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Forgotten Ally

by Rana Mitter

The epic, untold story of China's devastating eight-year war of resistance against JapanFor decades, a major piece of World War II history has gone virtually unwritten. The war began in China, two years before Hitler invaded Poland, and China eventually became the fourth great ally, partner to the United States, the Soviet Union, and Great Britain. Yet its drama of invasion, resistance, slaughter, and political intrigue remains little known in the West.Rana Mitter focuses his gripping narrative on three towering leaders: Chiang Kai-shek, the politically gifted but tragically flawed head of China's Nationalist government; Mao Zedong, the Communists' fiery ideological stalwart, seen here at the beginning of his epochal career; and the lesser-known Wang Jingwei, who collaborated with the Japanese to form a puppet state in occupied China. Drawing on Chinese archives that have only been unsealed in the past ten years, he brings to vivid new life such characters as Chiang's American chief of staff, the unforgettable "Vinegar Joe" Stilwell, and such horrific events as the Rape of Nanking and the bombing of China's wartime capital, Chongqing. Throughout, Forgotten Ally shows how the Chinese people played an essential role in the wider war effort, at great political and personal sacrifice.Forgotten Ally rewrites the entire history of World War II. Yet it also offers surprising insights into contemporary China. No twentieth-century event was as crucial in shaping China's worldview, and no one can understand China, and its relationship with America today, without this definitive work.

Forgotten Among the Lilies: Learning to Love Beyond Our Fears

by Ronald Rolheiser

The author of The Holy Longing explores the debilitating obsessions that often dominate our lives and offers down-to-earth guidance for learning to leave our fears, anxieties, and guilt "forgotten among the lilies." "Rarely do we taste the food we eat or the coffee we drink. Instead we go through our days too preoccupied, too compulsive, and too dissatisfied to really be able to be present for and celebrate our own lives," Ronald Rolheiser writes in the introduction to this powerful collection of essays...

The Forgotten Command: Be Holy

by William Macdonald John Ritchie

"Be ye holy, for I am holy" is as relevant now as in Peter's time. The author's forthright speaking and views make for searching reading.

The Forgotten Depression

by James Grant

By the publisher of the prestigious Grant's Interest Rate Observer, an account of the deep economic slump of 1920-21 that proposes, with respect to federal intervention, "less is more." This is a free-market rejoinder to the Keynesian stimulus applied by Bush and Obama to the 2007-09 recession, in whose aftereffects, Grant asserts, the nation still toils.James Grant tells the story of America's last governmentally-untreated depression; relatively brief and self-correcting, it gave way to the Roaring Twenties. His book appears in the fifth year of a lackluster recovery from the overmedicated downturn of 2007-2009. In 1920-21, Woodrow Wilson and Warren G. Harding met a deep economic slump by seeming to ignore it, implementing policies that most twenty-first century economists would call backward. Confronted with plunging prices, wages, and employment, the government balanced the budget and, through the Federal Reserve, raised interest rates. No "stimulus" was administered, and a powerful, job-filled recovery was under way by late in 1921. In 1929, the economy once again slumped--and kept right on slumping as the Hoover administration adopted the very policies that Wilson and Harding had declined to put in place. Grant argues that well-intended federal intervention, notably the White House-led campaign to prop up industrial wages, helped to turn a bad recession into America's worst depression. He offers the experience of the earlier depression for lessons for today and the future. This is a powerful response to the prevailing notion of how to fight recession. The enterprise system is more resilient than even its friends give it credit for being, Grant demonstrates.

The Forgotten Door

by Alexander Key

Lost in an unfamiliar world, a traveler searches for understandingAt night, Little Jon's people go out to watch the stars. Mesmerized by a meteor shower, he forgets to watch his step and falls through a moss-covered door to another land: America. He awakes hurt, his memory gone, sure only that he does not belong here. Captured by a hunter, Jon escapes by leaping six feet over a barbed-wire fence. Hungry and alone, he staggers through the darkness and is about to be caught when he is rescued by a kind family known as the Beans. They shelter him, feed him, and teach him about his new home. In return, he will change their lives forever. Although the Beans are kind to Little Jon, the townspeople mistrust the mysterious visitor. But Jon has untold powers, and as he learns to harness them, he will show his newfound friends that they have no reason to be afraid.

Forgotten Ellis Island

by Lorie Conway

A century ago, in the shadow of the Statue of Liberty, one of the world's greatest public hospitals was built. Massive and modern, the hospital's twenty-two state-of-the-art buildings were crammed onto two small islands, man-made from the rock and dirt excavated during the building of the New York subway. As America's first line of defense against immigrant-borne disease, the hospital was where the germs of the world converged. The Ellis Island hospital was at once welcoming and foreboding-a fateful crossroad for hundreds of thousands of hopeful immigrants. Those nursed to health were allowed entry to America. Those deemed feeble of body or mind were deported. Three short decades after it opened, the Ellis Island hospital was all but abandoned. As America after World War I began shutting its border to all but a favored few, the hospital fell into disuse and decay, its medical wards left open only to the salt air of the New York Harbor. With many never-before-published photographs and compelling, sometimes heartbreaking stories of patients (a few of whom are still alive today) and medical staff, Forgotten Ellis Island is the first book about this extraordinary institution. It is a powerful tribute to the best and worst of America's dealings with its new citizens-to-be.

Forgotten Fatherland: The True Story of Nietzsche's Sister and Her Lost Aryan Colony

by Ben Macintyre

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF A SPY AMONG FRIENDSIn 1886 Elisabeth Nietzsche, Friedrich's bigoted, imperious sister, founded a "racially pure" colony in Paraguay together with a band of blonde-haired fellow Germans. Over a century later Ben Macintyre sought out the survivors of this "Nueva Germania" to discover the remains of this bizarre colony. Forgotten Fatherland vividly recounts his arduous adventure locating the survivors, while also tracing the colorful history of Elisabeth's return to Europe, where she inspired the mythical cult of her brother's philosophy and later became a mentor to Hitler. Brilliantly researched and mordantly funny, this is an illuminating portrait of a forgotten people and of a woman whose deep influence on the twentieth century can only now be fully understood.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Forgotten Fiancee

by Lucy Gordon

The woman he couldn't rememberNot long ago, Justin Hallwood had been a hard-driving, London-based tycoon. Now he was inexplicably drawn to the little village of Haven -- especially to Sarah Conroy, a lovely single mother with an adorable baby son. The man she couldn't forgetOnce, Sarah thought that she and Justin would be together always. Then she'd announced her pregnancy, and he was gone. Two years later he was back -- with no memory of their shared past. Sarah knew that Justin was so close to remembering -- but if he did, would it mean that he would be lost to her again. . . this time forever?

Forgotten Fifteenth

by Barrett Tillman

November 1943-May 1945-The U.S. Army Air Forces waged an unprecedentedly dogged and violent campaign against Hitler's vital oil production and industrial plants on the Third Reich's southern flank. Flying from southern Italy, far from the limelight enjoyed by the Eighth Air Force in England, the Fifteenth Air Force engaged in high-risk missions spanning most of the European continent. The story of the Fifteenth Air Force deserves a prideful place in the annals of American gallantry.In his new book, Forgotten Fifteenth: The Daring Airmen Who Crippled Hitler's War Machine, Tillman brings into focus a seldom-seen multinational cast of characters, including pilots from Axis nations Romania, Hungary, and Bulgaria and many more remarkable individuals. They were the first generation of fliers-few of them professionals-to conduct a strategic bombing campaign against a major industrial nation. They suffered steady attrition and occasionally spectacular losses. In so doing, they contributed to the end of the most destructive war in history.Forgotten Fifteenth is the first-ever detailed account of the Fifteenth Air Force in World War II and the brave men that the history books have abandoned until now. Tillman proves this book is a must-read for military history enthusiasts, veterans, and current servicemen.

The Forgotten Founding Father

by Joshua Kendall

Noah Webster's name is now synonymous with the dictionary he created, but his story is not nearly so ubiquitous. Now acclaimed author of The Man Who Made Lists, Joshua Kendall sheds new light on Webster's life, and his far-reaching influence in establishing the American nation.Webster hobnobbed with various Founding Fathers and was a young confidant of George Washington and Ben Franklin. He started New York's first daily newspaper, predating Alexander Hamilton's New York Post. His "blue-backed speller" for schoolchildren sold millions of copies and influenced early copyright law. But perhaps most important, Webster was an ardent supporter of a unified, definitively American culture, distinct from the British, at a time when the United States of America were anything but unified-and his dictionary of American English is a testament to that.

The Forgotten Girl

by David Bell

The past has arrived uninvited at Jason Danvers's door... ...and it's his younger sister, Hayden, a former addict who severed all contact with her family as her life spiraled out of control. Now she's clean and sober but in need of a desperate favor--she asks Jason and his wife to take care of her teenage daughter for forty-eight hours while she handles some business in town.But Hayden never returns.And her disappearance brings up more unresolved problems from Jason's past, including the abrupt departure of his best friend on their high school graduation night twenty-seven years earlier. When a body is discovered in the woods, the mysteries of his sister's life--and possible death--deepen. And one by one these events will shatter every expectation Jason has ever had about families, about the awful truths that bind them and the secrets that should be taken to the grave.

The Forgotten Girls - Free Preview (first 5 Chapters)

by Sara Blaedel

In a forest in Denmark, a ranger discovers the fresh corpse of an unidentified woman. A large scar on one side of her face should make the identification easy, but nobody has reported her missing. After four days, Louise Rick--the new commander of the Missing Persons Department--is still without answers. But when she releases a photo to the media, an older woman phones to say that she recognizes the woman as Lisemette, a child she once cared for in the state mental institution many years ago. Lisemette, like the other children in the institution, was abandoned by her family and branded a "forgotten girl. " But Louise soon discovers something more disturbing: Lisemette had a twin, and both girls were issued death certificates over 30 years ago. As the investigation brings Louise closer to her childhood home, she uncovers more crimes that were committed--and hidden--in the forest, and finds a terrible link to her own past that has been carefully concealed.

A Forgotten Horseman: A Son's Weekend Memoir

by Lee E. Downing

As an adult, the author looks back and tells the story of a weekend he spent at a horse show with his father. His father was an African-American horse trainer of Saddlebred show horses in the 1950's. The author tells the story of his father and other African-American trainers of the day through his own eyes as an observer just entering his teens.

Forgotten (Jennie McGrady Mystery #13)

by Patricia H. Rushford

Jennie McGrady is looking forward to a day spent hiking in the mountains with her friends. She's arranged to meet them at the trailhead but arrives a few minutes early and takes the opportunity to enjoy the solitude and cool mountain air. But lurking nearby is a man wanted on burglary charges -- and in a heartbeat Jennie is taken hostage. Zack is a sweet kid but has been forced into a life of crime by his aunt and uncle. Only fourteen, he's afraid of being put into a detention center himself if he turns his guardians in. But he seems sympathetic to Jennie -- can she convince him to let her go and even escape with her?Corisa and Brandy Graham, during a weekend at their family cabin, stumble upon a nearly unconscious girl their age alone in the woods. She's been seriously injured -- and doesn't remember a thing about who she is or how she got there....

The Forgotten Language

by Erich Fromm

Renowned psychoanalyst Erich Fromm investigates the universal language of symbols, expressed through dream and myths, and how it illuminates our humanityIn this study, Erich Fromm opens up the world of symbolic language, "the one foreign language that each of us must learn." Understanding symbols, he posits, helps us reach the hidden layers of our individual personalities, as well as connect with our common human experiences. By grasping the symbolic language of dreams, Fromm explains, we can then also understand the deeper wisdom of myths, art, and literature. This also gives us access to what we, and our society, usually repress. Fromm shares the history of dream interpretations, and demonstrates his analysis of many types of dreams. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Erich Fromm including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the author's estate.

Forgotten Life

by Brian W. Aldiss

Winner of two Hugo Awards, one Nebula Award, and named a Grand Master by the Science Fiction Writers of America, Brian W. Aldiss has, for over fifty years, continued to challenge readers' minds with literate, thought-provoking, and inventive science fiction.Analyst Clement Winters is trying to write a biography of his recently deceased older brother, Joseph. Through the writings Joseph left behind--letters, diaries, notes, and confessions--Clement realizes how little he actually knows his brother and how vastly his perception of him differs from reality. As Clement tries to make sense of the life of his deceased sibling, he uncovers "little dark corners" of his family history and even his own life. This ebook includes an introduction by the author.

Forgotten Lullaby

by Rita Herron

Emma Wadsworth couldn't remember the car wreck that put her in the hospital-or the past five years of her life. But there was no denying her instant attraction to the sexy stranger she saw when she opened her eyes. Grant Wadsworth-her husband. . . 'With every look, every tough, Grant showed her how much he wanted her. And seeing Grant with their baby daughter stirred emotions that seemed like memories. But whoever had caused Emma's wreck wasn't finished with her yet. As a killer closed in, Emma sought shelter in the one place she felt safe-the arms of the stranger she married. . .

The Forgotten Man (Elvis Cole #10)

by Robert Crais

A dying man claims to be the unknown father of Elvis Cole, private eye.

Forgotten Past

by Mary Alford

LOST MEMORIES Faith McKenzie was the only survivor of a brutal home invasion. Viciously attacked and left for dead, Faith can't remember anything about that night-including the identity of the killer. All she knows is that he's stalking her from every place she flees and has tracked her to a small Maine island. Her neighbor, private investigator and security specialist JT Wyatt, rescues her twice. Now JT is insisting on the whole story-a story that Faith can't remember. Desperate to feel safe, Faith puts her trust in the handsome P.I. Yet a killer is dead set on ensuring that Faith's memory never returns.

Forgotten Patriots

by Edwin G. Burrows

Between 1775 and 1783, some 200,000 Americans took up arms against the British Crown. Just over 6,800 of those men died in battle. About 25,000 became prisoners of war, most of them confined in New York City under conditions so atrocious that they perished by the thousands. Evidence suggests that at least 17,500 Americans may have died in these prisons-more than twice the number to die on the battlefield. It was in New York, not Boston or Philadelphia, where most Americans gave their lives for the cause of independence.New York City became the jailhouse of the American Revolution because it was the principal base of the Crown's military operations. Beginning with the bumper crop of American captives taken during the 1776 invasion of New York, captured Americans were stuffed into a hastily assembled collection of public buildings, sugar houses, and prison ships. The prisoners were shockingly overcrowded and chronically underfed-those who escaped alive told of comrades so hungry they ate their own clothes and shoes.Despite the extraordinary number of lives lost, Forgotten Patriots is the first-ever account of what took place in these hell-holes. The result is a unique perspective on the Revolutionary War as well as a sobering commentary on how Americans have remembered our struggle for independence-and how much we have forgotten.

The Forgotten (Peter Decker & Rina Lazarus Series, #13)

by Faye Kellerman

Rina Lazarus and her husband, LAPD Homicide Lieutenant Peter Decker, are shocked by an outrage that cuts close to the spiritual heart of their family. Rina's small storefront synagogue has been desecrated with anti-Semitic graffiti and grisly Nazi death camp photographs. The alleged perpetrator is seventeen-year-old Ernesto Golding, a "rich kid" obsessed with haunting suspicions about the origins of his Polish paternal grandfather. Then Ernesto is found brutally murdered, along with his therapist, Dr. Mervin Baldwin, at an exclusive nature camp that caters moneyed, troubled children. For Decker and his wife, unraveling the truth behind Ernesto's violent death becomes more terrifying with each sinister twist. For lethal secrets with roots in the horrors of a past genteration are coming to the surface, propelling Peter and Rina into a ghastly world of ruthless parents and damaged youth -- and toward a dark evil and its ultimate retribution.

The Forgotten Planet (Classics of Modern Science Fiction Series #6)

by George Zebrowski Murray Leinster

It was a wild planet, but the space ships of Earth saw that it would someday be suitable for habitation, so they seeded it with lower forms of life--bacteria, fungi, simple plants, and insects--to re-create the food chain that human colonists would need. Next should have come the higher forms of animal life, but something went wrong. The Galactic record keepers lost their punch card, the planet was forgotten, and for centuries the forces of evolution worked their magic without further human intervention. Then one day a lifeboat, escaping from the stricken starship Icarus, brought a party of humans to the forgotten planet, where they encountered a nightmare world of huge mushrooms, giant spiders and beetles, monster worms and deadly fungi, a land of dense clouds and perpetual mists, without sunlight. It was an experiment out of control. Rescue was impossible and survival uncertain, so the descendants of the Icarus's people lost their technology, their culture and their language, and degenerated into savagery.

The Forgotten Queen

by Bogdan D. L.

From her earliest days, Margaret Tudor knows she will not have the luxury of choosing a husband. As daughter of Henry VII, her duty is to gain alliances for England. Barely out of girlhood, Margaret is married by proxy to James IV and travels to Edinburgh to become Queen of Scotland. Despite her doubts, Margaret falls under the spell of her adopted home. But she has rivals. While Jamie is an affectionate husband, he is not a faithful one. And providing an heir cannot guarantee Margaret's safety when Jamie leads an invading army against her own brother, Henry VIII. In the wake of tragic loss she falls prey to the attentions of the ambitious Earl of Angus--a move that brings Scotland to the brink of anarchy. Beset by betrayal, secret alliances, and the vagaries of her own heart, Margaret has one overriding ambition--to preserve the crown of Scotland for her son, no matter what the cost. Exquisitely detailed and poignant, The Forgotten Queen vividly depicts the life and loves of an extraordinary woman who helped shape the fate of two kingdoms--and in time, became the means of uniting them. Praise for the novels of D. L. BogdanA story of love and redemption, beautifully told. --Christy English on The Sumerton WomenThrobs with intensity as it lays bare the secret delights of Tudor court life and the sudden, lethal terrors. A tale of innocence and ruthless ambition locked in a love-hate embrace. --Barbara Kyle on Secrets of the Tudor Court

The Forgotten Queen

by D. L. Bogdan

From her earliest days, Margaret Tudor knows she will not have the luxury of choosing a husband. As daughter of Henry VII, her duty is to gain alliances for England. Barely out of girlhood, Margaret is married by proxy to James IV and travels to Edinburgh to become Queen of Scotland.Despite her doubts, Margaret falls under the spell of her adopted home. But she has rivals. While Jamie is an affectionate husband, he is not a faithful one. And providing an heir cannot guarantee Margaret's safety when Jamie leads an invading army against her own brother, Henry VIII. In the wake of tragic loss she falls prey to the attentions of the ambitious Earl of Angus--a move that brings Scotland to the brink of anarchy. Beset by betrayal, secret alliances, and the vagaries of her own heart, Margaret has one overriding ambition--to preserve the crown of Scotland for her son, no matter what the cost. Exquisitely detailed and poignant, The Forgotten Queen vividly depicts the life and loves of an extraordinary woman who helped shape the fate of two kingdoms--and in time, became the means of uniting them. Praise for the novels of D.L. Bogdan"A story of love and redemption, beautifully told." --Christy English on The Sumerton Women"Throbs with intensity as it lays bare the secret delights of Tudor court life and the sudden, lethal terrors. A tale of innocence and ruthless ambition locked in a love-hate embrace." --Barbara Kyle on Secrets of the Tudor Court

Forgotten Readers: Recovering the Lost History of African American Literary Societies

by Elizabeth Mchenry

Over the past decade the popularity of black writers including E. Lynn Harris and Terry McMillan has been hailed as an indication that an active African American reading public has come into being. Yet this is not a new trend; there is a vibrant history of African American literacy, literary associations, and book clubs. Forgotten Readers reveals that neglected past, looking at the reading practices of free blacks in the antebellum north and among African Americans following the Civil War. It places the black upper and middle classes within American literary history, illustrating how they used reading and literary conversation as a means to assert their civic identities and intervene in the political and literary cultures of the United States from which they were otherwise excluded. Forgotten Readers expands our definition of literacy and urges us to think of literature as broadly as it was conceived of in the nineteenth century. Elizabeth McHenry delves into archival sources, including the records of past literary societies and the unpublished writings of their members. She examines particular literary associations, including the Saturday Nighters of Washington, D. C. , whose members included Jean Toomer and Georgia Douglas Johnson. She shows how black literary societies developed, their relationship to the black press, and the ways that African American women's clubs--which flourished during the 1890s--encouraged literary activity. In an epilogue, McHenry connects this rich tradition of African American interest in books, reading, and literary conversation to contemporary literary phenomena such as Oprah Winfrey's book club.

Showing 95,951 through 95,975 of 191,987 results

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