he can no longer pretend to be someone else. "Something fundamental has vanished." His wife has gone, his audience has left him, his agent can't persuade him to make a comeback.Into this shattering account of inexplicable and terrifying self-evacuation bursts a counterplot of unusual erotic desire, a consolation for a bereft life so risky and aberrant that it points not toward comfort and gratification but to a yet darker and more shocking end. In this long day's journey into night, told with Roth's inimitable urgency, bravura, and gravity, all the ways that we convince ourselves of our solidity, all our life's performances--talent, love, sex, hope, energy, reputation--are stripped off.The Humbling is Roth's thirtieth book.

Humboldt's Gift

by Saul Bellow

Humboldt's Gift is the story about Charlie Citrine who posthumously receives a gift from the poet Von Humboldt Fleischer that changes the way he views himself and the world. Long Synopsis: In Saul Bellow's Humboldt's Gift, the main protagonist, Charlie Citrine, a successful writer, is an intellectual who is tormented by feelings of emptiness and by disturbing recollections. In his youth, his love of literature causes him to befriend the poet Von Humboldt Fleischer. While he is alive, Fleischer becomes Citrine's mentor and teaches him the importance of the spiritual and sparks his interest in intellectual pursuits. Through Fleischer's death along with other experiences and associations, Citrine learns how to integrate his spirituality and intellectuality with the mundane. Throughout the novel, Citrine grapples with the question of how the human being with an infinite soul is going to live in the often anti-human and materialistic society and culture. Charlie is reawakened to his responsibilities. Equally important as asking this question, Citrine finds the courage to continue in his life which is plagued by paradoxes and uncertainties. In the end of the novel, he is awakened to his responsibilities and learns to become involved in everyday reality. Humboldt's Gift has won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

Humbug Holiday: A Christmas Carol (Cracked Classics #4)

by Tony Abbott

Bah, humbug! Frankie and Devin are pretty grouchy about getting transported into "A Christmas Carol", but they have never met someone as grouchy as Ebenezer Scrooge. As they take the fastest ghost-guided tour of all time, the duo can't help but try to soften up crabby old Scrooge himself... just in time for the holidays.

Humbug Man

by Diana Palmer

Romance novel with a Christmas theme.

The Humbug Murders

by L. J. Oliver

Ebenezer Scrooge from Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol investigates a shocking murder--before he becomes the next victim--in this playful mystery in a new series from a New York Times bestselling author.Scrooge considers himself a rational man with a keen sense of deductive reasoning developed from years of business dealings. But that changes one night when he's visited by the ghost of his former boss and friend, Fezziwig, who mysteriously warns him that three more will die, and ultimately Ebenezer himself--if he doesn't get to the bottom of a vast conspiracy. When he wakes the next day, Scrooge discovers that not only is Fezziwig dead, but he's under arrest as all evidence points toward himself: Scrooge's calling card was found in the cold, dead hand of Fezziwig's body, and someone scribbled "HUMBUG" in blood on the floor nearby. Now, Scrooge must race against the pocket watch to clear his name, protect his interests, and find out who killed his last true friend--before the "Humbug Killer" strikes again. Joining Scrooge in his adventures is a spunky sidekick named Adelaide, who matches his wits at every turn, plus the Artful Dodger, Fagin, Belle, Pickwick, and even Charles Dickens himself as a reporter dealing in the lurid details of London's alleyway crimes. Full of action and wry humor, The Humbug Murders is a fun take on a classic character--Scrooge as you've never seen him before.

Hume

by H. W. Noonan

The father of modern scepticism and perhaps the most important English philosopher, Hume was lauded within his own lifetime as a pivotal figure of the Enlightenment. His 'naturalist' approach to a wide variety of philosophical topics resulted in highly original theories of perception, personal identity, causation, politics, morality, and religion, many of which were extremely controversial and continue to make waves today. Harold Noonan's excellent introduction to Hume presents Hume's ideas in their original context as well as discussing their relevance to contemporary philosophical debate. Can we argue that the design of the universe points to the existence of God? What makes us persons? What can we rationally believe in? Hume's voice, lucid and witty, is still an acute critic of human nature and Western thought.

Hume: A Very Short Introduction

by Alfred Jules Ayer

Biography of Hume and a cogent discussion of his philosophy.

Showing 110,226 through 110,250 of 191,239 results

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