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Favorite Recipes of California Winemakers

by Lee Hecker

This cookbook is dedicated to a simple, well-known truth: Good food is even better with wine. More than 200 dedicated vintners and their families have contributed more than 500 time-tested recipes.

Favorite Socks

by Ann Budd

Portable, quick to knit, and universally wearable, new knitters have recently been discovering socks in droves, while Interweave Knits magazine has been providing original, beautiful patterns for a decade. Featuring 25 beautiful and timeless sock patterns for every occasion in a range of techniques, traditions, and designs, many of these patterns have become unavailable as original issues of Interweave Knits went out of print, but are available once again in this inspired collection. Highlights include a tutorial for knitting socks on two circular needles, instructions for making resoleable socks, and six completely new designs for those avid knitters who may have every issue of Interweave Knits magazine.

The Favorites

by Mary Yukari Waters

Fourteen-year-old Sarah Rexford, half-Japanese and half-American, feels like an outsider when she visits her family in Japan. She quickly learns that in traditional Kyoto, personal boundaries are firmly drawn and actions are not always what they appear. Sarah learns of a family secret -- an interfamily adoption arranged in the throes of World War II. Her grandmother gave up one of her daughters to the matriarch of the family, and the two families have coexisted quietly, living on the same lane. While this arrangement is never discussed, it looms over the two households. In this carefully articulated world, where every gesture and look has meaning, Sarah must learn the rules by which her mother, aunts, and grandmother live.

Fay

by Larry Brown

Fay Jones had no education, hardly any shell you can't call what her father's been tryin with her since she grew up "love." So, at the ripe age of seventeen, Fay Jones leaves home. She lights out alone, wearing her only dress and her rotting sneakers, carrying a purse with a half pack of cigarettes and two dollar bills. Even in 1985 Mississippi, two dollars won't go far on the road. She's headed for the bright lights and big times and even she knows she needs help getting there. But help's not hard to come by when you look like Fay. There's a highway patrolman who gives her a lift, with a detour to his own place. There are truck drivers who pull over to pick her up, no questions asked. There's a crop duster pilot with money for a night or two on the town. And finally there's a strip joint bouncer who deals on the side. At the end of this suspenseful, compulsively readable novel, there are five dead bodies stacked up in Fay's wake. Fay herself is sighted for the last time in New Orleans. She'll make it, whatever making it means, because Fay's got what it takes: beauty, a certain kind of innocent appeal, and the instinct for survival.

Faye Levy's International Jewish Cookbook

by Faye Levy

Faye Levy's International Jewish Cookbook presents over 300 mouth-watering recipes from all over the world.

FBI Agent (Cool Helping Careers)

by Geoffrey M. Horn

FBI Agent: Sound the alarm - a bank has been robbed! Get help - people are being held hostage! Look out - a dangerous criminal is on the run. Today's world demands highly trained FBI agents equipped with the skills to handle tough situations. Becoming an FBI agent means more than learning how to use firearms. FBI agents are expert investigators who locate evidence, track criminals, provide security, hunt for terrorists, and solve today's most difficult crimes.

FBI Careers

by Thomas H. Ackerman

Those looking to start or advance their career with one of the nation's most exciting employers will find everything they need to know about the FBI hiring process with this enhanced, eye-opening guide.

FBI's Ten Most Wanted

by Dary Matera

The history, the hunts, the captures -- and the criminals still at large In 1950, the FBI officially instituted its now-legendary list of the "Ten Most Wanted Fugitives" as a means of alerting the public and enlisting their aid in the apprehension of notorious felons. Over the years, it has included such infamous names as bank robber Willie Sutton, serial killer Ted Bundy, and assassin James Earl Ray -- and 447 of the 475 criminals have been apprehended, many of them thanks to tips from ordinary citizens. In this gripping and endlessly fascinating account, New York Times bestselling author Dary Matera offers readers a stunning, in-depth look at some of the most remarkable manhunts in the history of law enforcement -- and shocking profiles of the crimes and the criminals currently enshrined . . . including an elusive mass-murderer with a $27 million bounty on his head: Osama Bin Laden.

FDR and Chief Justice Hughes

by James F. Simon

The author of acclaimed books on the bitter clashes between presidents and chief justices--Jefferson and Marshall, Lincoln and Taney--over the character of the nation, constitutional power, slavery, secession and the president's war powers, James F. Simon tells the dramatic story of the struggle between FDR and Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes that decided the fate of the New Deal. The collision of Roosevelt and Hughes, like those of Jefferson and Marshall, Lincoln and Taney, occurred at a pivotal moment in American history. Roosevelt came to office in 1933 at the height of the Great Depression. He bombarded Congress with a fusillade of legislative initiatives that included shutting down insolvent banks, regulating stocks, imposing industrial codes, and rationing agricultural production. Major New Deal statutes, which Roosevelt considered critical to the nation's economic recovery, were struck down by the Hughes Court as unconstitutional. In 1936, FDR was reelected by a landslide and the exasperated president proposed legislation to relieve, he said, the overburdened and elderly justices of their heavy workload. He proposed the appointment of an additional justice for each sitting member over seventy years old. Six of the justices on the Hughes Court, including the Chief Justice, were over seventy. The proposal would have permitted the president to stack the Court with justices favorable to the New Deal. The Chief deftly rebutted the claim that the Court was not abreast of its work, and the proposal was defeated. In grudging admiration, FDR later said that the Chief Justice was the best politician in the country. Despite the defeat of his plan, Roosevelt never lost confidence and, like Hughes, never ceded leadership. He outmaneuvered isolationist senators to expedite aid to Great Britain as the Allies hovered on the brink of defeat. He then led his country through the Second World War to become the greatest president of the twentieth century.

FDR: A Biography

by Ted Morgan

Thorough and easy to read.

FDR Goes to War

by Burton W. Folsom Anita Folsom

From the acclaimed author of New Deal or Raw Deal?, called "eye-opening" by the National Review, comes a fascinating exposé of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's destructive wartime legacy--and its adverse impact on America's economic and foreign policies today. Did World War II really end the Great Depression--or did President Franklin Roosevelt's poor judgment and confused management leave Congress with a devastating fiscal mess after the final bomb was dropped? In this provocative new book, historians Burton W. Folsom, Jr., and Anita Folsom make a compelling case that FDR's presidency led to evasive and self-serving wartime policies. At a time when most Americans held isolationist sentiments--a backlash against the stunning carnage of World War I--Roosevelt secretly favored an aggressive interventionist foreign policy. Yet, throughout the 1930s, he spent lavishly on his disastrous New Deal programs and slashed defense spending, leaving America vastly unprepared for Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor and the challenge of fighting World War II. History books tell us the wartime economy was a boon, thanks to massive government spending. But the skyrocketing national debt, food rations, nonexistent luxuries, crippling taxes, labor strikes, and dangerous work of the time tell a different story--one that is hardly the stuff of recovery. Instead, the war ushered in a new era of imperialism for the executive branch. Roosevelt seized private property, conducted illegal wiretaps, tried to silence domestic opposition, and interned 110,000 Japanese Americans. He set a dangerous precedent for entangling alliances in foreign affairs, including his remarkable courtship of Russian dictator Joseph Stalin, while millions of Americans showed the courage, perseverance, and fortitude to make the weapons and fight the war. Was Roosevelt a great wartime leader, as historians almost unanimously assert? The Folsoms offer a thought-provoking revision of his controversial legacy. FDR Goes to War will make America take a second look at one of its most complicated presidents.

FDR's Ambassadors and the Diplomacy of Crisis

by David Mayers

What effect did personality and circumstance have on US foreign policy during World War II? This incisive account of US envoys residing in the major belligerent countries - Japan, Germany, Italy, China, France, Great Britain, USSR - highlights the fascinating role played by such diplomats as Joseph Grew, William Dodd, William Bullitt, Joseph Kennedy and W. Averell Harriman. Between Hitler's 1933 ascent to power and the 1945 bombing of Nagasaki, US ambassadors sculpted formal policy - occasionally deliberately, other times inadvertently - giving shape and meaning not always intended by Franklin D. Roosevelt or predicted by his principal advisors. From appeasement to the Holocaust and the onset of the Cold War, David Mayers examines the complicated interaction between policy, as conceived in Washington, and implementation on the ground in Europe and Asia. By so doing, he also sheds needed light on the fragility, ambiguities and enduring urgency of diplomacy and its crucial function in international politics.

FDR's Deadly Secret

by Steven Lomazow Eric Fettmann

The death of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1945 sent shock waves around the world. His lifelong physician swore that the president had always been a picture of health. Later, in 1970, Roosevelt's cardiologist admitted he had been suffering from uncontrolled hypertension and that his death-from a cerebral hemorrhage-was "a cataclysmic event waiting to happen. " But even this was a carefully constructed deceit, one that began in the 1930s and became acutely necessary as America approached war. In this great medical detective story and narrative of a presidential cover-up, an exhaustive study of all available reports of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's health, and a comprehensive review of thousands of photographs, an intrepid physician-journalist team reveals that Roosevelt at his death suffered from melanoma, a skin cancer that had spread to his brain and abdomen. Roosevelt's condition was not only physically disabling, but also could have affected substantially his mental function and his ability to make decisions in the days when the nation was imperiled by World War II.

FDR's Folly: How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression

by Jim Powell

"Admirers of FDR credit his New Deal with restoring the American economy after the disastrous contraction of 1929-33. Truth to tell--as Powell demonstrates without a shadow of a doubt--the New Deal hampered recovery from the contraction, prolonged and added to unemployment, and set the stage for ever more intrusive and costly government. Powell's analysis is thoroughly documented, relying on an impressive variety of popular and academic literature both contemporary and historical." -Milton Friedman, Nobel Laureate, Hoover Institution. "There is a critical and often forgotten difference between disaster and tragedy. Disasters happen to us all, no matter what we do. Tragedies are brought upon ourselves by hubris. The Depression of the 1930s would have been a brief disaster if it hadn't been for the national tragedy of the New Deal. Jim Powell has proven this." -P. J. O'Rourke, author of Parliament of Whores and Eat the Rich. "The material laid out in this book desperately needs to be available to a much wider audience than the ranks of professional economists and economic historians, if policy confusion similar to the New Deal is to be avoided in the future." -James M. Buchanan, Nobel Laureate, George Mason University. "I found Jim Powell's book fascinating. I think he has written an important story, one that definitely needs telling." -Thomas Fleming, author of The New Dealers' War. "Jim Powell is one tough-minded historian, willing to let the chips fall where they may. That's a rare quality these days, hence more valuable than ever. He lets the history do the talking." -David Landes, Professor of History Emeritus, Harvard University. "Jim Powell draws together voluminous economic research on the effects of all of Roosevelt's major policies. Along the way, Powell gives fascinating thumbnail sketches of the major players. The result is a devastating indictment, compellingly told. Those who think that government intervention helped get the U. S. economy out of the depression should read this book." -David R. Henderson, editor of The Fortune Encyclopedia of Economics and author of The Joy of Freedom. The Great Depression and the New Deal. For generations, the collective American consciousness has believed that the former ruined the country and the latter saved it. Endless praise has been heaped upon President Franklin Delano Roosevelt for masterfully reining in the Depression's destructive effects and propping up the country on his New Deal platform. In fact, FDR has achieved mythical status in American history and is considered to be, along with Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln, one of the greatest presidents of all time. But would the Great Depression have been so catastrophic had the New Deal never been implemented? In FDR's Folly, historian Jim Powell argues that it was in fact the New Deal itself, with its shortsighted programs, that deepened the Great Depression, swelled the federal government, and prevented the country from turning around quickly. You'll discover in alarming detail how FDR's federal programs hurt America more than helped it, with effects we still feel today, including: * How Social Security actually increased unemployment * How higher taxes undermined good businesses * How new labor laws threw people out of work * And much more.

FDR's Splendid Deception

by Hugh Gregory Gallagher

Focuses on FDR's disability and the lengths gone to to conceal it from the world.

Fear

by L. Ron Hubbard

A novel of compelling suspense. Professor James Lowry didn't believe in spirits, or witches, or demons. Not until a gentle spring evening when his hat disappeared, and suddenly he couldn't remember the last four hours of his life. Now, the quiet university town of Atworthy is changing -- slightly at first, then faster and more frighteningly each time he tries to remember. Lowry is pursued by a dark, secret evil that is turning his whole world against him while it whispers a warning from the shadows: If you find your hat you'll find your four hours. If you find your four hours then you will die... "A classic tale of creeping, surreal menace and horror... one of the really, really good ones." --Stephen King

Fear

by Jeff Abbott

From New York Times bestselling author Jeff Abbott... Everyone has a memory they'd like to forget. For federal witness Miles Kendrick, it's the shootout that left his best friend dead--and Miles a hunted and haunted man. While helping his psychiatrist with a mysterious favor, Miles stumbles upon an illegal research program that could free him--and millions of others with post-traumatic stress disorder--from crippling memories. But when his doctor ends up dead, Miles must run for his life from a murderous conspiracy that gives new meaning to the word "fear."

Fear

by Francine Pascal

I SWORE I WOULD NEVER BE LIKE MY FATHER. I SWORE I WOULD NEVER BETRAY THOSE WHO TRUST ME. I LIED.

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream

by Hunter S. Thompson

First published in "Rolling Stone" magazine in 1971, "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" is Hunter S. Thompson's savagely comic account of what happened to this country in the 1960s. It is told through the writer's account of an assignment he undertook with his attorney to visit Las Vegas and 'check it out.' The book stands as the final word on the highs and lows of that decade, one of the defining works of our time, and a stylistic and journalistic tour de force

Fear and Other Uninvited Guests: Tackling the Anxiety, Fear, and Shame That Keep Us from Optimal Living and Loving

by Harriet G. Lerner

With stories that are sometimes hilarious and sometimes heartbreaking, Lerner takes us through the most difficult lessons the universe sends us. We learn- How a man was "cured in a day" of the fear of rejection -- and what we can learn from his story How the author overcame her dread of public speaking when her worst fears were realized How to deal with the fear of not being good enough, and with the shame of feeling essentially flawed and inadequate How to stay calm and clear in an anxious, crazy workplace How to manage fear and despair when life sends a crash course in illness, vulnerability, and loss How "positive thinking" helps -- and harms How to be our best and bravest selves, even when we are terrified and have internalized the shaming messages of others No one signs up for anxiety, fear, and shame, but we can't avoid them either. As we learn to respond to these three key emotions in new ways, we can live more fully in the present and move into the future with courage, clarity, humor, and hope.

Fear and Trembling and The Sickness Unto Death (New in Paperback)

by Søren Kierkegaard Walter Lowrie Gordon Marino

Walter Lowrie's classic, bestselling translation of Søren Kierkegaard's most important and popular books remains unmatched for its readability and literary quality. Fear and Trembling and The Sickness Unto Death established Kierkegaard as the father of existentialism and have come to define his contribution to philosophy. Lowrie's translation, first published in 1941 and later revised, was the first in English, and it has introduced hundreds of thousands of readers to Kierkegaard's thought. Kierkegaard counted Fear and Trembling and The Sickness Unto Death among "the most perfect books I have written," and in them he introduces two terms--"the absurd" and "despair"--that have become key terms in modern thought. Fear and Trembling takes up the story of Abraham and Isaac to explore a faith that transcends the ethical, persists in the face of the absurd, and meets its reward in the return of all that the faithful one is willing to sacrifice, while The Sickness Unto Death examines the spiritual anxiety of despair. Walter Lowrie's magnificent translation of these seminal works continues to provide an ideal introduction to Kierkegaard. And, as Gordon Marino argues in a new introduction, these books are as relevant as ever in today's age of anxiety.

Fear and Trembling: A Novel

by Adriana Hunter Amélie Nothomb

According to ancient Japanese protocol, foreigners deigning to approach the emperor did so only with fear and trembling. Terror and self-abasement conveyed respect. Amelie, our well-intentioned and eager young Western heroine, goes to Japan to spend a year working at the Yumimoto Corporation. Returning to the land where she was born is the fulfillment of a dream for Amelie; working there turns into comic nightmare. Alternately disturbing and hilarious, unbelievable and shatteringly convincing, Fear and Trembling will keep readers clutching tight to the pages of this taut little novel, caught up in the throes of fear, trembling, and, ultimately, delight. Translated by Adriana Hunter. First published in France under the title "Stupeur et tremblements".

Fear and Trembling / Repetition

by Howard V. Hong Edna H. Hong Søren Kierkegaard

For Fear and Trembling, Kierkegaard used the pseudonym Johannes de Silentio, and for Repetition, he used Constantin Constantius. In Fear and Trembling, Kierkegaard explores the faith that transcends the ethical, while in Repetition, he discusses the most profound implications of the unity of personhood and of identity within change - the repetition that creates the rebirth of God in the heart of man, bringing the eternal into the present and allowing the past to retain its meaning.

Fear Collector

by Gregg Olsen

YOU'LL SLEEP WITH THE LIGHTS ON AFTER READING GREGG OLSEN. " --Allison Brennan Ted Bundy. America's most notorious serial killer. For two women, he is the ultimate obsession. One is a cop whose sister may have been one of Bundy's victims. The other is a deranged groupie who corresponded with Bundy in prison--and raised her son to finish what Bundy started. To charm and seduce innocent girls. To kidnap and brutalize more women than any serial killer in history. And to lure one obsessed cop into a trap as sick and demented as Bundy himself. . . Praise for Gregg Olsen's novels"WICKEDLY CLEVER! TWISTED. "--Lisa Gardner"OLSEN WRITES RAPID-FIRE PAGE-TURNERS. "--The Seattle Times "GRABS YOU BY THE THROAT. "--Kay Hooper

Fear: Essential Wisdom for Getting Through the Storm

by Thich Nhat Hanh

Fear is destructive, a pervasive problem we all face. Vietnamese Buddhist Zen Master, poet, scholar, peace activist, and one of the foremost spiritual leaders in the world--a gifted teacher who was once nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize by Martin Luther King Jr.--Thich Nhat Hanh has written a powerful and practical strategic guide to overcoming our debilitating uncertainties and personal terrors. The New York Times said Hanh, "ranks second only to the Dalai Lama" as the Buddhist leader with the most influence in the West. In Fear: Essential Wisdom for Getting through the Storm, Hanh explores the origins of our fears, illuminating a path to finding peace and freedom from anxiety and offering powerful tools to help us eradicate it from our lives

Showing 74,176 through 74,200 of 147,232 results

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