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The Islamic Context of The Thousand and One Nights

by Muhsin J. Al-Musawi

In this fascinating study, Muhsin J. al-Musawi shows how deeply Islamic heritage and culture is embedded in the tales of The Thousand and One Nights (known to many as the Arabian Nights) and how this integration invites readers to make an Islamic milieu. Conservative Islam dismisses The Thousand and One Nights as facile popular literature, and liberal views disregard the rich Islamic context of the text. Approaching the text with a fresh and unbiased eye, al-Musawi reads the tales against Islamic schools of thought and theology and recovers persuasive historical evidence to reveal the cultural and religious struggle over Islam that drives the book's narrative tension and binds its seemingly fragmented stories. Written by a number of authors over a stretch of centuries, The Thousand and One Nights depicts a burgeoning, urban Islamic culture in all its variety and complexity. As al-Musawi demonstrates, the tales document their own places and periods of production, reflecting the Islamic individual's growing exposure to a number of entertainments and temptations and their conflict with the obligations of faith. Aimed at a diverse audience, these stories follow a narrative arc that begins with corruption and ends with redemption, conforming to a paradigm that concurs with the sociological and religious concerns of Islam and the Islamic state. By emphasizing Islam in his analysis of these entertaining and instructional tales, al-Musawi not only illuminates the work's consistent equation between art and life, but he also sheds light on its underlying narrative power. His study offers a brilliant portrait of medieval Islam as well, especially its social, political, and economic institutions and its unique practices of storytelling.

Islamic Gunpowder Empires

by Douglas E. Streusand

Islamic Gunpowder Empires provides readers with a history of Islamic civilization in the early modern world through a comparative examination of Islam's three greatest empires--the Ottomans (centered in what is now Turkey), the Safavids (in modern Iran), and the Mughals (ruling the Indian subcontinent). Author Douglas Streusand explains the origins of the three empires; compares the ideological, institutional, military, and economic contributors to their success; and analyzes the causes of their rise, expansion, and ultimate transformation and decline. Streusand depicts the three empires as a part of an integrated international system extending from the Atlantic to the Straits of Malacca, emphasizing both the connections and the conflicts within that system. He presents the empires as complex polities in which Islam is one political and cultural component among many. The treatment of the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires incorporates contemporary scholarship, dispels common misconceptions, and provides an excellent platform for further study.

Islamic Imperialism A History

by Efraim Karsh

From the first Arab-Islamic Empire of the mid-seventh century to the Ottomans, the last great Muslim empire, the story of the Middle East has been the story of the rise and fall of universal empires and, no less important, of imperialist dreams. So argues Efraim Karsh in this highly provocative book. Rejecting the conventional Western interpretation of Middle Eastern history as an offshoot of global power politics, Karsh contends that the region's experience is the culmination of long-existing indigenous trends, passions, and patterns of behavior, and that foremost among these is Islam's millenarian imperial tradition. The author explores the history of Islam's imperialism and the persistence of the Ottoman imperialist dream that outlasted World War I to haunt Islamic and Middle Eastern politics to the present day. September 11 can be seen as simply the latest expression of this dream, and such attacks have little to do with U. S. international behavior or policy in the Middle East, says Karsh. The House of Islam's war for world mastery is traditional, indeed venerable, and it is a quest that is far from over.

Islamic Political Ethics

by Sohail H. Hashmi

One of the most dynamic aspects of the Islamic revival during the past two centuries has been the rethinking of Islamic political thought. A broad range of actors, ideas, and ideologies characterize the debate on how Islamic ethics and law should be manifested in modern institutions. Yet this aspect of the "return to Islam" has been neglected by policymakers, the media, and even many scholars, who equate "political Islam" with merely one strand, labeled "Islamic fundamentalism." Bringing together ten essays from six volumes of the Ethikon Series in Comparative Ethics, this book gives a rounded treatment to the subject of Islamic political ethics. The authors explore the Islamic ethics of civil society, boundaries, pluralism, and war and peace. They consider questions of diversity, discussing, among other subjects, Islamic regimes' policies regarding women and religious minorities. The chapters on war and peace take up such crucial and timely issues as the Islamic ethics of jihad, examining both the legitimate conditions for the declaration of war and the proper conduct of war. In their discussions, the contributors analyze the works of classical writers as well as the full range of modern reinterpretations. But beyond these analyses of previous and contemporary thinkers, the essays also reach back to the two fundamental sources of Islamic ethics--the Qur'an and traditions of the Prophet--to develop fresh insights into how Islam and Muslims can contribute to human society in the twenty-first century.

Islamization from Below

by Brian J. Peterson

The colonial era in Africa, spanning less than a century, ushered in a more rapid expansion of Islam than at any time during the previous thousand years. In this groundbreaking historical investigation, Brian J. Peterson considers for the first time how and why rural peoples in West Africa "became Muslim" under French colonialism. Peterson rejects conventional interpretations that emphasize the roles of states, jihads, and elites in "converting" people, arguing instead that the expansion of Islam owed its success to the mobility of thousands of rural people who gradually, and usually peacefully, adopted the new religion on their own. Based on extensive fieldwork in villages across southern Mali (formerly French Sudan) and on archival research in West Africa and France, the book draws a detailed new portrait of grassroots, multi-generational processes of Islamization in French Sudan while also deepening our understanding of the impact and unintended consequences of colonialism.

Island

by Aldous Huxley

Humorous novel depicting Huxley's views on corporate power, consumerism, capitalism, sexual mores, and cynicism in a utopian world.

The Island

by Victoria Hislop

The Petrakis family lives in the small Greek seaside village of Plaka. Just off the coast is the tiny island of Spinalonga, where the nation's leper colony once was located--a place that has haunted four generations of Petrakis women. There's Eleni, ripped from her husband and two young daughters and sent to Spinalonga in 1939, and her daughters Maria, finding joy in the everyday as she dutifully cares for her father, and Anna, a wild child hungry for passion and a life anywhere but Plaka. And finally there's Alexis, Eleni's great-granddaughter, visiting modern-day Greece to unlock her family's past.A richly enchanting novel of lives and loves unfolding against the backdrop of the Mediterranean during World War II, The Island is an enthralling story of dreams and desires, of secrets desperately hidden, and of leprosy's touch on an unforgettable family.

Island

by Jane Rogers

Nikki's vengeance takes her to a remote island off the coast of Scotland, where both the beaches and the inhabitants are full of artifacts from the past that haunt the present. Here she discovers a mother who concocts remedies in her dank kitchen and a brother whose seemingly simple mind is filled with stories of past islanders, crofters, and Vikings. Gradually her brother's dangerous love and strange way of seeing the world transform Nikki's life in ways that she could never expect. With her signature blend of psychological intensity and strong moral underpinnings, Jane Rogers skillfully leads us into a primal, almost mythic world where our darkest impulses and most profound fears are played out to shocking consequence. Part fairy tale, part murder mystery, Island is, like the madness it depicts, terrifying, logical, and utterly consuming.

The Island

by Peter Benchley

How could hundreds of boats, carrying more than 2,000 people, simply disappear? Why does no one know, or care to know? Blair Maynard becomes obsessed with finding out what's going on.

Island

by Richard Laymon

When Rupert Conway set out on a cruise with seven other people, he planned to swim a little, get some sun He certainly didn't plan to get shipwrecked. But after the yacht blew up, that's what happened--he and his shipmates were stranded on a deserted island. Luckily for them, the island has plenty of fresh water and enough food to last until they get rescued. And luckily for Rupert, most of his fellow castaways are attractive women. But that's where his luck ran out--because the castaways aren't alone on the island. In the dense jungle beyond the beach there's a maniac on the loose, a killer with a murderous heart, a clever mind and a taste for blood. He doesn't like his new neighbors and he plans to slaughter them all... one by one.

The Island

by Tim Lebbon

When a preternatural storm followed by a tsunami drops a mysterious island off the shores of the port town of Pavmouth Breaks, the island's inhabitants offer to help the town's residents rebuild using their unfamiliar machine technology. Kel Boon, once part of a secret organization battling against incursions by "Strangers" from beyond the world, and his witch lover, Namior, soon suspect that the visitors are not what they seem. The Bram Stoker Award-winning author of Fallen has written a uniquely terrifying horror fantasy that contrasts the homey comforts of a small seaport town with horrors that come from the realm of nightmares. A standout choice for most dark fantasy readers. Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

The Island

by Heather Graham

On a weekend vacation Beth Anderson is unnerved when a stroll on the beach reveals what appears to be a skull. As a stranger approaches, Beth panics and covers the evidence. But when she later returns to the beach, the skull is gone. Determined to find solid evidence to bring to the police, Beth digs deeper into the mystery of the skull-and everywhere she goes, Keith Henson, the stranger from the beach, seems to appear. He claims to be keeping an eye on her safety, but Beth senses other motives. Then a body washes ashore, and Beth begins to think she needs more help than she bargained for. Because investigating is a dangerous game, and someone wants to stop Beth from playing.

The Island

by Victoria Hislop

The Petrakis family lives in the small Greek seaside village of Plaka. Just off the coast is the tiny island of Spinalonga, where the nation's leper colony once was located--a place that has haunted four generations of Petrakis women. There's Eleni, ripped from her husband and two young daughters and sent to Spinalonga in 1939, and her daughters Maria, finding joy in the everyday as she dutifully cares for her father, and Anna, a wild child hungry for passion and a life anywhere but Plaka. And finally there's Alexis, Eleni's great-granddaughter, visiting modern-day Greece to unlock her family's past. A richly enchanting novel of lives and loves unfolding against the backdrop of the Mediterranean during World War II, The Island is an enthralling story of dreams and desires, of secrets desperately hidden, and of leprosy's touch on an unforgettable family.

The Island

by Victoria Hislop

The Petrakis family lives in the small Greek seaside village of Plaka. Just off the coast is the tiny island of Spinalonga, where the nation's leper colony once was located--a place that has haunted four generations of Petrakis women. There's Eleni, ripped from her husband and two young daughters and sent to Spinalonga in 1939, and her daughters Maria, finding joy in the everyday as she dutifully cares for her father, and Anna, a wild child hungry for passion and a life anywhere but Plaka. And finally there's Alexis, Eleni's great-granddaughter, visiting modern-day Greece to unlock her family's past.A richly enchanting novel of lives and loves unfolding against the backdrop of the Mediterranean during World War II, The Island is an enthralling story of dreams and desires, of secrets desperately hidden, and of leprosy's touch on an unforgettable family.

The Island

by Victoria Hislop

On the brink of a life-changing decision, Alexis Fielding longs to find out about her mother's past. But Sofia has never spoken of it. All she admits to is growing up in a small Cretan village before moving to London. When Alexis decides to visit Crete, however, Sofia gives her daughter a letter to take to an old friend, and promises that through her she will learn more. Arriving in Plaka, Alexis is astonished to see that it lies a stone's throw from the tiny, deserted island of Spinalonga - Greece's former leper colony. Then she finds Fotini, and at last hears the story that Sofia has buried all her life: the tale of her great-grandmother Eleni and her daughters and a family rent by tragedy, war and passion. She discovers how intimately she is connected with the island, and how secrecy holds them all in its powerful grip...The acclaimed million-copy number one bestseller and winner of Richard & Judy's Summer Read 2006 from Victoria Hislop is a dramatic tale of four generations, rent by war, illicit love, violence and leprosy, from the thirties, through the war, to the present day.On the brink of a life-changing decision, Alexis Fielding longs to find out about her mother's past. But Sofia has never spoken of it. All she admits to is growing up in a small Cretan village before moving to London. When Alexis decides to visit Crete, however, Sofia gives her daughter a letter to take to an old friend, and promises that through her she will learn more. Arriving in Plaka, Alexis is astonished to see that it lies a stone's throw from the tiny, deserted island of Spinalonga - Greece's former leper colony. Then she finds Fotini, and at last hears the story that Sofia has buried all her life: the tale of her great-grandmother Eleni and her daughters and a family rent by tragedy, war and passion. She discovers how intimately she is connected with the island, and how secrecy holds them all in its powerful grip...

Island

by Aldous Huxley

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY DAVID BRADSHAW For over a hundred years the Pacific island of Pala has been the scene of a unique experiment in civilisation. Its inhabitants live in a society where western science has been brought together with eastern philosophy and humanism to create a paradise on earth. When cynical journalist, Will Farnaby, arrives to search for information about potential oil reserves on Pala, he quickly falls in love with the way of life on the island. Soon the need to complete his mission becomes an intolerable burden. In counterpoint to Brave New World and Ape and Essence, in Island Huxley gives us his vision of utopia.

Island at the End of the World: The Turbulent History of Easter Island

by Steven Roger Fischer

'A fascinating and highly readable history of one of the most exotic islands on earth' The Economist 'Fischer's robust book dispels the mystery and reveals the tale of the evolution of an island that, for a thousand years, developed in almost total isolation' The Good Book Guide Famed for its extreme isolation and breathtaking monumental sculpture, Easter Island was a verdant South Sea idyll when the first Polynesian settlers landed there around AD 700 But by the i6th century, when voyaging in the South Pacific was far less widespread, Easter Islanders became stranded on what had turned into a desert like isle, and were forced to adapt to survive In 1722 the first European visitors encountered a people thriving in total isolation, surrounded by huge architectural platforms of fitted stones topped by hundred of monolithic busts Subsequent intruders brought trade, disease and violence, and the Islanders responded through cultural reinvention new leaders, new rituals, new gods Steven Roger Fischer relates a compelling story of how wars, smallpox and the 'Great Death' decimated the Island, and how a despotic Frenchman claimed it for himself, only to be killed by the remaining Islanders - a population of just 111. He describes its colonization and annexation by Chile, and its peaceful but insistent civil rights movement in the 1960s. Today the population has increased, as has tourism, and the Island continues to be managed by the indigenous Rapanui people Island at the End of the World presents, for the first time in the English language, a comprehensive history told by a writer who is intimately familiar with Easter Island's history, its people and their extraordinary story. Foreign interest has never been so keen, and this book is a much-needed history of a little-known but remarkable place.

Island Beneath the Sea

by Isabel Allende

Born on the island of Saint-Domingue, Zarité--known as Tété--is the daughter of an African mother she never knew and one of the white sailors who brought her into bondage. Though her childhood is one of brutality and fear, Tété finds solace in the traditional rhythms of African drums and the voodoo loa she discovers through her fellow slaves. When twenty-year-old Toulouse Valmorain arrives on the island in 1770, it's with powdered wigs in his trunks and dreams of financial success in his mind. But running his father's plantation, Saint Lazare, is neither glamorous nor easy. Although Valmorain purchases young Tété for his bride, it is he who will become dependent on the services of his teenaged slave.Against the merciless backdrop of sugarcane fields, the lives of Tété and Valmorain grow ever more intertwined. When the bloody revolution of Toussaint Louverture arrives at the gates of Saint Lazare, they flee the brutal conditions of the French colony, soon to become Haiti, for the raucous, free-wheeling enterprise of New Orleans. There Tété finally forges a new life, but her connection to Valmorain is deeper than anyone knows and not easily severed. With an impressive richness of detail, and a narrative wit and brio second to none, Allende crafts the riveting story of one woman's determination to find love amid loss, to offer humanity though her own has been so battered, and to forge a new identity in the cruelest of circumstances.

An Island Called Moreau

by Brian W. Aldiss

A castaway government official is stranded on an island of man-made monsters in this bold reimagining of the H. G. Wells science fiction classic War is hell, and the conflict tearing apart the world may be humankind's last. Set adrift on a makeshift raft in the middle of the South Pacific, the sole survivor of a sabotaged space-shuttle flight, undersecretary of state Calvert Roberts is certain his life is coming to an end. But fate intervenes, depositing him dehydrated and half starved on the beach of an uncharted island with a giant M etched into a cliff wall. At first it appears to be paradise, but Eden has a dark side: Here, Dr. Mortimer Dart is playing God. A genius geneticist who is certifiably mad, he is called Master by the unspeakable creations of his predecessor--monstrous creatures, neither human nor animal, but some nightmarish hybrid. Yet as horrible as the stranded government official finds these abominations, it is the truth behind Dart's experiments that chill Roberts's blood--for it will open wide a window onto an inescapable future of emptiness, ashes, and death. One of twentieth-century science fiction's brightest luminaries, Grand Master Brian W. Aldiss pays homage to one of the genre's most beloved progenitors, the great H. G. Wells, author of The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, and other science fiction classics. An Island Called Moreau is a gripping near-future tale of inhuman experimentation, dystopia, morality, war, and mad science that honors and ingeniously updates Wells's brilliant dark masterwork, The Island of Doctor Moreau.

An Island Far from Home

by John Donahue

Set against the vivid backdrop of the Civil War, this is a timeless tale of friends and enemies, anguish and adventure. "Dear Private John Meadows: My name is Joshua Loring. ... My pa got killed at Fredericksburg so I don't much like Rebs. I'm joining the army as soon as I can. ... I just hope the war doesn't end before I get my chance". And so begins the life-changing relationship between Joshua, a twelve-year-old from Massachusetts, and his unlikely pen pal, a lonely fourteen-year-old Confederate soldier imprisoned on George's Island. Joshua sends the letter at his uncle's request, although he's sure there isn't a Reb in the world he'd like. The events that follow force Joshua to confront his deepest feelings about the enemy and lead to the greatest adventure of his life.

Island Flame

by Karen Robards

Dear Reader, It is difficult for an author to choose a favorite from among her own books, especially when she has been lucky enough--as I have--to make a career out of doing what she loves. But some stories are memorable because they mark an important milestone in an author's life, and for me, perhaps none is more special than Island Flame--my very first book. I was thrilled when it was published, and now, more than thirty years later, I am just as excited to share it again with you. Island Flame is a classic tale of romance on the high seas, featuring two extraordinary characters: the headstrong Lady Catherine Aldley and the legendary pirate Jonathan Hale. I don't have to tell you that their tumultuous escapade sizzles with passion (lots of passion!), but what I hope you will take away most from Cathy and Jonathan is that dreams do come true--in love and in life. Mine did, and I hope yours will too. I look forward to sharing many more adventures together in the future. Enjoy! Karen Robards

Island Girls (Mary-Kate and Ashley, Two of a Kind Diaries)

by Nancy Butcher Mary-Kate Olsen Ashley Olsen

Mary-Kate and Ashley are all set for an exciting summer with their friends. Their adventures begin with a Survivor-like competition. But the game turns sour when they realizes it's much more fun to lounge around the pool sipping humid fruit drinks.

Island Heat

by Sarah Mayberry

It's been eight years since Tory Sanderson has seen Ben Cooper--eight years since she found out he seduced her to win a bet with some classmates at the prestigious Culinary Institute of America, and eight years since she got her revenge. . . . After fulfilling her dream of publishing a cookbook of island recipes, Tory is thrilled when she's invited on a Caribbean cruise as a guest lecturer. But excitement turns to anxiety when she finds out that Ben, who is now a celebrated restaurateur, will join her as the guest chef. Ben accepted the guest chef gig in order to enjoy a week of Tory sweating it out in the kitchen. But once the heat starts to climb, getting even turns out to be the last thing on his mind. In fact, picturing a future with Tory in his kitchen might add just the right amount of spice to his life. . . .

Island in the Sea of Time

by S. M. Stirling

It's spring on Nantucket and everything is perfectly normal, until a sudden storm blankets the entire island. When the weather clears, the island's inhabitants find that they are no longer in the late twentieth century. . . but have been transported instead to the Bronze Age! Now they must learn to survive with suspicious, warlike peoples they can barely understand and deal with impending disaster, in the shape of a would-be conqueror from their own time. .

Island Keeper

by Harry Mazer

Longing to disappear after the death of her beloved younger sister, 16-year-old Cleo runs away from her overprotective and oppressive family and goes to a remote island where she is the only human inhabitant.

Showing 77,951 through 77,975 of 127,475 results

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