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Letters from Maine

by May Sarton

The poetic tale of a fleeting love affair In her sixty years in literature, May Sarton has taken her readers through all of her emotions and pushed us to explore new places within ourselves. But her feelings are never more raw or exposed than in Letters from Maine. The rugged coast provides a stark background for Sarton's images of a tragically brief and newfound love. She describes the willingness to give anything and devote everything to a new love, as well as the despair at the memory of what is left over. As Sarton grew older, time became an increasingly prominent factor in her life, but as Letters from Maine shows, it is never too late to love.

Letters From Prison

by Richard Seaver Marquis De Sade

The 1990s have seen a resurgence of interest in the Marquis de Sade, with several biographies competing to put their version of his life story before the public. But Sadean scholar Richard Seaver takes us directly to the source, translating Sade's prison correspondence. Seaver's translations retain the aristocratic hauteur of Sade's prose, which still possesses a clarity that any reader can appreciate. "When will my horrible situation cease?" he wrote to his wife shortly after his incarceration began in 1777. "When in God's name will I be let out of the tomb where I have been buried alive? There is nothing to equal the horror of my fate!" But he was never reduced to pleading for long, and not always so solicitous of his wife's feelings; a few years later, he would write, "This morning I received a fat letter from you that seemed endless. Please, I beg of you, don't go on at such length: do you believe that I have nothing better to do than to read your endless repetitions?" For those interested in learning about the man responsible for some of the most infamous philosophical fiction in history, Letters from Prison is an indispensable collection.

Letters From Ruth's Attic: 31 Daily Insights For Knowing God's Love

by Ruth Graham

Ever feel like running away? Ever asked, "Why me?" Have you doubted whether God is listening? Do you sometimes get discouraged because you are just plain tired, or secretly wonder how God could possibly find pleasure in you? If so, this collection of unique reflections from Ruth Bell Grahams pen will lift your spirits, stir your smile, and encourage you in your walk with God. Ruth Bell Graham (1920-2007), wife of Billy Graham, often called herself a pack rat, alluding to the attic she loaded with the stuff of memories as well as with simple treasures others had overlooked. In a similar way she packed her writing with illustrations stored in memory and stories collected from forgotten writers and ancient sources, then added her fresh thoughts. One longtime friend said Ruths writing revealed an alchemist's gift for transforming ordinary experiences and everyday observations into insights of wisdom.

Letters From the Earth: Uncensored Writings

by Mark Twain Bernard Devoto

"I have told you nothing about man that is not true." You must pardon me if I repeat that remark now and then in these letters; I want you to take seriously the things I am telling you, and I feel that if I were in your place and you in mine, I should need that reminder from time to time, to keep my credulity from flagging.<P> In Letters from the Earth, Twain presents himself as the Father of History -- reviewing and interpreting events from the Garden of Eden through the Fall and the Flood, translating the papers of Adam and his descendants through the generations. First published fifty years after his death, this eclectic collection is vintage Twain: sharp, witty, imaginative, complex, and wildly funny.

Letters from Tully: A Woman's Life on the Dakota Frontier

by Estella Bowen Culp

A collection of letters from a woman pioneer in South Dakota in early 1900s.

Letters From Vinnie

by Maureen S. Sappey

This is the story of Vinnie Ream, a real historical figure who was a teenager at the start of the Civil War. Through fictionalized letters spanning eight years, from the time the Ream family moves to Washington, D.C., to the eve of her departure for Italy, Vinnie chronicles her life to a friend. In 1861 Vinnie is 13 years old and already recognized as an accomplished painter, musician, and poet. She is also known for her fierce political opinions and formidable beauty. Pushing away her numerous suitors in order to contribute to the war effort, Vinnie sings for wounded soldiers and at fund raising concerts, and at age 16 turns her talents toward sculpting. Her "heart's fondest ambition" is to sculpt a likeness of Abraham Lincoln; and when she obtains permission, she works on it in his office for five months. Vinnie finishes the clay bust in the morning before Lincoln's assassination and is later commissioned to create a life-size image of the great man in plaster. Today, when visitors enter the Rotunda in the Capitol building, they are greeted by Vinnie's beautiful statue of Lincoln, which was recast in white marble in Italy.

Letters from Yellowstone

by Diane Smith

In the spring of 1898, A. E. (Alexandria) Bartram--a spirited young woman with a love for botany--is invited to join a field study in Yellowstone National Park. The study's leader, a mild-mannered professor from Montana, assumes she is a man, and is less than pleased to discover the truth. Once the scientists overcome the shock of having a woman on their team, they forge ahead on a summer of adventure, forming an enlightening web of relationships as they move from Mammoth Hot Springs to a camp high in the backcountry. But as they make their way collecting amid Yellowstone's beauty the group is splintered by differing views on science, nature, and economics. In the tradition of A. S. Byatt's Angels and Insects and Andrea Barrett's Ship Fever, this delightful novel captures an ever-fascinating era and one woman's attempt to take charge of her life. .

Letters My Mother Never Read: An Abandoned Child's Journey

by Jerri Diane Sueck

The true story of Jerri, whose mother died when she was 8 and whose extended family wouldn't take care of her. Describes Jerri's time in foster care and a group home. Jerri eventually graduates from college and leads a successful life.

The Letters of Allen Ginsberg

by Bill Morgan Allen Ginsberg

Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997) was one of twentieth-century literature's most prolific letter-writers. This definitive volume showcases his correspondence with some of the most original and interesting artists of his time, including Jack Kerouac, William S. Burroughs, Gregory Corso, Neal Cassady, Lionel Trilling, Charles Olson, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Philip Whalen, Peter Orlovsky, Philip Glass, Arthur Miller, Ken Kesey, and hundreds of others. Through his letter writing, Ginsberg coordinated the efforts of his literary circle and kept everyone informed about what everyone else was doing. He also preached the gospel of the Beat movement by addressing political and social issues in countless letters to publishers, editors, and the news media, devising an entirely new way to educate readers and disseminate information. Drawing from numerous sources, this collection is both a riveting life in letters and an intimate guide to understanding an entire creative generation.

Letters Of The Century: America 1900-1999

by Lisa Grunwald Stephen J. Adler

More than 400 letters from famous people and regular citizens giving voice to events throughout the century.

Letters of E. B. White

by E. B. White Dorothy Lobrano Guth

The closest thing to an autobiography we will ever see from White.

Letters of E.B. White

by E. B. White

Originally edited by Dorothy Lobrano Guth, and revised and updated by Martha White Foreword by John Updike These letters are, of course, beautifully written but above all personal, precise, and honest. They evoke E. B. White's life in New York and in Maine at every stage of his life. They are full of memorable characters: White's family, the New Yorker staff and contributors, literary types and show business people, farmers from Maine and sophisticates from New York-Katherine S. White, Harold Ross, James Thurber, Alexander Woolcott, Groucho Marx, John Updike, and many, many more. Each decade has its own look and taste and feel. Places, too-from Belgrade (Maine) to Turtle Bay (NYC) to the S. S. Buford, Alaska-bound in 1923-are brought to life in White's descriptions. There is no other book of letters to compare with this; it is a book to treasure and savor at one's leisure. As White wrote in this book, "A man who publishes his letters becomes nudist-nothing shields him from the world's gaze except his bare skin. . . . a man who has written a letter is stuck with it for all time. "

The Letters of Evelyn Waugh

by Evelyn Waugh Mark Amory

The correspondence of English author Evelyn Waugh, who lived from 1903 to 1966.

Letters of Franz Liszt, Volume 2: From Rome to the End

by Constance Bache Franz Liszt

The Austrio-Hungarian composer Franz Liszt (1811-1886) was a pianistic miracle. He could play anything on site and composed over 400 works centered around "his" instrument. Among his key works are his Hungarian Rhapsodies, his Transcendental Etudes, his Concert Etudes, his Etudes based on variations of Paganinini's Violin Caprices and his Sonata, one of the most important of the nineteenth century. He also wrote thousands of letters, of which 399 are translated into English in this second of a 2-volume set of letters (the first volume contains 260 letters). Those who knew him were struck by his extremely sophisticated personality. He was surely one of the most civilized people of the nineteeth century, internalizing within himself a complex conception of human civility, and attempting to project it in his music and his communications with people. His life was centered around people; he knew them, worked with them, remembered them, thought about them, and wrote about them using an almost poetic language, while pushing them to reflect the high ideals he believed in. His personality was the embodiment of a refined, idealized form of human civility. He was the consummate musical artist, always looking for ways to communicate a new civilized idea through music, and to work with other musicians in organizing concerts and gatherings to perform the music publicly. He also did as much as he could to promote and compliment those whose music he believed in. He was also a superlative musical critic, knowing, with few mistakes, what music of his day was "artistic" and what was not. But, although he was clearly a musical genius, he insisted on projecting a tonal, romantic "beauty" in his music, confining his music to a narrow range of moral values and ideals. He would have rejected 20th-century music that entertained cynical notions of any kind, or notions that obviated the concept of beauty in any way. There is little of a Prokofiev, Stravinsky, Shostakovich, Cage, Adams, and certainly none of a Schoenberg, in Liszt's music. His music has an ideological "ceiling," and that ceiling is "beauty." It never goes beyond that. And perhaps it was never as "beautiful" as the music of Mozart, Bach or Beethoven, nor quite as rational (Are all the emotions in Liszt's music truly "controlled?"). But it certainly was original and instructive, and it certainly will linger.

The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien

by J. R. R. Tolkien Humphrey Carpenter Christopher Tolkien

Tolkien, author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, was one of the 20th century's most prolific letter writers. Over the years he wrote a mass of correspondence - to his publishers, his family, friends and fans of his books - which records the history and composition of his works and his reaction to subsequent events. By turns thoughtful, impish, scholarly, impassioned, playful, vigorous, and gentle, Tolkien poured his heart and mind into a great stream of letters to intimate friends and unknown admirers all over the world. From this collection one sees a mind of immense complexity and many layers - artistic, religious, charmingly eccentric, sentimental, and ultimately brilliant.

The Letters of Paul

by Charles B. Cousar

The Interpreting Biblical Texts series presents a concise edition covering the seven undisputed epistles of Paul. In this volume, Charles Cousar is primarily concerned not with the man Paul and his life and work, but with his surviving letters. Part 1 introduces methods in reading the Pauline letters. Part 2 attends to the critical themes emerging in the letters--the decisiveness of Jesus Christ and old versus new life. Part 3 discusses the other six letters bearing Paul's name that appear in the New Testament.

The Letters of Robert Frost

by Robert Frost

One of the acknowledged giants of twentieth-century American literature, Robert Frost was a public figure much celebrated in his day. Although his poetry reached a wide audience, the private Frost--pensive, mercurial, and often very funny--remains less appreciated. Following upon the publication of Frost's notebooks and collected prose, "The Letters of Robert Frost" is the first major edition of the poet's written correspondence. The hundreds of previously unpublished letters in these annotated volumes deepen our understanding and appreciation of this most complex and subtle of verbal artists. Volume One traverses the years of Frost's earliest poems to the acclaimed collections "North of Boston "and "Mountain Interval "that cemented his reputation as one of the leading lights of his era. The drama of his personal life--as well as the growth of the audacious mind that produced his poetry--unfolds before us in Frost's day-to-day missives. These rhetorical performances are at once revealing and tantalizingly evasive about relationships with family and close friends, including the poet Edward Thomas. We listen in as Frost defines himself against contemporaries Ezra Pound and William Butler Yeats, and we witness the evolution of his thoughts about prosody, sound, style, and other aspects of poetic craft. In its literary interest and sheer display of personality, Frost's correspondence is on a par with the letters of Emily Dickinson, Robert Lowell, and Samuel Beckett. "The Letters of Robert Frost" holds hours of pleasurable reading for lovers of Frost and modern American poetry.

The Letters of Sylvia Beach

by Sylvia Beach Keri Walsh No?l Riley Fitch

Founder of the Left Bank bookstore Shakespeare and Company and the first publisher of James Joyce's Ulysses, Sylvia Beach had a legendary facility for nurturing literary talent. In this first collection of her letters, we witness Beach's day-to-day dealings as bookseller and publisher to expatriate Paris. Friends and clients include Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, H. D. , Ezra Pound, Janet Flanner, William Carlos Williams, F. Scott Fitzgerald, James Joyce, and Richard Wright. As librarian, publicist, publisher, and translator, Beach carved out a unique space for herself in English and French letters. This collection reveals Beach's charm and resourcefulness, sharing her negotiations with Marianne Moore to place Joyce's work in The Dial; her battle to curb the piracy of Ulyssesin the United States; her struggle to keep Shakespeare and Company afloat during the Depression; and her complicated affair with the French bookstore owner Adrienne Monnier. These letters also recount Beach's childhood in New Jersey; her work in Serbia with the American Red Cross; her internment in a German prison c& and her friendship with a new generation of expatriates in the 1950s and 1960s. Beach was the consummate American in Paris and a tireless champion of the avant-garde. Her warmth and wit made the Rue de l'Od on the heart of modernist Paris.

Letters on Art and Literature

by Francois Mauriac

France's great Catholic author and Nobel Prize winner unfolds his thoughts on a variety of topics in a series of letters written to such men as Albert Camus, Jean Cocteau, Pierre Schaeffer and Jacques Rivire. Readers of Proust's Way, Men I Hold Great and The Stumbling Block will find intense interest in Mauriac's reflections on the death of Georges Bernanos, the Claudel-Gide correspondence and the Routier youth movement.

Letters to a Young Catholic

by George Weigel

In this remarkable tour of the Catholic world, George Weigel helps us understand how Catholicism fosters what Flannery O'Connor called "the habit of being. " Taking the reader by the hand, Weigel embarks on a journey to Catholic landmarks as diverse as Chartres Cathedral and St. Mary's Church in Greenville, South Carolina; the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem and G. K. Chesterton's favorite pub; the grave of a modern martyr in Warsaw, and the Sistine Chapel. Weaving together insights from history, literature, theology, and music, Weigel uses these touchstones to illuminate the beliefs that have shaped Catholicism for two thousand years. With clarity and conviction, Weigel examines the foundations of Catholic faith and explores the topics of grace, prayer, vocation, sin and forgiveness, suffering, and-most importantly-love. Putting a dramatic face on this invitation to Catholicism, Weigel introduces some of the figures who have shaped his faith and thought-Michelangelo and Fra Angelico; Evelyn Waugh and Cardinal John Henry Newman; Father Jerzy Popieuszko and Pope John Paul II; Edith Stein and Mother Teresa-as he also shares anecdotes from his own Catholic life. To a world that sometimes seems closed and claustrophobic, he suggests, Christian humanism offers a world with windows and doors-and a skylight. In these letters, George Weigel conveys the power of a faith that is at once personal and universal, timely and eternal. His book will inspire not only the young generation of Catholics whose World Youth Day celebrations have launched an era of renewal for the Church, but also the faithful, the doubtful, and the searchers of every age.

Letters to a Young Conservative

by Dinesh D'Souza

Dinesh D'Souza rose to national prominence as one of the founders of the Dartmouth Review, a leading voice in the rebirth of conservative politics on college campuses in the 1980s.He fired the first popular shot against political correctness with his best-selling exposé Illiberal Education. Now, after serving as a Reagan White House staffer, the managing editor of Policy Review, and a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and the Hoover Institution, he addresses the next generation in Letters to a Young Conservative. Drawing on his own colorful experiences, both within the conservative world and while skirmishing with the left, D'Souza aims to enlighten and inspire young conservatives and give them weapons for the intellectual battles that they face in high school, college, and everyday life. Letters to a Young Conservative also illuminates the enduring themes that for D'Souza anchor the conservative position: not "family values" or patriotism, but a philosophy based on natural rights and a belief in universal moral truths.With a light touch, D'Souza shows that conservatism needn't be stodgy or defensive, even though it is based on preserving the status quo. To the contrary, when a conservative has to expose basic liberal assumptions to scrutiny, he or she must become a kind of imaginative, fun-loving, forward-looking guerrilla--philosophically conservative but temperamentally radical.Among the topics Dinesh D'Souza covers in Letters to a Young Conservative: Fighting Political CorrectnessAuthentic vs. Bogus MulticulturalismWhy Government Is the ProblemWhen the Rich Get RicherHow Affirmative Action Hurts BlacksThe Feminist MistakeAll the News That FitsHow to Harpoon a LiberalThe Self-Esteem HoaxA Republican Realignment?Why Conservatives Should Be Cheerful

Showing 66,626 through 66,650 of 100,963 results

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