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The Boy Who Ate Fear Street (Ghosts of Fear Street #11)

by R. L. Stine

He eats on and on... Sam used to be a picky eater. He hated trying new foods. Not anymore. Now he eats everything he sees... Everything. Could it be because of the spice Aunt Sylvie put in his macaroni and cheese? He has to find out -- soon. Or he'll guzzle up his house and friends on Fear Street.

The Boy Who Changed the World

by Andy Andrews

Did you know that what you do today can change the world forever?The Boy Who Changed the World opens with a young Norman Borlaug playing in his family's cornfields with his sisters. One day, Norman would grow up and use his knowledge of agriculture to save the lives of two billion people. Two billion! Norman changed the world! Or was it Henry Wallace who changed the world? Or maybe it was George Washington Carver?This engaging story reveals the incredible truth that everything we do matters! Based on The Butterfly Effect, Andy's timeless tale shows children that even the smallest of our actions can affect all of humanity. The book is beautifully illustrated and shares the stories of Nobel Laureate Norman Borlaug, Vice President Henry Wallace, Inventor George Washington Carver, and Farmer Moses Carver. Through the stories of each, a different butterfly will appear. The book will end with a flourish of butterflies and a charge to the child that they, too, can be the boy or girl who changes the world.

The Boy Who Could Change the World

by Lawrence Lessig Aaron Swartz

In his too-short life, Aaron Swartz reshaped the Internet, questioned our assumptions about intellectual property, and touched all of us in ways that we may not even realize. His tragic suicide in 2013 at the age of twenty-six after being aggressively prosecuted for copyright infringement shocked the nation and the world.Here for the first time in print is revealed the quintessential Aaron Swartz: besides being a technical genius and a passionate activist, he was also an insightful, compelling, and cutting essayist. With a technical understanding of the Internet and of intellectual property law surpassing that of many seasoned professionals, he wrote thoughtfully and humorously about intellectual property, copyright, and the architecture of the Internet. He wrote as well about unexpected topics such as pop culture, politics both electoral and idealistic, dieting, and lifehacking. Including three in-depth and previously unpublished essays about education, governance, and cities,The Boy Who Could Change the World contains the life's work of one of the most original minds of our time.

The Boy Who Could Find Anything

by Joan Lowery Nixon

David finds all sorts of missing items other people but cannot locate his own possessions.

The Boy Who Could Fly

by Robert Newman

Joey has always been a special kid, but his brother, Mark, is worried that the people in their new town won't understand his odd behavior Mark has always known that his brother, Joey, was special. The problem is, Joey has always been a little too special for most people to understand. When the brothers move to rural upstate New York to live with their aunt and uncle, Mark is worried that Joey will have a hard time fitting into their new town--especially since Joey has a habit of speaking his thoughts inside people's minds instead of out loud. Mark believes that Joey can do anything he sets his mind to--if he wanted to, he could probably even fly. But when a local politician dares Joey to prove his talents, Mark worries that by accepting the challenge, Joey is keeping himself from ever being able to live a regular life again. And in a town like Westfield, not being normal can be dangerous.

The Boy Who Could See Demons

by Carolyn Jess-Cooke

Bestselling author Carolyn Jess-Cooke has written a brilliant novel of suspense that delves into the recesses of the human mind and soul--perfect for fans of Gillian Flynn and Lisa Unger. The Boy Who Could See Demons follows a child psychologist who comes up against a career-defining case--one that threatens to unravel her own painful past and jeopardizes the life of a boy who can see the impossible. Dr. Anya Molokova, a child psychiatrist, is called in to work at MacNeice House, an adolescent mental health treatment center. There she is told to observe and assess Alex Connolly, a keenly intelligent, sensitive ten-year-old coping with his mother's latest suicide attempt. Alex is in need of serious counseling: He has been harming himself and others, often during blackouts. At the root of his destructive behavior, Alex claims, is his imaginary "friend" Ruen, a cunning demon who urges Alex to bend to his often violent will. But Anya has seen this kind of behavior before--with her own daughter, Poppy, who suffered from early-onset schizophrenia. Determined to help Alex out of his darkness, Anya begins to treat the child. But soon strange and alarming coincidences compel Anya to wonder: Is Alex's condition a cruel trick of the mind? Or is Ruen not so make-believe after all? The reality, it turns out, is more terrifying than anything she has ever encountered. A rich and deeply moving page-turner, The Boy Who Could See Demons sets out to challenge the imagination and capture the way life takes unexpected turns. In the best storytelling tradition, it leaves the reader changed.Advance praise for The Boy Who Could See Demons "A psychologically complex thriller, told with compassion in a marvelously suspenseful narrative that keeps you engaged from the first page to the last . . . This book has it all: a dark and dangerous setting, characters full of depth, rich emotions, and a clever plot. You'll fall in love with Alex--and his demons."--Chevy Stevens, author of Still Missing "Top-notch psychological suspense . . . Beware what you think you know. It might be only the demons talking."--Lisa Gardner, author of Touch & Go "Brilliant! Rich with fully formed characters, this heart-gripping novel will keep you riveted from first page to last."--Jeffery Deaver, author of XO "Utterly captivating, this is a book I adored and savored from the first to the very last magical page."--Tess Gerritsen, author of Ice Cold "An absolute chiller, deep, moving, and utterly gripping . . . I was riveted from the unsettling beginning to the mind-bender of an ending. This is a stellar read that will stay with me for a good long while."--Lisa Unger, author of Heartbroken "A rare and intriguing book, both emotionally and intellectually challenging . . . The cerebral challenge is the puzzle at the heart of the novel: Whose truth is real?"--Helen Grant, author of The Vanishing of Katharina Linden "A stunning story--a well-researched, authoritative delve into psychosis, guilt, and damage . . . thrilling, wholly plausible, and utterly satisfying."--Julia Crouch, author of Every Vow You BreakFrom the Hardcover edition.

The Boy Who Couldn’t Die

by William Sleator

When his best friend dies in a plane crash, sixteen-year-old Ken has a ritual performed that will make him invulnerable, but soon learns that he had good reason to be suspicious of the woman he paid to lock his soul away.

The Boy Who Died and Came Back

by Robert Moss

Travels in Many Worlds with a Master Storyteller Join Robert Moss for an unforgettable journey that will expand your sense of reality and confirm that there is life beyond death and in other dimensions of the multiverse. Moss describes how he lived a whole life in another world when he died at age nine in a Melbourne hospital and how he died and came back again, in another sense, in a crisis of spiritual emergence during midlife. As he shares his adventures in walking between the worlds, we begin to understand that all times -- past, future, and parallel -- may be accessible now. Moss presents nine keys for living consciously at the center of the multidimensional universe, embracing synchronicity, entertaining our creative spirits, and communicating with a higher Self.

The Boy Who Drank Too Much

by Shep Greene

A teenage hockey star tries to cope with his problems through drinking, but finally seeks help through his friends.

The Boy Who Drew Birds

by Jacqueline Davies

John James Audubon was a boy who loved the out-of-doors more than the in. He was a boy who believed in studying birds in nature, not just from books. And, in the fall of 1804, he was a boy determined to learn if the small birds nesting near his Pennsylvania home really would return the following spring. This book reveals how the youthful Audubon pioneered a technique essential to our understanding of birds. Capturing the early passion of America's greatest painter of birds, this story will leave young readers listening intently for the call of birds large and small near their own homes.

The Boy Who Drew Cats

by Margaret Hodges

A boy's obsession with drawing cats everywhere gets him trouble, until the felines reward their creator.

The Boy Who Drew Cats and Other Japanese Fairy Tales

by Lafcadio Hearn Francis A. Davis

A talking tea kettle, a monstrous goblin-spider that lives in a haunted temple, miniature soldiers that plague a lazy young bride, and other fanciful creatures abound in this captivating collection of eleven Japanese fairy tales.Youngsters are transported to an exotic, faraway world of samurai warriors, rice fields, humble cottages, and a magical spring in five tales excellently translated and adapted by noted writer and linguist Lafcadio Hearn: "The Fountain of Youth," "Chin-Chin Kobakama," "The Goblin-Spider," "The Old Woman Who Lost Her Dumplings," and the title story. Six additional stories -- in versions by Grace James, Basil Hall Chamberlain, and other authorities on Japanese folklore -- include "The Tea-Kettle," "The Wooden Bowl," "My Lord Bag-o'-Rice," "The Hare of Inaba," "The Silly Jelly-Fish," and "The Matsuyama Mirror."

The Boy Who Fell Out of the Sky: A True Story

by Ken Dornstein

Ken Dornstein always looked up to his older brother David. David was handsome, popular and successful with women. He was talented, and had dreams of writing the Great American Novel - dreams his little brother never doubted would come true. David died in the Lockerbie bombing of 1988, aged 25. This memoir begins as the story of Ken's investigation into David's death. But as his obsessive enquiries go on, it becomes the story of David's life, what he meant to Ken - and who he really was. As it moves towards its devastating finale, Ken's account becomes as page-turning as a thriller, and raises the question: how well do we know the people we love?

The Boy Who Followed Ripley

by Patricia Highsmith

"Ripley is an unmistakable descendant of Gatsby, that 'penniless young man without a past' who will stop at nothing."--Frank Rich Now part of American film and literary lore, Tom Ripley, "a bisexual psychopath and art forger who murders without remorse when his comforts are threatened" (New York Times Book Review), was Patricia Highsmith's favorite creation. In The Boy Who Followed Ripley (1980), Highsmith explores Ripley's bizarrely paternal relationship with a troubled young runaway, whose abduction draws them into Berlin's seamy underworld. More than any other American literary character, Ripley provides "a lens to peer into the sinister machinations of human behavior" (John Freeman, Pittsburgh Gazette).

The Boy Who Followed Ripley

by Patricia Highsmith

Now part of American film and literary lore, Tom Ripley, "a bisexual psychopath and art forger who murders without remorse when his comforts are threatened" ( New York Times Book Review ), was Patricia Highsmith's favorite creation. In The Boy Who Followed Ripley (1980), Highsmith explores Ripley's bizarrely paternal relationship with a troubled young runaway, whose abduction draws them into Berlin's seamy underworld. More than any other American literary character, Ripley provides "a lens to peer into the sinister machinations of human behavior" (John Freeman, Pittsburgh Gazette ).

The Boy Who Invented the Bubble Gun: An Odyssey of Innocence

by Paul Gallico

[from inside flaps] "The author of the great best seller THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE has written a new tale that is both suspenseful and beguiling. It involves international intrigue, a nationwide search for a runaway nine-year-old boy, and a psychopath who holds the lives of a busload of people in his grenade-filled hand. The boy, Julian West, is a headstrong but endearing prodigy who decides to travel from San Diego to Washington, D.C., in order to patent his invention--a seemingly innocuous toy gun that shoots beautiful, luminous soap bubbles. Armed with the makings of tuna fish sandwiches, two changes of underwear and socks, a clean shirt, and a toothbrush but no toothpaste, Julian embarks on an adventure that will have repercussions in the Kremlin and the Pentagon and that will make him the nation's most unlikely hero. En route, Julian encounters a high school couple masquerading as honeymooners, a murderer on the lam, a cynical but congenial Vietnam veteran, a bungling Russian spy, a frustrated American counterspy, a passel of police, and two elderly British gun-toting sisters. And throughout this fast-moving story is interwoven a wise and heartwarming theme on the inviolability of innocence."

The Boy Who Invented TV: The Story of Philo Farnsworth

by Kathleen Krull

An inspiring true story of a boy genius. Plowing a potato field in 1920, a 14-year-old farm boy from Idaho saw in the parallel rows of overturned earth a way to "make pictures fly through the air." This boy was not a magician; he was a scientific genius and just eight years later he made his brainstorm in the potato field a reality by transmitting the world's first television image. This fascinating picture-book biography of Philo Farnsworth covers his early interest in machines and electricity, leading up to how he put it all together in one of the greatest inventions of the 20th century. The author's afterword discusses the lawsuit Farnsworth waged and won against RCA when his high school science teacher testified that Philo's invention of television was years before RCA's.

The Boy Who Killed Caterpillars

by Joshua Kornreich

In a language all his own, a language driven by stutterance and repetition, Joshua Kornreich evokes and seduces the reader into a boyhood mythography where things are not always what they seem to be.

The Boy Who Killed Demons

by Dave Zeltserman

"My name's Henry Dudlow. I'm fifteen and a half. And I'm cursed. Or damned. Take your pick. The reason? I see demons." So begins the latest novel by horror master Dave Zeltserman. The setting is quiet Newton, Massachussetts, where nothing ever happens. Nothing, that is, until two months after Henry Dudlow's 13th birthday, when his neighbor, Mr. Hanley, suddenly starts to look . . . different. While everyone else sees a balding man with a beer belly, Henry suddenly sees a nasty, bilious, rage-filled demon. Once Henry catches onto the real Mr. Hanley, he starts to see demons all around him, and his boring, adolescent life is transformed. There's no more time for friends or sports or the lovely Sally Freeman--instead Henry must work his way through ancient texts and hunt down the demons before they steal any more innocent children. And if hunting demons is hard at any age, it's borderline impossible when your parents are on your case, and your grades are getting worse, and you can't tell anyone about your chosen mission. A very scary novel written with verve and flashes of great humor, The Boy Who Killed Demons is Dave Zeltserman's most accomplished and entertaining horror novel yet.

The Boy Who Killed Demons

by Dave Zeltserman

My name s Henry Dudlow. I m fifteen and a half. And I m cursed. Or damned. Take your pick. The reason? I see demons. So begins the latest novel by horror master Dave Zeltserman. The setting is quiet Newton, Massachussetts, where nothing ever happens. Nothing, that is, until two months after Henry Dudlow s 13th birthday, when his neighbor, Mr. Hanley, suddenly starts to look . . . different. While everyone else sees a balding man with a beer belly, Henry suddenly sees a nasty, bilious, rage-filled demon. Once Henry catches onto the real Mr. Hanley, he starts to see demons all around him, and his boring, adolescent life is transformed. There s no more time for friends or sports or the lovely Sally Freeman instead Henry must work his way through ancient texts and hunt down the demons before they steal any more innocent children. And if hunting demons is hard at any age, it s borderline impossible when your parents are on your case, and your grades are getting worse, and you can t tell anyone about your chosen mission. A very scary novel written with verve and flashes of great humor, The Boy Who Killed Demons is Dave Zeltserman s most accomplished and entertaining horror novel yet.

The Boy Who Lived With The Seals (with Image Descriptions)

by Rafe Martin

When their son disappeared, his parents thought they would never see him again. But years later, the boy was spotted swimming with the seals. Shannon's haunting pictures dramatize the bittersweet beauty of this traditional story from the Chinook people of the Northwest. Full-color illustrations.

The Boy Who Loved Anne Frank: A Novel

by Ellen Feldman

"An appealing and inventive novel...original and cathartic."--Dana Kennedy, New York Times On February 16, 1944, Anne Frank recorded in her diary that Peter, whom she at first disliked but eventually came to love, had confided in her that if he got out alive, he would reinvent himself entirely. This is the story of what might have happened if the boy in hiding survived to become a man. Peter arrives in America, the land of self-creation; he flourishes in business, marries, and raises a family. He thrives in the present, plans for the future, and has no past. But when The Diary of a Young Girl is published to worldwide acclaim and gives rise to bitter infighting, he realizes the cost of forgetting. Based on extensive research of Peter van Pels and the strange and disturbing life Anne Frank's diary took on after her death, this is a novel about the memory of death, the death of memory, and the inescapability of the past. Reading group guide included.

The Boy Who Loved Batman

by Michael E. Uslan

Is any superhero cooler than Batman? He s a crime-fighting vigilante with a tragic past, a lawless attitude, and a seemingly endless supply of high-tech gadgetry. In this fully illustrated memoir, author Michael Uslan recalls his journey from early childhood fandom through to the decades he spent on a caped crusade of his own: to bring Batman to the silver screen as the dark, serious character he was at heart. Uslan's story traces his path from the wilds of New Jersey to the limelight of Hollywood, following his work as Executive Producer on every Batman film from Tim Burton s 1989 re-envisioning to 2012's The Dark Knight Rises. Through it all, he helped to create one of the most successful pop culture franchises of all time.

The Boy Who Loved to Draw

by Barbara Brenner

When Benjamin West was seven years old, the only thing in the world he wanted to do was draw pictures. For a time, that got him into a peck of trouble. Papa wasn't pleased when Benjamin "borrowed" his best quill pen. Mama wasn't happy that Benjamin would rather sketch the cows than milk them. And Grimalkin, the family cat, was not keen on being the source for paintbrush hairs! Truth was, there was nothing Benjamin cared more about than art, and that led him to some surprising adventures. Here, in lively easy-to-read words and vivid pictures, is the engaging true story of Benjamin West, the farmboy from colonial Pennsylvania who grew up to become the first world-famous American artist and a friend to Benjamin Franklin and the king of England.

The Boy Who Loved Windows

by Patricia Stacey

This enthralling memoir is the day-by-day story of how one little boy was saved from a path leading to autistic isolation. It is also a first-hand account of the new model of research and treatment pioneered by Stanley Greenspan, M. D. that makes this recovery possible for others. Walker, whom pediatricians worried would never walk, talk, or perhaps even hear or see, was lucky enough to be born to a family who would not accept defeat. Pat Stacey reveals the darkest fears, struggles, exhaustion, tiny victories, and eventual joys her family faced as they gradually brought Walker into full contact with the world.

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