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The Civil War in France (3rd edition)

by Karl Marx

Karl Marx's contemporary account of the Paris Commune, placing it in context of the wider events in France at the time.

The Civil War in Kentucky: Battle for the Bluegrass State

by Kent Masterson Brown

Top scholars contribute to this book of essays on the complex series of battles and political maneuvers for control of Kentucky during the Civil War.

Civil War in Paradise! (The Secret World Of Alex Mack #27)

by Bonnie D. Stone

When Alex Mack finds out that the historic Civil War landmark Fort Paradise will be demolished for a new road, she and her friends go into action to stop the deconstruction process. Alex leads the charge, only to find trouble around every corner. Time is running out, but Alex and her powers have to keep a low profile. If she and her friends don't move fast, Fort Paradise--and maybe Alex--will be history.

Civil War Journal

by Albert A. Nofi

DID YOU KNOW THAT... * The room in which Robert E. Lee was born was also the birthplace of two signers of the Declaration of Independence * Philip Sheridan was suspended from West Point for a year because of a "quarrel of belligerent character" * During the election of 1860, Northern States cast a quarter of a million more votes against Lincoln that did the entire South * George McClellan had to secure special permission to be admitted to West Point--because he was only 15 * At least one woman served as a "drummer boy" during the Civil War * The famed U.S.S. Monitor was the first warship to have flush toilets From the fascinating to the frivolous, A Civil War Journal presents little-known facts that will both entertain and enlighten you. This entertaining and informative chronicl e of the Civil War and the people who waged it shines a new light on the hidden corners of history, bringing you more than 500 surprising episodes, eye-opening anecdotes, and little-known facts. From the private eccentricities of well-known figures to sobering statistics about the war itself, these pages reveal: * What Union victory took place in Japan * How many cigars Grant smoked each day * Why Abraham Lincoln grew a beard * Why Major General James Longstreet wore carpet slippers at the battle of Antietem * Why a Union warship was named after a Confederate general * How many Confederate flags were captured at Gettysburg * How much money the U.S. spent on the war per day in 1865 * Who the last surviving Civil War general was and open your eyes to the tremendous impact the war had on soldiers and civilians alike. The perfect browsing book for Civil War buffs, trivia mavens, and the insatiably curious, A Civil War Journal is a treasure trove of odd information and unusual insights.

Civil War Memories

by S. T. Joshi

Civil War Memories is a collection of nineteen stories of the Civil War written in the late 1800's, giving them a ring of authenticity. The voices are both Northern and Southern, male and female, angry and melancholy, serious and comic; but they all treat the Civil War as a watershed in American history and in the lives of those who lived through it.

The Civil War Memories of Elizabeth Bacon Custer

by Arlene Reynolds Elizabeth Bacon Custer

In her first year of marriage (1864-1865) to General George Armstrong Custer, Libbie Custer witnessed the Civil War firsthand. Her experiences of danger, hardship, and excitement made ideal material for a book, one that she worked on for years in later life but ultimately never published.In this volume, Arlene Reynolds has produced a readable narrative of Libbie Custer's life during the war years by chronologically reconstructing Libbie's original, unpublished notes and diaries found in the archives of the Little Big Horn Battlefield National Monument. In these reminiscences, Libbie Custer adds striking, eloquent details to the Civil War story as she describes her life both in camp and in Washington. Her stories of incidents such as fording a swollen river sidesaddle on horseback, dancing at the Inaugural Ball near President Lincoln, and watching the massive review of the Army of the Potomac after the surrender have the engrossing quality of a well-written novel.For general readers and students of women's history, this book tells a fascinating story of a sheltered girl's maturation into a courageous woman in the crucible of war. And for both devotees and detractors of her husband, it offers an intimate glimpse into his youth, West Point years, and early military service.

The Civil War of 1812

by Alan Taylor

In this deeply researched and clearly written book, the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Alan Taylor tells the riveting story of a war that redefined North America. During the early nineteenth century, Britons and Americans renewed their struggle over the legacy of the American Revolution. Soldiers, immigrants, settlers, and Indians fought in a northern borderland to determine the fate of a continent. Would revolutionary republicanism sweep the British from Canada? Or would the British empire contain, divide, and ruin the shaky American republic?In a world of double identities, slippery allegiances, and porous boundaries, the leaders of the republic and of the empire struggled to control their own diverse peoples. The border divided Americans--former Loyalists and Patriots--who fought on both sides in the new war, as did native peoples defending their homelands. Serving in both armies, Irish immigrants battled one another, reaping charges of rebellion and treason. And dissident Americans flirted with secession while aiding the British as smugglers and spies.During the war, both sides struggled to sustain armies in a northern land of immense forests, vast lakes, and stark seasonal swings in the weather. In that environment, many soldiers panicked as they fought their own vivid imaginations, which cast Indians as bloodthirsty savages. After fighting each other to a standstill, the Americans and the British concluded that they could safely share the continent along a border that favored the United States at the expense of Canadians and Indians. Both sides then celebrated victory by forgetting their losses and by betraying the native peoples.A vivid narrative of an often brutal (and sometimes comic) war that reveals much about the tangled origins of the United States and Canada.From the Hardcover edition.

The Civil War Papers of George C. McClellan

by Stephen W. Sears

No one played as many major roles during the Civil War as General George B. McClellan, nor did any other figure write such candid letters about himself, his motivations, and his intentions. For Civil War buffs, this collection is a gold mine, revealing nuggets of fresh information on the military operations and political machinations, from the battle of Antietam through McClellan's 1864 race for the presidency. Perhaps most telling of all are the uninhibited letters he wrote to his wife, apparently meant as reminders to himself toward the writing of his memoirs. Surprisingly, well over half of these 813 letters and dispatches are being published for the first time. A Civil War expert and prize-winning author in his own right, Stephen Sears gives us a fine companion to his recent biography of McClellan, letting this man of many complexities speak for himself. A not-to-be-missed narrative of one of American history's most exciting dramas told by one of its chief actors.

Civil War: People and Perspectives

by Lisa Tendrich Frank

Presenting modern historical scholarship in an accessible and engaging manner, this reference for students and general readers offers a social historian's view of the Civil War, shifting the focus away from political and military leaders to look at how the war affected, and was affected by, ordinary citizens across the spectrum of racial, class, and gender boundaries. Chapters look at topics such as civilians in invaded and occupied areas, immigrants in battle and on the home front, and the urban Civil War, and each chapter contains two biographical sidebars that personalize the experiences discussed. A section of about 30 pages of one- to two-page excerpts from letters, diaries, news reports, and other primary sources offers further insight into the lives of everyday Americans. A glossary of terms, key figures and events, and concepts is included. Historical b&w photos are also included. Topics in the series are selected to fit curricular standards for both high school history classes and undergraduate American history courses. An emphasis on social history brings historical analysis into the classroom while still focusing on topics that will engage students.

Civil War Stories (unabridged)

by Ambrose Bierce

Sixteen dark and vivid selections by great satirist and short-story writer. "A Horseman in the Sky," "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge," "Chickamauga," "A Son of the Gods," "What I Saw of Shiloh," "Four Days in Dixie" and 10 more. Masterly tales offer excellent examples of Bierce's dark pessimism and storytelling power.

Civil War Sub: The Mystery of the Hunley

by Kate Boehm Jerome

Recounts events surrounding the mysterious sinking of the Confederate submarine, the H.L. Hunley, and its recent recovery from deep in the waters off the coast of South Carolina.

Civil War Talks

by John G. Selby George S. Bernard John Horn Hampton Newsome

George S. Bernard was a Petersburg lawyer and member of the 12th Virginia Infantry Regiment during the Civil War. Over the course of his life, Bernard wrote extensively about his wartime experiences and collected accounts from other veterans. In 1892, he published War Talks of Confederate Veterans, a collection of firsthand accounts focusing on the battles and campaigns of the 12th Virginia that is widely read to this day. Bernard prepared a second volume but was never able to publish it. After his death in 1912, his papers became scattered or simply lost. But a series of finds, culminating with the discovery of a cache of papers in Roanoke in 2004, have made it possible to reconstruct a complete manuscript of the unpublished second volume. The resulting book, Civil War Talks, contains speeches, letters, Bernard's wartime diary, and other firsthand accounts of the war not only by veterans of the Confederacy, such as General William Mahone, but by Union veterans as well. Their personal stories cover the major military campaigns in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--Seven Pines, Malvern Hill, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Petersburg, and Appomattox. For the general reader, this volume offers evocative testimonies focusing on the experiences of individual soldiers. For scholars, it provides convenient access to many accounts that, until now, have not been widely available or have been simply unknown.

The Civil War: The Final Year Told by Those Who Lived It

by Aaron Sheehan-Dean

This final installment of the highly acclaimed four-volume series traces events from March 1864 to June 1865. It provides an incomparable portrait of a nation at war with itself, while illuminating the military and political events that brought the Union to final victory, and slavery and secession to their ultimate destruction. Here are more than 150 letters, diary entries, memoir excerpts, speeches, articles, messages, and poems by over a hundred participants and observers, both famous and unsung, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, William T. Sherman, Robert E. Lee, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, Harriet Jacobs, Henry Adams, Elizabeth Keckly, and George Templeton Strong, as well as Union and Confederate soldiers; women diarists from North and South; and freed slaves. The selections include vivid and haunting firsthand accounts of legendary battles and campaigns-- the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, the Atlanta campaign, the Crater, Franklin, Sherman's march through Georgia and the Carolinas--as well as of the desperate conditions inside Andersonville prison; the sinking of the Confederate raider Alabama; the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment; and the struggles of both black and white civilians to survive the harsh and violent downfall of the Confederacy.

The Civil War: The First Year Told by Those Who Lived It

by Stephen W. Sears Brooks D. Simpson Sheehan-Dean Aaron

After 150 years the Civil War is still our greatest national drama, at once heroic, tragic, and epic-our Iliad, but also our Bible, a story of sin and judgment, suffering and despair, death and resurrection in a "new birth of freedom." Drawn from letters, diaries, speeches, articles, poems, songs, military reports, legal opinions, and memoirs, The Civil War: The First Year gathers over 120 pieces by more than sixty participants to create a unique firsthand narrative of this great historical crisis. Beginning on the eve of Lincoln's election in November 1860 and ending in January 1862 with the appointment of Edwin M. Stanton as secretary of war, this volume presents writing by figures well-known-Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Mary Chesnut, Frederick Douglass, and Lincoln himself among them-and less familiar, like proslavery advocate J.D.B. DeBow, Lieutenants Charles B. Haydon of the 2nd Michigan Infantry and Henry Livermore Abbott of the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment, and plantation mistresses Catherine Edmondston of North Carolina and Kate Stone of Mississippi. Together, the selections provide a powerful sense of the immediacy, uncertainty, and urgency of events as the nation was torn asunder. Includes headnotes, a chronology of events, biographical and explanatory endnotes, full-color hand-drawn endpaper maps, and an index. Companion volumes will gather writings from the second, third, and final years of the conflict.

The Civil War: The Second Year Told By Those Who Lived It

by Stephen W. Sears

The Library of America's ambitious four-volume series continues with this volume that traces events from January 1862 to January 1863, an unforgettable portrait of the crucial year that turned a secessionist rebellion into a war of emancipation. Including eleven never-before- published pieces, here are more than 140 messages, proclamations, newspaper stories, letters, diary entries, memoir excerpts, and poems by more than eighty participants and observers, among them Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, George B. McClellan, Robert E. Lee, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Clara Barton, Harriet Jacobs, and George Templeton Strong, as well as soldiers Charles B. Haydon and Henry Livermore Abbott; diarists Kate Stone and Judith McGuire; and war correspondents George E. Stephens and George Smalley. The selections include vivid and haunting narratives of battles-Fort Donelson, Pea Ridge, the gunboat war on the Western rivers, Shiloh, the Seven Days, Second Bull Run, Antietam, Iuka, Corinth, Perryville, Fredericksburg, Stones River-as well as firsthand accounts of life and death in the military hospitals in Richmond and Georgetown; of the impact of war on Massachusetts towns and Louisiana plantations; of the struggles of runaway slaves and the mounting fears of slaveholders; and of the deliberations of the cabinet in Washington, as Lincoln moved toward what he would call "the central act of my administration and the great event of the nineteenth century": the revolutionary proclamation of emancipation.

The Civil War: The Third Year Told by Those Who Lived It

by Brooks D. Simpson

This is the third volume of the ground-breaking eyewitness narrative that has been called a "masterpiece."Spanning the crucial months from January 1863 to March 1864, this third volume of The Library of America's highly acclaimed four volume series presents an incomparable portrait of a nation at war with itself while illuminating the military and political events that brought the Union closer to victory and slavery closer to destruction. It brings together more than 140 contemporary letters, diary entries, speeches, articles, messages, and poems by more than eighty participants and observers, among them Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, William T. Sherman, Robert E. Lee, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, Mary Chesnut, Clement Vallandigham, Henry Adams, Charlotte Forten, Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, and George Templeton Strong, as well as Union officers Robert Gould Shaw, Charles B. Haydon, and Henry Livermore Abbott; Confederate diarists Catherine Edmondston, Kate Stone, and Judith McGuire; and Alabama soldier Samuel Pickens, Iowa housewife Catharine Peirce, Kentucky preacher George Richard Browder, and Kansas clergyman Richard Cordley. The selections include vivid and haunting eyewitness narratives of some of the war's most famous battles--Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Vicksburg, Fort Wagner, Chickamauga, Chattanooga--as well as firsthand accounts of the merciless guerrilla war in Missouri and Kansas; the Richmond bread riot and the New York draft riots; the controversies surrounding the use of black soldiers and the Lincoln administration's curtailment of civil liberties; and the struggles of civilians both black and white to survive increasingly harsh wartime conditions.Each volume features a detailed chronology of events, biographical notes about the writers, textual and explanatory notes, and original hand-drawn endpaper maps by expert Civil War cartographer Earl McElfresh.The Civil War: The Final Year Told by Those Who Lived It will be published in 2014.

Civil War, A to Z: The Complete Handbook of America's Bloodiest Conflict

by Clifford L. Linedecker

With hundreds of entries, as well as photographs, drawings, and a handy time line of events--The Civil War A to Z encompasses everything about that historic conflict ... from Appomattox to Zouaves. Who or what are "Zouaves," you may ask? They were members of certain volunteer regiments from both the North and the South. That's just one example of the scope and depth of The Civil War A to Z. This encyclopedic, illustrated reference of the war between the States features facts both familiar and engagingly new in an easy-to-follow alphabetical format, this handy reference belongs in every Civil War library. Near an informative entry on "Robert E. Lee," you'll find startling revelations about "Lincoln's In-laws"--four of whom actually fought for the Confederacy. Not far from the battle of "Shiloh" are "Sutlers," profiteers who trailed along with armies, hawking all kinds of (sometimes shoddy) stuff. And right around "weapons" sits "General Stand Watie," the only American Indian to achieve the rank of general with the Confederacy. In short, this wonderful one-volume account ranges from the basic to the bizarre, from secession to spies to all kinds of swords, creating a complete picture of the war from the first shot to final surrender. No Civil War enthusiast or simple student of history will want to be without this indispensable and entertaining guide to one of America's most pivotal, endlessly fascinating events.

Civil War Virginia: Battleground for a Nation

by James I. Robertson

Since Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy, it was the target for Union assaults throughout the Civil War. Virginia was the site of more than half the battles of the war, and saw extraordinary damage to civilian property. This book recounts the war as it was fought on Virginia soil, with portraits of key players and descriptions of life on the homefront as well as the battlefield.

Civil War Wests

by Adam Arenson

This innovative study presents a new, integrated view of the Civil War and Reconstruction and the history of the western United States. Award-winning historians such as Steven Hahn, Martha Sandweiss, William Deverell, Virginia Scharff, and Stephen Kantrowitz offer original essays on lives, choices, and legacies in the American West, discussing the consequences for American Indian nations, the link between Reconstruction and suffrage movements, and cross-border interactions with Canada and Mexico. In the West, Civil War battlefields and Civil War politics engaged a wide range of ethnic and racial distinctions, raising questions that would arise only later in places farther east. Histories of Reconstruction in the South ignore the connections to previous occupation efforts and citizenship debates in the West. The stories contained in this volume complicate our understanding of the paths from slavery to freedom for white as well as non-white Americans. By placing the histories of the American West and the Civil War and Reconstruction period within one sustained conversation, this volume expands the limits of both by emphasizing how struggles over land, labor, sovereignty, and citizenship shaped the U.S. nation-state in this tumultuous era. This volume highlights significant moments and common concerns of this continuous conflict, as it stretched across the continent and throughout the nineteenth century. Publishing on the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War, this collection brings eminent historians into conversation, looking at the Civil War from several Western perspectives, and delivers a refreshingly disorienting view intended for scholars, general readers, and students.

Civil Wars

by Rosellen Brown

An idealistic couple, Teddy and Jessie Carlls, former activists in the civil rights movement in the 1960s and deeply committed to racial tolerance and equality, live with their children as virtually the only whites in a black development. When Teddy's racist sister and her husband are killed in an automobile accident, the Carlls are named as guardians of their two children--budding racists in their own right--and the expanded family finds it necessary to move. Teddy and Jessie reluctantly move to a larger house in a white, middle-class neighborhood. The novel focuses on Jessie's desperate efforts to help her in-laws' children adjust both to their loss and to the atmosphere of racial tolerance the children must confront in their new family.

Civil Wars, Insecurity, and Intervention

by Jack Snyder Barbara F. Walter

Since the end of the cold war, a series of costly civil wars, many of them ethnic conflicts, have dominated the international security agenda. The international community, often acting through the United Nations or regional organizations like NATO, has felt compelled to intervene with military forces in many of these conflicts -- four of which comprise the heart of this book: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Somalia, Cambodia, and Rwanda. Civil Wars, Insecurity, and Interventionis a detailed examination by a host of distinguished scholars of these recent interventions in order to draw lessons for today's policy debates. The contributors view ethnic conflict and internal war through the prism of the concept of the security dilemma -- a situation in which parties with strong incentives to cooperate wind up nonetheless in bloody competition out of distrust of the opponent. Civil Wars, Insecurity, and Interventionassesses how international intervention can help solve the security dilemma in civil wars by designing political and military arrangements that make security commitments credible to the warring parties. The mixed record of partial successes, failures, and in some cases counterproductive interventions suggests an urgent need to extract lessons with a view toward developing a framework for making future policy choices.

Civilian Warriors : The Inside Story of Blackwater and the Unsung Heroes of the War on Terror

by Erik Prince

Forget everything you think you know about Blackwater. And get ready for a thrilling, true story that will make you rethink who the good guys and bad guys have been since 9/11. No company in our time has been as mysterious or as controversial as Blackwater. Founded by former Navy SEAL Erik Prince in 1997, it recruited special forces veterans and others with the skills and courage to take on the riskiest security jobs in the world. As its reputation grew, government demand for its services escalated, and Blackwater's men eventually completed nearly one hundred thousand missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. Both the Bush and Obama administrations found the company indispensible. It sounds like a classic startup success story, except for one problem: Blackwater has been demonized around the world. From uninformed news coverage to grossly distorted fictional portrayals, Blackwater employees have been smeared as mercenaries, profiteers, jackbooted thugs, and worse. Because of the secrecy requirements of Blackwater's contracts with the Pentagon, the State Department, and the CIA, Prince was unable to speak out when his company's opponents spread false information. But now he's able to tell the full and often shocking story of Blackwater's rise and fall. In Civilian Warriors, Prince pulls no punches and spares no details. He explains his original goal of building an elite center for military and law enforcement training. He recounts how the company shifted gears after 9/11. He honors our troops while challenging the Pentagon's top leadership. And he reveals why highly efficient private military contractors have been essential to running our armed forces, since long before Blackwater came along. Above all, Prince debunks myths about Blackwater that spread while he was forced to remain silent--myths that tarnished the memory of men who gave their lives for their country but never got the recognition they deserved. He reveals new information about some of the biggest controversies of the War on Terror, including: * The true story of the Nisour Square massacre in Baghdad. * The actual details of Blackwater's so-called impunity in Iraq. * The events leading up to the televised deaths of Blackwater contractors in Fallujah. Prince doesn't pretend to be perfect, and he doesn't hide the sometimes painful details of his private life. But he has done a great public service by setting the record straight. His book reads like a thriller but is too improbable to be fiction.

A Civilian's Guide to the U.S. Military

by Barbara Schading Richard Schading

Attention! Learn more about your military now! Does a corporal have to salute a lieutenant or is it the other way around? What are forward-deployed units? Is an "armored cow" a type of tank or something soldiers eat? Are Polaris missiles dropped from the air or launched from a submarine? If someone calls you a "Cat 4" should you be honored or offended? Do you feel lost when it comes to all things military? Sure, you hear things on the news and maybe you know someone who is in the military, but you probably have a hard time fully grasping the acronyms, equipment, and protocol they discuss. That's where A Civilian's Guide to the U.S. Military can help. Author Barbara Schading decodes all things military for you. She discusses each branch-Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and the Coast Guard-in simple terms you can understand. You'll get the background information, an easy-to-read chart showing rank and insignia, and an explanation of the organization of each branch. In addition, the book has extensive glossaries that cover terms, acronyms, slang, and equipment. You'll find an entire chapter that covers special operations forces like the Green Berets, Force Recons, Army Rangers, and more. You'll learn about their specific training, missions, and history. The book also covers other important aspects of the military like: flag and saluting etiquette military funerals the Tombs of the Unknownthe American Legion, USO, Veterans of Foreign Wars, and other groups military law military academies medals and decorations official military music an explanation of the Geneva Convention and a list of resources to help you find more information So the next time you read the paper or talk with a new recruit, you don't have to feel lost. Become a knowledgeable civilian with the help of A Civilian's Guide to the U.S. Military.

The Civilian's Guide to the U.S. Military: A Comprehensive Reference to the Customs, Language, & Structure of the Armed Forces

by Barbara Schading Richard Schading Virginia Slayton

Attention! Learn more about your military now! Does a corporal have to salute a lieutenant or is it the other way around? What are forward-deployed units? Is an "armored cow" a type of tank or something soldiers eat? Are Polaris missiles dropped from the air or launched from a submarine? If someone calls you a "Cat 4" should you be honored or offended? Do you feel lost when it comes to all things military? Sure, you hear things on the news and maybe you know someone who is in the military, but you probably have a hard time fully grasping the acronyms, equipment, and protocol they discuss. That's whereA Civilian's Guide to the U. S. Militarycan help. Author Barbara Schading decodes all things military for you. She discusses each branch#151;Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and the Coast Guard#151;in simple terms you can understand. You'll get the background information, an easy-to-read chart showing rank and insignia, and an explanation of the organization of each branch. In addition, the book has extensive glossaries that cover terms, acronyms, slang, and equipment. You'll find an entire chapter that covers special operations forces like the Green Berets, Force Recons, Army Rangers, and more. You'll learn about their specific training, missions, and history. The book also covers other important aspects of the military like: flag and saluting etiquette military funerals the Tombs of the Unknown the American Legion, USO, Veterans of Foreign Wars, and other groups military law military academies medals and decorations official military music an explanation of the Geneva Convention and a list of resources to help you find more information So the next time you read the paper or talk with a new recruit, you don't have to feel lost. Become a knowledgeable civilian with the help ofA Civilian's Guide to the U. S. Military.

Civilisation

by Kenneth Clark

Kenneth Clark's sweeping narrative looks at how Western Europe evolved in the wake of the collapse of the Roman Empire, to produce the ideas, books, buildings, works of art and great individuals that make up our civilisation. The author takes us from Iona in the ninth century to France in the twelfth, from Florence to Urbino, from Germany to Rome, England, Holland and America. Against these historical backgrounds he sketches an extraordinary cast of characters -- the men and women who gave new energy to civilisation and expanded our understanding of the world and of ourselves. He also highlights the works of genius they produced -- in architecture, sculpture and painting, in philosophy, poetry and music, and in science and engineering, from Raphael's School of Athens to the bridges of Brunel.

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