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Citizenship, Grades K-3

by the editors at Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

NIMAC-sourced textbook

Citizenship in Action and Leadership: Theory and Application

by United State Army Junior ROTC

The book introduces lessons to the learners about the US Army Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (JROTC) Program, its mission, and the Leadership Education and Training (LET) curriculum for the first level of their instructions.

Citizenship in the Western Tradition

by Peter Riesenberg

Intended for both general readers and students, Peter Riesenberg's instructive book surveys Western ideas of citizenship from Greek antiquity to the French Revolution. It is striking to observe the persistence of important civic ideals and institutions over a period of 2,500 years and to learn how those ideals and institutions traveled over space and time, from the ancient Mediterranean to early modern France, England, and America.

Citizenship in the World: Merit Badge Series

by Boys Scouts of America

A guide for completing the Citizenship in the World merit badge for Boy Scouts.

Citizenship in the World (Merit Badge Series)

by Boy Scouts of America

This merit badge booklet introduces scouts to their place as citizens of the world as a whole.

Citizenship: A Very Short Introduction

by Richard Bellamy

Interest in citizenship has never been higher. Politicians of all stripes stress its importance, as do church leaders, captains of industry and every kind of campaigning group--from those supporting global causes, such as tackling world poverty, to others with a largely local focus, such as combating neighborhood crime. In this brilliant, compact introduction, Richard Bellamy offers an eye-opening look at an idea that is as important as it is rare--the prospect of influencing government policy according to reasonably fair rules and on a more or less equal basis with others. Bringing together the most recent scholarship, the book sheds light on how ideas of citizenship have changed through time from ancient Greece to the present, looks at concepts such as membership and belonging, and highlights the relation between citizenship, rights, and democracy. Bellamy also examines the challenges confronting the very possibility of citizenship today, the impact of globalization, the desirability of "global citizenship," the teaching of citizenship in schools, citizenship tests for immigrants, and the many different definitions and types of citizenship in modern society.

Citizenville

by Gavin Newsom

"Citizenville offers both an impassioned plea for more tech-enabled government and a tour d'horizon of the ways some governments have begun using technology to good effect... a fast-paced and engaging read" --San Francisco Chronicle A rallying cry for revolutionizing democracy in the digital age, Citizenville reveals how ordinary Americans can reshape their government for the better. Gavin Newsom, the lieutenant governor of California, argues that today's government is stuck in the last century while-in both the private sector and our personal lives-absolutely everything else has changed. The explosion of social media, the evolution of Internet commerce, the ubiquity of smart phones that can access all the world's information; in the face of these extraordinary advances, our government appears increasingly irrelevant and out of touch. Drawing on wide-ranging interviews with thinkers and politicians, Newsom's Citizenville shows how Americans can transform their government, taking matters into their own hands to dissolve political gridlock even as they produce tangible changes in the real world. When local Web designers wanted to prevent muggings in Chicago and Oakland, they created innovative crime-mapping tools using public police data. When congressional representatives wanted citizens' input on new legislation, they used interactive blogging tools to invite public comments and changes. When a town in Texas needed to drum up civic engagement, officials invented a local digital "currency" to reward citizens for participating in government-making small-town politics suddenly as fun and addictive as online games such as Farmville. Surveying the countless small advances made by ordinary Americans in reinventing government for the twenty-first century, Newsom unveils a path for American prosperity and democratic vitality. Newsom explains how twenty-first-century problems are too big and too expensive for the government simply to buy solutions; instead, Americans must innovate their way out. Just as the post office and the highway system provide public infrastructure to channel both personal and private enterprise-a platform upon which citizens can grow-so too could a modern digital government house the needs, concerns, information, and collaboration of an enlightened digital citizenry. A vision for better government that truly achieves the ancient goal of commonwealth and a triumphant call for individuals to reinvigorate the country with their own two hands, Citizenville is a timely road map for restoring American prosperity and for reinventing citizenship in today's networked age. .

Citrix XenDesktop® Cookbook - Third Edition

by Gaspare A. Silvestri

Over 40 engaging recipes that will help you implement a full-featured XenDesktop® 7.6 architecture and its main satellite components About This Book * Implement, configure, and optimize the migration from a physical to a VDI architecture using XenDesktop 7.6 * Publish desktops and applications to the end user devices, optimizing their performance and increasing the security for the delivered resources * A pragmatic guide that helps you to explore the XenDesktop 7.6 architecture and its related components to implement a service-oriented architecture based on the Citrix FlexCast approach Who This Book Is For If you are a system administrator or an experienced IT professional who wants to refer to a centralized container of procedures and advanced tasks in XenDesktop, this is the book for you. Experience of the virtualized environment and an understanding of the general concepts of desktop virtualization (VDI) are required. What You Will Learn * Upgrade from XenDesktop 5.6 / 7.x to XenDesktop 7.6 * Configure and deploy virtual machines for XenDesktop 7.6 * Perform configuration and optimization operations for desktop and server OS images for future deployments * Plan and configure XenDesktop user experience * Execute desktop environment administration tasks, including catalog creation, power management, and resource allocation * Understand how to publish the hosted applications, Local Access Apps (LAA), and applications using Microsoft App-V * Work with XenDesktop PowerShell to reduce the time required to perform the management tasks by the creation of the PowerShell scripts * Implement the two-factor hardware and software authentication for XenDesktop * Install and configure Citrix Netscaler Gateway 10.5 and Citrix XenMobile 10 to improve the quality, the performance, and the manageability of your Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) architecture In Detail In the era of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) and consecration of the mobile devices, Citrix has strengthened its position in this market, powering its desktop and application virtualization platforms, integrating the ability to publish virtual and physical desktops with the capability to assign applications and contents in a secure manner on any device, anywhere, more than previous versions. The XenDesktop 7.6 version is a more integrated platform, which permits the use and interaction with mobility and cloud platforms leaders in the market. This book will help you understand how to implement, configure, and optimize migration from a physical to a VDI architecture, moving from a standard application approach to a centralized and more secure way to assign and release resources to the end users. The book begins with the upgrade and installation procedures for the core infrastructural components, along with an explanation of how to deploy and optimize procedures for desktop virtual machines. Moving on, you will perform desktop and applications deployment through the XenDesktop core plus integrated publishing platforms, such as Microsoft App-V. Finally, the book explains how to install and configure important collateral platforms such as the Citrix Netscaler, Citrix CloudBridge and Citrix XenMobile platforms, along with execution of the most advanced activities and configurations. Style and approach This book is a step-by-step course that includes standard and high-level tasks oriented to deploy a full-functioning Citrix environment. This practical approach is based on both GUI and command-line operations, which gives IT professionals an alternative on the way to operate, where possible.

Citrus County

by John Brandon

There shouldn't be a Citrus County. Teenage romance should be difficult, but not this difficult. Boys like Toby should cause trouble but not this much. The moon should glow gently over children safe in their beds. Uncles in their rockers should be kind. Teachers should guide and inspire. Manatees should laze and palm trees sway and snakes keep to their shady spots under the azalea thickets. The air shouldn't smell like a swamp. The stars should twinkle. Shelby should be her own hero, the first hero of Citrus County. She should rescue her sister from underground, rescue Toby from his life. Her destiny should be a hero's destiny.

Citrus County

by John Brandon

There shouldn't be a Citrus County. Teenage romance should be difficult, but not this difficult. Boys like Toby should cause trouble but not this much. The moon should glow gently over children safe in their beds. Uncles in their rockers should be kind. Teachers should guide and inspire. Manatees should laze and palm trees sway and snakes keep to their shady spots under the azalea thickets. The air shouldn't smell like a swamp. The stars should twinkle. Shelby should be her own hero, the first hero of Citrus County. She should rescue her sister from underground, rescue Toby from his life. Her destiny should be a hero's destiny.

Citrus Mites: Identification, Bionomy and Control

by Vincenzo Vacante

Citrus pests are a serious issue for crop growers, causing problems in yield and economic losses. Citrus Mites is a comprehensive study of mites harmful to citrus plants from all citrus growing regions around the world. Providing a useful resource for identifying citrus crop pests, the text will also address methods of removal from plants, describe symptoms of damage caused by pests and discuss methods of eradication and control, making it essential for horticulturalists, pomologists and acarologists as well as practitioners, researchers and students of crop protection and pest management.

City

by Clifford D. Simak David W. Wixon

Intelligent canines in a far-future city preserve the legends and lore of their absent human masters Thousands of years have passed since humankind abandoned the city--first for the countryside, then for the stars, and ultimately for oblivion--leaving their most loyal animal companions alone on Earth. Granted the power of speech centuries earlier by the revered Bruce Webster, the intelligent, pacifist dogs are the last keepers of human history, raising their pups with bedtime stories, passed down through generations, of the lost "websters" who gave them so much but will never return. With the aid of Jenkins, an ageless service robot, the dogs live in a world of harmony and peace. But they now face serious threats from their own and other dimensions, perhaps the most dangerous of all being the reawakened remnants of a warlike race called "Man." In the Golden Age of Asimov and Heinlein, Clifford D. Simak's writing blazed as brightly as anyone's in the science fiction firmament. Winner of the International Fantasy Award, City is a magnificent literary metropolis filled with an astonishing array of interlinked stories and structures--at once dystopian, transcendent, compassionate, and visionary.

City

by Alessandro Baricco Ann Goldstein

The author of the international bestseller Silk now delivers a ravishing and wildly inventive novel about friendship, genius and its discontents, and the redemptive power of narrative. Somewhere in America lives a brilliant boy named Gould, an intellectual guided missile aimed at the Nobel Prize. His only companions are an imaginary giant and an imaginary mute. Improbably-and yet with impeccable logic--he falls into the care of Shatzy Shell, a young woman whose life up till that point has been equally devoid of human connection . Theirs is a relationship of stories and of stories within stories: of Gould's evolving saga of an underdog boxer and the violent Western that Shatzy has been dictating into a tape recorder since the age of six. Out of these stories, Alessandro Baricco creates a masterpiece of metaphysical pulp fiction that recalls both Scheherazade and Italo Calvino. By turns exhilarating and deeply moving, City is irresistible.

City

by Clifford D. Simak

The years had moved too fast. Years that had brought the family plane and helicopter, leaving the auto to rust in some forgotten place, the unused roads to fall into disrepair. Years that had virtually wiped out the tilling of the soil with the rise of hydroponics. Years that had brought cheap land with the disappearance of the farm as an economic unit, had sent city people scurrying out into the country where each man, for less than the price of a city lot, might own broad acres. Years that had revolutionized the construction of homes to a point where families simply walked away from their old homes to the new ones that could be bought, custom-made, for less than half the price of a prewar structure and could be changed, at small cost, to accommodate need of additional space or just a passing whim .... *** Earth was very different without its cities. There were no more wars, because the population centers which had formerly been prime targets no longer existed. Among the people who left the cities and their descendants, some took to the stars and met beings from other worlds; some took to the woods, and let their primitive lifestyle carry them further and further from the basic design of society. And some simply remained on the land their families originally bought, growing ever more deeply ensconced in those pockets of tradition. *** It was Bruce Webster, from the pocket known as Webster House, who first changed the dogs. Recognizing that the differences between humans and canines might be an advantage--dogs, with their own brand of intelligence, would be able to comprehend things people could not--he reasoned that two thinking races would have to be better than one. So he surgically altered a few dogs' throats and tongues, enabling them to mimic the words he taught them. Special contact lenses were invented, changing canine eyesight enough to allow them to learn to read. As time went on, the traits Bruce initiated were passed on to each successive generation of dogs. And as the Dogs developed and advanced--aided by robots that humans had built ages ago--Man ceased to be the dominant species on Earth and became a creature of legend. A legend the Dogs still tell on winter nights, when the wind is from the north and the fires burn high ....

City

by Paco Underhill William H. Whyte

Named by Newsweek magazine to its list of "Fifty Books for Our Time."For sixteen years William Whyte walked the streets of New York and other major cities. With a group of young observers, camera and notebook in hand, he conducted pioneering studies of street life, pedestrian behavior, and city dynamics. City: Rediscovering the Center is the result of that research, a humane, often amusing view of what is staggeringly obvious about the urban environment but seemingly invisible to those responsible for planning it.Whyte uses time-lapse photography to chart the anatomy of metropolitan congestion. Why is traffic so badly distributed on city streets? Why do New Yorkers walk so fast--and jaywalk so incorrigibly? Why aren't there more collisions on the busiest walkways? Why do people who stop to talk gravitate to the center of the pedestrian traffic stream? Why do places designed primarily for security actually worsen it? Why are public restrooms disappearing? "The city is full of vexations," Whyte avers: "Steps too steep; doors too tough to open; ledges you cannot sit on. . . . It is difficult to design an urban space so maladroitly that people will not use it, but there are many such spaces." Yet Whyte finds encouragement in the widespread rediscovery of the city center. The future is not in the suburbs, he believes, but in that center. Like a Greek agora, the city must reassert its most ancient function as a place where people come together face-to-face.

The City

by Stella Gemmell

In her debut solo novel, Stella Gemmell, coauthor of the "powerful" (Booklist) conclusion to David Gemmell's Troy series, weaves a dark epic fantasy about a war-torn civilization and the immortal emperor who has it clutched in his evil grasp. The City is ancient, layers upon layers. Once a thriving metropolis, it has sprawled beyond its bounds, inciting endless wars with neighboring tribes and creating a barren wasteland of what was once green and productive. In the center of the City lives the emperor. Few have ever seen him, but those who have recall a man in his prime, though he should be very old. Some grimly speculate that he is no longer human, if he ever was. A small number have come to the desperate conclusion that the only way to stop the war is to end the emperor's unnaturally long life. From the mazelike sewers below the City, where the poor struggle to stay alive in the dark, to the blood-soaked fields of battle, where few heroes manage to endure the never-ending siege, the rebels pin their hopes on one man--Shuskara. The emperor's former general, he was betrayed long ago and is believed to be dead. But, under different aliases, he has survived, forsaking his City and hiding from his immortal foe. Now the time has come for him to engage in one final battle to free the City from the creature who dwells at its heart, pulling the strings that keep the land drenched in gore.

City and Environment

by Christopher Boone Modarres Ali

For the first time in history, more than half the people of the world live in cities. Comprehending the impact of this widespread urbanization requires an awareness of the complex relationships between cities and natural ecosystems. This innovative book moves beyond the anti-urban lamentations that often dominate today's academic discourse to examine the evolution of cities and to illuminate the roles that humans play in shaping their environments, both natural and constructed. Christopher G. Boone and Ali Modarres argue that understanding the multiple forces of urbanization requires a holistic approach to the interactions of social, cultural, economic, political, and environmental factors. Without casting judgments, City and Environment seeks to engage readers in an exploration of cities from a truly global perspective. Throughout, it illuminates the social-ecological systems of cities not as an academic exercise-although informing academic audiences is one of its goals-but ultimately to help transform cities into livable and ecologically sustainable environments.

The City and Man

by Leo Strauss

The provocative essays constitute a brilliant attempt to use classical political philosophy as a means of liberating modern political philosophy from the stranglehold of ideology.

The City and the Pillar

by Gore Vidal

A literary cause célèbre when first published more than fifty years ago, Gore Vidal's now-classic The City and the Pillar stands as a landmark novel of the gay experience. Jim, a handsome, all-American athlete, has always been shy around girls. But when he and his best friend, Bob, partake in awful kid stuff, the experience forms Jim's ideal of spiritual completion. Defying his parents' expectations, Jim strikes out on his own, hoping to find Bob and rekindle their amorous friendship. Along the way he struggles with what he feels is his unique bond with Bob and with his persistent attraction to other men. Upon finally encountering Bob years later, the force of his hopes for a life together leads to a devastating climax. The first novel of its kind to appear on the American literary landscape, The City and the Pillar remains a forthright and uncompromising portrayal of sexual relationships between men.

The City and the Stars

by Arthur C. Clarke

Clarke is widely revered as one of the most influential science fiction writers of the 20th century, esteemed alongside Isaac Asimov and Robert Heinlein, a trio known informally as the "Big Three." Before his death in 2008, he authored more than 100 novels, novellas, and short story collections and laid the groundwork for science fiction as we know it today. Combining scientific knowledge and visionary literary aptitude, Clarke's work explored the implications of major scientific discoveries in astonishingly inventive and mystical settings. Clarke's short stories and novels have won numerous Hugo and Nebula Awards, have been translated into more than 30 languages, and have sold millions of copies worldwide. Several of his books, including 2001: A Space Odyssey and 2010: Odyssey II, have been adapted into films that still stand as classic examples of the genre. Without a doubt, Arthur C. Clarke is one of the most important voices in contemporary science fiction literature.

The City and the Stars / The Sands of Mars

by Arthur C. Clarke

"The City and the Stars" was the earliest Clarke novel to mix science and mystical transcendence, a theme that he carried through in many later novels. Alvin, a young man born in the enclosed utopian city of Diaspar, in Earth's far future, becomes impatient with the technology-mediated claustrophobia of his "perfect" life and determines to find out what is beyond his city.<P>"The Sands of Mars" was Arthur C. Clarke's first full-length novel. It was one of the first SF novels about Mars to abandon the romantic fantasies of Edgar Rice Burroughs, C. S. Lewis, and Ray Bradbury. When it was written, it was already a certainty that the planet's atmosphere was too thin to support higher animals of the terrestrial type. There could be no Martian princesses, alas. In "The Sands of Mars," celebrated writer Martin Gibson is on his first trip to Mars. Things go smoothly enough until he actually sets foot on the red planet -- at which point he stumbles upon Mars's most carefully hidden secrets... <P>"Arthur Clarke is probably the most critically admired of all currently active writers of science fiction... awesomely informed about physics and astr

City at the End of Time

by Greg Bear

Do you dream of a city at the end of time? In a time like the present, on a world that may or may not be our own, three young people-Ginny, Jack, and Daniel-dream of a fabulous, decadent city in the distant future: the Kalpa. The dreams of Ginny and Jack overtake them without warning, leaving their bodies behind while carrying their consciousnesses forward, into the minds of two inhabitants of the Kalpa-a would-be warrior, Jebrassy, and an inquisitive explorer, Tiadba-who have been genetically retroengineered to possess qualities of ancient humanity. In turn, the dreams of Tiadba and Jebrassy carry them back, into the minds of Jack and Ginny. As for Daniel: he dreams of an empty darkness--all his future holds. But more than dreams link Ginny, Jack, and Daniel. They are fate-shifters, born with the ability to skip like stones across the surface of the fifth dimension, inhabiting alternate versions of themselves. And they are each guardians of an object whose origins and purpose are unknown, a gnarled, stony artifact called a sum-runner that persists unchanged through all versions of time. They can save the future, but they are being hunted down.

The City at Three PM

by Peter Lasalle

In "The City at Three PM," award-winning fiction writer Peter LaSalle offers 11 startlingly original personal essays dealing with his longtime quest for world travel. These literary errands range from driving recklessly across the county to seek out Saul Bellow in Chicago to settling in for long evenings at a pub in Dublin with Christy Brown, the celebrated Irish author afflicted with cerebral palsy who typed with his toes. In Buenos Aires LaSalle senses metaphysical transport while investigating Borges' work; in Cameroon he attends the wonderful opening of a small bookstore; in Hollywood he finds himself caught in a crazy mob scene while researching the work of 1930s master American novelist and screenwriter Nathanael West; in Tunisia he follows in the footsteps of Flaubert at the ruins of ancient Carthage. And those are just some of the adventures. Having first appeared in distinguished publications here and abroad, including "The Best American Travel Writing," these are beautifully crafted pieces, heartfelt, honest, observant, and often moving toward genuine transcendence. Overall they conjure up those fine moments when travel intersects with the important role of literature in our lives, in this case yielding writing entirely unique and satisfying.

The City Bears Adventures (D. J. Dillon Adventure #2)

by Lee Roddy

In the Sierra Nevada Mountains, a thirteen-year-old Christian boy and his new friend discover that keeping a bear cub as a pet creates problems as the cub matures.

City Beasts

by Mark Kurlansky

All-new stories about the urban worlds where animals and humans fight, love, and find common ground, from the nationally bestselling author of Cod and Salt. In these stories, Mark Kurlansky journeys to his familiar haunts like New York's Central Park or Miami's Little Havana but with an original, earthy, and adventurous perspective. From baseball players in the Dominican Republic to Basque separatists in Spain to a restaurant owner in Cuba, from urban coyotes to a murder of crows, Kurlansky travels the worlds of animals and their human counterparts, revealing moving and hilarious truths about our connected existence. In the end, he illuminates how closely our worlds are aligned, how humans really are beasts, susceptible to their basest instincts, their wildest dreams, and their artful survival.From the Trade Paperback edition.

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