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The Cure

by Sarah Gorham

In The Cure, Sarah Gorham's mature, eager, intelligent poetic voice explores family--and marriage; and self--as forms in which we move, escaping and demanding restraint, seeking and fearing contact with each other. The book moves toward and away from a riveting sequence, "The Family Afterward," that examines the intrusions and heartbreaks, complicities and narrowings of definition, that are forced upon the family members of an alcoholic. Gorham is interested in appetite: for drink, for sex, for oblivion, for comfort. The paradoxes she most thrillingly defines are the tightest ones, degrees and atmospheres apart. The Cure is both accessible and intimate; sometimes funny, sometimes desolate. Gorham describes a hike, the hiker coming upon a limestone cross, surrounded by the tchotchke-mementos of previous passers-by. She is flooded, but trusts the surprise of her emotion: "Very moving these rookie prayers/ This unmajestic gratitude. " It's that delectable sensibility, the pause that yields finely tuned appreciation, that marks Gorham's vision, her cupped ear listening to the world.

The Cure

by David Shobin

As the reluctant chief spokesperson for the pioneering Ecolabs, charismatic Dr. Steve McLaren has praised the company's latest herbal drug to a nationwide television audience. As a caring physician, he has unwittingly prescribed it to countless women.<P> Touted as the "female Viagra", Restore-Tabs are the miraculous answer to the prayers of anyone desperate to enhance her appearance and her sex drive. McLaren suspects that the supposedly harmless little pill is too good to be true--yet even he doesn't grasp the chilling truth until it's too late.<P> One by one, McLaren's patients are developing alarming side effects. With growing dead, the good doctor realizes that the nutritional supplement is responsible for the extreme symptoms--and that somebody at Ecolabs will stop at nothing to keep him from investigating...

Cure Constipation Now

by Wes Jones

An easy-to-follow plan to regain a healthy gastrointestinal system-and relieve problems from gas to bloating to IBS. Close to 100 million Americans suffer from chronic-and sometimes very serious- gastrointestinal conditions. Prominent gastroenterologist Dr. Wesley Jones has found that virtually all digestive problems have one single underlying cause-constipation. Our modern diets and stressful lifestyles can make poor digestion such a common experience that sometimes people don't even recognize it as a problem. Here, Dr. Jones provides a proven program that has already helped thousands relieve and prevent constipation-related gastrointestinal problems for life. No one wants to talk about constipation, but millions suffer from it. Take as evidence the ubiquitous ads for Dannon's billion-dollar brand, Activia, which features Jamie Lee Curtis talking about "occasional irregularity." Constipation is one of the most common gastrointestinal complaints in the United States, resulting in about two million doctor visits annually. However, most people treat themselves without seeking medical help, as is evident from the millions of dollars Americans spend on laxatives each year. Now, this book will offer them a safe, proven, easy-to-follow program to relieve constipation once and for all. Because it's not just uncomfortable-it's unhealthy!

The Cure for Alcoholism

by David Sinclair Roy Eskapa

Finally, there is a cure for alcoholism. This is the first step.Featuring new and updated information and studies, including an introduction by actress Claudia Christian, the second edition of The Cure for Alcoholism delivers exactly what millions of alcoholics and families of alcoholics have been hoping for: a painless, dignified, and medically proven cure for their addiction. Backed by 82 clinical trials and research that extends back to 1964, The Sinclair Method deploys an opiate-blocking medication in a very specific way-in combination with ongoing drinking-to extinguish the addictive "software" in the brain. The de-addiction process rolls back the addictive mechanism in the brain to its original pre-addicted state-before the first drink was consumed, making this program an actual cure for alcoholism.Drs. Roy Eskapa and David Sinclair of The Sinclair Method have put together a sound scientific book that proves that with this particular method, alcoholism can be cured in more than 78 percent of patients. What's more, the treatment avoids the dangerous withdrawal symptoms, allowing patients to detox gradually and safely while they are still drinking. This removes the need for expensive and unpleasant inpatient rehabilitation programs. Actual drinking levels and cravings automatically decrease until control over alcohol is restored. The bottom line is that patients can control their drinking or stop altogether with the simple yet powerful process outlined in The Cure for Alcoholism.Including a new introduction by actress Claudia Christian about The Sinclair Method's impact on her life, updated trial information, and a letter explaining the treatment that can be given to doctors by patients, The Cure for Alcoholism is a revolutionary book for anyone who wants to gain control over drinking.

The Cure for Death by Lightning

by Gail Anderson-Dargatz

"The cure for death by lightning was handwritten in thick, messy blue ink in my mother's scrapbook, under the recipe for my father's favourite oatcakes: Dunk the dead by lightning in a cold water bath for two hours and if still dead, add vinegar and soak for an hour more. " So begins Gail Anderson-Dargatz's extraordinary first novel, a seductive and thrilling book that captures the heart and imagination, as filled with the magic and mystery of life as it is with its lurking evils and gut-wrenching hardships. The Cure for Death by Lightning sold more than a staggering 100,000 copies in Canada alone and became a bestseller in Great Britain, later to be published in the United States and Europe. It was nominated for the Giller Prize, the richest fiction prize in Canada, and received a Betty Trask Award in the U. K. The Cure for Death by Lightning takes place in the poor, isolated farming community of Turtle Valley, British Columbia, in the shadow of the Second World War. The fifteenth summer of Beth Weeks's life is full of strange happenings: a classmate is mauled to death; children go missing on the nearby reserve; an unseen predator pursues Beth. She is surrounded by unusual characters, including Nora, the sensual half-Native girl whose friendship provides refuge; Filthy Billy, the hired hand with Tourette's Syndrome; and Nora's mother, who has a man's voice and an extra little finger. Then there's the darkness within her own family: her domineering, shell-shocked father has fits of madness, and her mother frequently talks to the dead. Beth, meanwhile, must wrestle with her newfound sexuality in a harsh world where nylons, perfume and affection have no place. Then, in a violent storm, she is struck by lightning in her arm, and nothing is quite the same again. She decides to explore the dangers of the bush. Beth is a strong, honest, and compassionate heroine, bringing hope and joy into an environment that is often cruel. The character of Beth's haunted mother infuses the book with life by means of her scrapbook of recipes scattered throughout, with luscious descriptions of food, gardening, and remedies, both practical and bizarre. Seen through Beth's eyes, the West Coast landscape is full of beauty and mysteries, with its forests and rivers, and its rich native culture. The Globe and Mail commented that The Cure for Death by Lightning was "Canadian to the core," with hints of Susannah Moodie and Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro. Anderson-Dargatz's vision of rural life has drawn comparisons with William Faulkner and John Steinbeck. A magic realism reminiscent of Latin American literature is also present, as flowers rain from the sky, and men turn into animals. Yet the style of The Cure for Death by Lightning, which the Boston Globe called "Pacific Northwest Gothic," is wholly original. Launched in a year with more than the usual number of excellent first novels (1996 was also the year of Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald and Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels), this book with its assured voice heralds a worthy successor to Margaret Atwood, Carol Shields, Margaret Laurence and Alice Munro.

The Cure for Grief

by Nellie Hermann

Ruby is the youngest child in the tightly knit Bronstein family, a sensitive, observant girl who looks up to her older brothers and is in awe of her stern but gentle father, a Holocaust survivor whose past and deep sense of morality inform the family's life. But when Ruby is ten, her eldest brother enters the hospital and emerges as someone she barely recognizes. It is only the first in a startling series of tragedies that befall the Bronsteins and leave Ruby reeling from sorrow and disbelief. This disarmingly intimate and candid novel follows Ruby through a coming-of-age marked by excruciating loss, one in which the thrills, confusion, and longing of adolescence are heightened by the devastating events that accompany them. As Ruby's family fractures, she finds solace in friendships and the beginnings of romance, in the normalcy of summer camp and the prom. But her anger and heartache shadow these experiences, separating her from those she loves, until she chooses to reconcile what she has lost with whom she has become. Nellie Hermann's insightful debut is a heartbreakingly authentic story of the enduring potential for resilience and the love that binds a family.

Cure for the Common Breakup

by Beth Kendrick

Welcome to Black Dog Bay, a tiny seaside town in Delaware known as "the best place in America to bounce back from your breakup." Home to the Better Off Bed-and-Breakfast, the Eat Your Heart Out bakery, and the Whinery bar, Black Dog Bay offers a haven for the suddenly single. Flight attendant Summer Benson lives by two rules: Don't stay with the same man for too long and never stay in one place. She's about to break rule number one by considering accepting her boyfriend's proposal--then disaster strikes and her world is shattered in an instant. Summer heads to Black Dog Bay, where the locals welcome her. Even Hattie Huntington, the town's oldest, richest, and meanest resident, likes her enough to give her a job. Then there's Dutch Jansen, the rugged, stoic mayor, who's the opposite of her type. She probably shouldn't be kissing him. She definitely shouldn't be falling in love. After a lifetime of globe-trotting, Summer has finally found a home. But Hattie has old scores to settle and a hidden agenda for her newest employee. Summer finds herself faced with an impossible choice: Leave Black Dog Bay behind forever, or stay with the ones she loves and cost them everything....

Cure for the Common Life

by Max Lucado

"Sweet spot." Golfers understand the term. So do tennis players. Ever swung a baseball bat or paddled a Ping-Pong ball? If so, you know the oh-so-nice feel of the sweet spot. Life in the sweet spot rolls like the downhill side of a downwind bike ride. But you don't have to swing a bat or a club to know this. What engineers give sports equipment, God gave you.A zone, a region, a life precinct in which you were made to dwell. He tailored the curves of your life to fit an empty space in his jigsaw puzzle. And life makes sweet sense when you find your spot. But if you're like 87 percent of workers, you haven't found it. You don't find meaning in your work--or you're one of the 80 percent who don't believe their talents are used. What can you do? You're suffering from the common life, and you desperately need a cure. Best-selling author Max Lucado has found it. In Cure for the Common Life he offers practical tools for exploring and identifying your own uniqueness, motivation to put your strengths to work, and the perfect prescription for finding and living in your sweet spot for the rest of your life.

Cure for the Common Life Workbook

by Max Lucado

Max Lucado wrote Cure for the Common Life to help you find your uniqueness. Now, in Cure for Common Life Small Group Study, Max teams with People Management International. In this engaging and dynamic 6-week small group study, you will learn how to: pay attention to your uniqueness, unpack your life to discover your S.T.O.R.Y., strengthen and enhance your relationships, discover your career strengths, and live in your sweet spot every day of your life!

The Cure: How a Father Raised $100 Million--and Bucked the Medical Establishment--in a Quest to Save His Children

by Geeta Anand

A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist tracks the audacious efforts of a financial consultant who quit his job and created a biotechnology start-up company in an effort to turn science into a cure for his children's rare, fatal disease.

The Cure Within: A History of Mind-Body Medicine

by Anne Harrington

"A splendid history of mind-body medicine...a book that desperately needed to be written."--Jerome Groopman, New York Times Is stress a deadly disease on the rise in modern society? Can mind-body practices from the East help us become well? When it comes to healing, we believe we must look beyond doctors and drugs; we must look within ourselves. Faith, relationships, and attitude matter. But why do we believe such things? From psychoanalysis to the placebo effect to meditation, this vibrant cultural history describes mind-body healing as rooted in a patchwork of stories, allowing us to make new sense of our suffering and to rationalize new treatments and lifestyles.

Cured by Nature

by Tara Mackey

Life can be stressful, overwhelming, and sometimes difficult to cope with. Modern medical professionals will tell you to take various prescription medications, which can ultimately do more harm than good. But it doesn't have to be that way! Healing is all in the mind and can be attained through finding harmony in your own life and resorting to natural remedies already provided by the very environment in which you live. Blogger Tara Mackey, who has a background in science, shares her own experiences with stress, depression, and anxiety and teaches you how to break free from them. Growing up, Tara suffered from dependency on various prescription drugs for depression, anxiety, and ADHD. She witnessed her best friend's decline and suicide and watched helplessly as the effects of heroin addiction took a hold of her mother. At age twenty-four, she decided that enough was enough and quit her prescription meds cold-turkey in search for happiness. Today, she is drug-free, stress-free, and happy. Cured by Nature is Tara's personal story combined with her knowledge and advice to battling personal demons and coming out victorious. Follow Tara as she shows you how to adapt and grow, using various herbal remedies, breathing exercises, and mind-strengthening techniques that will help you be a happier and better you.

Curing MS: How Science Is Solving the Mysteries of Multiple Sclerosis

by Howard L. Weiner

What causes multiple sclerosis? When will there be a cure? Dr. Howard Weiner has spent nearly three decades trying to find answers to the mysteries of multiple sclerosis, an utterly confounding and debilitating disease that afflicts almost half a million Americans. Curing MS is his moving, personal account of the long-term scientific quest to pinpoint the origins of the disease and to find a breakthrough treatment for its victims. Dr. Weiner has been at the cutting edge of MS research and drug development, and he describes in clear and illuminating detail the science behind the symptoms and how new drugs may hold the key to "taming the monster." From the "Twenty-one Points" of MS--a concise breakdown of the knowns and unknowns of the disease--to stories from the frontlines of laboratories and hospitals, Curing MS offers a message of hope about new treatments and makes a powerful argument that a cure can--and will--be found.

The Curiosities: A Collection of Stories

by Maggie Stiefvater Brenna Yovanoff Tessa Gratton

From acclaimed YA authors Maggie Stiefvater, Tessa Gratton, and Brenna Yovanoff comes this anthology. A vampire locked in a cage in the basement, for good luck. Bad guys, clever girls, and the various reasons why the guys have to stop breathing. These are but a few of the curiosities collected in this volume of short stories by three practitioners of paranormal fiction.

The Curiosities of Food: Or the Dainties and Delicacies of Different Nations Obtained from the Animal Kingdom

by Peter Lund Simmonds

Originally published in London in 1859, this rare treasure of culinary history was recently brought to light in the award-winning Oxford Companion to Food, whose author, Alan Davidson, used it as a primary reference in researching some of the more obscure foodstuffs consumed across the globe. Davidson writes that "[CURIOSITIES] is in all probability the first attempt to write a general worldwide survey of animal products. " Long out of print and scarce even in the antiquarian market, this lost classic of wit, erudition, and grand storytelling is now made available in a facsimile edition, with an introduction by Davidson. As Simmonds reveals in his charming culinary travelogue, just about everything that walks, swims, crawls, slithers, or flies has been eaten at one time or another, and the eminent Victorian scholar has the tasting notes. On lizards: "In Guatemala, there is a popular belief, that lizards eaten alive cure cancer. . . . The man who first eat a live oyster or clam, was certainly a venturous fellow, but the eccentric individual who allowed a live lizard to run down his throat was infinitely more so. " Ģ One of the most important works of culinary history from the nineteenth century, and a significant primary source for Alan Davidson's award-winning Oxford Companion to Food.

Curiosity

by Gary Blackwood

Intrigue, danger, chess, and a real-life hoax combine in this historical novel from the author of The Shakespeare Stealer Philadelphia, PA, 1835. Rufus, a twelve-year-old chess prodigy, is recruited by a shady showman named Maelzel to secretly operate a mechanical chess player called the Turk. The Turk wows ticket-paying audience members and players, who do not realize that Rufus, the true chess master, is hidden inside the contraption. But Rufus's job working the automaton must be kept secret, and he fears he may never be able to escape his unscrupulous master. And what has happened to the previous operators of the Turk, who seem to disappear as soon as Maelzel no longer needs them? Creeping suspense, plenty of mystery, and cameos from Edgar Allan Poe and P. T. Barnum mark Gary Blackwood's triumphant return to middle grade fiction.

Curiosity: How Science Became Interested in Everything

by Philip Ball

With the recent landing of the Mars rover Curiosity, it seems safe to assume that the idea of being curious is alive and well in modern scienceOCothat itOCOs not merely encouraged but is seen as an essential component of the scientific mission. Yet there was a time when curiosity was condemned. Neither Pandora nor Eve could resist the dangerous allure of unanswered questions, and all knowledge wasnOCOt equalOCofor millennia it was believed that there were some things we should not try to know. In the late sixteenth century this attitude began to change dramatically, and in "Curiosity: ""How Science Became Interested in Everything, "Philip Ball investigates how curiosity first became sanctionedOCowhen it changed from a vice to a virtue and how it became permissible to ask any and every question about the world. aLooking closely at the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries, Ball vividly brings to life the age when modern science began, a time that spans the lives of Galileo and Isaac Newton. In this entertaining and illuminating account of the rise of science as we know it, Ball tells of scientists both legendary and lesser known, from Copernicus and Kepler to Robert Boyle, as well as the inventions and technologies that were inspired by curiosity itself, such as the telescope and the microscope. The so-called Scientific Revolution is often told as a story of great geniuses illuminating the world with flashes of inspiration. But "Curiosity" reveals a more complex story, in which the liberationOCoand subsequent tamingOCoof curiosity was linked to magic, religion, literature, travel, trade, and empire. Ball also asks what has become of curiosity today: how it functions in science, how it is spun and packaged for consumption, how well it is being sustained, and how the changing shape of science influences the kinds of questions it may continue to ask. aThough proverbial wisdom tell us that it was through curiosity that our innocence was lost, that has not deterred us. Instead, it has been completely the contrary: today we spend vast sums trying to reconstruct the first instants of creation in particle accelerators, out of a pure desire to "know. " Ball refuses to let us take this desire for granted, and this book is a perfect homage to such an inquisitive attitude. "

The Curiosity Keeper

by Sarah E. Ladd

"It is not just a ruby, as you say. It is large as a quail's egg, still untouched and unpolished. And it is rumored to either bless or curse whomever possesses it." Camille Iverness can take care of herself. She's done so since the day her mother abandoned the family and left Camille to run their shabby curiosity shop on Blinkett Street. But when a violent betrayal leaves her injured with no place to hide, Camille has no choice but to accept help from the mysterious stranger who came to her aid. Jonathan Gilchrist never wanted to inherit Kettering Hall. As a second son, he was content working as a village apothecary. But when his brother's death made him heir just as his father's foolish decisions put the estate at risk, only the sale of a priceless possession--a ruby called the Bevoy--can save the family from ruin. But the gem has disappeared. And all trails lead to Iverness Curiosity Shop--and the beautiful shop girl who may or may not be the answer to his questions. Curious circumstance throws them together, and an intricate dance of need and suspicion leads the couple from the seedy backwaters of London to the elite neighborhoods of the wealthy to the lush, green Surrey countryside--all in the pursuit of a blood-red gem that collectors will sacrifice anything to possess. Caught at the intersection of blessings and curses, greed and deceit, two determined souls must unite to protect what they hold dear. But when a passion that shines far brighter than any gem is ignited, each will have to decide how much they are willing to risk for their future, love, and happiness.

Curiosity Killed the Cat Sitter: Dixie Hemingway Mysteries, No. 1

by Blaize Clement

In the first in a new series, Dixie Hemingway, a professional pet-sitter, discovers a client's cat hiding from a very dead intruder, which launches her investigation into the whereabouts of her now suspicious-looking--and vanished--client.

The Curiosity of School

by Zander Sherman

It's one thing we all have in common. We've all been to school. But as Zander Sherman shows in this fascinating, often shocking account of institutionalized education, sending your kids off to school was not always normal. In fact, school is a very recent invention. Taking the reader back to 19th-century Prussia, where generals, worried about soldiers' troubling individuality, sought a way to standardize every young man of military age, through to the most controversial debates that swirl around the world about the topic of education today, Sherman tells the often astonishing stories of the men and women-and corporations-that have defined what we have come to think of as both the privilege and the responsibility of being educated. Along the way, we discover that the SAT was invented as an intelligence test designed to allow the state to sterilize "imbeciles," that suicide in the wake of disappointing results in the state university placement exams is the fifth leading cause of death in China, and that commercialized higher education seduces students into debt as cynically as credit card companies do. Provocative, entertaining-and even educational-The Curiosity of School lays bare the forces that shape the institution that shapes all of us.

The Curiosity of School

by Zander Sherman

It¿s one thing we all have in common. We¿ve all been to school. But as Zander Sherman shows in this fascinating, often shocking account of institutionalized education, sending your kids off to school was not always normal. In fact, school is a very recent invention. Taking the reader back to 19th-century Prussia, where generals, worried about soldiers¿ troubling individuality, sought a way to standardize every young man of military age, through to the most controversial debates about the topic of education today, Sherman tells the often astonishing stories of the men and women¿and corporations¿that have defined what we have come to think of as both the privilege and the responsibility of being educated. With clarity, detachment, and wry humour, Sherman presents the story of school through the stories of its most influential¿and peculiar¿reformers. We learn that Montessori schools were embraced by Mussolini's Italy, that the founder of Ryerson University was a champion of the Canadian residential school system (for which the government apologized a century and a half later), and that Harvard was once a byword for mediocrity. Along the way, we discover that the SAT was invented as an intelligence test designed to allow the state to sterilize ¿imbeciles¿ and in its current state is perhaps equally pernicious, that suicide in the wake of disappointing results in the state university placement exams is the fifth leading cause of death in China, and that commercialized higher education seduces students into debt as cynically as credit card companies do.

Curiosity Of School,The

by Zander Sherman

It's one thing we all have in common. We've all been to school. But as Zander Sherman shows in this fascinating, often shocking account of institutionalized education, sending your kids off to school was not always normal. In fact, school is a very recent invention. Taking the reader back to 19th-century Prussia, where generals, worried about soldiers' troubling individuality, sought a way to standardize every young man of military age, through to the most controversial debates that swirl around the world about the topic of education today, Sherman tells the often astonishing stories of the men and women-and corporations-that have defined what we have come to think of as both the privilege and the responsibility of being educated. Along the way, we discover that the SAT was invented as an intelligence test designed to allow the state to sterilize "imbeciles," that suicide in the wake of disappointing results in the state university placement exams is the fifth leading cause of death in China, and that commercialized higher education seduces students into debt as cynically as credit card companies do. Provocative, entertaining-and even educational-The Curiosity of School lays bare the forces that shape the institution that shapes all of us.

Curiosity Thrilled the Cat : A magical cat mystery

by Sofie Kelly

When librarian Kathleen Paulson moved to Mayville Heights, Minnesota, she had no idea that two strays would nuzzle their way into her life. Owen is a tabby with a catnip addiction and Hercules is a stocky tuxedo cat who shares Kathleen's fondness for Barry Manilow. But beyond all the fur and purrs, there's something more to these felines. When murder interrupts Mayville's Music Festival, Kathleen finds herself the prime suspect. More stunning is her realisation that Owen and Hercules are magical - and she's relying on their skills to solve a purr-fect murder.

Curious?

by Todd Kashdan

Dead cats. That's the image many people conjure up when you mention curiosity. An image perpetuated by a dusty old proverb that has long represented the extent of our understanding of the term. This book might not put the proverb to rest, but it will flip it upside down: far from killing anything, curiosity breathes new life into almost everything it touches. In Curious? Dr. Todd Kashdan offers a profound new message missing from so many books on happiness: the greatest opportunities for joy, purpose, and personal growth don't, in fact, happen when we're searching for happiness. They happen when we are mindful, when we explore what's novel, and when we live in the moment and embrace uncertainty. Positive events last longer and we can extract more pleasure and meaning from them when we are open to new experiences and relish the unknown. Dr. Kashdan uses science, story, and practical exercises to show you how to become what he calls a curious explorer--a person who's comfortable with risk and challenge and who functions optimally in an unstable, unpredictable world. Here's a blueprint for building lasting, meaningful relationships, improving health, increasing creativity, and boosting productivity. Aren't you curious to know more?

Curious

by Ian Leslie

Today it seems we have the world at our fingertips. Thanks to smartphones and tools such as Google and Wikipedia, we're able feed any aspect of our curiosity instantly. But does this mean we are actually becoming more curious? Absolutely not. In Curious, Ian Leslie argues that true curiosity#151;the sustained quest for understanding that begets insight and innovation#151;is becoming increasingly difficult to harness in our wired world. We confuse ease of access to information with curiosity, and risk losing our ability to ask questions that extend our knowledge gap rather than merely filling it. Worst of all, this decline in curiosity has led to a decline in empathy and our ability to care about those around us. Combining the latest science with an urgent call to cultivate curious minds, Curious draws on psychology, social history, and popular culture to show that being deeply curious is our only hope when it comes to solving current crises#151;as well as an essential part of being human.

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