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Galileo

by Eric Bentley Bertolt Brecht Charles Laughton

Considered by many to be one of Brecht's masterpieces, Galileo explores the question of a scientist's social and ethical responsibility, as the brilliant Galileo must choose between his life and his life's work when confronted with the demands of the Inquisition. Through the dramatic characterization of the famous physicist, Brecht examines the issues of scientific morality and the difficult relationship between the intellectual and authority. This version of the play is the famous one that was brought to completion by Brecht himself, working with Charles Laughton, who played Galileo in the first two American productions (Hollywood and New York, 1947). Since then the play has become a classic in the world repertoire. "The play which most strongly stamped on my mind a sense of Brecht's great stature as an artist of the modern theatre was Galileo." - Harold Clurman; "Thoughtful and profoundly sensitive." - Newsweek.

Galileo: And the Science Deniers

by Mario Livio

A fresh interpretation of the life of Galileo Galilei, one of history&’s greatest and most fascinating scientists, that sheds new light on his discoveries and how he was challenged by science deniers. &“We really need this story now, because we&’re living through the next chapter of science denial&” (Bill McKibben).Galileo&’s story may be more relevant today than ever before. At present, we face enormous crises—such as the minimization of the dangers of climate change—because the science behind these threats is erroneously questioned or ignored. Galileo encountered this problem 400 years ago. His discoveries, based on careful observations and ingenious experiments, contradicted conventional wisdom and the teachings of the church at the time. Consequently, in a blatant assault on freedom of thought, his books were forbidden by church authorities. Astrophysicist and bestselling author Mario Livio draws on his own scientific expertise to provide captivating insights into how Galileo reached his bold new conclusions about the cosmos and the laws of nature. A freethinker who followed the evidence wherever it led him, Galileo was one of the most significant figures behind the scientific revolution. He believed that every educated person should know science as well as literature, and insisted on reaching the widest audience possible, publishing his books in Italian rather than Latin. Galileo was put on trial with his life in the balance for refusing to renounce his scientific convictions. He remains a hero and inspiration to scientists and all of those who respect science—which, as Livio reminds us in this gripping book, remains threatened even today.

Galileo and The Magic Numbers

by Sidney Rosen

Sixteenth century Italy produced a genius who marked the world with his studies and hypotheses about mathematical, physical and astronomical truths. His father, musician Vincenzio Galilei said, "Truth is not found behind a man's reputation. Truth appears only when the answers to questions are searched out by a free mind. This is not the easy path in life but it is the most rewarding." Galileo challenged divine law and the physics of Aristotle, and questioned everything in search of truths. And it was through this quest for truth that he was able to establish a structure for modern science.

Galileo and the Scientific Revolution

by Laura Fermi Gilberto Bernardini

An absorbing account of the origins of modern science as well as a biography of the revolutionary thinker, this inspiring book was co-written by a former director of the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics and a historian of science (who was also the wife of physicist Enrico Fermi). It begins in Galileo's youth, with his return to his native city of Pisa to train as a physician. Instead, the student became captivated by the power of mathematical reasoning — an interest that led him to apply mathematical logic to natural events and, ultimately, to invent the concept of experimentation. Galileo's progress from student to teacher to scientific innovator is traced, with particular emphasis on his experiments with building and refining telescopes and his unprecedented observations of the moon and planets. The dramatic results of his findings, including his refutation of Aristotelian theory and his support of Copernican doctrine, are related in full, along with his clash with the papal inquisition and his tragic demise under house arrest. Written with a warm appreciation for the wonders of Galileo's achievements and with impeccable scholarship, this book concludes with a survey of the scientist's remarkable legacy. 12 figures. Appendix. Bibliography. Index.

Galileo goes to Jail and other Myths about Science and Religion

by Ronald L. Numbers

A new generation of historians both of science and of the church began to examine episodes in the history of science and religion through the values and knowledge of the actors themselves. Now Ronald Numbers has recruited the leading scholars in this new history of science to ­puncture the myths, from Galileo's incarceration to Darwin's deathbed conversion to Einstein's belief in a personal God who didn't play dice with the universe.

Galileo Project

by Albert Van Helden

Biography of Galileo

Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir of Science, Faith and Love

by Dava Sobel

The author of Longitude presents a biography of the man Einstein called the father of modern physics, and the Church long branded a heretic, as revealed through the newly translated letters of his confidante daughter. Includes b&w illustrations of featured personalities, locales, and scientific paraphernalia, and a chronology demonstrating Galileo's legacy through the present.

Galileo’s Dream

by Kim Stanley Robinson

Late Renaissance Italy still abounds in alchemy and Aristotle, yet it trembles on the brink of the modern world. Galileo's new telescope encapsulates all the contradictions of this emerging reality. Then one night a stranger presents a different kind of telescope for Galileo to peer through. Galileo is not sure if he is in a dream, an enchantment, a vision, or something else as yet undefined. . . . The blasted wasteland he sees when he points the telescope at Jupiter, of harsh yellows and reds and blacks, looks just like hell as described by the Catholic church, and Galileo is a devout Catholic. But he's also a scientist, perhaps the very first in history. What he's looking at is the future, the world of Jovian humans three thousand years hence. He is looking at Jupiter from the vantage point of one of its moons whose inhabitants maintain that Galileo has to succeed in his own world for their history to come to pass. Their ability to reach back into the past and call Galileo "into resonance" with the later time is in an action that will have implications for both periods, and those in between, like our own. By day Galileo's life unfurls in early seventeenth century Italy, leading inexorably to his trial for heresy. By night Galileo struggles to be a kind of sage, or an arbiter in a conflict . . . but understanding what that conflict might be is no easy matter, and resolving his double life is even harder. This sumptuous, gloriously thought-provoking and suspenseful novel recalls Robinson's magnificent Mars books as well as bringing to us Galileo as we have always wanted to know him, in full.

Galileo's Error: Foundations for a New Science of Consciousness

by Philip Goff

From a leading philosopher of the mind comes this lucid, provocative argument that offers a radically new picture of human consciousness—panpsychism.Understanding how brains produce consciousness is one of the great scientific challenges of our age. Some philosophers argue that consciousness is something "extra," beyond the physical workings of the brain. Others think that if we persist in our standard scientific methods, our questions about consciousness will eventually be answered. And some even suggest that the mystery is so deep, it will never be solved. Decades have been spent trying to explain consciousness from within our current scientific paradigm, but little progress has been made.Now, Philip Goff offers an exciting alternative that could pave the way forward. Rooted in an analysis of the philosophical underpinnings of modern science and based on the early twentieth-century work of Arthur Eddington and Bertrand Russell, Goff makes the case for panpsychism, a theory which posits that consciousness is not confined to biological entities but is a fundamental feature of all physical matter—from subatomic particles to the human brain. In Galileo's Error, he has provided the first step on a new path to the final theory of human consciousness.

Galileo's New Universe: The Revolution in Our Understanding of the Cosmos

by Stephen P. Maran Laurence A. Marschall

The story of how Galileo’s telescope transformed the heavens—and contemporary astrophysics: A “lively history . . . ideal for armchair scientists and stargazers” (Publishers Weekly). In the fall of 1609, Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei turned his modified spyglass toward the sky—and greatly expanded the scope of human understanding. The scientific, historical, and social implications of the telescope, as well as its modern-day significance, are brought into startling focus in this fascinating account co-written by NASA scientist Stephen P. Maran and physics professor Laurence A. Marschall. Galileo could not have fathomed the profound changes his new instrument would bring about for civilization. With it, he made some of the most astonishing discoveries in scientific history: A seemingly flat moon magically transformed into a dynamic, crater-filled orb, and a large, black sky suddenly held millions of galaxies. Reflecting on how Galileo’s world compares with contemporary society, Galileo’s New Universe deftly moves from the cutting-edge technology available in seventeenth-century Europe to the unbelievable phenomena discovered during the last fifty years, documenting important astronomical advances and the effects they have had over time.

Galileo's Starry Night

by Kelly Terwilliger

Galileo used his telescope to discover new and marvelous mysteries in the night sky!

Galiver Saahasa Yatralu

by Venkata Ratna Publishers

Galiver Saahasa Yatralu is the Telugu version of Galiver Travels by Jonathan Swift. This is the story of a sailor who loses his way and ends up in islands with lilliputs and giants leading to challenging situations and about how he escapes the situations both the times.

Gallagher Girls Digital Omnibus

by Ally Carter

Don't miss a single moment of the beloved, bestselling Gallagher Girls series in this ebook collection, where spies-in-training navigate secret missions, friendship, betrayals, and first love.Cammie Morgan is a student at the Gallagher Academy for Exceptional Young Women, a fairly typical all-girls school -- that is, if every school taught advanced martial arts in PE and the latest in chemical warfare in science, and students received extra credit for breaking CIA codes in computer class. The Gallagher Academy might claim to be a school for geniuses but it's really a school for spies.Even though Cammie is fluent in fourteen languages and capable of killing a man in seven different ways, she has no idea what to do when she meets an ordinary boy who thinks she's an ordinary girl. Sure, she can tap his phone, hack into his computer, or track him through town with the skill of a real "pavement artist" -- but can she maneuver a relationship with someone who can never know the truth about her?Cammie Morgan may be an elite spy-in-training, but she's on her most dangerous mission yet -- falling in love.This ebook collection includes all six Gallagher Girls books: I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You, Cross My Heart and Hope to Spy, Don't Judge a Girl by Her Cover, Only the Good Spy Young, Out of Sight, Out of Time, and United We Spy.

The Gallagher Guide To The Baby Years

by Stephanie Gallagher

From the best high chair to easy recipes for time-crunched moms, this reference offers heaps of vital information in one accessible volume--an essential "cheat sheet" for negotiating the baby years.

Gallant Haryana: The First and Crucial Battlefield of AD 1857

by C.B. Singh Sheoran

The book contains a narrative of the events of the first Indian war of Independence (1857-60) in modern Haryana and surrounding areas in a chronological order derived from hitherto untouched sources such as original and first-hand reports of the British commanding officers and accompanying magistrates, available in the contemporary newspapers archival files and government publications.Please note: Taylor & Francis does not sell or distribute the Hardback in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka

Gallardo's Goes to Mexico

by Clayton M. Christensen

The theories of market segmentation and brand building in Chapter 3, What Products Will Customers Want to Buy? in The Innovator's Solution by Clayton Christensen and Michael Raynor suggest that when companies segment markets and build brands in ways that match how the customer sees the market--customers hire products to get jobs done--their success rate in innovation increases. Gallardo's is a privately held firm whose products--salsas, sauces, and seasonings for Latin American dishes--were sold primarily in the southwestern United States. When the company had saturated that geographical market, its CEO decided to invade Mexico. Describes how Gallardo's marketers learned what jobs Mexican housewives hired these products to do. Shows how the company used these market insights to segment the market along different lines than its competitors. Gallardo's products and advertisements ended up spurring significant growth in the market, but most of the growth was captured by its primary competitor. What went wrong? Were Gallardo's branding and segmentation strategies consistent with the jobs-to-be-done model? Does the company have the chance to relaunch its products more successfully?

The Gallatin Way to Yellowstone (Transportation)

by Duncan T. Patten

The Gallatin Way, a picturesque route heading south through the canyon to the west gate of Yellowstone, boasts a history covering more than a century of exploration, homesteading and development. Early pioneers and adventurers endured a rugged and unforgiving terrain where today's travelers speed along a modern highway. One might expect to see dramatic shifts, yet little change is evident in some areas, while others teem with contemporary luxuries. Pairing historic and modern photography of the same locations, Duncan T. Patten retraces the marvel of this iconic thoroughfare.

The Gallery

by Laura Marx Fitzgerald

A riveting historical art mystery for fans of Chasing Vermeer and The Westing Game, set in the Roaring Twenties! It's 1929, and twelve-year-old Martha has no choice but to work as a maid in the New York City mansion of the wealthy Sewell family. But, despite the Gatsby-like parties and trimmings of success, she suspects something might be deeply wrong in the household--specifically with Rose Sewell, the formerly vivacious lady of the house who now refuses to leave her room. The other servants say Rose is crazy, but scrappy, strong-willed Martha thinks there's more to the story--and that the paintings in the Sewell's gallery contain a hidden message detailing the truth. But in a house filled with secrets, nothing is quite what it seems, and no one is who they say. Can Martha follow the clues, decipher the code, and solve the mystery of what's really going on with Rose Sewell? Inspired by true events described in a fascinating author's note, The Gallery is a 1920s caper told with humor and spunk that readers today will love.

Gallery of Best Cover Letters

by David F. Noble

A diverse collection of more than 300 new and updated cover letters and 23 corresponding resumes gives readers a wide range of exemplary models that showcase the most attractive and impressive materials written by professionals.

Gallery of Best Resumes

by David F. Noble

Showcases the very best resume samples--selected from thousands of submissions developed by professional resume writers throughout the nation. These powerful resumes cover jobs from all occupational groups at all levels.

The Gallery of Unfinished Girls

by Lauren Karcz

A beautiful and evocative look at identity and creativity, The Gallery of Unfinished Girls is a stunning debut in magical realism. Perfect for fans of The Walls Around Us and Bone Gap. Mercedes Moreno is an artist. At least, she thinks she could be, even though she hasn’t been able to paint anything worthwhile in the past year. Her lack of inspiration might be because her abuela is in a coma. Or the fact that Mercedes is in love with her best friend, Victoria, but is too afraid to admit her true feelings. Despite Mercedes’s creative block, art starts to show up in unexpected ways. A piano appears on her front lawn one morning, and a mysterious new neighbor invites Mercedes to paint with her at the Red Mangrove Estate.At the Estate, Mercedes can create in ways she hasn’t ever before. But Mercedes can’t take anything out of the Estate, including her new-found clarity. Mercedes can’t live both lives forever, and ultimately she must choose between this perfect world of art and truth and a much messier reality. “A dreamy and subtle work of art, The Gallery of Unfinished Girls explores love, family, and the maddening, magical drive to create art.”—Adi Alsaid, author of Let's Get Lost

Gallery Whispers

by Quintin Jardine

Deputy Chief Constable Bob Skinner has a lot on his plate. One of the world?s most ruthless terrorists is on his way to Edinburgh with only one thing on his mind: the forthcoming conference of world Heads of Government. If Skinner doesn't pick up his trail fast, he could have a global disaster in his backyard. While all eyes are focused on the terrorist threat, a terminally ill woman is found dead - an apparent suicide. But the marks of an assisted death are discovered. Yet this seemingly random death soon proves to be the beginning of an ominous pattern. For Skinner, the desperate race to find a heartless terrorist mixes uneasily with the search for a mercy killer- a search which takes on a poignant personal significance. And it's not long before Skinner himself will be staring death straight in the eye...

The Gallic War

by Julius Caesar H. J. Edwards

The only chronicle by an ancient general of his own campaigns, this historical treasure is also a work of profound literary merit. Julius Caesar's fascinating account of his conquests offers a trove of priceless details about the cultures of Gaul, Germany, and Britain during the First century B.C.--and of the great man himself.Despite his extensive background in politics, Caesar expresses himself without hiding behind rhetoric, in an uncluttered, factual style. Vigorous, direct, and eloquent, his accounts resemble memoirs or historical outlines rather than a formal histories. His notes on cultural matters, although secondary to his attention to military affairs, offer the era's most complete picture of the settings and personalities among Celtic and German tribes. This excellent translation offers several helpful features.

The Gallic Wars

by Julius Caesar

Caesar portrayed his invasion of Gaul as being a defensive pre-emptive action, most historians agree that the wars were fought primarily to boost Caesar's political career and to pay off his massive debts. Even so, Gaul was extremely important to Rome, as they had been attacked many times by the Gauls. Conquering Gaul allowed Rome to secure the natural border of the river Rhine. Caesar painstakingly describes his military campaign, and this is it is still the most important historical source on the Gaul campaign. It is also a masterwork of political propaganda, as Caesar was keenly interested in manipulating his readers in Rome as he published this book just as the Roman Civil war began. W. A. Macdevitt's translations brings this land mark historic book alive.

Gallipoli: An Australian Medical Perspective (Australian Combat Support #1)

by Michael Tyquin

To be successful, a modern army needs logistical support to survive - to arm, feed, transport, and care for its soldiers. As history shows us the maintenance of health in any army , is a key factor in warfare. In many respects the Gallipoli campaign was a doomed undertaking. The seeds of ultimate defeat in December 1915 were the risks that attended a hugely ambitious, complex, and large-scale amphibious operation - the landings on well-defended shores on the Gallipoli peninsula, under cover of darkness. Communications at the time were primitive, while general staff officers had little understanding of their own army's medical assets or the needs of a large medical organisation. The Australian Army Medical Corps (AAMC) received aid from, and gave support to, all five forces at various times during 1915. Underlying the execution of the Dardanelles campaign were factors wholly outside the control of the Australian AMS. Undoubtedly tragic, and sometimes avoidable, errors were made at the highest level of command, with subsequent pressures on the AMS. An amphibious operation of this type and scale, however, was without parallel in modern military history, and mistakes were inevitable, as they are with any campaign of such complexity. Gallipoli: An Australian Medical Perspective explores these complexities and mistakes through the eyes of the infant Australian Army Medical Corps.

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