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The Long, Bitter Trail (Andrew Jackson and the Indians)

by Anthony F. C. Wallace

This account of Congress's Indian Removal Act of 1830 focuses on the plight of the Indians of the Southeast--Cherokees, Creeks, Choctaws, Chickasaws, and Seminoles--who were forced to leave their ancestral lands and relocate to what is now the state of Oklahoma. Revealing Andrew Jackson's central role in the government's policies, Wallace examines the racist attitudes toward Native Americans that led to their removal and, ultimately, their tragic fate.

The Long Christmas

by Ruth Sawyer

The Christmas is long because the author believes it takes a full season of feasting, singing, storytelling, and observing many holiday traditions to attain then maintain a Christmas state of mind in keeping with the importance of Christ's birth. Ruth Sawyer retells tales she's gathered with care and respect for the traditions and peoples who have passed them on for centuries as Christmas entertainment and inspiration. Her 9 page Introduction in which she sketches the practices of many nations since the first Christmas is as captivating as the 13 stories that follow. Who would not sympathize with the old men who, on the day before Twelfth Night, stood so long admiring the pastries through the display windows that mischievous boys nailed their coat tails to the shop walls? Before each tale is a carol from that story's country of origin. Such as the carol from the north of Spain in which Miguel brings a mouse, gray and small, for Christ's house. And a cobbler sings, "Carol clear, casting all fear out, May his sandals wear the year out." The stories are peopled with a gallery of characters spurning, embracing, and being moved by the birth of Jesus. Satan in a sombrero terrorizes shepherds who don't yet know that Jesus as been born. A Roman soldier, who laughed three times at Christians, wanders for centuries until he understands the goodness Christ brought to the world. A kind, generous girl who never had a family or home of her own because she was scorned as a tinker's daughter, is given a home for all time where she can shelter the poor. Three frightened, motherless, boys are rudely pushed out of bed by a cranky dwarf who makes them do cartwheels and stand on their heads to keep warm, but leaves them with the merriest Christmas of their lives. A hunch backed young ship builder, a starving Irish Immigrant with two cold babies, and a wise, devoted King's fool, make us believe in miracles and challenge us to help others and put love in our Christmas celebrations.

Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul

by Douglas Adams

When a passenger check-in desk at Terminal Two, Heathrow Airport, shot up through the roof engulfed in a ball of orange flame the usual people tried to claim responsibility. First the IRA, then the PLO and the Gas Board. Even British Nuclear Fuels rushed out a statement to the effect that the situation was completely under control, that it was a one in a million chance, that there was hardly any radioactive leakage at all and that the site of the explosion would make a nice location for a day out with the kids and a picnic, before finally having to admit that it wasn't actually anything to do with them at all. No rational cause could be found for the explosion -- it was simply designated an act of God. But, think Dirk Gently, which God? And why? What God would be hanging around Terminal Two of Heathrow Airport trying to catch the 15:37 to Oslo? Funnier than Psycho...more chilling than Jeeves Takes Charge ...shorter than War and Peace...the new Dirk Gently novel, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul.

Long Day's Journey into Night

by Eugene O'Neill

Eugene O'Neill's autobiographical play Long Day's Journey into Night is regarded as his finest work. First published by Yale University Press in 1956, it won the Pulitzer Prize in 1957 and has since sold more than one million copies. This edition, which includes a new foreword by Harold Bloom, coincides with a new production of the play starring Brian Dennehy, which opens in Chicago in January 2002 and in New York in April.

The Long Descent: A User's Guide to the End of the Industrial Age

by John Michael Greer

Americans are expressing deep concern about US dependence on petroleum, rising energy prices, and the threat of climate change. Unlike the energy crisis of the 1970s, however, there is a lurking fear that now the times are different and the crisis may not easily be resolved. The Long Descent examines the basis of such fear through three core themes: Industrial society is following the same well-worn path that has led other civilizations into decline, a path involving a much slower and more complex transformation than the sudden catastrophes imagined by so many social critics today. The roots of the crisis lie in the cultural stories that shape the way we understand the world. Since problems cannot be solved with the same thinking that created them, these ways of thinking need to be replaced with others better suited to the needs of our time. It is too late for massive programs for top-down change; the change must come from individuals. Hope exists in actions that range from taking up a handicraft or adopting an "obsolete" technology, through planting an organic vegetable garden, taking charge of your own health care or spirituality, and building community. Focusing eloquently on constructive adaptation to massive change, this book will have wide appeal. John Michael Greer is a certified Master Conserver, organic gardener, and scholar of ecological history. The current Grand Archdruid of the Ancient Order of Druids in America (AODA), his widely-cited blog, The Archdruid Report (thearchdruidreport.blogspot.com) deals with peak oil, among other issues. He lives in Ashland, Oregon.

The Long-Distance Dad

by Steven Ashley

You can't always be there physically for your children-but that doesn't mean you can't be a good dad. Steven Ashley, founder of the Divorced Fathers Network, shows you how to remain an important part of your child's life-no matter how far apart you are.

Long Distance Lover

by Donna Hill

World-class sprinter Kelly Maxwell doesn't have time for romance. But when she suffers an injury on the track, she begins to reevaluate her life. Facing a difficult recovery at a physical rehab facility in New York, Kelly must decide whether she really loves the sport. But after meeting with her physical therapist, Dr. Alex Hutchinson, she faces yet another hurdle.Alex Hutchinson has fallen in love with the wrong woman before-another athlete just like Kelly. Now, years later, he doesn't want to make the same mistake twice. He tries to back off, but the attraction is too strong. And when he realizes that Kelly's coach has his own agenda, Alex tries to protect her even more. But is he ready to heal his broken heart?

Long-Distance Marriage

by Sharon Kendrick

Alessandra works at an advertisement agency in London, and is married to Cameron Calder, a well-known CEO of a large enterprise. The charismatic Cameron always manages to charm anyone he meets, but when he first meets Alessandra, she treats him coldly. Cameron is fascinated by this "cool lady," and asks her to marry him! But Alessandra doesn't know. . . that this marriage will bring a seemingly endless suffering. . .

The Long Divergence: How Islamic Law Held Back the Middle East

by Timur Kuran

In the year 1000, the economy of the Middle East was at least as advanced as that of Europe. But by 1800, the region had fallen dramatically behind--in living standards, technology, and economic institutions. In short, the Middle East had failed to modernize economically as the West surged ahead. What caused this long divergence? And why does the Middle East remain drastically underdeveloped compared to the West? InThe Long Divergence, one of the world's leading experts on Islamic economic institutions and the economy of the Middle East provides a new answer to these long-debated questions. Timur Kuran argues that what slowed the economic development of the Middle East was not colonialism or geography, still less Muslim attitudes or some incompatibility between Islam and capitalism. Rather, starting around the tenth century, Islamic legal institutions, which had benefitted the Middle Eastern economy in the early centuries of Islam, began to act as a drag on development by slowing or blocking the emergence of central features of modern economic life--including private capital accumulation, corporations, large-scale production, and impersonal exchange. By the nineteenth century, modern economic institutions began to be transplanted to the Middle East, but its economy has not caught up. And there is no quick fix today. Low trust, rampant corruption, and weak civil societies--all characteristic of the region's economies today and all legacies of its economic history--will take generations to overcome. The Long Divergenceopens up a frank and honest debate on a crucial issue that even some of the most ardent secularists in the Muslim world have hesitated to discuss.

The Long Embrace: Raymond Chandler and the Woman He Loved

by Judith Freeman

Raymond Chandler was among the most original and enduring crime novelists of the twentieth century. Yet much of his pre-writing life, including his unconventional marriage, has remained shrouded in mystery. In this compelling, wholly original book, Judith Freeman sets out to solve the puzzle of who Chandler was and how he became the writer who would create in Philip Marlowe an icon of American culture. Visiting Chandler's many homes and apartments, Freeman uncovers vestiges of the Los Angeles that was Chandler's terrain and inspiration for his imagination. She also uncovers the life of Cissy Pascal, the older, twice-divorced woman Chandler married in 1924. A revelation of a marriage that was a wellspring of need, illusion, and creativity, The Long Embrace provides us with a more complete picture of Raymond Chandler's life and art than any we have had before.

The Long Exile: A Tale of Inuit Betrayal and Survival in the High Arctic

by Melanie Mcgrath

Arriving in the Inuit community of Inukjuak, on the east coast of the Hudson Bay, in 1920, Robert Flaherty set about filming his influential film Nanook of the North. After finishing his filming, Flaherty would leave never to return, but the son he fathered, Josephie Flaherty, would remain behind to suffer with his community as they were forcibly moved hundreds of miles north by the Canadian government some 30 years later, not to receive any form of redress until the mid-1990s. This book both describes the making of the movie and the influence it had on perceptions of the Inuit and the fortunes of Robert Flaherty's Inuit descendants as they coped with exile and hardship. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Long Fall

by Lynn Kostoff

In sun-baked Phoenix, Arizona, this never-predictable tale tosses into its antic mix a dead father, his two sons--one a small-time ex-con with a consistent genius for sabotaging his own best interests, the other a straight, uptight solid citizen with a moneymaking chain of dry-cleaning stores and a restive ex-stewardess of a wife named Evelyn. Recently released from prison for possession of a truckload of black-market saguaro cacti - and in deep debt to an unforgiving crank dealer, Jimmy Coates returns home only to discover that his brother has cut him out of his inheritance. A not-unjustifiable desire to settle old scores and new sends Jimmy on a robbery spree that wipes out four of his brother's dry-cleaning establishments. But when he finds himself tumbling for a mutinously sexy Evelyn, the impulse to vengeance reverses itself. Unwittingly, however, Jimmy has already set in motion a series of dangerous consequences - adultery, blackmail, love, betrayal - that culminate in a blueprint for murder. And it could be Jimmy himself who is taking the long fall.

The Long Fall (Leonid McGill #1)

by Walter Mosley

A brand-new mystery series from one of the country's best-known, best-loved writers: a new character, a new city, a new era. A new Walter Mosley. His name is etched on the door of his Manhattan office: LEONID McGILL, PRIVATE INVESTIGATOR. It's a name that takes a little explaining, but he's used to it. "Daddy was a communist and great-great- Granddaddy was a slave master from Scotland. You know, the black man's family tree is mostly root. Whatever you see aboveground is only a hint at the real story." Ex-boxer, hard drinker, in a business that trades mostly in cash and favors: McGill's an old-school P.I. working a city that's gotten fancy all around him. Fancy or not, he has always managed to get by-keep a roof over the head of his wife and kids, and still manage a little fun on the side-mostly because he's never been above taking a shady job for a quick buck. But like the city itself, McGill is turning over a new leaf, "decided to go from crooked to slightly bent." New York City in the twenty-first century is a city full of secrets-and still a place that reacts when you know where to poke and which string to pull. That's exactly the kind of thing Leonid McGill knows how to do. As soon as The Long Fall begins, with McGill calling in old markers and greasing NYPD palms to unearth some seemingly harmless information for a high-paying client, he learns that even in this cleaned-up city, his commitment to the straight and narrow is going to be constantly tested. And we learn that with this protagonist, this city, this time, Mosley has tapped a rich new vein that's inspiring his best work since the classic Devil in a Blue Dress.

The Long Falling

by Keith Ridgway

Grace Quinn is an Englishwoman living in rural Ireland. Isolated by religion and circumstance, she endures both an abusive husband and a strained relationship with her son, Martin, whose open homosexuality her husband refuses to accept. After an act of desperation, reeling with doubt and denial, she seeks out her son in Dublin. Keith Ridgway "affectingly renders the separate sanctuaries of mother and son . . . and lights the distance between them" (The New Yorker). Keith Ridgway's first novel, nominated for 1999 Lambda Literary Award.

Long for This World

by Jonathan Weiner

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer Jonathan Weiner comes a fast-paced and astonishing scientific adventure story: has the long-sought secret of eternal youth at last been found? In recent years, the dream of eternal youth has started to look like more than just a dream. In the twentieth century alone, life expectancy increased by more than thirty years-almost as much time as humans have gained in the whole span of human existence. Today a motley array of scientists, researchers, and entrepreneurs believe that another, bigger leap is at hand-that human immortality is not only possible, but attainable in our own time. Is there genius or folly in the dreams of these charismatic but eccentric thinkers? In Long for This World, Jonathan Weiner, a natural storyteller and an intrepid reporter with a gift for making cutting-edge science understandable, takes the reader on a whirlwind intellectual quest to find out. From Berkeley to the Bronx, from Cambridge University to Dante's tomb in Ravenna, Weiner meets the leading intellectuals in the field and delves into the mind-blowing science behind the latest research. He traces the centuries-old, fascinating history of the quest for longevity in art, science, and literature, from Gilgamesh to Shakespeare, Doctor Faustus to "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button." And he tells the dramatic story of how aging could be conquered once and for all, focusing on the ideas of those who believe aging is a curable disease. Chief among them is the extraordinary Aubrey de Grey, a garrulous Englishman who bears more than a passing resemblance to Methuselah (at 969 years, the oldest man in the Bible) and who is perhaps immortality's most radical and engaging true believer. A rollicking scientific adventure story in the grand manner of Oliver Sacks, Long for This World is science writing of the highest order and with the highest stakes. Could we live forever? And if we could...would we want to?

The Long Fuse: An Interpretation of the Origins of World War I (second edition)

by Laurence Lafore

A study of the causes and origins of the First World War.

The Long Good Boy (Rachel Alexander and Dash Mystery #6)

by Carol Lea Benjamin

P. I. Rachel Alexander dives into the world of transvestite hookers in Manhattan's meat packing district to help solve the case of a killer with a deadly eye out for the wanna-be-ladies.

The Long Goodbye

by Patti Davis

Ronald Reagan's daughter writes with a moving openness about losing her father to Alzheimer's disease. The simplicity with which she reveals the intensity, the rush, the flow of her feelings encompasses all the surprises and complexities that ambush us when death gradually, unstoppably invades life.In The Long Goodbye, Patti Davis describes losing her father to Alzheimer's disease, saying goodbye in stages, helpless against the onslaught of a disease that steals what is most precious-a person's memory. "Alzheimer's," she writes, "snips away at the threads, a slow unraveling, a steady retreat; as a witness all you can do is watch, cry, and whisper a soft stream of goodbyes."She writes of needing to be reunited at forty-two with her mother ("she had wept as much as I over our long, embittered war"), of regaining what they had spent decades demolishing; a truce was necessary to bring together a splintered family, a few weeks before her father released his letter telling the country and the world of his illness . . .The author delves into her memories to touch her father again, to hear his voice, to keep alive the years she had with him.She writes as if past and present were coming together, of her memories as a child, holding her father's hand, and as a young woman whose hand is being given away in marriage by her father . . . of her father teaching her to ride a bicycle, of the moment when he let her go and she went off on her own . . . of his teaching her the difference between a hawk and a buzzard . . . of the family summer vacations at a rented beach house-each of them tan, her father looking like the athlete he was, with a swimmer's broad shoulders and lean torso. . . . She writes of how her father never resisted solitude, in fact was born for it, of that strange reserve that made people reach for him. . . . She recalls him sitting at his desk, writing, staring out the window . . . and she writes about the toll of the disease itself, the look in her father's eyes, and her efforts to reel him back to her. Moving . . . honest . . . an illuminating portrait of grief, of a man, a disease, and a woman and her father.From the Hardcover edition.

The Long Goodbye

by Raymond Chandler

Marlowe befriends a down on his luck war veteran with the scars to prove it. Then he finds out that Terry Lennox has a very wealthy nymphomaniac wife, who he's divorced and re-married and who ends up dead. and now Lennox is on the lam and the cops and a crazy gangster are after Marlowe.From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Long Gray Line

by Rick Atkinson

Based on the true story of Marty Maher, a humble Irish immigrant who rose through the ranks to become one of West Point's most beloved instructors. A rousing tribute to a remarkable man & his way of life.

Long Hand Writing for the Blind

by Elizabeth D. Freund

This guide, which accompanies the Handwriting kit, sould by APH, can be used on its own, with a piece of metal screening in place of the writing board, and plastic cursive letters purchased at most teacher stores. Outlines a way to learn all of the letters in lower case and Capital as well as the numbers in cursive. Good resource for learning how to write.

A Long Hard Journey: The Story Of The Pullman Porter

by Patricia C. Mckissack Fredrick L. Mckissack

"An exciting labor history . . . an excellent introduction to the subject". --School Library Journal. Coretta Scott King Award winner.

A Long, Hard Ride

by Alison Kent

Cardin Worth is ready to tune up her engine-with Trey, her former crush! However, he's a Davis-one of her car-racing family's bitter rivals. But she might be able to create peace, and also get some sizzling sex on the side......if Trey pretends to be her fiancé, that is!Having a little fun on those steamy Southern nights seems like a great idea. Just to patch up the feud, of course. Then Trey'll be leaving town again-this time for good. But Cardin's not sure she can relinquish the superheated sex...because Trey's the most talented, uh,mechanicto ever look under her hood!

The Long Hard Road Out of Hell

by Marilyn Manson

This book is an autobiography of America's most controversial celebrity icon, Marilyn Manson.

Long Henry

by Robert Kammen

Long Henry Banner was tall and rock-lean, and hanging at his hip was a .45 Colt Dragoon. He was marshal of Waco and a confirmed bachelor until the day Cassandra Ashbury stepped off the noon stage from the East. A week later they were man and wife. And then Henry got bushwhacked by a stranger and damn near got killed, and by the time he was back on his feet again, Cassandra was gone. Long Henry knew that sentimentality can buy a man a parcel of land on Boot Hill. But Texans have short fuses and long memories. It would take Henry seven years to track his wife north to the biggest spread in Wyoming. It would be there in the shadow of the Big Horns that he'd square off for a second showdown with death-and live or die to learn a woman's secret that was sealed with gunpowder and blood.

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