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Showing 96,176 through 96,200 of 241,764 results

Designing Embedded Hardware

by John Catsoulis

Intelligent readers who want to build their own embedded computer systems-- installed in everything from cell phones to cars to handheld organizers to refrigerators-- will find this book to be the most in-depth, practical, and up-to-date guide on the market. Designing Embedded Hardware carefully steers between the practical and philosophical aspects, so developers can both create their own devices and gadgets and customize and extend off-the-shelf systems. There are hundreds of books to choose from if you need to learn programming, but only a few are available if you want to learn to create hardware. Designing Embedded Hardware provides software and hardware engineers with no prior experience in embedded systems with the necessary conceptual and design building blocks to understand the architectures of embedded systems. Written to provide the depth of coverage and real-world examples developers need, Designing Embedded Hardware also provides a road-map to the pitfalls and traps to avoid in designing embedded systems. Designing Embedded Hardware covers such essential topics as: The principles of developing computer hardware Core hardware designs Assembly language concepts Parallel I/O Analog-digital conversion Timers (internal and external) UART Serial Peripheral Interface Inter-Integrated Circuit Bus Controller Area Network (CAN) Data Converter Interface (DCI) Low-power operation This invaluable and eminently useful book gives you the practical tools and skills to develop, build, and program your own application-specific computers.

Designing Evolvable Web APIs with ASP.NET

by Glenn Block Howard Dierking Darrel Miller Pablo Cibraro Pedro Felix

Design and build Web APIs for a broad range of clients--including browsers and mobile devices--that can adapt to change over time. This practical, hands-on guide takes you through the theory and tools you need to build evolvable HTTP services with Microsoft's ASP.NET Web API framework. In the process, you'll learn how design and implement a real-world Web API.Ideal for experienced .NET developers, this book's sections on basic Web API theory and design also apply to developers who work with other development stacks such as Java, Ruby, PHP, and Node.Dig into HTTP essentials, as well as API development concepts and stylesLearn ASP.NET Web API fundamentals, including the lifecycle of a request as it travels through the frameworkDesign the Issue Tracker API example, exploring topics such as hypermedia support with collection+jsonUse behavioral-driven development with ASP.NET Web API to implement and enhance the applicationExplore techniques for building clients that are resilient to change, and make it easy to consume hypermedia APIsGet a comprehensive reference on how ASP.NET Web API works under the hood, including security and testability

Designing Fictions

by Michael L. Ross

Advertising, long a controlling force in industrial society, has provoked an important body of imaginative work by English language writers. Michael Ross's Designing Fictions is the first study to investigate this symbiotic relationship on a broad scale. In view of the appreciable overlap between literary and promotional writing, Ross asks whether imaginative fiction has the latitude to critique advertising as an industry and as a literary form, and finds that intended critiques, time and again, turn out to be shot through with ambivalence. The texts considered include a wide range of books by British, American, and Canadian authors, from H.G. Wells's pioneering fictional treatment of mass marketing in Tono-Bungay (1909) to Joshua Ferris's depiction of a faltering Chicago agency in Then We Came to the End (2007). Along the way, among other examples, Ross discusses George Orwell's seriocomic study of the stand-off between poetry and advertising in his 1936 novel Keep the Aspidistra Flying and Margaret Atwood's probing of the impact of promotion on perception in The Edible Woman (1969). The final chapter of the book considers the popular television series Mad Men, where the tension between artistic and commercial pressures is especially acute. Written in a straightforward style for a wide audience of readers, Designing Fictions argues that the impact of advertising is universal and discussions of its significance should not be restricted to a narrow group of specialists.

Designing for Behavior Change

by Stephen Wendel

A new wave of products is helping people change their behavior and daily routines, whether it's exercising more (Jawbone Up), taking control of their finances (HelloWallet), or organizing their email (Mailbox). This practical guide shows you how to design these types of products for users seeking to take action and achieve specific goals. Stephen Wendel, HelloWallet's head researcher, takes you step-by-step through the process of applying behavioral economics and psychology to the practical problems of product design and development. Using a combination of lean and agile development methods, you'll learn a simple iterative approach for identifying target users and behaviors, building the product, and gauging its effectiveness. Discover how to create easy-to-use products to help people make positive changes. Learn the three main strategies to help people change behavior Identify your target audience and the behaviors they seek to change Extract user stories and identify obstacles to behavior change Develop effective interface designs that are enjoyable to use Measure your product's impact and learn ways to improve it Use practical examples from products like Nest, Fitbit, and Opower

Designing for Growth: A Design Thinking Toolkit for Managers

by Liedtka Jeanne Tim Ogilvie

Jeanne Liedtka and Tim Ogilvie educate readers in one of the hottest trends in business development: "design thinking," or the ability to turn abstract ideas into practical applications for maximal business growth. Jeanne Liedtka's recent book, The Catalyst: How YOU Can Lead Extraordinary Growth, was named a Top Innovation and Design Thinking Book by Business Week. Tim Ogilvie has been hailed a visionary for his pioneering contributions to service innovation, business model innovation, and customer experience design. Liedtka and Ogilvie cover the mindset, techniques, and vocabulary of design thinking, unpack the mysterious connection between design and growth, and teach managers, in a straightforward way, how to exploit design's exciting potential. Exemplified by Apple and the success of their elegant products, and cultivated by high profile design firms such as IDEO, design thinking unlocks creative right brain capabilities to solve a range of problems. This approach has become a necessary component of successful business practice, helping managers turn abstract concepts into everyday tools that grow business while minimizing risk.

The Designing for Growth Field Book

by Jeanne Liedtka Tim Ogilvie Rachel Brozenske

In Designing for Growth: A Design Thinking Tool Kit for Managers (D4G), Jeanne Liedtka and Tim Ogilvie showed how design can boost innovation and drive growth. In this companion guide, also suitable as a stand-alone project workbook, the authors provide a step-by-step framework for applying the D4G toolkit and process to a particular project, systematically explaining how to address the four key questions of their design thinking approach.The field book maps the flow of the design process within the context of a specific project and reminds readers of key D4G takeaways as they work. The text helps readers identify an opportunity, draft a design brief, conduct research, establish design criteria, brainstorm, develop concepts, create napkin pitches, make prototypes, solicit feedback from stakeholders, and run learning launches. The workbook demystifies tools that have traditionally been the domain of designers -- from direct observation to journey mapping, storytelling, and storyboarding -- that power the design thinking process and help businesses align around a project to realize its full potential.

Designing for Learning in an Open World

by Gráinne Conole

The Internet and associated technologies have been around for almost twenty years. Networked access and computer ownership are now the norm. There is a plethora of technologies that can be used to support learning, offering different ways in which learners can communicate with each other and their tutors, and providing them with access to interactive, multimedia content. However, these generic skills don't necessarily translate seamlessly to an academic learning context. Appropriation of these technologies for academic purposes requires specific skills, which means that the way in which we design and support learning opportunities needs to provide appropriate support to harness the potential of technologies. More than ever before learners need supportive 'learning pathways' to enable them to blend formal educational offerings, with free resources and services. This requires a rethinking of the design process, to enable teachers to take account of a blended learning context.

Designing for People

by Henry Dreyfuss

Henry S. Dreyfuss is considered the founding father of industrial design in the United States and one of the most prolific designers of the past century. During his forty years of design practice, he authored or inspired countless American design landmarks, including the model 300 Bell telephone, the Twentieth Century Limited locomotive, Hoover appliances, RCA televisions, Lockheed aircraft interiors, the S.S. Constitution and the S.S. Independence. His revolutionary insights about anthropometrics and ergonomics won the admiration of clients and design institutions across the globe. He wrote "The Measure of Men and Women" and "The Symbol Source Book", taught at the California Institute of Technology, and won numerous awards.

Designing for Performance

by Lara Callender Hogan

As a web designer, you encounter tough choices when it comes to weighing aesthetics and performance. Good content, layout, images, and interactivity are essential for engaging your audience, and each of these elements has an enormous impact on page load time and the end-user experience. In this practical book, Laura Hogan helps you approach projects with page speed in mind, showing you how to test and benchmark which design choices are most critical.To get started, all you need are basic HTML and CSS skills and Photoshop experience.Topics include:The impact of page load time on your site, brand, and usersPage speed basics: how browsers retrieve and render contentBest practices for optimizing and loading imagesHow to clean up HTML and CSS, and optimize web fontsMobile-first design with performance goals by breakpointUsing tools to measure performance as your site evolvesMethods for shaping an organization's performance culture

Designing for the Digital Age: How to Create Human-Centered Products and Services

by Kim Goodwin

Whether you're designing consumer electronics, medical devices, enterprise Web apps, or new ways to check out at the supermarket, today's digitally-enabled products and services provide both great opportunities to deliver compelling user experiences and great risks of driving your customers crazy with complicated, confusing technology. Designing successful products and services in the digital age requires a multi-disciplinary team with expertise in interaction design, visual design, industrial design, and other disciplines. It also takes the ability to come up with the big ideas that make a desirable product or service, as well as the skill and perseverance to execute on the thousand small ideas that get your design into the hands of users. It requires expertise in project management, user research, and consensus-building. This comprehensive, full-color volume addresses all of these and more with detailed how-to information, real-life examples, and exercises. Topics include assembling a design team, planning and conducting user research, analyzing your data and turning it into personas, using scenarios to drive requirements definition and design, collaborating in design meetings, evaluating and iterating your design, and documenting finished design in a way that works for engineers and stakeholders alike.

Designing Games

by Tynan Sylvester

<p>How do you design a video game that people <i>love</i> to play? In this practical guide, game designer Tynan Sylvester shows you how to create emotionally charged experiences through the right combination of game mechanics, fictional wrapping, and story. You&#8217;ll learn design principles and practices used by top studios, backed by examples from today&#8217;s most popular games.</p>

Designing Gestural Interfaces: Touchscreens and Interactive Devices

by Dan Saffer

If you want to get ahead in this new era of interaction design, this is the reference you need. Nintendo's Wii and Apple's iPhone and iPod Touch have made gestural interfaces popular, but until now there's been no complete source of information about the technology. Designing Gestural Interfaces provides you with essential information about kinesiology, sensors, ergonomics, physical computing, touchscreen technology, and new interface patterns -- all you need to know to augment your existing skills in "traditional" web design, software, or product development. Packed with informative illustrations and photos, this book helps you: Get an overview of technologies surrounding touchscreens and interactive environments Learn the process of designing gestural interfaces, from documentation to prototyping to communicating to the audience what the product does Examine current patterns and trends in touchscreen and gestural design Learn about the techniques used by practicing designers and developers today See how other designers have solved interface challenges in the past Look at future trends in this rapidly evolving field Only six years ago, the gestural interfaces introduced in the film Minority Report were science fiction. Now, because of technological, social, and market forces, we see similar interfaces deployed everywhere. Designing Gestural Interfaces will help you enter this new world of possibilities.

Designing Great Beers

by Ray Daniels

Author Ray Daniels provides the brewing formulas, tables, and information to take your brewing to the next level in this detailed technical manual.

Designing Human Practices: An Experiment with Synthetic Biology

by Paul Rabinow Gaymon Bennett

In 2006 anthropologists Paul Rabinow and Gaymon Bennett set out to rethink the role that human sciences play in biological research, creating the Human Practices division of the Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center--a facility established to create design standards for the engineering of new enzymes, genetic circuits, cells, and other biological entities--to formulate a new approach to the ethical, security, and philosophical considerations of controversial biological work. They sought not simply to act as watchdogs but to integrate the biosciences with their own discipline in a more fundamentally interdependent way, inventing a new, dynamic, and experimental anthropology that they could bring to bear on the center's biological research. Designing Human Practices is a detailed account of this anthropological experiment and, ultimately, its rejection. It provides new insights into the possibilities and limitations of collaboration, and diagnoses the micro-politics which effectively constrained the potential for mutual scientific flourishing. Synthesizing multiple disciplines, including biology, genetics, anthropology, and philosophy, alongside a thorough examination of funding entities such as the National Science Foundation, Designing Human Practices pushes the social study of science into new and provocative territory, utilizing a real-world experience as a springboard for timely reflections on how the human and life sciences can and should transform each other.

Designing Human Resource Management Systems

by Jayant Mukherjee

Designing Human Resource Management Systems provides a framework for designing and implementing Human Resource Management (HRM) systems in various kinds of organizations, even those with limited resources. It is intended for leaders, decision makers, senior managers, HR practitioners, and consultants wishing to innovate, structure, and implement HRM systems in organizations. Distinguishing features of the book are: - Guidelines in each of the practice areas of HRM that identify key components and discuss important considerations in designing the sub-system of that practice area. - Exhibits in the form of tools, questionnaires, inventories, forms, policies, and other aspects of utility for designing HRM systems. - Key Terms and Concepts section in each chapter that provides relevant theory, concepts, and research in each practice area. The book comprehensively covers concepts and relevant theories pertaining to job analysis, human resource planning, recruitment and selection, performance management, training and development, 360-degree feedback, mentoring and executive coaching, and reward management. The guidelines present a logical, simple, and easy-to-adopt approach with examples related to what can possibly go wrong and therefore what to guard against.

Designing Interfaces

by Jenifer Tidwell

This idea book describes 94 user interface design components for both desktop and web applications. Separate chapters address content structure, navigation, page layout, actions and commands, information graphics, and data collection forms. Most of the patterns receive a two-page layout that explains when, how, and why to use the technique and provides example screenshots in color. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Designing Interfaces

by Jenifer Tidwell

Designing a good interface isn't easy. Users demand software that is well-behaved, good-looking, and easy to use. Your clients or managers demand originality and a short time to market. Your UI technology -- web applications, desktop software, even mobile devices -- may give you the tools you need, but little guidance on how to use them well. UI designers over the years have refined the art of interface design, evolving many best practices and reusable ideas. If you learn these, and understand why the best user interfaces work so well, you too can design engaging and usable interfaces with less guesswork and more confidence. Designing Interfaces captures those best practices as design patterns -- solutions to common design problems, tailored to the situation at hand. Each pattern contains practical advice that you can put to use immediately, plus a variety of examples illustrated in full color. You'll get recommendations, design alternatives, and warnings on when not to use them. Each chapter's introduction describes key design concepts that are often misunderstood, such as affordances, visual hierarchy, navigational distance, and the use of color. These give you a deeper understanding of why the patterns work, and how to apply them with more insight. A book can't design an interface for you -- no foolproof design process is given here -- but Designing Interfaces does give you concrete ideas that you can mix and recombine as you see fit. Experienced designers can use it as a sourcebook of ideas. Novice designers will find a roadmap to the world of interface and interaction design, with enough guidance to start using these patterns immediately.

Designing Interfaces

by Jenifer Tidwell

Despite all of the UI toolkits available today, it's still not easy to design good application interfaces. This bestselling book is one of the few reliable sources to help you navigate through the maze of design options. By capturing UI best practices and reusable ideas as design patterns, Designing Interfaces provides solutions to common design problems that you can tailor to the situation at hand. This updated edition includes patterns for mobile apps and social media, as well as web applications and desktop software. Each pattern contains full-color examples and practical design advice that you can use immediately. Experienced designers can use this guide as a sourcebook of ideas; novices will find a roadmap to the world of interface and interaction design. Design engaging and usable interfaces with more confidence and less guesswork Learn design concepts that are often misunderstood, such as affordances, visual hierarchy, navigational distance, and the use of color Get recommendations for specific UI patterns, including alternatives and warnings on when not to use them Mix and recombine UI ideas as you see fit Polish the look and feel of your interfaces with graphic design principles and patterns "Anyone who's serious about designing interfaces should have this book on their shelf for reference. It's the most comprehensive cross-platform examination of common interface patterns anywhere." --Dan Saffer, author of Designing Gestural Interfaces (O'Reilly) and Designing for Interaction (New Riders)

Designing Interfaces in Public Settings

by Stuart Reeves

Interaction with computers is becoming an increasingly ubiquitous and public affair. With more and more interactive digital systems being deployed in places such as museums, city streets and performance venues, understanding how to design for them is becoming ever more pertinent. Crafting interactions for these public settings raises a host of new challenges for human-computer interaction, widening the focus of design from concern about an individual's dialogue with an interface to also consider the ways in which interaction affects and is affected by spectators and bystanders. Designing Interfaces in Public Settings takes a performative perspective on interaction, exploring a series of empirical studies of technology at work in public performance environments. From interactive storytelling to mobile devices on city streets, from digital telemetry systems on fairground rides to augmented reality installation interactive, the book documents the design issues emerging from the changing role of technology as it pushes out into our everyday lives. Building a design framework from these studies and the growing body of literature examining public technologies, this book provides a new perspective for understanding human-computer interaction. Mapping out this new and challenging design space, Designing Interfaces in Public Settings offers both conceptual understandings and practical strategies for interaction design practitioners, artists working with technology, and computer scientists.

Designing Logos

by Jack Gernsheimer

How to design great logos, step by step by step. * Lavishly illustrated with 750 color images * How-tos, case studies, and detailed analysis of well-known logos What makes a logo good? What makes it bad? What makes it great? The entire process of logo design is examined, from the initial client interview to brainstorming, from first presentation to delivery of the final standards manual. Through 750 color illustrations, classic logos are analyzed, and readers will learn a thirteen-point system for measuring the effectiveness of any logo. Learn about the uses of positive and negative space, balance, color, and typography; follow intriguing case studies; discover how to make effective presentations to clients. Designers, marketing and branding specialists, educators, and students everywhere need this definitive guide to creating great logos.

Designing Mathematics or Science Curriculum Programs: A Guide for Using Mathematics and Science Education Standards

by Committee on Science Education K-12 the Mathematical Sciences Education Board

With the publication of the National Science Education Standards and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics, a clear set of goals and guidelines for achieving literacy in mathematics and science was established. Designing Mathematics or Science Curriculum Programs has been developed to help state- and district-level education leaders create coherent, multi-year curriculum programs that provide students with opportunities to learn both mathematics and science in a connected and cumulative way throughout their schooling.Researchers have confirmed that as U.S. students move through the grade levels, they slip further and further behind students of other nations in mathematics and science achievement. Experts now believe that U.S. student performance is hindered by the lack of coherence in the mathematics and science curricula in many American schools. By structuring curriculum programs that capitalize on what students have already learned, the new concepts and processes that they can learn will be richer, more complex, and at a higher level. Designing Mathematics or Science Curriculum Programs outlines: Components of effective mathematics and science programs. Criteria by which these components can be judged. A process for developing curriculum that is structured, focused, and coherent. Perhaps most important, this book emphasizes the need for designing curricula across the entire 13-year span that our children spend in elementary and secondary school as a way to improve the quality of education. Ultimately, it will help state and district educators use national and state standards to design or re-build mathematics and science curriculum programs that develop new ideas and skills based on earlier ones--from lesson to lesson, unit to unit, year to year.Anyone responsible for designing or influencing mathematics or science curriculum programs will find this guide valuable.

Designing Mobile Payment Experiences

by Skip Allums

Now that consumer purchases with mobile phones are on the rise, how do you design a payment app that's safe, easy to use, and compelling? With this practical book, interaction and product designer Skip Allums provides UX best practices and recommendations to help you create familiar, friendly, and trustworthy experiences.Consumers want mobile transactions to be as fast and reliable as cash or bank cards. This book shows designers, developers, and product managers--from startups to financial institutions--how to design mobile payments that not only safeguard identity and financial data, but also provide value-added features that exceed customer expectations.Learn about the major mobile payment frameworks: NFC, cloud, and closed loopExamine the pros and cons of Google Wallet, Isis, Square, PayPal, and other payment appsProvide walkthroughs, demos, and easy registration to quickly gain a new user's trustDesign efficient point-of-sale interactions, using NFC, QR, barcodes, or geolocationAdd peripheral services such as points, coupons and offers, and money management

Designing Multi-Device Experiences

by Michal Levin

Welcome to our multi-device world, a world where a user's experience with one application can span many devices--a smartphone, a tablet, a computer, the TV, and beyond. This practical book demonstrates the variety of ways devices relate to each other, combining to create powerful ensembles that deliver superior, integrated experiences to your users. Learn a practical framework for designing multi-device experiences, based on the 3Cs--Consistent, Complementary, and Continuous approaches Graduate from offering everything on all devices, to delivering the right thing, at the right time, on the best (available) device Apply the 3Cs framework to the broader realm of the Internet of Things, and design multi-device experiences that anticipate a fully connected world Learn how to measure your multi-device ecosystem performance Get ahead of the curve by designing for a more connected future

Designing Next Generation Web Projects with CSS3

by Sandro Paganotti

This book is designed for you if you are a frontend web developer; it requires a solid knowledge of CSS syntax and of the most common CSS2 properties and selectors.

Designing Our Way to a Better World

by Thomas Fisher

Envisioning what we need, when it doesn't yet exist: this, Thomas Fisher tells us, is what design does. And if what we need now is a better world--functioning schools, working infrastructure, thriving cities--why not design one? Fisher shows how the principles of design apply to services and systems that seem to evolve naturally, systems whose failures sometimes seem as arbitrary and inevitable as the weather. But the "invisible" systems we depend on for our daily lives (in education, politics, economics, and public health) are designed every bit as much as the products we buy and the environments we inhabit--and are just as susceptible to creative reimagining.Designing Our Way to a Better World challenges the assumptions that have led to so much poor performance in the public and private realms: that our schools cannot teach creativity, that our governments cannot predict the disasters that befall us, that our health system will protect us from pandemics, that our politics will remain polarized, that our economy cannot avoid inequality, and that our industry cannot help but pollute the environment. Targeting these assumptions, Fisher's approach reveals the power of design to synthesize our knowledge about the world into greater wholes. In doing so, this book opens up possible futures--and better futures--than the unsustainable and inequitable one we now face.

Showing 96,176 through 96,200 of 241,764 results

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