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Engineering the Revolution: Arms and Enlightenment in France, 1763-1815

by Ken Alder

Engineering the Revolution documents the forging of a new relationship between technology and politics in Revolutionary France, and the inauguration of a distinctively modern form of the "technological life. " Here, Ken Alder rewrites the history of the eighteenth century as the total history of one particular artifact--the gun--by offering a novel and historical account of how material artifacts emerge as the outcome of political struggle. By expanding the "political" to include conflict over material objects, this volume rethinks the nature of engineering rationality, the origins of mass production, the rise of meritocracy, and our interpretation of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution.

Engineers of Victory

by Paul Kennedy

Paul Kennedy, award-winning author of The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers and one of today's most renowned historians, now provides a new and unique look at how World War II was won. Engineers of Victory is a fascinating nuts-and-bolts account of the strategic factors that led to Allied victory. Kennedy reveals how the leaders' grand strategy was carried out by the ordinary soldiers, scientists, engineers, and businessmen responsible for realizing their commanders' visions of success.In January 1943, FDR and Churchill convened in Casablanca and established the Allied objectives for the war: to defeat the Nazi blitzkrieg; to control the Atlantic sea lanes and the air over western and central Europe; to take the fight to the European mainland; and to end Japan's imperialism. Astonishingly, a little over a year later, these ambitious goals had nearly all been accomplished. With riveting, tactical detail, Engineers of Victory reveals how.Kennedy recounts the inside stories of the invention of the cavity magnetron, a miniature radar "as small as a soup plate," and the Hedgehog, a multi-headed grenade launcher that allowed the Allies to overcome the threat to their convoys crossing the Atlantic; the critical decision by engineers to install a super-charged Rolls-Royce engine in the P-51 Mustang, creating a fighter plane more powerful than the Luftwaffe's; and the innovative use of pontoon bridges (made from rafts strung together) to help Russian troops cross rivers and elude the Nazi blitzkrieg. He takes readers behind the scenes, unveiling exactly how thousands of individual Allied planes and fighting ships were choreographed to collectively pull off the invasion of Normandy, and illuminating how crew chiefs perfected the high-flying and inaccessible B-29 Superfortress that would drop the atomic bombs on Japan.The story of World War II is often told as a grand narrative, as if it were fought by supermen or decided by fate. Here Kennedy uncovers the real heroes of the war, highlighting for the first time the creative strategies, tactics, and organizational decisions that made the lofty Allied objectives into a successful reality. In an even more significant way, Engineers of Victory has another claim to our attention, for it restores "the middle level of war" to its rightful place in history.Advance praise for Engineers of Victory "Paul Kennedy's history of World War II is a demonstration not only of incisive analysis and mastery of subject, but of profound integrity, and a historian's desire to celebrate not great leaders but the forgotten scientists, technicians, and logisticians who gave us the tactical edge, without which the strategic designs could never have been achieved."--Robert D. Kaplan, author of The Revenge of Geography "Kennedy's fine-grained analysis and suspicion of any one single cause--like cipher cracking, intelligence and deception operations, or specific weapons systems, like the Soviet T-34 tank--permit him to persuasively array his supporting facts. . . . An absorbing new approach to a well-worked field."--Kirkus Reviews (starred review) "A fresh and stimulating approach."--Publishers WeeklyFrom the Hardcover edition.

The Engine's Child

by Holly Phillips

From acclaimed author Holly Phillips comes a major work of visionary fantasy in the vein of Jeff Vandermeer and China Miéville. As richly detailed as it is evocative, the vivid prose of this ambitious novel illuminates a lushly imagined world poised on the brink of revolution. Lanterns and flickering bulbs light the shadowy world of the rasnan, the island at the edge of a world-spanning ocean that harbors, in its ivory towers and mossy temples, the descendants of men and women who long ago fled a world ruined by magical and technological excess. But not all the island's inhabitants are resigned to exile. A mysterious brotherhood seeks to pry open doors that lead back to their damaged, dangerous homeland. Others risk the even greater danger of flight, seeking new lands and new freedoms in the vast, uncharted sea. Amid a web of conspiracy and betrayal, three people threaten to shatter this fragile world. Scheming Lord Ghar, faithful to lost gods and forbidden lore, plays an intricate power game; Lady Vashmarna, an iron-willed ruler, conceals a guilty secret behind her noble façade; and Moth, a poor, irreverent novice, holds perhaps the darkest power of all: a mysterious link to a shadowy force that may prove to be humanity's final hope-or its ultimate doom. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Engines of Change: The American Industrial Revolution 1790-1860

by Brooke Hindle Steven Lubar

THE MATERIAL ASPECTS OF AMERICAN LIFE UNDERWENT GREAT CHANGE in the period from 1790 to 1860, a pattern of development often referred to as the American Industrial Revolution. At the center of this transformation was a series of technological developments that were directly associated with labor, management, and organizational change. This book's discussion begins with physical survivals of technologies of that era, most of them preserved in the Smithsonian Institution. The book, like the exhibition from which it is derived (also entitled Engines of Change), endeavors to look through these artifacts to gain an understanding of the Industrial Revolution that differs significantly from popular perceptions. Specific insights can be gained from three dimensional survivals and from two dimensional views that are neither available in written accounts nor communicable through words alone. The photographs, drawings, and maps included here are, consequently, more than mere illustrations, more than a pleasant way to underline the written text. Indeed, in some ways they constitute the book's primary message. At the same time, the most obvious message conveyed by artifacts and pictures is limited by its unavoidable specificity. It must always be placed in a larger and broader context. Occasionally, observers bring enough context with them to interpret the artifacts they see, but usually extended verbal explanation is required to make objects and pictures truly meaningful. That is the purpose of the text of this book- to provide the context, to look through the physical survivals to an enriched comprehension of the technology and related aspects of the American Industrial Revolution.

Engines of Change: A History of the American Dream in Fifteen Cars

by Paul Ingrassia

A narrative like no other: a cultural history that explores how cars have both propelled and reflected the American experience-- from the Model T to the Prius. From the assembly lines of Henry Ford to the open roads of Route 66, from the lore of Jack Kerouac to the sex appeal of the Hot Rod, America's history is a vehicular history--an idea brought brilliantly to life in this major work by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Paul Ingrassia. Ingrassia offers a wondrous epic in fifteen automobiles, including the Corvette, the Beetle, and the Chevy Corvair, as well as the personalities and tales behind them: Robert McNamara's unlikely role in Lee Iacocca's Mustang, John Z. DeLorean's Pontiac GTO , Henry Ford's Model T, as well as Honda's Accord, the BMW 3 Series, and the Jeep, among others. Through these cars and these characters, Ingrassia shows how the car has expressed the particularly American tension between the lure of freedom and the obligations of utility. He also takes us through the rise of American manufacturing, the suburbanization of the country, the birth of the hippie and the yuppie, the emancipation of women, and many more fateful episodes and eras, including the car's unintended consequences: trial lawyers, energy crises, and urban sprawl. Narrative history of the highest caliber, Engines of Change is an entirely edifying new way to look at the American story.

The Engines of God

by Jack Mcdevitt

The first Priscilla Hutchins novel! Humans call them the Monument-Makers. An unknown race, they left stunning alien statues on distant planets in the galaxy. Each relic is different. Each inscription defies translation. Yet all are heartbreakingly beautiful. And for planet Earth, on the brink of disaster, they may hold the only key to survival for the entire human race.

The Engines of God (Academy Series, Book 1)

by Jack Mcdevitt

Jack McDevitt's Academy series features Priscilla Hutchins, a starship captain, and Gregory Macallister, a cynical journalist, who are both involved with a space development agency whose funds are being cut as Earth's government struggles with the effects of long neglected environmental problems. The Academy's starships find that planets within reach are almost devoid of intelligent life. However, scientists discover a series of extinct civilizations in a pattern that suggests that a menace from the heart of the galaxy periodically sweeps through Earth's star region with deadly effects. The series consists, thus far, of six novels, several of which have been Nebula finalists. They are, in order, as follows: The Engines of God, Deepsix, Chindi, Omega, Odyssey, and Cauldron. From the book jacket: With his debut, The Hercules Text, Jack McDevitt#11;was declared "staggeringly good... an extremely welcome newcomer" by Starlog. Then#11;came A Talent for War, called by Michael Bishop#11;"the best science fiction war novel I have read #11;since Joe Haldeman's The Forever War" Now, in#11;The Engines of God, McDevitt brings us his#11;trademark combination of deep human insight #11;and solid scientific knowledge, fulfilling all the#11;promise of his earlier writing-and moving to the#11;next level Two hundred years ago, humans made a stunning discovery in the far reaches of the solar #11;System: a huge statue of an alien creature, with#11;an inscription that defied all efforts at translation.#11;Now as faster-than-light drive opens the stars to #11;exploration, humans are finding other relics of#11;the race they call the Monument-Makers-each#11;different and each heartbreakingly beautiful. But#11;except for a set of footprints on Jupiter's moon #11;Iapetus, there is no trace of the enigmatic race#11;that has left them behind. Then a team of scientists working on a dead #11;world discover an ominous new image of the #11;Monument-Makers. Somehow it all fits with other#11;lost civilizations, and possibly with Earth's own#11;future. And distant past. But Earth itself is on the#11;brink of ecological disaster-there is no time to#11;search for answers. Even to a question that may#11;hold the key to survival for the entire human #11;race... With The Engines of God, Jack McDevitt has launched himself into the top ranks of the hottest and most relevant authors of science fiction.

Engines of War

by Christian Wolmar

Before the nineteenth century, armies had to rely on slow and unreliable methods of transportation to move soldiers and equipment during times of conflict. But with the birth of the railroad in the early 1830s, the way wars were fought would change forever. In Engines of War, renowned expert Christian Wolmar tells the story of that transformation, examining all the engagements in which railways played a part from the Crimean War and American Civil War through both world wars, the Korean War, and the Cold War with its mysterious missile trains. He shows that the 'iron road' not only made armies far more mobile, but also greatly increased the scale and power of available weaponry. Wars began to be fought across wider fronts and over longer timescales, with far deadlier consequences. From armored engines with their swiveling guns to track sabotage by way of dynamite, railway lines constructed across frozen Siberian lakes and a Boer war ambush involving Winston Churchill, Engines of War shows how the railways - a fantastic generator of wealth in peacetime - became a weapon of war exploited to the full by governments across the world.

England

by Tamara L. Britton

An introduction to the history, geography, plants and animals, government, people, and culture of England.

England and Its Rulers: 1066-1270: Foreign Lordship and National Identity

by M. T. Clanchy

From William the Conqueror to 1270.

England in Literature

by Scott Foresman

England in Literature has eight chronological units presenting a survey of major British writers from the beginning until the present time.

England: The Land

by Erinn Banting

England's landscape is rich in beauty and dotted with history. From the breathtaking Lake District to the southern downs, take a journey across England. [This text is listed as an example that meets Common Core Standards in English language arts in grades 4-5 at http://www.corestandards.org.]

England to Me

by Emily Hahn

Author of such celebrated and acclaimed works as THE SOONG SISTERS, CHINA TO ME, and FRACTURED EMERALD: IRELAND, Emily Hahn has been called by the New Yorker as "a forgotten American literary treasure." Now, E-Reads continues to reintroduce Hahn to a new generation of readers, bringing to light her richly textured voice and unique perspective on a world that continues to exist both through history and fiction."It was August 2nd, 1946, when we arrived. The war was not so long over that we had shed every reminder of it, even in New York, and the Queen Mary was still fitted up as a troopship." From this opening, Emily Hahn's ENGLAND TO ME takes readers into a world filled with uncertainty, as she tries to settle in the English countryside after her harrowing years in the Far East. From Southampton to London, here is a portrait of a country in flux, and of a woman of strong insight determined to find her place in it.

England's Lane

by Joseph Connolly

Jim and Milly. Stan and Jane. Jonathan and Fiona. Winter, 1959.Three married couples: each living in England's Lane, each with an only child, and each attending to family, and their livelihoods--the ironmonger, the sweetshop and the butcher.Each of them hiding their lies, disguising sin, and coping in the only way they know how.

England's Mistress

by Kate Williams

She was the most famous woman in England-the beautiful model for society painters Joshua Reynolds and George Romney, an icon of fashion, the wife of an ambassador, and the mistress of naval hero Horatio Nelson. But Emma Hamilton had been born to the poverty of a coal-mining town and spent her teenage years working as a prostitute. From the brothels of London to the glittering court of Naples and the pretentious country estate of the most powerful admiral in England, British debut historian Kate Williams captures the life of Emma Hamilton with all its glamour and heartbreak. In lucid, engaging prose, Williams brings to life a complex and intelligent woman. Emma is sensuous, generous, artistic, at once shamelessly seductive and recklessly ambitious. Willing to do anything for love and fame, she sets out to make herself a star-and she succeeds beyond even her wildest dreams. By the age of twenty-six, she leaves behind the precarious life of a courtesan to become Lady Hamilton, wife of Sir William Hamilton-the aging, besotted, and probably impotent British ambassador to the court of Naples.But everything changes when Lord Nelson steams into Naples harbor fresh from his triumph at the Battle of the Nile and literally falls into Emma's adoring arms. Their all-consuming romance-conducted amid the bloody tumult of the Napoleonic Wars-makes Emma an international celebrity, especially when she returns to England pregnant with Nelson's baby.With a novelist's flair and an historian's eye for detail, Williams conjures up the world that Emma Hamilton conquered by the sheer force of her charisma. All but inventing the art of publicity, Emma turned herself into a kind of flesh-and-blood goddess-celebrated by wits and artists, adored by thousands, and, for a time, very rich. Yet Emma was willing to throw it all away for the man she adored. After four years of archival research and making use of hundreds of previously undiscovered letters and documents, Kate Williams sets the record straight on one of the most fascinating and ravishing women in history. England's Mistress captures the relentless drive, the innovative style, and the burning passion of a true heroine.From the Hardcover edition.

England's Mistress

by Kate Williams

She was the most famous woman in England-the beautiful model for society painters Joshua Reynolds and George Romney, an icon of fashion, the wife of an ambassador, and the mistress of naval hero Horatio Nelson. But Emma Hamilton had been born to the poverty of a coal-mining town and spent her teenage years working as a prostitute. From the brothels of London to the glittering court of Naples and the pretentious country estate of the most powerful admiral in England, British debut historian Kate Williams captures the life of Emma Hamilton with all its glamour and heartbreak. In lucid, engaging prose, Williams brings to life a complex and intelligent woman. Emma is sensuous, generous, artistic, at once shamelessly seductive and recklessly ambitious. Willing to do anything for love and fame, she sets out to make herself a star-and she succeeds beyond even her wildest dreams. By the age of twenty-six, she leaves behind the precarious life of a courtesan to become Lady Hamilton, wife of Sir William Hamilton-the aging, besotted, and probably impotent British ambassador to the court of Naples.But everything changes when Lord Nelson steams into Naples harbor fresh from his triumph at the Battle of the Nile and literally falls into Emma's adoring arms. Their all-consuming romance-conducted amid the bloody tumult of the Napoleonic Wars-makes Emma an international celebrity, especially when she returns to England pregnant with Nelson's baby.With a novelist's flair and an historian's eye for detail, Williams conjures up the world that Emma Hamilton conquered by the sheer force of her charisma. All but inventing the art of publicity, Emma turned herself into a kind of flesh-and-blood goddess-celebrated by wits and artists, adored by thousands, and, for a time, very rich. Yet Emma was willing to throw it all away for the man she adored. After four years of archival research and making use of hundreds of previously undiscovered letters and documents, Kate Williams sets the record straight on one of the most fascinating and ravishing women in history. England's Mistress captures the relentless drive, the innovative style, and the burning passion of a true heroine.From the Hardcover edition.

Engleby

by Sebastian Faulks

Sebastian Faulks's new novel is a bolt from the blue: contemporary, demotic, angry, heart-wrenching, and funny, in the deepest shade of black. Mike Engleby says things that others dare not even think. A man devoid of scruple or self-pity, he rises without trace in Thatcher's England and scorches through the blandscape of New Labour. In the course of his brief, incandescent career, he and the reader encounter many famous people -- actors, writers, politicians, household names -- but by far the most memorable is Engleby himself. Sebastian Faulks's new novel can be read as a lament for a generation and the country it failed. It is also a meditation on the limits of science, the curse of human consciousness and on the lyrics of 1970s' rock music. And beneath this highly disturbing surface lies an unfolding mystery of gripping narrative power. For when one of Mike's contemporaries unaccountably disappears, the reader has to ask: is even the shameless Engleby capable of telling the whole truth?

English

by Joan Swann Dick Leith David Graddol

A history of the English language.

English

by Wang Gang Martin Merz Jane Weizhen Pan

"I loved this book and can't stop talking about it. . . Transcendent." -Carolyn See, The Washington Post In the tradition of Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress, Wang Gang's English is a captivating coming-of- age novel about the power of language to launch a journey of self- discovery. When a new teacher comes to school-a tall, elegantly dressed man from Shanghai carrying an English dictionary under his arm-twelve- year-old Love Liu turns away from Chairman Mao's little red book and toward the teacher's big blue book for answers to his most pressing questions about love and life. But as a whole new world begins to open up for him, Love Liu must face a test more challenging than any he'll take in the classroom.

English 2200 with Writing Applications: A Programmed Course in Grammar and Usage (Fourth College Edition)

by Joseph C. Blumenthal

ENGLISH 2200, ENGLISH 2600, and ENGLISH 3200 are the original programmed courses in grammar, usage, sentence-building, capitalization, and punctuation.

English 5 Student Worktext

by Emily Gray Eileen M. Berry Sarah Clayton Nancy Jean Holmes

This textbook was written by members of the faculty and staff of Bob Jones University. Standing for the "old-time religion" and the absolute authority of the Bible since 1927, Bob Jones University is the world's leading fundamental Christian university.

The English American

by Alison Larkin

When Pippa Dunn,adopted as an infant and raised terribly British, discovers that her birth parents are from the American South, she finds that "culture clash" has layers of meaning she'd never imagined. Meet The English American, a fabulously funny, deeply poignant debut novel that sprang from Larkin's autobiographical one-woman show of the same name. In many ways, Pippa Dunn is very English: she eats Marmite on toast, knows how to make a proper cup of tea, has attended a posh English boarding school, and finds it entirely familiar to discuss the crossword rather than exchange any cross words over dinner with her proper English family. Yet Pippa -- creative, disheveled, and impulsive to the core -- has always felt different from her perfectly poised, smartly coiffed sister and steady, practical parents, whose pastimes include Scottish dancing, gardening, and watching cricket. When Pippa learns at age twenty-eight that her birth parents are from the American South, she feels that lifelong questions have been answered. She meets her birth mother, an untidy, artistic, free-spirited redhead, and her birth father, a charismatic (and politically involved) businessman in Washington, D.C.; and she moves to America to be near them. At the same time, she relies on the guidance of a young man with whom she feels a mysterious connection; a man who discovered his own estranged father and who, like her birth parents, seems to understand her in a way that no one in her life has done before. Pippa feels she has found her "self" and everything she thought she wanted. But has she? Caught between two opposing cultures, two sets of parents, and two completely different men, Pippa is plunged into hilarious, heart-wrenching chaos. The birth father she adores turns out to be involved in neoconservative activities she hates; the mesmerizing mother who once abandoned her now refuses to let her go. And the man of her fantasies may be just that... With an authentic adopted heroine at its center, Larkin's compulsively readable first novel unearths universal truths about love, identity, and family with wit, warmth, and heart.

English and Western Literature

by George Kearns

This book is divided into two parts; Part One: English Literature and Part Two: Western Literature. Part One presents a chronological survey of English literature from its Anglo-Saxon beginnings in 449 to the present day.

English as a Global Language: Second Edition

by David Crystal

English as a Global Language: Second Edition

Showing 87,076 through 87,100 of 190,594 results

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