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Joseph

by Charles R. Swindoll

Every day it seems another so-called "hero" falls from grace, but in his Great Lives from God's Word series, Chuck Swindoll introduces you to heroes who stand the test of time. In his third and latest volume, Joseph, Swindoll challenges Christians to aspire to the virtues of obedience, mercy, and courage---all of which characterized the life of this richly blessed child of God.

Joseph Andrews and Shamela

by Henry Fielding

H. Fielding wrote Joseph Andrews (1742) and Shamela (1741) in response to Samuel Richardson's Pamela (1740), where Shamela is a bawdy travesty. Joseph Andrews begins as a satire, but outgrows its origins. Its roots lie in Cervantes and Marivaux.

Joseph Anton: A Memoir

by Salman Rushdie

On February 14, 1989, Valentine's Day, Salman Rushdie was telephoned by a BBC journalist and told that he had been "sentenced to death" by the Ayatollah Khomeini. For the first time he heard the word fatwa. His crime? To have written a novel called The Satanic Verses, which was accused of being "against Islam, the Prophet and the Quran." So begins the extraordinary story of how a writer was forced underground, moving from house to house, with the constant presence of an armed police protection team. He was asked to choose an alias that the police could call him by. He thought of writers he loved and combinations of their names; then it came to him: Conrad and Chekhov--Joseph Anton. How do a writer and his family live with the threat of murder for more than nine years? How does he go on working? How does he fall in and out of love? How does despair shape his thoughts and actions, how and why does he stumble, how does he learn to fight back? In this remarkable memoir Rushdie tells that story for the first time; the story of one of the crucial battles, in our time, for freedom of speech. He talks about the sometimes grim, sometimes comic realities of living with armed policemen, and of the close bonds he formed with his protectors; of his struggle for support and understanding from governments, intelligence chiefs, publishers, journalists, and fellow writers; and of how he regained his freedom. It is a book of exceptional frankness and honesty, compelling, provocative, moving, and of vital importance. Because what happened to Salman Rushdie was the first act of a drama that is still unfolding somewhere in the world every day.Praise for Salman Rushdie "In Salman Rushdie . . . India has produced a glittering novelist--one with startling imaginative and intellectual resources, a master of perpetual storytelling."--The New Yorker "Salman Rushdie has earned the right to be called one of our great storytellers."--The Observer "Our most exhilaratingly inventive prose stylist, a writer of breathtaking originality."--Financial Times

Joseph Conrad

by J. H. Stape J. H. Stape Allan H. Simmons Allan H. Simmons

Joseph Conrad is one of the great figures in the tradition of the English novel. This book provides a critically-informed introduction to Conrad and his work, placing him in his political, social, and literary context, and examining his relationship to Modernism, England and Empire. It covers the range of Conrad's fiction, from the early Malay novels, through such key works as Heart of Darkness, Lord Jim, Nostromo, The Secret Agent, and Under Western Eyes, to his later novels.

Joseph Conrad The Dover Reader

by Joseph Conrad

Fluent from birth in French as well as his native Polish, Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) learned his third language, English, as an adult. And it was in English that he wrote his evocative stories and novels, drawing upon his experiences in the British and French navies to portray the struggles of humanity amid the world's vast indifference. This anthology offers readers the essential Joseph Conrad, including his debut novel, Almayer's Folly. Other features include his political thriller, The Secret Agent, along with his most famous novel, Heart of Darkness, and a related account of an 1890 expedition, The Congo Diary. A selection of short stories includes "Youth: A Narrative," "An Anarchist," "An Outpost of Progress," and "The Secret Sharer."

Joseph Conrad's Critical Reception

by John G. Peters

Throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Joseph Conrad's novels and short stories have consistently figured into - and helped to define - the dominant trends in literary criticism. This book is the first to provide a thorough yet accessible overview of Conrad scholarship and criticism spanning the entire history of Conrad studies, from the 1895 publication of his first book, Almayer's Folly, to the present. While tracing the general evolution of the commentary surrounding Conrad's work, John G. Peters's careful analysis also evaluates Conrad's impact on critical trends such as the belles lettres tradition, the New Criticism, psychoanalysis, structuralist and post-structuralist criticism, narratology, postcolonial studies, gender and women's studies, and ecocriticism. The breadth and scope of Peters's study make this text an essential resource for Conrad scholars and students of English literature and literary criticism.

Joseph E. Johnston: A Civil War Biography

by Craig L. Symonds

"Riveting. . . . A thoughtful biography." --New York Times Book Review General Joseph E. Johnston was in command of Confederate forces at the South's first victory--Manassas in July 1861--and at its last--Bentonville in April 1965. Many of his contemporaries considered him the greatest southern field commander of the war; others ranked him second only to Robert E. Lee. But Johnston was an enigmatic man. His battlefield victories were never decisive. He failed to save Confederate forces under siege by Grant at Vicksburg, and he retreated into Georgia in the face of Sherman's march. His intense feud with Jefferson Davis ensured the collapse of the Confederacy's western campaign in 1864 and made Johnston the focus of a political schism within the government. Now in this rousing narrative of Johnston's dramatic career, Craig L. Symonds gives us the first rounded portrait of the general as a public and private man.

Joseph Goebbels

by Curt Riess

All about Joseph Goebbels, his childhood and adulthood.

Joseph Had a Little Overcoat

by Simms Taback

The story takes place in a small village in Poland probably in the middle or late 19th century, and the people are dressed in costumes of the period. This elegant picture book tells the story of Joseph's overcoat, and what he does wih it when it wears out. Along the way, children meet some Yiddish words and glimpse a bit of Jewish culture. This picture book includes picture descriptions, and this file should make an excellent embossed braille copy.

Joseph in the Snow, and The Clockmaker, Volume II

by Berthold Auerbach

It is doubtful whether this tale should be considered a juvenile story or not. The hero is a child, and upon this child the chief interest of the narrative concentrates, but in many respects it is written for mature minds. It is a graphic, simple, and touching tale of unusual power, that may be read with pleasure by old and young alike.

Joseph Roth: A Life in Letters

by Joseph Roth Michael Hofmann

The monumentality of this biographical work further establishes Joseph Roth--with Kafka, Mann, and Musil--in the twentieth-century literary canon. Who would have thought that seventy-three years after Joseph Roth's lonely death in Paris, new editions of his translations would be appearing regularly? Roth, a transcendent novelist who also produced some of the most breathtakingly lyrical journalism ever written, is now being discovered by a new generation. Nine years in the making, this life through letters provides us with our most extensive portrait of Roth's calamitous life--his father's madness, his wife's schizophrenia, his parade of mistresses (each more exotic than the next), and his classic westward journey from a virtual Hapsburg shtetl to Vienna, Berlin, Frankfurt, and finally Paris. Containing 457 newly translated letters, along with eloquent introductions that richly frame Roth's life, this book brilliantly evokes the crumbling specters of the Weimar Republic and 1930s France. Displaying Roth's ceaselessly inventive powers, it finally charts his descent into despair at a time when "the word had died, [and] men bark like dogs."

Joseph Smith

by Robert V. Remini

Robert Remini's work on the Jacksonian epoch has won him acclaim as well as the National Book Award. In Joseph Smith, he employs his keen insight and rich storytelling gift to explore one of the period's major figures. The most important reformer and innovator in American religious history, Joseph Smith has remained a fascinating enigma to many both inside and outside the Mormon Church he founded.<P> Born in 1805, Smith grew up during the "Second Great Awakening," when secular tumult had spawned radical religious fervor and countless new sects. His contemplative nature and soaring imagination--the first of his many visions occurred at the age of fourteen--were nurtured in the close, loving family created by his deeply devout parents. His need to lead and be recognized was met by his mission as God's vehicle for a new faith and by the hundreds who, magnetized by his charm and charismatic preaching, gave rise to the Mormon Church. Remini brings Smith into unprecedented focus and contextualizes his enduring contribution to American life and culture within the distinctive characteristics of an extraordinary age.

Joseph Smith: Rough Stone Rolling

by Richard Lyman Bushman

Joseph Smith, America's preeminent visionary and prophet, rose from a modest background to found the largest indigenous Christian church in American history. Without the benefit of wealth, education, or social position, he published the 584-page Book of Mormon when he was twenty-three; organized a church when he was twenty-four; and founded cities, built temples, and attracted thousands of followers before his violent death at age thirty-eight. Rather than perishing with him, Mormonism migrated to the Rocky Mountains, flourished there, and now claims millions of followers worldwide. In Joseph Smith: Rough Stone Rolling, Richard Bushman, an esteemed American cultural historian and a practicing Mormon, tells how Smith formed a new religion from the ground up. Moving beyond the popular stereotype of Smith as a colorful fraud, the book explores the inner workings of his personality-his personal piety, his temper, his affection for family and friends, and his incredible determination. It describes how he received revelations and why his followers believed them. Smith was a builder of cities. He sought to form egalitarian, just, and open communities under God and laid out a plan for ideal cities, which he hoped would fill the world. Adopted as the model for hundreds of Mormon settlements in the West, Smith's urban vision may have left a more lasting imprint on the landscape than that of any other American. He was controversial from his earliest years. His followers honored him as a man who spoke for God and restored biblical religion. His enemies maligned him as a dangerous religious fanatic, an American Mohammad, and drove the Mormons from every place in which they settled. Smith's ultimate assassination by an armed mob raises the question of whether American democracy can tolerate visionaries. The book gives more attention to Joseph Smith's innovative religious thought than any previous biography. As Bushman writes, "His followers derived their energy and purpose from the religious world he brought into being. " Some of the teachings were controversial, such as property redistribution and plural marriage, but Smith's revelations also delved into cosmology and the history of God. They spoke of the origins of the human personality and the purpose of life. While thoroughly Christian, Smith radically reconceived the relationship between humans and God. The book evaluates the Mormon prophet's bold contributions to Christian theology and situates him culturally in the modern world. Published on the two hundredth anniversary of Smith's birth, Joseph Smith: Rough Stone Rolling is an in-depth portrayal of the mysterious figure behind one of the world's fastest growing faiths. From the Hardcover edition.

Joseph, the Dreamer

by Clyde Robert Bulla

A retelling of the Bible story in which Joseph is reunited with his family many years after being sold into slavery in Egypt.

Joseph Who Loved the Sabbath

by Marilyn Hirsh

Long ago, there lived a poor. man named Joseph. All week long he worked hard so he could buy only the finest things for the Sabbath, the seventh day of the week. Season after season, Joseph worked hard for Sorab, a greedy and selfish farmer who scoffed at Joseph's love for the Sabbath. Sorab would never pay Joseph more, no matter how hard he worked. Then, one night, Sorab had a bad dream that all he owned would soon be Joseph's. What the dream did not foretell was an adventure of storms at sea, recovered treasure, a ad a home newly filled with joy. Marilyn Hirsh's energetic retelling of a Jewish folktale has its source in the Talmud, but contains many elements common to traditional world folklore. Vibrant illustrations by Devis Grebu, with a touch of humor, make this a story for all ages end all cultures. Ages 3-8

Joseph - Women's Bible Study Preview Book

by Melissa Spoelstra

This pocket-size book provides a snapshot of the underlying message of the complete study--that God wants us to release our past and present hurts and allow Him to do a supernatural work of forgiveness in our life. Based on the Bible study:Joseph: The Journey to Forgiveness.

Josephine

by Beverly Jenkins

A businesswoman at 17, sassy Josephine Best has a sharp tongue--especially where Adam Morgan is concerned. He may be a Union soldier in the War Between the States, but that doesn't mean he's Jojo's hero. Or does it?

Josephine Baker and the Rainbow Tribe

by Matthew Pratt Guterl

Creating a sensation with her risqué nightclub act and strolls down the Champs Elysées, pet cheetah in tow, Josephine Baker lives on in popular memory as the banana-skirted siren of Jazz Age Paris. In Josephine Baker and the Rainbow Tribe, Matthew Pratt Guterl brings out a little known side of the celebrated personality, showing how her ambitions of later years were even more daring and subversive than the youthful exploits that made her the first African American superstar. Her performing days numbered, Baker settled down in a sixteenth-century chateau she named Les Milandes, in the south of France. Then, in 1953, she did something completely unexpected and, in the context of racially sensitive times, outrageous. Adopting twelve children from around the globe, she transformed her estate into a theme park, complete with rides, hotels, a collective farm, and singing and dancing. The main attraction was her Rainbow Tribe, the family of the future, which showcased children of all skin colors, nations, and religions living together in harmony. Les Milandes attracted an adoring public eager to spend money on a utopian vision, and to worship at the feet of Josephine, mother of the world. Alerting readers to some of the contradictions at the heart of the Rainbow Tribe project--its undertow of child exploitation and megalomania in particular--Guterl concludes that Baker was a serious and determined activist who believed she could make a positive difference by creating a family out of the troublesome material of race.

Josephine: A Life of the Empress

by Carolly Erickson

"Born a creole in Martinique, sent to France in her teens to marry a distant relative in order to salvage the family fortunes, Josephine was adventurous, ambitious and above all hardy - a survivor in a hazardous time. Soon separated from her dissolute, spiteful husband, she made her way in the salons of Paris, a member of the shadow-world on the margins of respectability." "Confined to the worst prison in Paris during the murderous days of the French Revolution, condemned to death, she miraculously escaped her fate and went on to marry the rising star of the Directory, Napoleon Bonaparte - the man who in a few short years, with Josephine at his side, became Emperor of the French." "But the partnership between them was flawed, for by the time Josephine met Bonaparte she had become accustomed to associating romantic liaisons with profit, and not with tenderness. Bonaparte, at first besotted with his wife, soon became her tormentor, and she sought escape and romance with the love of her life, an obscure officer named Hippolyte Charles." "Carolly Erickson brings the complex, charming, ever resilient Josephine to life in this memorable portrait, one that carries the reader along every twist and turn of the empress's often thorny path, from the sensual richness of her childhood in the tropics to her final lonely days at Malmaison." --BOOK JACKET. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Joseph's Bones

by Jerome M. Segal

A bold and radical reinterpretation of the Old Testament. "Brilliant. . . Nothing quite like it has appeared in years. " (Jack Miles, author of God: A Biography ) Imagine if someone who had never heard of Judaism or Christianity read the Old Testament. How could the relationship between God and humanity possibly be understood? In Joseph's Bones, Segal approaches the Bible from this fresh perspective-one framed by the story of the Israelites' fidelity to Joseph-and finds something unexpected: an account of the human condition that reads like an existential novel about the struggle of mankind against the unpredictable and often unwarranted wrath of God. This is a rarity in Biblical interpretation- brilliant and rigorously argued, "a work of stunning originality. "

Josephus: The Essential Writings

by Flavius Josephus

An award-winning translation and condensation of Jewish Antiquities and The Jewish War. Translated and edited by Paul L. Maier.

Josette

by Kathleen Bittner Roth

"An exciting new voice in historical romance." --Anna Campbell, award?winning author of What a Duke Dares"Monsieur Andrews, welcome to my home."At the smoky, velvet sound, Cameron swung around. Every function in his body--heart, breath, blood ceased to function. She was lovely. More than lovely. Tendrils of raven hair framed a face so exquisite, it disarmed him. Her mouth, a soft, dewy pink, parted. And those eyes, as dark as Creole coffee, intelligent and assessing, roamed over him and then back to take hold of his. He needed to step closer, to stroke her skin. To possess her. But would his wealth and worldly experience be a match for the free-spirited Cajun-born widow? Across the oceans, between worlds old and new--two lost souls find themselves at a crossroads.

Showing 149,376 through 149,400 of 258,140 results

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