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The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories

by Dr Seuss

Seuss scholar/collector Charles D. Cohen has hunted down seven rarely seen stories by Dr. Seuss, originally published in magazines between 1950 and 1951. In an Introduction to the collection, Cohen explains the significance these seven stories have, not only as lost treasures, but as transitional stories in Dr. Seuss's career.

Birbal the Clever Courtier

by Anupa Lal

The humorous wits and ideas of Birbal, who was one of the cleverest courtiers of the Mughal Emperor Akbar, keeps Indians amused for generations.

Birch Hollow Schoolmarm (Dora's Diary #1)

by Carrie Bender

Popular author Carrie Bender begins a new series about Dora, the adopted daughter of Miriam and Nate (in Miriam's Journal). Join Dora as she runs around with the Amish youth, then makes peace with her parents and church.

Bird

by Crystal Chan

Entrenched secrets, mysterious spirits, and an astonishing friendship weave together in this extraordinary and haunting debut. Nothing matters. Only Bird matters. And he flew away. Jewel never knew her brother Bird, but all her life she has lived in his shadow. Her parents blame Grandpa for the tragedy of their family's past; they say that Grandpa attracted a malevolent spirit--a duppy--into their home. Grandpa hasn't spoken a word since. Now Jewel is twelve, and she lives in a house full of secrets and impenetrable silence. Jewel is sure that no one will ever love her like they loved Bird, until the night that she meets a mysterious boy in a tree. Grandpa is convinced that the boy is a duppy, but Jewel knows that he is something more. And that maybe--just maybe--the time has come to break through the stagnant silence of the past.

The Bird: A Natural History of Who Birds Are, Where They Came From, and How They Live

by Colin Tudge

Originally published: Consider the birds: who they are and what they do. London: Allen Lane, 2008.

Bird Ambulance

by Arline Thomas

Stories from a woman in New York who began her own shelter for injured wild birds. She talks about assisting falcons, hawks, pigeons and owls, but there is also a chapter on other animals--like squirrels--who come into her life. A fantastic read with helpful information on what to feed injured birds and mammals.

The Bird Artist: A Novel

by Howard Norman

Howard Norman's The Bird Artist, the first book of his Canadian trilogy, begins in 1911. Its narrator, Fabian Vas is a bird artist: He draws and paints the birds of Witless Bay, his remote Newfoundland coastal village home. In the first paragraph of his tale Fabian reveals that he has murdered the village lighthouse keeper, Botho August. Later, he confesses who and what drove him to his crime--a measured, profoundly engrossing story of passion, betrayal, guilt, and redemption between men and women.

Bird Boy

by Elizabeth Starr Hill

Chang, a mute Chinese boy whose father uses cormorants to fish, is pleased when he is finally old enough to help with the Big Catch and the raising of a new bird.

Bird by Bird

by Anne Lamott

"Thirty years ago my older brother, who was ten years old at the time, was trying to get a report on birds written that he'd had three months to write. It was due the next day. We were out at our family cabin in Bolinas, and he was at the kitchen table close to tears, surrounded by binder paper and pencils and unopened books on birds, immobilized by the hugeness of the task ahead. Then my father sat down beside him, put his arm around my brother's shoulder, and said, 'Bird by bird, buddy. Just take it bird by bird.'"From the Trade Paperback edition.he funniest people alive.If you have ever wondered what it takes to be a writer, what it means to be a writer, what the contents of your school lunches said about what your parents were really like, this books for you. From faith, love, and grace to pain, jealousy, and fear, Lamott insists that you keep your eves open, and then shows you how to survive. And always, from the life of the artist she turns to the art of life."An inspiring book about writing as a way of finding the truth-- San Francisco Chronicle"Surpasses all the other books on writing already out there -- even the wonderful stuff by Natalie Goldberg, John Gardner, and Annie Dillard."-- Seattle Times"Well-written, funny, and useful." -- Denver Post"I ended up reading it twice and expect to dip into it again in times of need. I recommend this book to other writers without reservation....This woman is uncanny."-- Marie Winn, Wall Street Journal"A quirky, personal, mordant, down-to-earth guide to fiction writing by a wonderful novelist essayist. Lamott makes writing seem like something you could actually enjoy."-- The NationFrom the Hardcover edition.

Bird Cloud

by Annie Proulx

"Bird Cloud" is the name Annie Proulx gave to 640 acres of Wyoming wetlands and prairie and four-hundred-foot cliffs plunging down to the North Platte River. On the day she first visited, a cloud in the shape of a bird hung in the evening sky. Proulx also saw pelicans, bald eagles, golden eagles, great blue herons, ravens, scores of bluebirds, harriers, kestrels, elk, deer and a dozen antelope. She fell in love with the land, then owned by the Nature Conservancy, and she knew what she wanted to build on it--a house in harmony with her work, her appetites and her character, a library surrounded by bedrooms and a kitchen. Proulx's first work of nonfiction in more than twenty years, Bird Cloud is the story of designing and constructing that house--with its solar panels, Japanese soak tub, concrete floor and elk horn handles on kitchen cabinets. It is also an enthralling natural history and archaeology of the region--inhabited for millennia by Ute, Arapaho and Shoshone Indians-- and a family history, going back to nineteenth-century Mississippi riverboat captains and Canadian settlers. Proulx, a writer with extraordinary powers of observation and compassion, here turns her lens on herself. We understand how she came to be living in a house surrounded by wilderness, with shelves for thousands of books and long worktables on which to heap manuscripts, research materials and maps, and how she came to be one of the great American writers of her time. Bird Cloud is magnificent.

Bird Cloud: A Memoir of Place

by Annie Proulx

Part autobiography, part natural history, Bird Cloud is the glorious story of Annie Proulx's piece of the Wyoming landscape and her home there."Bird Cloud" is the name Annie Proulx gave to 640 acres of Wyoming wetlands and prairie and four-hundred-foot cliffs plunging down to the North Platte River. On the day she first visited, a cloud in the shape of a bird hung in the evening sky. Proulx also saw pelicans, bald eagles, golden eagles, great blue herons, ravens, scores of bluebirds, harriers, kestrels, elk, deer and a dozen antelope. She fell in love with the land, then owned by the Nature Conservancy, and she knew what she wanted to build on it--a house in harmony with her work, her appetites and her character, a library surrounded by bedrooms and a kitchen. Bird Cloud is the story of designing and constructing that house--with its solar panels, Japanese soak tub, concrete floor, and elk horn handles on kitchen cabinets. It is also an enthralling natural history and archaeology of the region--inhabited for millennia by Ute, Arapaho, and Shoshone Indians--and a family history, going back to nineteenth-century Mississippi riverboat captains and Canadian settlers. Proulx, a writer with extraordinary powers of observation and compassion, here turns her lens on herself. We understand how she came to be living in a house surrounded by wilderness, with shelves for thousands of books and long worktables on which to heap manuscripts, research materials and maps, and how she came to be one of the great American writers of her time.

Bird Count (Adventure Boardbook Series 1-2-3)

by Alison Hill Spencer

Growing up with a father who cherished birds and traveled the world with ornithologists on birding trips, Alison Spencer has always enjoyed birds. Unable to find children's books that depicted realistic birds, she decided to create her own. This delightful, colorful book not only introduces kids to birds they might see but also reinforces count concepts. Images removed.

Bird Dream

by Matt Higgins

"[R]iveting... a must-read. A highflying, electrifying story of a treacherous sport in which every triumph is an eye blink away from becoming a disaster." --Kirkus (STARRED) A heart-stopping narrative of risk and courage, Bird Dream tells the story of the remarkable men and women who pioneered the latest advances in aerial exploration--from skydiving to BASE jumping to wingsuit flying--and made history with their daring. Bird Dream shows that recent decades have witnessed an unprecedented revolution in human flight. By the end of the twentieth century BASE jumping was the most dangerous of all the extreme sports, with thrill-seeking jumpers parachuting from bridges, mountains, radio towers, and even skyscrapers. Despite numerous fatalities and legal skirmishes, BASE jumpers like Jeb Corliss of California thought they had discovered the ultimate rush. But all this changed for Corliss in 1999, when, high in the mountains of northern Italy, he and other jumpers watched in wonder as a stranger--wearing a cunning new jumpsuit featuring "wings" between the arms and legs--leaped from a ledge and then actually flew from the vertiginous cliffs. This dude's flying, thought Corliss with a start. This changes everything. What Corliss had witnessed was a wingsuit, an innovation more flying squirrel than bird or plane. Wingsuits were not new; they had fascinated men for centuries. Yet a modern design had improved safety and performance, allowing wingsuit pilots to leap from a helicopter or high cliff and soar for miles--using little more than their bodies--before deploying a parachute to reach the ground safely. The best pilots could fly close to the earth, rapidly navigating narrow canyons and mountain ranges. Still, colossal dangers remained, and the beauty of exploring human flight with such unprecedented grace would exact the ultimate cost for some pilots--they would pay with their lives. Drawing on intimate access to Corliss and other top pilots from around the globe, Bird Dream tracks the evolution of the wingsuit movement through the larger than life characters who, in an age of viral video, forced the sport onto the world stage. Their exploits--which entranced millions of fans along the way--defied imagination. They were flying; not like the Wright brothers, but the way we do in our dreams. Some dared to dream of going further yet, to a day when a wingsuit pilot might fly, and land, all without a parachute. A growing number of wingsuit pilots began plotting ways in which a human being might leap from the sky and land. A half dozen groups around the world were dedicated to this quest for a "wingsuit landing," conjuring the pursuit of nations that once inspired the race to first summit Everest. Given his fame as a stuntman, the brash, publicity-hungry Corliss remained the popular favorite to claim the first landing. Yet Bird Dream also tracks the path of another man, Gary Connery--a forty-two-year-old Englishman--who was quietly plotting to beat Corliss at his own game. Accompanied by an international cast of wingsuit devotees--including a Finnish magician, a parachute tester from Brazil, an Australian computer programmer, a gruff hang-gliding champion-turned-aeronautical engineer, a French skydiving champion, and a South African costume designer--Corliss and Connery raced to leap into the unknown, a contest that would lead to triumph for one and nearly cost the other his life. Based on five years of firsthand reporting and original interviews, Bird Dream is the work of journalist Matt Higgins, who traveled the world alongside these extraordinary men and women as they jumped and flew in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Offering a behind-the-scenes take on some of the most spectacular and disastrous events of the wingsuit movement, Higgins's Bird Dream is a riveting, adrenaline-fueled adventure at the very edge of human experience. Library Journal (STARRED) "[A]ction-packed... An engrossing and exhaustively researched account of extremists who challenge failure and death on a regular basis. High...

Bird Farm

by Philip Kaplan

See the excitement and danger of life on an aircraft carrier like never before. How does it feel to sit aboard a thirty-ton jet and be hurled over a ship's bow at 140 miles per hour? And how does a deck crew coordinate its efforts to achieve such a feat every thirty seconds? Offering a rare glimpse of life aboard an aircraft carrier, The Bird Farm paints a vivid and often hair-raising portrait of military aircraft carriers and carrier crews, and of the planes and pilots who depend on them. Based on archival research and interviews with veterans and contemporary carrier personnel, this stunning volume tells the story of the aircraft carrier--from the first ramshackle seaplane carriers to today's nuclear-powered supercarriers--and celebrates their undeniable impact on modern warfare. Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in history--books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

Bird in a Box

by Andrea Pinkney

Otis, Willie, and Hibernia are three children with a lot in common: they've all lost a loved one, they each have secret dreams, and they won't stop fighting for what they want. And they're also a lot like their hero, famed boxer Joe Louis. Throughout this moving novel, their lives gradually converge to form friendship, family, and love. Their trials and triumphs echo those of Joe Louis, as he fights to become the heavyweight boxing champion.Andrea Pinkney masterfully weaves in factual information about Joe Louis and actual radio commentary from his fights, enriching the narrative of this uniquely rendered and beautifully written novel.

Bird in a Cage

by Anne Schraff

"... Clint meets a beautiful and mysterious girl who wants to steal his fathers jewel and later discovers that her family are criminals.

Bird In A Cage

by Lee Martin

Fort Worth policewoman Deb Ralston is celebrating her 25th anniversary in one of the city's new restaurants when a young performer plunges to her death from a golden velvet bird cage. Deb begins to sort through a maze of family secrets and circus traditions to find a murderer before he strikes again.

A Bird in the Hand

by Diana Henry

Chicken is one of the most popular foods we love to cook and eat: comforting, quick, celebratory and casual. Plundering the globe, there is no shortage of brilliant ways to cook it, whether you need a quick supper on the table after work, something for a lazy summer barbecue or a feast to nourish family and friends. From quick Vietnamese lemon grass and chilli chicken thighs and a smoky chicken salad with roast peppers and almonds, through to a complete feast with pomegranate, barley and feta stuffed roast chicken with Georgian aubergines, there is no eating or entertaining occasion that isn't covered in this book. In A Bird in the Hand, Diana Henry o?ffers a host of new, easy and not-so-very-well-known dishes, starring the bird we all love.

Bird in the Hand

by Paul Hostovsky

From the book: Sighted Guide Technique at the Fine Arts Work Center In your hands the poems in their Braille versions grow longer, thicker, whiter. They are giving themselves goose bumps, they are that good. Still they are only as good as themselves. We are two people wide for the purposes of this exercise. Remembering that is my technique, it's that simple. Remembering it well is success. Success is simply paying attention. Like a poem with very long lines we appear a little wider, move a little slower than most of the community of haiku poets leaping past us with a few right words. A word about doors: they open inward or outward, turn clockwise or counterclockwise, depending on something that you and I will probably never grasp. Doorknobs dance away and the songs of the common house sparrow who is everywhere, you say, play in the eaves as we pass together through the door to the world, you holding my elbow, your elbow and mine making two triangles trawling the air for the tunneling, darting, juking, ubiquitous brown birds.

The Bird in the Plum Tree

by Lucy Floyd Yu Cha Pak

NIMAC-sourced textbook

Bird Lake Moon

by Kevin Henkes

Spencer thought the house might be haunted. Mitch knew it wasn't. And he knew why. The whole time Spencer and Mitch hung out together at Bird Lake that summer, there were secrets keeping them apart. And maybe a secret knowledge keeping them together, too-together like members of the same tribe. Like friends.

Bird of Paradise

by Raquel Cepeda

In 2009, when Raquel Cepeda almost lost her estranged father to heart disease, she was terrified she'd never know the truth about her ancestry. Every time she looked in the mirror, Cepeda saw a mystery--a tapestry of races and ethnicities that came together in an ambiguous mix. With time running out, she decided to embark on an archaeological dig of sorts by using the science of ancestral DNA testing to excavate everything she could about her genetic history. Digging through memories long buried, she embarks upon a journey not only into her ancestry but also into her own history. Born in Harlem to Dominican parents, she was sent to live with her maternal grandparents in the Paraíso (Paradise) district in Santo Domingo while still a baby. It proved to be an idyllic reprieve in her otherwise fraught childhood. Paraíso came to mean family, home, belonging. When Cepeda returned to the US, she discovered her family constellation had changed. Her mother had a new, abusive boyfriend, who relocated the family to San Francisco. When that relationship fell apart, Cepeda found herself back in New York City with her father and European stepmother: attending tennis lessons and Catholic schools; fighting vicious battles wih her father, who discouraged her from expressing the Dominican part of her hyphenated identity; and immersed in the '80s hip-hop culture of uptown Manhattan. It was in these streets, through the prism of hip-hop and the sometimes loving embrace of her community, that Cepeda constructed her own identity. Years later, when Cepeda had become a successful journalist and documentary filmmaker, the strands of her DNA would take her further, across the globe and into history. Who were her ancestors? How did they--and she--become Latina? Her journey, as the most unforgettable ones often do, would lead her to places she hadn't expected to go. With a vibrant lyrical prose and fierce honesty, Cepeda parses concepts of race, identity, and ancestral DNA among Latinos by using her own Dominican-American story as one example, and in the process arrives at some sort of peace with her father.

The Bird of Time

by George Alec Effinger

Far into the future, Hartstein's graduation present from his grandparents was a wonderful trip...into the past. He had a long future in the doughnut industry to look forward to but this trip was the icing on the cake. It had been a long time since that first experiment in time travel was successfully pulled off, although not without its flaws. Now, in the future, time travel was a lucrative tourist industry. But the time travel industry was keeping one little fact to itself: two percent never came back. This cover-up was the work of the Agency. The Agency knew what others did not: that the past wasn't really the past but a complicated dynamic of individual perceptions of what the past might have been. The past isn't real and reality becomes a state of mind. While selling their particular brand of escapist entertainment and vacation packages, the Agency didn't bother to tell its clients or the populace in general that a war was going on--a time war. The Agency was spending its time in a neck-and-neck battle with the Temporary Underground. The battlefield was none other than the space-time continuum, the weapons were time-shifts and theoretical mathematics. Hartstein had no idea what his trip would be or where it would take him.

Bird on the Wing

by Winifred Madison

Elizabeth felt the year in Lincoln, Nebraska, had been the longest in her life. Longing to return to her real mother and her friends in Sacramento, she had refused to make friends, and she scorned everything about her new stepmother, the tacky Lorene. Elizabeth is full of anger and resentment, so when a seemingly trivial incident with Lorene suddenly evolves into a bitter fight, she decides to run away and hitchhike to California. While she is on the road Elizabeth meets an older girl with the unusual name of Maija Hrdlka, and it is this meeting that changes Elizabeth's life. Maija is a weaver who seems to Elizabeth to be full of wisdom and grace. The girls become good friends, and when Elizabeth's life in Sacramento turns into a travesty of her dreams, she runs away once again to live with Maija. How Elizabeth changes under Maija's influence from a shallow schoolgirl into an artist on the way to a mature understanding of herself and others is the crux of this sensitive and intriguing novel.

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