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Showing 53,901 through 53,925 of 203,141 results

America's Civil War

by Brooks D. Simpson

Brief but thorough summarization of the history of the period, complete with an anotated biography.

America's Constitution: A Biography

by Akhil Reed Amar

In America's Constitution, one of this era's most accomplished constitutional law scholars, Akhil Reed Amar, gives the first comprehensive account of one of the world's great political texts. Incisive, entertaining, and occasionally controversial, this "biography" of America's framing document explains not only what the Constitution says but also why the Constitution says it. We all know this much: the Constitution is neither immutable nor perfect. Amar shows us how the story of this one relatively compact document reflects the story of America more generally. (For example, much of the Constitution, including the glorious-sounding "We the People," was lifted from existing American legal texts, including early state constitutions.) In short, the Constitution was as much a product of its environment as it was a product of its individual creators' inspired genius.Despite the Constitution's flaws, its role in guiding our republic has been nothing short of amazing. Skillfully placing the document in the context of late-eighteenth-century American politics, America's Constitution explains, for instance, whether there is anything in the Constitution that is unamendable; the reason America adopted an electoral college; why a president must be at least thirty-five years old; and why-for now, at least-only those citizens who were born under the American flag can become president. From his unique perspective, Amar also gives us unconventional wisdom about the Constitution and its significance throughout the nation's history. For one thing, we see that the Constitution has been far more democratic than is conventionally understood. Even though the document was drafted by white landholders, a remarkably large number of citizens (by the standards of 1787) were allowed to vote up or down on it, and the document's later amendments eventually extended the vote to virtually all Americans. We also learn that the Founders' Constitution was far more slavocratic than many would acknowledge: the "three fifths" clause gave the South extra political clout for every slave it owned or acquired. As a result, slaveholding Virginians held the presidency all but four of the Republic's first thirty-six years, and proslavery forces eventually came to dominate much of the federal government prior to Lincoln's election.Ambitious, even-handed, eminently accessible, and often surprising, America's Constitution is an indispensable work, bound to become a standard reference for any student of history and all citizens of the United States. [This text is listed as an example that meets Common Core Standards in English language arts in grades 11-12 at http://www.corestandards.org.]

America's Courts and the Criminal Justice System

by David W. Neubauer Henry F. Fradella

Open this book and step into America's court system! With Neubauer and Fradella's best-selling text, you will see for yourself what it is like to be a judge, a prosecutor, a defense attorney, and more. This fascinating and well-researched text gives you a realistic sense of being in the courthouse--you will quickly gain an understanding of what it is like to work in and be a part of the American criminal justice system. This concept of the courthouse "players" makes it easy to understand each person's important role in bringing a case through the court process. Throughout the text, the authors highlight not only the pivotal role of the criminal courts but also the court's importance and impact on society as a whole.

America's Covered Bridges

by Terry E. Miller A. Chester Ong Ronald G. Knapp

The history of North America is in many ways encapsulated in the history of her covered bridges. The early 1800s saw a tremendous boom in the construction of these bridges, and in the years that followed as many as 15,000 covered bridges were built. Today, fewer than a thousand remain.Without covered bridges to span the rivers and provide access to vast swaths of the interior that had previously been difficult to access-America never would have developed the way she did. In America's Covered Bridges, authors Terry E. Miller and Ronald G. Knapp tell the fascinating story of these bridges, how they were built, the technological breakthroughs required to construct them, and above all the dedication and skill of their builders. Each of the bridges, whether still standing or long gone, has a story to tell about the nature of America at the time-not only about its transportational needs, but the availability of materials and the technological prowess of the people who built it.This book is absolutely packed with fascinating stories and information-passionately told by two leading experts on this subject. The book will be of tremendous interest to anyone interested in American history, carpentry and early technology.

America's Democratic Republic (Fourth Edition)

by Edward S. Greenberg Benjamin I. Page

Updated in a new 4th edition, America's Democratic Republic is a brief, affordable book in an accessible trade-like format that explores the clash between the democratic aspirations of the American people and the republican foundations of our Constitution. Written with a lively, narrative style, this text traces the storyline of American government and focuses on the long standing and inescapable tension between the country's 18th century republican Constitutional foundations and the democratic aspirations of the American people.

America's Dumbest Criminals

by Daniel Butler Leland Gregory Alan Ray

BASED ON TRUE STORIES FROM LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICIALS ACROSS THE COUNTRY

America's Economic Way of War: War and the US Economy from the Spanish-American War to the Persian Gulf War

by Hugh Rockoff

How did economic and financial factors determine how America waged war in the twentieth century? This important new book exposes the influence of economics and finance on the questions of whether the nation should go to war, how wars would be fought, how resources would be mobilized, and the long-term consequences for the American economy. Ranging from the Spanish-American War to the Gulf War, Hugh Rockoff explores the ways in which war can provide unique opportunities for understanding the basic principles of economics as wars produce immense changes in monetary and fiscal policy and so provide a wealth of information about how these policies actually work. He shows that wars have been more costly to the United States than most Americans realize as a substantial reliance on borrowing from the public, money creation and other strategies to finance America's war efforts have hidden the true cost of war.

America's Ethan Allen

by Stewart H. Holbrook

This book presents the life and legends of Colonel Ethan Allen and Green Mountain boys of the American Revolution.

America's Favorite Radio Station: WKRP in Cincinnati

by Michael B. Kassel

Although it became one of the most successful programs in syndicated television history, WKRP in Cincinnati faced an uphill struggle trying to obtain prime-time success. Kassel chronicles the decisions and problems that affected WKRP's primetime success, and explores the reasons why it went on to become a classic.

America's Fiscal Constitution

by Bill White

What would Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Lincoln, the Roosevelts, Truman, and Eisenhower have done about today's federal debt crisis?America's Fiscal Constitution tells the remarkable story of fiscal heroes who imposed clear limits on the use of federal debt, limits that for two centuries were part of an unwritten constitution. Those national leaders borrowed only for extraordinary purposes and relied on well-defined budget practices to balance federal spending and revenues. That traditional fiscal constitution collapsed in 2001. Afterward-for the first time in history-federal elected officials cut taxes during war, funded permanent new programs entirely with debt, grew dependent on foreign creditors, and claimed that the economy could not thrive without routine federal borrowing.For most of the nation's history, conservatives fought to restrain the growth of government by insisting that new programs be paid for with taxation, while progressives sought to preserve opportunities for people on the way up by balancing budgets. Virtually all mainstream politicians recognized that excessive debt could jeopardize private investment and national independence.With original scholarship and the benefit of experience in finance and public service, Bill White dispels common budget myths and distills practical lessons from the nation's five previous spikes in debt. America's Fiscal Constitution offers an objective and hopeful guide for people trying to make sense of the nation's current, most severe, debt crisis and its impact on their lives and our future.

America's Forgotten Pandemic

by Alfred W. Crosby

Between August 1918 and March 1919 the Spanish influenza spread worldwide, claiming over 25 million lives, more people than those perished in the fighting of the First World War. It proved fatal to at least a half-million Americans. Yet, the Spanish flu pandemic is largely forgotten today. In this vivid narrative, Alfred W. Crosby recounts the course of the pandemic during the panic-stricken months of 1918 and 1919, measures its impact on American society, and probes the curious loss of national memory of this cataclysmic event. In a new edition, with a new preface discussing the recent outbreaks of diseases, including the Asian flu and the SARS epidemic, America's Forgotten Pandemic remains both prescient and relevant. Alfred W. Crosby is a Professor Emeritus in American Studies, History and Geography at the University of Texas at Austin, where he taught for over 20 years. His previous books include Throwing Fire (Cambrige, 2002), the Measure of Reality (Cambridge, 1997) and Ecological Imperialism (cambridge, 1986). Ecological Imperialism was the winner of the 1986 Phi Beta Kappa book prize. The Measure of Reality was chosen by the Los Angeles Times as one of the 100 most important books of 1997.

America's Great Debate: Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and the Compromise That Preserved the Union

by Fergus M. Bordewich

The Mexican War introduced vast new territories into the United States, among them California and the present-day Southwest. When gold was discovered in California in the great Gold Rush of 1849, the population swelled, and settlers petitioned for admission to the Union. But the U.S. Senate was precariously balanced with fifteen free states and fifteen slave states. Up to then states had been admitted in pairs, one free and one slave, to preserve that tenuous balance in the Senate. Would California be free or slave? So began a paralyzing crisis in American government, and the longest debate in Senate history. Fergus Bordewich tells the epic story of the Compromise of 1850 with skill and vigor, bringing to life two generations of senators who dominated the great debate. Luminaries such as John Calhoun, Daniel Webster, and Henry Clay--who tried unsuccessfully to cobble together a compromise that would allow for California's admission and simultaneously put an end to the nation's agony over slavery--were nearing the end of their long careers. Rising stars such as Jefferson Davis, William Seward, and Stephen Douglas--who ultimately succeeded where Clay failed--would shape the country's politics as slavery gradually fractured the nation. The Compromise saved the Union from collapse, but it did so at a great cost. The gulf between North and South over slavery widened with the strengthened Fugitive Slave Law that was part of the complex Compromise. In America's Great Debate Fergus Bordewich takes us back to a time when compromise was imperative, when men swayed one another in Congress with the power of their ideas and their rhetoric, when partisans on each side reached across the aisle to preserve the Union from tragedy.

America's Great Game

by Hugh Wilford

The Central Intelligence Agency's reputation in the Middle East today has been marred by waterboarding and drone strikes, yet in its earliest years the agency was actually the region's staunchest western ally. In America's Great Game, celebrated intelligence historian Hugh Wilford reveals how three colorful CIA operatives-Kermit and Archie Roosevelt, and maverick covert-ops expert Miles Copeland-attempted, futilely, to bring the U.S. and Middle East into harmony during the 1940s and '50s. Heirs to an American missionary tradition that taught them to treat Arabs and Muslims with respect and empathy, these CIA "Arabists" nevertheless behaved like political puppet-masters, orchestrating coup plots throughout the Middle East while seeking to sway public opinion in America against support for the new state of Israel. Their efforts, and ultimate failure, would doom U.S.-Middle Eastern relations for decades to come. Drawing on extensive new material, including declassified government records, private papers, and personal interviews, America's Great Game shows how three well-intentioned spies inadvertently ruptured relations between America and the Arab world.

America's History

by James A. Henretta Lynn Dumenil David Brody

In order for students to succeed in an AP U. S. history course, they need to understand not only what happened, but also why it happened. "America's History" has long been praised as a text that helps students to think critically about history and analyze both how and why historical events have occurred. "America's History" deftly weaves together political, social, and cultural history in a narrative that students find accessible and engaging. Exceptional pedagogical support -- overviews, maps, figures, illustrations, and embedded documents -- are carefully integrated to encourage the development of students' historical skills. "America's History" is the text that covers not only the facts, but also the skills that students need to have success in the AP U. S. history course. Need help with the audit? Click here to download an AP correlation.

America's History (7th Edition)

by James A. Henretta Rebecca Edwards Robert O. Self

America's History helps students understand the world in which we live, by drawing links between events in the United States and those elsewhere.

America's History: Land of Liberty

by John L. Esposito Vivian Bernstein Steck-Vaughn Staff Mel Miller

As you go through this book, you will discover how people created a new nation in North America that was different from any other country. Every chapter starts with statements made to encourage readers in the units and chapters. There are questions presented at the beginning of every chapter that help students to focus on the main ideas throughout the book.

America's History: Land of Liberty, Beginning to 1877

by Vivian Bernstein

As you read America's History: Land of Liberty, you will discover how people created a new nation in North America that was different from any other country. That nation, the United States of America, was the only nation at the end of the 1700s where people made their own laws and ruled themselves without a king or queen. It was a great experiment because no one knew if a nation with such a government could survive. You will learn how the new nation not only survived, but grew larger and stronger.

America's Journey: Continuity and Change in the Twentieth Century

by David Goldfield Carl Abbott Virginia Dejohn Anderson Jo Ann E. Argersinger Peter H. Argersinger William L. Barney Robert M. Weir

A number of features in this book are designed to aid in the study of history. Each chapter begins with Questions, organized by the main subtopics of each chapter, that encourage careful consideration of important themes and developments.

America’s Last Call: On the Brink of a Financial Holocaust

by David Wilkerson

(Quoted from the Author) "A majority of Americans have concluded, 'Morals do not count. Let our leaders do as they please; just give us a booming economy!' God is about to crush this abominable American mindset. Soon the American dream will become the American nightmare. Yet through it all, those who know God can be assured of constant protection and provision from His hands." Even though Wilkerson published his book in 1998, his predictions about the U.S. economy are surprisingly accurate. and therefore, are worth investigating.

America's Last Wild Horses

by Hope Ryden

From the Book Jacket: "A richly researched and written book with an unusual appeal." -Publishers Weekly "This book is a treat for everyone who knows or cares about horses." -Cleveland Amory No wild animal captures the spirit of North America quite so powerfully as the wild horse-nor has any faced such diverse and potent enemies. In this provocative account, Hope Ryden-who helped to ensure the passage of the Wild and Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act, which grants mustangs special protection-combs the history of these proud and noble horses; Descended from the Spanish horses ridden by the conquistadors, they evolved into the tough and intelligent ponies that Indians-and later, explorers and cowboys-learned to rely on. From the period when wholesale extermination of the buffalo was underway until recent times, commercial and political interests have sought to eliminate the wild horses as varmints. In the latest update to this classic story Ryden tells of the successes: and failures in the past ten years of regulation, and has added stunning new color photographs. The subject of a front-page article in The New York Times. when it was first published, america's last wild horses continues to be a compelling testament to the life of a uniquely American symbol of grace and wildness, and is a must read for horse lovers and Western history enthusiast everywhere.

America's Longest War: The United States and Vietnam, 1950-1975 (3rd edition)

by George C. Herring

Americas Longest War provides a complete and balanced history of the Vietnam War. It is not mainly a military history, but seeks to integrate military, diplomatic, and political factors in order to clarify America's involvement and ultimate failure in Vietnam.

America's Medicis: The Rockefellers and Their Astonishing Cultural Legacy

by Suzanne Loebl

The first book to explore the immense cultural contributions of one of America's wealthiest and most influential families: the Rockefellers. Abby Aldrich Rockefeller sparked her family's passion for art, but it was her husband, John D. Rockefeller Jr., who once was hailed as the "greatest friend and patron of the arts since Florence's Lorenzo de Medici." Together and separately they, as well as their descendents, became a major force on the American art scene. The dozen Rockefeller-sponsored museums, including MoMA and the Cloisters, are among the world's finest. Their architectural projects-Rockefeller Center, the restoration of Colonial Williamsburg, Lincoln Center-are equally stellar. The family also enriched existing institutions with entire collections of modern, Asian, "primitive," and folk art, in addition to ancient artifacts. Based on a wealth of information culled from the family's extensive archives, America's Medicis traces the Rockefellers' artistic philanthropies from their beginnings to the present. As author Suzanne Loebl makes clear, the Rockefellers did more than simply provide money and artworks; they also devoted themselves to the causes they believed in-a commitment that helped define and direct America's artistic tastes. In spite of all these material gifts, the Rockefellers' most lasting contribution was to teach America that art does not belong to a rarefied elite, but can be enjoyed and understood by all. Erudite and engaging, America's Medicis is a remarkable account of the twentieth-century American art world and the extraordinary family at its center.

America's Miracle Man in Vietnam: American Encounters/Global Interactions

by Emily S. Rosenberg Gilbert M. Joseph

America's Miracle Man in Vietnam rethinks the motivations behind one of the most ruinous foreign-policy decisions of the postwar era: America's commitment to preserve an independent South Vietnam under the premiership of Ngo Dinh Diem. The so-called Diem experiment is usually ascribed to U. S. anticommunism and an absence of other candidates for South Vietnam's highest office. Challenging those explanations, Seth Jacobs utilizes religion and race as categories of analysis to argue that the alliance with Diem cannot be understood apart from America's mid-century religious revival and policymakers' perceptions of Asians. Jacobs contends that Diem's Catholicism and the extent to which he violated American notions of "Oriental" passivity and moral laxity made him a more attractive ally to Washington than many non-Christian South Vietnamese with greater administrative experience and popular support. A diplomatic and cultural history, America's Miracle Man in Vietnam draws on government archives, presidential libraries, private papers, novels, newspapers, magazines, movies, and television and radio broadcasts. Jacobs shows in detail how, in the 1950s, U. S. policymakers conceived of Cold War anticommunism as a crusade in which Americans needed to combine with fellow Judeo-Christians against an adversary dangerous as much for its atheism as for its military might. He describes how racist assumptions that Asians were culturally unready for democratic self-government predisposed Americans to excuse Diem's dictatorship as necessary in "the Orient. " By focusing attention on the role of American religious and racial ideologies, Jacobs makes a crucial contribution to our understanding of the disastrous commitment of the United States to "sink or swim with Ngo Dinh Diem. "

America's Most Ghostly Places: New York State

by Jeffrey A. Wands

America's Most Ghostly Places: New York State: A Psychic Medium's Guide to Investigating Haunted Locations will enlighten your view of ghosts and make you more sensitive to paranormal activity.The state of New York is home to a large number of haunted sites populated by ghosts--people who have died sudden or violent deaths and have been unable to rest in peace. These ghosts and spirits inhabit bars and restaurants, cemeteries, homes, and popular historic sites, many times hoping to find someone who can relay an important message to their loved ones before making their journey to the other side. Nationally acclaimed psychic medium and communicator to the spirits, Jeffrey A. Wands, has been interacting with ghosts and spirits for the majority of his life and is now sharing stories about those he has encountered in New York's most ghostly places, including who they were when they were alive, what happened to them before they died, and what paranormal activity has been reported by visitors to these haunted sites. You will learn what to expect when you step onto any of these twenty-seven haunted locations, many of which hold historic relevancy, such as Hotel Chelsea, St. James Chapel, Flushing Town Hall, Five Corners Cemetery and the New York State Capital Building. However, you must remember one thing before embarking on your ghost-hunting adventure: always show the utmost respect for the ghosts and their personal space.

America's Most Haunted

by Eric Olsen Theresa Argie

Throughout the United States, there are places haunted by souls both malevolent and benign. Places where paranormal activity runs rampant. Places where we can glimpse the other side... In America's Most Haunted, "Haunted Housewife" investigator Theresa Argie and journalist Eric Olsen team up to take you on a first-person tour of some of America's most active paranormal hotspots. Experience the crawl through the death tunnel where visitors have reported sightings of an inhuman creature that creeps along the walls and ceilings. Walk the decks of the Queen Mary with the hundreds of souls that met their ends in watery graves. And get to know the spirits that wait in jails, mansions, lunatic asylums, and even a stately old hotel. Combining spine-tingling stories, documented evidence, and interviews with some of the top names in paranormal investigation--including the stars of TV's "Ghost Hunters," "Ghost Adventures," and more--America's Most Haunted gives you a terrifying chance to tour our nation's most famous haunted places. Are you brave enough to take a look?

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