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Colonial Pathologies: American Tropical Medicine, Race, and Hygiene in the Philippines

by Warwick Anderson

Colonial Pathologies is a groundbreaking history of the role of science and medicine in the American colonization of the Philippines from 1898 through the 1930s. Warwick Anderson describes how American colonizers sought to maintain their own health and stamina in a foreign environment while exerting control over and "civilizing" a population of seven million people spread out over seven thousand islands. In the process, he traces a significant transformation in the thinking of colonial doctors and scientists about what was most threatening to the health of white colonists. During the late nineteenth century, they understood the tropical environment as the greatest danger, and they sought to help their fellow colonizers to acclimate. Later, as their attention shifted to the role of microbial pathogens, colonial scientists came to view the Filipino people as a contaminated race, and they launched public health initiatives to reform Filipinos' personal hygiene practices and social conduct. A vivid sense of a colonial culture characterized by an anxious and assertive white masculinity emerges from Anderson's description of American efforts to treat and discipline allegedly errant Filipinos. His narrative encompasses a colonial obsession with native excrement, a leper colony intended to transform those considered most unclean and least socialized, and the hookworm and malaria programs implemented by the Rockefeller Foundation in the 1920s and 1930s. Throughout, Anderson is attentive to the circulation of intertwined ideas about race, science, and medicine. He points to colonial public health in the Philippines as a key influence on the subsequent development of military medicine and industrial hygiene, U. S. urban health services, and racialized development regimes in other parts of the world.

The Colonial Wars 1689-1762: The Chicago History of American Civilization

by Howard H. Peckham Edited by Daniel J. Boorstin

Although the colonial wars consisted of almost continuous raids and skirmishes between the English and French colonists and their Indian allies and enemies, they can be separated into four major conflicts, corresponding to four European wars of which they were, in varying degrees, a part: King William's War (1689-97) (War of the League of Augsburg); Queen Anne's War (1702-13) (War of the Spanish Succession); King George's War (1744-48) (War of the Austrian Succession); and The French and Indian War (1755-62) (Seven Years' War). Mr. Peckham chronicles the events of these wars, summarizing the struggle for empire in America among France, England, and Spain. He indicates how the colonists applied the experience they gained from fighting Indians to their engagements with European powers. And what they learned from the colonial wars they translated into a political philosophy that led to independence and self-government. The ready involvement of the colonies in European ambitions, the success and failure of co-operation between colony and mother country, the efforts of the English colonies together, and the growing differences between them and Britain give the narrative continuity and rising excitement.

Colonialism and Postcolonial Development: Spanish America in Comparative Perspective

by James Mahoney

In this comparative-historical analysis of Spanish America, Mahoney offers a new theory of colonialism and postcolonial development. He explores why certain kinds of societies are subject to certain kinds of colonialism and why these forms of colonialism give rise to countries with differing levels of economic prosperity and social well-being. Mahoney contends that differences in the extent of colonialism are best explained by the potentially evolving fit between the institutions of the colonizing nation and those of the colonized society. Moreover, he shows how institutions forged under colonialism bring countries to relative levels of development that may prove remarkably enduring in the postcolonial period. The argument is sure to stir discussion and debate, both among experts on Spanish America who believe that development is not tightly bound by the colonial past, and among scholars of colonialism who suggest that the institutional identity of the colonizing nation is of little consequence.

Colonialism and the Call to Jihad in British India

by Tariq Hasan

A historical narrative that examines the role of ulema and their use of the concept of jihad during India's struggle for independence. Colonialism and the Call to Jihad in British India examines the role of Muslim religious leaders or Ulema's in India's freedom struggle. And it does so by visiting the life and times of seven main protagonists- the 19th century cleric Sayyid Ahmad Barelvi, the mystic revolutionary Maulvi Ahmadullah Shah, Maulana Mahmoodul Hasan( the founding father of the Silk Conspiracy and later of Jamia Millia Movement), Maulana Obaidullah Sindhi, Barkatullah Khan and Maulana Hussain Ahmad Madani. All eulogized the idea of 'Jihad' but used it to fight and lead the freedom struggle against the British. It examines the roots of the Walliullahi movement which led to the Deoband movement in the second half of the 19thcentury in North India. It also highlights the 20thcentury Silk letter movement in which Muslim Ulema worked in tandem with the Hindu and Sikh Nationalists led Ghadar Party which was active not just in India but also in Europe and the USA. The book is a timely reminder of a shared Hindu-Muslim unity during our freedom struggle and helps us understand the commonly misunderstood notion of Jihad in the Indian context. The book in the end puts onus on the prevailing political system to ensure that India does not fall victim to sectarian violence and religious intolerance.

Colonialism and the Emergence of Science Fiction

by John Rieder

This is the first full-length study of emerging Anglo-American science fiction's relation to the history, discourses, and ideologies of colonialism and imperialism. Nearly all scholars and critics of early science fiction acknowledge that colonialism is an important and relevant part of its historical context, and recent scholarship has emphasized imperialism's impact on late Victorian Gothic and adventure fiction and on Anglo-American popular and literary culture in general. John Rieder argues that colonial history and ideology are crucial components of science fiction's displaced references to history and its engagement in ideological production. He proposes that the profound ambivalence that pervades colonial accounts of the exotic "other" establishes the basic texture of much science fiction, in particular its vacillation between fantasies of discovery and visions of disaster. Combining original scholarship and theoretical sophistication with a clearly written presentation suitable for students as well as professional scholars, this study offers new and innovative readings of both acknowledged classics and rediscovered gems.Includes discussion of works by Edwin A. Abbott, Edward Bellamy, Edgar Rice Burroughs, John W. Campbell, George Tomkyns Chesney, Arthur Conan Doyle, H. Rider Haggard, Edmond Hamilton, W. H. Hudson, Richard Jefferies, Henry Kuttner, Alun Llewellyn, Jack London, A. Merritt, Catherine L. Moore, William Morris, Garrett P. Serviss, Mary Shelley, Olaf Stapledon, and H. G. Wells.

Colonialism, Antisemitism, and Germans of Jewish Descent in Imperial Germany

by Christian S. Davis

Colonialism, Antisemitism, and Germans of Jewish Descent in Imperial Germany examines the relationship between the colonial and antisemitic movements of modern Germany from 1871 to 1918, examining the complicated ways in which German antisemitism and colonialism fed off of and into each other in the decades before the First World War. Author Christian S. Davis studies the significant involvement with and investment in German colonialism by the major antisemitic political parties and extra-parliamentary organizations of the day, while also investigating the prominent participation in the colonial movement of Jews and Germans of Jewish descent and their tense relationship with procolonial antisemites. Working from the premise that the rise and propagation of racial antisemitism in late-nineteenth-century Germany cannot be separated from the context of colonial empire,Colonialism, Antisemitism, and Germans of Jewish Descent in Imperial Germanyis the first work to study the dynamic and evolving interrelationship of the colonial and antisemitic movements of the Kaiserreich era. It shows how individuals and organizations who originated what would later become the ideological core of National Socialism---racial antisemitism---both influenced and perceived the development of a German colonial empire predicated on racial subjugation. It also examines how colonialism affected the contemporaneous German antisemitic movement, dividing it over whether participation in the nationalist project of empire building could furnish patriotic credentials to even Germans of Jewish descent. The book builds upon the recent upsurge of interest among historians of modern Germany in the domestic impact and character of German colonialism, and on the continuing fascination with the racialization of the German sense of self that became so important to German history in the twentieth century.

Colonising Egypt

by Timothy Mitchell

Extending deconstructive theory to historical and political analysis, Timothy Mitchell examines the peculiarity of Western conceptions of order and truth through a re-reading of Europe's colonial encounter with nineteenth-century Egypt.

Colonization and Its Discontents

by Beverly C. Tomek

Pennsylvania contained the largest concentration of early America's abolitionist leaders and organizations, making it a necessary and illustrative stage from which to understand how national conversations about the place of free blacks in early America originated and evolved, and, importantly, the role that colonization--supporting the emigration of free and emancipated blacks to Africa--played in national and international antislavery movements. Beverly C. Tomek's meticulous exploration of the archives of the American Colonization Society, Pennsylvania's abolitionist societies, and colonizationist leaders (both black and white) enables her to boldly and innovatively demonstrate that, in Philadelphia at least, the American Colonization Society often worked closely with other antislavery groups to further the goals of the abolitionist movement.In Colonization and Its Discontents, Tomek brings a much-needed examination of the complexity of the colonization movement by describing in depth the difference between those who supported colonization for political and social reasons and those who supported it for religious and humanitarian reasons. Finally, she puts the black perspective on emigration into the broader picture instead of treating black nationalism as an isolated phenomenon and examines its role in influencing the black abolitionist agenda.

The Colonization of America (The White Indian Series #1)

by Donald Clayton Porter

THE KENT FAMILY CHRONICLES HIS LAND. The vast, virgin ocean of trees was his empire. He was Renno, the White Indian, the mightiest of all the Seneca braves. Now the settlers came to sweep over his home and hunting grounds, with their strange ways, their fiery weapons -- and with the beautiful Englishwoman claimed the verdant New World. Some came to settle, some to steal and wage war. Each man, woman and child found a new life. A harsh yet thrilling fate awaited Deborah -- one that few women dared dream and fewer still would ever know.

Colonize This!: Young Women of Color on Today's Feminism

by Cherríe Moraga Daisy Hernández Bushra Rehman

It has been decades since women of color first turned feminism upside down, exposing the '70s feminist movement as exclusive, white, and unaware of the concerns and issues of women of color from around the globe. Now a new generation of brilliant, outspoken women of color is speaking to the concerns of a new feminism, and to their place in it. Daisy Hernandez of Ms. magazine and poet Bushra Rehman have collected a diverse, lively group of emerging writers who speak to their experience--to the strength and rigidity of community and religion, to borders and divisions, both internal and external--and address issues that take feminism into the twenty-first century. One writer describes herself as a "mixed brown girl, Sri-Lankan and New England mill-town white trash," and clearly delineates the organizing differences between whites and women of color: "We do not kick ass the way the white girls do, in meetings of NOW or riot grrl. For us, it's all about family. " A Korean-American woman struggles to create her own identity in a traditional community: "Yam-ja-neh means nice, sweet, compliant. I've heard it used many times by my parents' friends who don't know shit about me. " An Arab-American feminist deconstructs the "quaint vision" of Middle-Eastern women with which most Americans feel comfortable. This impressive array of first-person accounts adds a much-needed fresh dimension to the ongoing dialogue between race and gender, and gives voice to the women who are creating and shaping the feminism of the future.

Colonizer's Model of the World

by J. M. Blaut

This book challenges one of the most pervasive and powerful beliefs of our time concerning world history and world geography. This is the doctrine of European diffusionism, the belief that the rise of Europe to modernity and world dominance is due to some unique European quality of race, environment, culture, mind, or spirit, and that progress for the rest of the world results from the diffusion of European civilization. J.M. Blaut persuasively argues that this doctrine is not grounded in the facts of history and geography, but in the ideology of colonialism. It is the world model which Europeans constructed to explain, justify, and assist their colonial expansion. The book first defines the Eurocentric diffusionist model of the world as one that invents a permanent world core, an "Inside," in which cultural evolution is natural and continuous, and a permanent periphery, and "Outside," in which cultural evolution is mainly an effect of the diffusion of ideas, commodities, settlers, and political control from the core. The ethnohistory of the doctrine is traced from its 16th-century origins, through its efflorescence in the period of classical colonialism, to its present form in theories of economic development, modernization, and new world order. Blaut demonstrates that most "Western" scholarship is to some extent diffusionist and based implicitly in the idea that the world has one permanent center from which culture-changing ideas tend to emanate. Eurocentric diffusionism has shaped our attitudes concerning race and the environment, psychology and society, technology and politics.

Colonoscopy

by Christopher B. Williams Jerome D. Waye Douglas K. Rex

First Edition - Winner of 2004 BMA Medical Book Competition in GastroenterologyThe second edition of this prize winning book is written by some of the world's foremost experts in the field of colonoscopy and colonic imaging. Every chapter has been updated and 5 new chapters have been added to include the latest information and advances in the field of colonoscopy:Capsule Colonoscopy Narrow Band ImagingConfocal EndomicroscopyEndoscopic Submucosal Dissection in the ColonNew Colonoscopes and Assist DevicesDrawing on the vast experience of the authors it covers every area of medicine that impacts on colonoscopy, including virtual colonography, pathology, techniques for pediatric and adult procedures, and legal aspects concerning colonoscopy. The book is focused on patient care, and provides explanations on how to perform the procedure effectively and make the best outcome for your patients. It serves as a detailed manual of procedures, extensively illustrated with diagrams and photographs.The book includes a companion DVD with supplementary material: a lecture on the history of colonoscopy, interviews with famous gastroenterologists, demonstrations of techniques, and typical and unusual cases.Click here to view a sample clip from the DVDhttp://www.gastrohep.com/waye/colonoscopy.aspThis is an invaluable compendium on all aspects of colonoscopy, suitable for use by every grade of practitioner world-wide and an essential reference book for allestablishments with an endoscopy facility.

Colony

by Anne Rivers Siddons

An unforgettable story of love, acceptance, and tradition. When Maude Chambliss first arrives at Retreat, the seasonal home of her husband's aristocratic family, she is a nineteen-year-old bride fresh from South Carolina's Low Country. Among the patrician men and women who reside in the summer colony on the coast of Maine, her gypsy-like beauty and impulsive behavior immediately brand her an outsider. She, as well as everyone else, is certain she will never fit in. And of course, she doesn't...at first. But over the many summers she spends there, Maude comes to cherish life in the colony, as she does the people who share it with her. There is her husband Peter, consumed with a darkness of spirit; her adored but dangerously fragile children; her domineering mother-in-law, who teaches her that it is the women who posses the strength to keep the colony intact; and Maine native Micah Willis, who is ultimately Maude's truest friend. This brilliant novel, rich with emotion, is filled with appealing, intense, and indomitable characters. Anne Rivers Siddons paints a portrait of a woman determined to preserve the spirit of past generations--and the future of aplaice where she became who she is...a place called Colony. "An outstanding multigenerational novel...We are hooked from the moment we meet Maude." The New York Times

Colony

by Anne Rivers Siddons

An unforgettable story of love, acceptance, and tradition. When Maude Chambliss first arrives at Retreat, the seasonal home of her husband's aristocratic family, she is a nineteen-year-old bride fresh from South Carolina's Low Country. Among the patrician men and women who reside in the summer colony on the coast of Maine, her gypsy-like beauty and impulsive behavior immediately brand her an outsider. She, as well as everyone else, is certain she will never fit in. And of course, she doesn't...at first. But over the many summers she spends there, Maude comes to cherish life in the colony, as she does the people who share it with her. There is her husband Peter, consumed with a darkness of spirit; her adored but dangerously fragile children; her domineering mother-in-law, who teaches her that it is the women who posses the strength to keep the colony intact; and Maine native Micah Willis, who is ultimately Maude's truest friend. This brilliant novel, rich with emotion, is filled with appealing, intense, and indomitable characters. Anne Rivers Siddons paints a portrait of a woman determined to preserve the spirit of past generations--and the future of aplaice where she became who she is...a place called Colony. "An outstanding multigenerational novel...We are hooked from the moment we meet Maude." The New York Times

Colony

by Ben Bova

The Earth has been poisoned by pollution, choked by overpopulation, and ravaged by the mindless greed of power-hungry corporations. A fragile peace is threatened by landless revolutionaries and global anarchy seems imminent. Yet a single ray of hope remains... Island One is a celestial Utopia, and David Adams is its most perfect creation-a man with a brain as advanced as any computer and a body free of human frailties. But David is a prisoner-a captive of the colony that created him- destined to spend the days of his life in an island-sized cylinder that circles a doomed and desperate home planet. Thousands of miles below him, a world trembles; its people cringe in terror and despair in anticipation of an impending apocalypse. And as the flames of war and revolt reach out far beyond the Earth's boundaries, Fate has cast one extraordinary human in the role of savior. For David Adams has a plan-one that will ultimately ensure the salvation of his species.. .or its annihilation. A BEAUTIFUL STORY FULL OF PROPHETIC VISIONS."

The Colony

by John Tayman

Beginning in 1866 and continuing for over a century, more than eight thousand people suspected of having leprosy were forcibly exiled to the Hawaiian island of Molokai -- the longest and deadliest instance of medical segregation in American history. Torn from their homes and families, these men, women, and children were loaded into shipboard cattle stalls and abandoned in a lawless place where brutality held sway. Many did not have leprosy, and many who did were not contagious, yet all were ensnared in a shared nightmare. Here, for the first time, John Tayman reveals the complete history of the Molokai settlement and its unforgettable inhabitants. It's an epic of ruthless manhunts, thrilling escapes, bizarre medical experiments, and tragic, irreversible error. Carefully researched and masterfully told, The Colony is a searing tale of individual bravery and extraordinary survival, and stands as a testament to the power of faith, compassion, and the human spirit.

Colony Fleet

by Susan R. Matthews

Four hundred years have passed since the leaders of an ecologically threatened Earth launched a great fleet of asteroid ships toward the stars. Five pristine planets were designated to be colonized by descendants of the first crews. Each new world would be inhabited by a homogenous mix of creators and facilitators, workers and intelligentsia. All would prosper in harmonious equality. But things have changed over the centuries...<P> Hillbrane Harkover belongs to the Jneers, the privileged third of the tripartite class system that evolved during the voyage. Now, with the first world landing mere months away, she finds herself betrayed by one of her own, expelled from her caste, and exiled to the dangerous fringes of the fleet. Abandoned here, where lowly Mechs toil in unsafe, unhealthy conditions, Hillbrane no longer has a place in the cruel hierarchy she has always taken for granted. But a four-century-old dream is suddenly in dire jeopardy, doomed by custom, suspicion, and class hatred. And someone on the outside may be the only one who can save the first colony--and the fleet--from catastrophe.

Colony of Evil

by Don Pendleton

Claiming one hundred square miles of mountainous terrain inside Colombia--ideal for the coca crop that supplies its revenue--Colonia Victoria is a sanctuary for humanity's most dedicated fanatics. Organized by one of Hitler's minions still deeply devoted to the eradication of those considered threats to the "master race," this Nazi Neverland is now a deadly global threat. And it's spearheading a new wave of terror--with a little help from drug money, corrupt offi cials and a partnership with Islamic fanatics. Mack Bolan's hunting party includes a Mossad agent and a local guide, as tracking Hans Gunter Dietrich becomes a violent trek deep into the jungle, where Bolan intends to dissolve an unholy alliance in blood.

The Colony of Unrequited Dreams

by Wayne Johnston

A mystery and a love story spanning five decades, The Colony of Unrequited Dreams is an epic portrait of passion and ambition, set against the beautiful, brutal landscape of Newfoundland. In this widely acclaimed novel, Johnston has created two of the most memorable characters in recent fiction: Joey Smallwood, who claws his way up from poverty to become New Foundland's first premier; and Sheilagh Fielding, who renounces her father's wealth to become a popular columnist and writer, a gifted satirist who casts a haunting shadow on Smallwood's life and career.The two meet as children at school and grow to realize that their lives are irreversibly intertwined, bound together by a secret they don't know they share. Smallwood, always on the make, torn between love of country and fear of failure, is as reluctant to trust the private truths of his heart as his rival and savior, Fielding--brilliant, hard-drinking, and unconventionally sexy. Their story ranges from small-town Newfoundland to New York City, from the harrowing ice floes of the seal hunt to the lavish drawing rooms of colonial governors, and combines erudition, comedy, and unflagging narrative brio in a manner reminiscent of John Irving and Charles Dickens. A tragicomic elegy for the "colony of unrequited dreams" that is Newfoundland, Wayne Johnston's masterful tribute to a people and a place establishes him as a novelist who is as profound as he is funny, with an impeccable sense of the intersection where private lives and history collide.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Coloproctology

by Steven Wexner Andrew P. Zbar

Coloproctology is a surgical specialty which dynamically changes every few years. There is a profusion of colorectal textbooks but specialty series on particularly complex topics as well as on the specialized management approach for trainees and training colorectal surgeons are actually few. The aim of this text is a superior quality colorectal book written by world experts targeted at senior surgical and colorectal trainees and young consultant coloproctologists in current areas of subspecialty expertise. The structure of the chapters is current and is based on what does not appear and is not addressed in current colorectal textbooks. This series has proven useful in areas already represented, including Neurosurgery, Vascular Surgery, Transplantation Surgery, etc. The text is aimed at being relatively didactic with an algorithm approach to specialized areas within coloproctology which could potentially be updated every 3 years or so with new topics to create a set for didactic training in colorectal surgery. It is anticipated that these texts will become valuable teaching textbooks and part of every coloproctologist's armamentarium as well as appealing to all general surgeons and surgical trainees engaged in complex elective and emergency colorectal surgery.

Color

by Victoria Finlay

In this vivid and captivating journey through the colors of an artist's palette, Victoria Finlay takes us on an enthralling adventure around the world and through the ages, illuminating how the colors we choose to value have determined the history of culture itself.How did the most precious color blue travel all the way from remote lapis mines in Afghanistan to Michelangelo's brush? What is the connection between brown paint and ancient Egyptian mummies? Why did Robin Hood wear Lincoln green? In Color, Finlay explores the physical materials that color our world, such as precious minerals and insect blood, as well as the social and political meanings that color has carried through time.Roman emperors used to wear togas dyed with a purple color that was made from an odorous Lebanese shellfish-which probably meant their scent preceded them. In the eighteenth century, black dye was called logwood and grew along the Spanish Main. Some of the first indigo plantations were started in America, amazingly enough, by a seventeen-year-old girl named Eliza. And the popular van Gogh painting White Roses at Washington's National Gallery had to be renamed after a researcher discovered that the flowers were originally done in a pink paint that had faded nearly a century ago. Color is full of extraordinary people, events, and anecdotes-painted all the more dazzling by Finlay's engaging style.Embark upon a thrilling adventure with this intrepid journalist as she travels on a donkey along ancient silk trade routes; with the Phoenicians sailing the Mediterranean in search of a special purple shell that garners wealth, sustenance, and prestige; with modern Chilean farmers breeding and bleeding insects for their viscous red blood. The colors that craft our world have never looked so bright.From the Hardcover edition.

Color and How to Use It

by William F. Powell

From the most delicate pastel tint to the boldest bright hue, color is a vitally important tool to you as an artist. Whether your preferred medium is acrylic, oil, or watercolor, a strong understanding of color and its applications is essential. Color and How to Use It includes in-depth information on color theory, important properties of color and light, and the fundamentals of color mixing. This comprehensive guide will teach you what color is, how it works, and how to make it work for you in your paintings.

Color and Light

by Delta Science Readers

NIMAC-sourced textbook

Color Atlas of Emergency Trauma

by Edward Newton Demetrios Demetriades

The new edition of this full-color atlas presents nearly 900 images from one of the largest and busiest trauma centers in North America. The images bring the reader to the bedside of patients with the full spectrum of common and uncommon traumatic injuries including motor vehicle accidents, falls, lacerations, burns, impalements, stabbings and gunshot wounds. The clinical, operative and autopsy photographs; x-ray, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography radiographs; and original illustrations depicting injury patterns will help guide clinicians in recognizing, prioritizing and managing trauma patients. Organized by major body regions into separate chapters on the head, face, neck, chest, abdomen, musculoskeletal system, spine and soft tissue, this thorough text discusses management guidelines, emergency workup protocols and common pitfalls. The Color Atlas of Emergency Trauma is an essential resource for those involved in trauma care.

Color Blind

by Jonathan Santlofer

Kate McKinnon is back -- and this time it's personal. When two hideously eviscerated bodies are discovered and the only link between them is a bizarre painting left at each crime scene, the NYPD turns to former cop Kate McKinnon, the woman who brought the serial killer the Death Artist to justice. Having settled back into her satisfying life as art historian, published author, host of a weekly PBS television series, and wife of one of New York's top lawyers, Kate wants no part of it. But Kate's sense of tranquility is shattered when this new sequence of murders strikes too close to home. With grief and fury to fuel her, she rejoins her former partner, detective Floyd Brown, and his elite homicide squad on the hunt for a vicious psychopath known as the Color-Blind Killer. In her rage and desperation, Kate allows herself to be drawn into a deadly game of cat and mouse. She abandons her glamorous life for the gritty streets of Manhattan, immersing herself in a world where brutality and madness appear to be the norm, where those closest to her may have betrayed her -- and where, in the end, nothing is what it seems.

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