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The Doctor's Wife

by Elizabeth Brundage

From the outside, the Knowles family appeared to have it all: a loving marriage, two beautiful children, a home in an idyllic part of the countryside in upstate New York. Michael is a rising OB/GYN at a prominent private practice, and his wife, Annie, teaches at a local college. But Annie's role as the doctor's wife has worn thin, and Michael has answered the call of an old flame to moonlight at the local women's health center, the city's only provider of abortions. These subtle cracks in their life widen when anonymous threats arrive at their home. The reason for this intimidation is not at all clear?is it, as seems to be the case, the work of religious extremists opposed to what Michael is doing? Or are these violent warnings meant for Annie? For she has made at least one certain enemy in town--Lydia Haas, the painter's wife, a disturbed young woman with a cellar full of her own dark secrets. Told in the alternating viewpoints of Michael, Annie, Simon, and Lydia, four fascinating and complex characters, The Doctor's Wife is steeped in psychological suspense, compelling and compulsively readable.

The Doctor's Wife for Keeps

by Alison Roberts

Surgeon Luke Anderson let her go once…But this time around he’ll get down on one knee!Seeing pediatrician Kate Saunders again, Luke can feel the chemistry that still sizzles between them. But bruised from his failed marriage, he doesn’t believe in happy-ever-afters anymore. Until he’s reminded of the marriage pact they made in college…and realizes Kate may be the one woman who was worth waiting for!

The Doctrine and Ritual of High Magic: A New Translation

by John Michael Greer Eliphas Lévi Mark Anthony Mikituk

Filling a huge gap in our spiritual culture, here--at last--is a comprehensive and elegant translation of the 1854 French masterwork of occult philosophy.The Doctrine and Ritual of High Magic reignited the esoteric spiritual search in the West and led to the emergence of Madame Blavatsky, Manly P. Hall, and the New Age revolution.Lévi's study of magic is an absolute must for every seeker in occult, esoteric, and druidic realms; but this need has been frustrated by dated and inaccurate translations--until now. Greer, a respected occult scholar, and Mikituk, a masterful translator, collaborate to restore this landmark work--complete with its original illustrations and symbols--to the center of the alternative spiritual canon.From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Doctrine of Judicial Review: Its Legal and Historical Basis and Other Essays

by Edward S. Corwin

This book, first published in 1914, contains five historical essays. Three of them are on the concept of judicial review, which is defined as the power of a court to review and invalidate unlawful acts by the legislative and executive branches of government. One chapter addresses the historical controversy over states' rights. Another concerns the Pelatiah Webster Myth�the notion that the US Constitution was the work of a single person.In "Marbury v. Madison and the Doctrine of Judicial Review," Edward S. Corwin analyzes the legal source of the power of the Supreme Court to review acts of Congress. "We, the People" examines the rights of states in relation to secession and nullification. "The Pelatiah Webster Myth" demolishes Hannis Taylor's thesis that Webster was the "secret" author of the constitution. "The Dred Scott Decision" considers Chief Justice Taney's argument concerning Scott's title to citizenship under the Constitution. "Some Possibilities in the Way of Treaty-Making" discusses how the US Constitution relates to international treaties.Matthew J. Franck's new introduction to this centennial edition situates Corwin's career in the history of judicial review both as a concept and as a political reality.

The Doctrine of Salvation in the First Letter of Peter

by Martin Williams

The prevalence of salvation language in the first letter of Peter has often been acknowledged though rarely investigated in depth. Martin Williams presents a new account exploring the concept of salvation in this theologically rich letter. He brings together the disciplines of hermeneutics, New Testament studies, and systematic and historical theology in order to explore the language of salvation which resonates within the text. The book also elaborates on a methodological level the segregation which has arisen between Biblical studies and theological studies. In doing this, Williams identifies a basis for how there can be interaction between these two different viewpoints. This book will be a valuable resource for students and scholars interested in the exegesis and theology of 1 Peter, the doctrine of salvation and Biblical interpretation.

The Doctrine of the Christian Life (A Theology of Lordship, Volume #3)

by John M. Frame

The third volume of Frame's Theology of Lordship series, this book focuses on biblical ethics. In an age of ethical relativism and suspicion of authority, how can we know what is good, virtuous, or just? Frame surveys non-Christian ethical traditions before setting forth a solidly Christian ethical method. By clarifying biblical norms, life situations, and personal dimensions, he presents a model for decision making that honors God in all aspects of life. Discussions range from natural law and conflict of duties to detailed explorations of the Ten Commandments in connection with questions surrounding worship, the Sabbath, church and state, respect for life and truth, sexuality, and the relation of Christ to culture.

The Doctrine of the Knowledge of God (A Theology of Lordship, Volume #1)

by John M. Frame

In keeping with the conviction that theology is the application of God's word to our lives in all situations, Frame combines trenchant analysis with practical insight and counsel for living in the knowledge of God.

The Doctrine of the Spirit-filled Church

by Francis Vlok

The Lord Jesus Christ declared . . . I will build My church: and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. (Matthew 16:18). Throughout the past two thousand years, the church has proclaimed a variety of methods for people to follow in Jesus’ steps. Yet, few have followed His instructions and built the church according to Christ’s teachings which were entrusted to the ministers in His church. The first church was rooted and grounded in the Apostles’ Doctrine (Acts 2:42) and as such the church was built on the sure foundation. Sadly, it has not always contended for the faith but designed and adopted methods that are not in accordance with Christ’s teachings.Now is the appropriate time for the church to return to the biblical structure and conform to tenets found in the Bible. This book contains all the tenets of the Apostles’ Doctrine in one volume. It expounds the deep truths within the Holy Writ and leads ministers to once again conform to the perfect will of God (Romans 12:1-2).

The Doctrine of the Word of God (A Theology of Lordship, Volume #4)

by John M. Frame

This book discusses God's word in modern theology and how God's word comes to us as his controlling power, meaningful authority, and personal presence.

The Doctrines That Divide: A Fresh Look at the Historic Doctrines That Separate Christians

by Erwin W. Lutzer

Lutzer examines various controversies that exist within the broad spectrum of Christianity, presenting the issue and the biblical understanding of the doctrines.

Document Processing Using Machine Learning

by Kaushik Roy Teresa Gonçalves K. C. Santosh Sk Md Obaidullah Nibaran Das

Document Processing Using Machine Learning aims at presenting a handful of resources for students and researchers working in the document image analysis (DIA) domain using machine learning since it covers multiple document processing problems. Starting with an explanation of how Artificial Intelligence (AI) plays an important role in this domain, the book further discusses how different machine learning algorithms can be applied for classification/recognition and clustering problems regardless the type of input data: images or text. In brief, the book offers comprehensive coverage of the most essential topics, including: · The role of AI for document image analysis · Optical character recognition · Machine learning algorithms for document analysis · Extreme learning machines and their applications · Mathematical foundation for Web text document analysis · Social media data analysis · Modalities for document dataset generation This book serves both undergraduate and graduate scholars in Computer Science/Information Technology/Electrical and Computer Engineering. Further, it is a great fit for early career research scientists and industrialists in the domain.

Documentary and Disability

by Catalin Brylla Helen Hughes

This edited collection of contributions from media scholars, film practitioners and film historians connects the vibrant fields of documentary and disability studies. Documentary film has not only played an historical role in the social construction of disability but continues to be a strong force for expression, inclusion and activism. Offering essays on the interpretation and conception of a wide variety of documentary formats, Documentary and Disability reveals a rich set of resources on subjects as diverse as Thomas Quasthoff's opera performances, Tourette syndrome in the developing world, queer approaches to sexual functionality, Channel 4 disability sports broadcasting, the political meaning of cochlear implant activation, and Christoph's Schlingensief's celebrated Freakstars 3000.

Documentary Film: A Very Short Introduction

by Patricia Aufderheide

Documentary film can encompass anything from Robert Flaherty's pioneering ethnography Nanook of the North to Michael Moore's anti-Iraq War polemic Fahrenheit 9/11, from Dziga Vertov's artful Soviet propaganda piece Man with a Movie Camera to Luc Jacquet's heart-tugging wildlife epic March of the Penguins. In this concise, crisply written guide, Patricia Aufderheide takes readers along the diverse paths of documentary history and charts the lively, often fierce debates among filmmakers and scholars about the best ways to represent reality and to tell the truths worth telling. Beginning with an overview of the central issues of documentary filmmaking--its definitions and purposes, its forms and founders--Aufderheide focuses on several of its key subgenres, including public affairs films, government propaganda (particularly the works produced during World War II), historical documentaries, and nature films. Her thematic approach allows readers to enter the subject matter through the kinds of films that first attracted them to documentaries, and it permits her to make connections between eras, as well as revealing the ongoing nature of documentary's core controversies involving objectivity, advocacy, and bias. Interwoven throughout are discussions of the ethical and practical considerations that arise with every aspect of documentary production. A particularly useful feature of the book is an appended list of "100 great documentaries" that anyone with a serious interest in the genre should see. Drawing on the author's four decades of experience as a film scholar and critic, this book is the perfect introduction not just for teachers and students but also for all thoughtful filmgoers and for those who aspire to make documentaries themselves.

Documentary Film in India: An Anthropological History (Routledge Contemporary South Asia Series)

by Giulia Battaglia

This book maps a hundred years of documentary film practices in India. It demonstrates that in order to study the development of a film practice, it is necessary to go beyond the classic analysis of films and filmmakers and focus on the discourses created around and about the practice in question. The book navigates different historical moments of the growth of documentary filmmaking in India from the colonial period to the present day. In the process, it touches upon questions concerning practices and discourses about colonial films, postcolonial institutions, independent films, filmmakers and filmmaking, the influence of feminism and the articulation of concepts of performance and performativity in various films practices. It also reflects on the centrality of technological change in different historical moments and that of film festivals and film screenings across time and space. Grounded in anthropological fieldwork and archival research and adopting Foucault’s concept of ‘effective history’, this work searches for points of origin that creates ruptures and deviations taking distance from conventional ways of writing film histories. Rather than presenting a univocal set of arguments and conclusions about changes or new developments of film techniques, the originality of the book is in offering an open structure (or an open archive) to enable the reader to engage with mechanisms of creation, engagement and participation in film and art practices at large. In adopting this form, the book conceptualises ‘Anthropology’ as also an art practice, interested, through its theoretico-methodological approach, in creating an open archive of engagement rather than a representation of a distant ‘other’. Similarly, documentary filmmaking in India is seen as primarily a process of creation based on engagement and participation rather than a practice interested in representing an objective reality. Proposing an innovative way of perceiving the growth of the documentary film genre in the subcontinent, this book will be of interest to film historians and specialists in Indian cinema(s) as well as academics in the field of anthropology of art, media and visual practices and Asian media studies.

A Documentary History of the United States

by Richard D. Heffner Alexander Heffner Richard C. Heffner

Here in a single volume are the documents, speeches, and letters that have forged American history, accompanied by interpretations of their significance by noted historian and broadcaster Richard D. Heffner. It includes complete text of the Declaration of Independence, the complete Constitution of the United States, the Emancipation Proclamation, FDR?s ?Four Freedoms? Speech, John F. Kennedy?s Inaugural Address, Martin Luther King Jr.?s ?I Have a Dream? Speech, documents relating to September 11, 2001, and Barack Obama?s Inaugural Address.

A Documentary History of the United States (Updated & Expanded)

by Richard D. Heffner Alexander Heffner

Here, in a single volume, are the documents, speeches, and letters that have forged American history, accompanied by interpretations of their significance by noted historian and broadcaster Richard D. Heffner with online journalist Alexander Heffner. Among the important documents in this book you will find: The complete text of the Declaration of Independence The complete Constitution of the United States The Monroe Doctrine The Emancipation Proclamation Woodrow Wilson's War Message to Congress Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Four Freedoms" Speech John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Address Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" Speech Ronald Reagan's Inaugural Addresses, 1981 and 1985 Documents relating to September 11, 2001 This edition has been expanded and updated to include: A new chapter on the Bush/Cheney Administration and the First and Second Election and Inauguration of Barack Obama as the Forty-Fourth President of the United States More Than One Million Copies Sold!

Documentation Basics (Second Edition): A Guide For The Physical Therapist Assistant

by Mia Erickson Becky McKnight

Documentation Basics: A Guide for the Physical Therapist Assistant, Second Edition is the perfect guide for all physical therapist assistant students and clinicians who want to update and refine their knowledge and skills in documentation.

Documenting Aftermath: Information Infrastructures in the Wake of Disasters (Infrastructures)

by Megan Finn

An examination of how changing public information infrastructures shaped people's experience of earthquakes in Northern California in 1868, 1906, and 1989. When an earthquake happens in California today, residents may look to the United States Geological Survey for online maps that show the quake's epicenter, turn to Twitter for government bulletins and the latest news, check Facebook for updates from friends and family, and count on help from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). One hundred and fifty years ago, however, FEMA and other government agencies did not exist, and information came by telegraph and newspaper. In Documenting Aftermath, Megan Finn explores changing public information infrastructures and how they shaped people's experience of disaster, examining postearthquake information and communication practices in three Northern California earthquakes: the 1868 Hayward Fault earthquake, the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire, and the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. She then analyzes the institutions, policies, and technologies that shape today's postdisaster information landscape.Finn argues that information orders—complex constellations of institutions, technologies, and practices—influence how we act in, experience, and document events. What Finn terms event epistemologies, constituted both by historical documents and by researchers who study them, explain how information orders facilitate particular possibilities for knowledge. After the 1868 earthquake, the Chamber of Commerce telegraphed reassurances to out-of-state investors while local newspapers ran sensational earthquake narratives; in 1906, families and institutions used innovative techniques for locating people; and in 1989, government institutions and the media developed a symbiotic relationship in information dissemination. Today, government disaster response plans and new media platforms imagine different sources of informational authority yet work together shaping disaster narratives.

Documenting Desegregation: Racial and Gender Segregation in Private Sector Employment Since The Civil Rights Act

by Kevin Stainback Donald Tomaskovic-Devey

Enacted nearly fifty years ago, the Civil Rights Act codified a new vision for American society by formally ending segregation and banning race and gender discrimination in the workplace. But how much change did the legislation actually produce? As employers responded to the law, did new and more subtle forms of inequality emerge in the workplace? In an insightful analysis that combines history with a rigorous empirical analysis of newly available data, Documenting Desegregation offers the most comprehensive account to date of what has happened to equal opportunity in America--and what needs to be done in order to achieve a truly integrated workforce. Weaving strands of history, cognitive psychology, and demography, Documenting Desgregation provides a compelling exploration of the ways legislation can affect employer behavior and produce change. Authors Kevin Stainback and Donald Tomaskovic-Devey use a remarkable historical record--data from more than six million workplaces collected by the U. S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) since 1966--to present a sobering portrait of race and gender in the American workplace. Progress has been decidedly uneven: black men, black women, and white women have prospered in firms that rely on educational credentials when hiring, though white women have advanced more quickly. And white men have hardly fallen behind--they now hold more managerial positions than they did in 1964. The authors argue that the Civil Rights Act's equal opportunity clauses have been most effective when accompanied by social movements demanding changes. EEOC data show that African American men made rapid gains in the 1960s at the height of the Civil Rights movement. Similarly, white women gained access to more professional and managerial jobs in the 1970s as regulators and policymakers began to enact and enforce gender discrimination laws. By the 1980s, however, racial desegregation had stalled, reflecting the dimmed status of the Civil Rights agenda. Racial and gender employment segregation remain high today, and, alarmingly, many firms, particularly in high-wage industries, seem to be moving in the wrong direction and have shown signs of resegregating since the 1980s. To counter this worrying trend, the authors propose new methods to increase diversity by changing industry norms, holding human resources managers to account, and exerting renewed government pressure on large corporations to make equal employment opportunity a national priority. At a time of high unemployment and rising inequality, Documenting Desegregation provides an incisive re-examination of America's tortured pursuit of equal employment opportunity. This important new book will be an indispensable guide for those seeking to understand where America stands in fulfilling its promise of a workplace free from discrimination.

Documenting Domestication: New Genetic and Archaeological Paradigms

by Melinda A. Zeder Daniel G. Bradley Eve Emshwiller Bruce D. Smith

This volume brings together leading archaeologists and biologists working on the domestication of both plants and animals to consider a wide variety of archaeological and genetic approaches to tracing the origin and dispersal of domesticates.

Documenting Learning with ePortfolios

by John C. Ittelson Helen L. Chen Tracy Penny Light

E-portfolios perform many functions in higher education at both an institutional and student level. This book offers online instructors guidance in creating and implementing e-portfolios with their students. It helps them assess the needs of their students then design and implement a strategic, comprehensive e-portfolio program tailored to these needs. Further, it lets instructors see how such programs can be used as an example of their own personal and professional academic development. This is an essential resource for any online instructor or student wishing to use e-portfolios as a tool.

Documenting the Documentary: Close Readings of Documentary Film and Video, New and Expanded Edition

by Barry Keith Grant Jeannette Sloniowski

Originally released in 1998, Documenting the Documentary responded to a scholarly landscape in which documentary film was largely understudied and undervalued aesthetically, and analyzed instead through issues of ethics, politics, and film technology. Editors Barry Keith Grant and Jeannette Sloniowski addressed this gap by presenting a useful survey of the artistic and persuasive aspects of documentary film from a range of critical viewpoints. This new edition of Documenting the Documentary adds five new essays on more recent films in addition to the text of the first edition. Thirty-one film and media scholars, many of them among the most important voices in the area of documentary film, cover the significant developments in the history of documentary filmmaking from Nanook of the North (1922), the first commercially released documentary feature, to contemporary independent film and video productions like Werner Herzog's Grizzly Man (2005) and the controversial Borat (2006). The works discussed also include representative examples of many important national and stylistic movements and various production contexts, from mainstream to avant-garde. In all, this volume offers a series of rich and revealing analyses of those "regimes of truth" that still fascinate filmgoers as much today as they did at the very beginnings of film history. As documentary film and visual media become increasingly important ways for audiences to process news and information, Documenting the Documentary continues to be a vital resource to understanding the genre. Students and teachers of film studies and fans of documentary film will appreciate this expanded classic volume.

Documenting Trauma in Comics: Traumatic Pasts, Embodied Histories, and Graphic Reportage (Palgrave Studies in Comics and Graphic Novels)

by Dominic Davies Candida Rifkind

Why are so many contemporary comics and graphic narratives written as memoirs or documentaries of traumatic events? Is there a specific relationship between the comics form and the documentation and reportage of trauma? How do the interpretive demands made on comics readers shape their relationships with traumatic events? And how does comics’ documentation of traumatic pasts operate across national borders and in different cultural, political, and politicised contexts? The sixteen chapters and three comics included in Documenting Trauma in Comics set out to answer exactly these questions. Drawing on a range of historically and geographically expansive examples, the contributors bring their different perspectives to bear on the tangled and often fraught intersections between trauma studies, comics studies, and theories of documentary practices and processes. The result is a collection that shows how comics is not simply related to trauma, but a generative force that has become central to its remembrance, documentation, and study.

Documents in World History Volume 2: The Modern Centuries: From 1500 to the Present (Fourth Edition)

by Peter N. Stearns Stephen S. Gosch Erwin P. Grieshaber

The book retains its global emphasis and includes more primary sources that balance social and cultural history with standard selections, political coverage, and fuller coverage of Africa and the Middle East, including Persia. Several individual passages have been replaced or augmented to provide greater richness and interest. Materials on social issues have also been augmented.

The Dodge Brothers: The Men, the Motor Cars, and the Legacy

by Charles K. Hyde

At the start of the Ford Motor Company in 1903, the Dodge Brothers supplied nearly every car part needed by the up-and-coming auto giant. After fifteen years of operating a successful automotive supplier company, much to Ford's advantage, John and Horace Dodge again changed the face of the automotive market in 1914 by introducing their own car. The Dodge Brothers automobile carried on their names even after their untimely deaths in 1920, with the company then remaining in the hands of their widows until its sale in 1925 to New York bankers and subsequent purchase in 1928 by Walter Chrysler. The Dodge nameplate has endured, but despite their achievements and their critical role in the early success of Henry Ford, John and Horace Dodge are usually overlooked in histories of the early automotive industry. Charles K. Hyde's book The Dodge Brothers: The Men, the Motor Cars, and the Legacy is the first scholarly study of the Dodge brothers and their company, chronicling their lives--from their childhood in Niles, Michigan, to their long years of learning the machinist's trade in Battle Creek, Port Huron, Detroit, and Windsor, Ontario--and examining their influence on automotive manufacturing and marketing trends in the early part of the twentieth century. Hyde details the brothers' civic contributions to Detroit, their hiring of minorities and women, and their often anonymous charitable contributions to local organizations. Hyde puts the Dodge brothers' lives and accomplishments in perspective by indicating their long-term influence, which has continued long after their deaths. The most complete and accurate resource on John and Horace Dodge available, The Dodge Brothers uses sources that have never before been examined. Its scholarly approach and personal tone make this book appealing for automotive historians as well as car enthusiasts and those interested in Detroit's early development.

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