Browse Results

Showing 99,976 through 100,000 of 100,000 results

Global Public Relations: Spanning Borders, Spanning Cultures

by Alan R. Freitag Ashli Quesinberry Stokes

This text provides a structured and practical framework for understanding the complexities of contemporary public relations. It is an instructional book that guides the reader through the challenges of communication and problem solving across a range of organizations and cross-cultural settings. Written in a straightforward, lively style, the book covers: foundational theories, and factors that shape the discipline communication across cultures trends affecting the public relations profession throughout the world. Incorporating case studies and commentary to illustrate key principles and stimulate discussion, this book also highlights the different approaches professionals must consider in different contexts, from communicating with employees to liaising with external bodies, such as government agencies or the media. Offering a truly global perspective on the subject, Global Public Relations is essential reading for any student or practitioner interested in public relations excellence in a global setting. A companion website provides additional material for lecturers and students alike: www.routledge.com/textbooks/9780415448154/

Dis/ability Studies: Theorising disablism and ableism

by Dan Goodley

In this ground-breaking new work, Dan Goodley makes the case for a novel, distinct, intellectual, and political project – dis/ability studies – an orientation that might encourage us to think again about the phenomena of disability and ability. Drawing on a range of interdisciplinary areas, including sociology, psychology, education, policy and cultural studies, this much needed text takes the most topical and important issues in critical disability theory, and pushes them into new theoretical territory. Goodley argues that we are entering a time of dis/ability studies, when both categories of disability and ability require expanding upon as a response to the global politics of neoliberal capitalism. Divided into two parts, the first section traces the dual processes of ableism and disablism, suggesting that one cannot exist without the other, and makes the case for a research-driven and intersectional analysis of dis/ability. The second section applies this new analytical framework to a range of critical topics, including: The biopolitics of dis/ability and debility Inclusive education Psychopathology Markets, communities and civil society. Dis/ability Studies provides much needed depth, texture and analysis in this emerging discipline. This accessible text will appeal to students and researchers of disability across a range of disciplines, as well as disability activists, policymakers, and practitioners working directly with disabled people.

An Introduction to Narratology

by Monika Fludernik

An Introduction to Narratology is an accessible, practical guide to narratological theory and terminology and its application to literature. In this book, Monika Fludernik outlines: the key concepts of style, metaphor and metonymy, and the history of narrative forms narratological approaches to interpretation and the linguistic aspects of texts, including new cognitive developments in the field how students can use narratological theory to work with texts, incorporating detailed practical examples a glossary of useful narrative terms, and suggestions for further reading. This textbook offers a comprehensive overview of the key aspects of narratology by a leading practitioner in the field. It demystifies the subject in a way that is accessible to beginners, but also reflects recent theoretical developments and narratology’s increasing popularity as a critical tool.

The Evolution of International Society: A Comparative Historical Analysis

by Adam Watson

`This is a real feast of a book. . . . a landmark book. It is clear enough to be used as a teaching text, and could make an excellent introduction to the discipline for those courageous enough to revise their courses. ' International Affairs `This is a bold, successful and valuable book. . . It is written with admirable clarity and merciful conciseness. ' International Relations `A stunning success. Watson's book is a masterful piece of theoretical and historical analysis. ' John A. Vasquez, Rutgers University Adam Watson, who died in 2007, was a former diplomat who in his later academic career became a pioneer of the discipline of international relations. Originally published in 1992, The Evolution of International Society made a major contribution to international theory and to our perception of how relations between states operate, and established Watson's place within the canon. This acclaimed and uniquely comprehensive work explains how international societies function across time, starting by examining the ancient state systems before turning to look in detail at the current worldwide international society. The book demonstrates that relations between states are not normally anarchic, but are in fact organized and regulated by elaborate rules and practices. In this timely reissue, a new introduction by Barry Buzan and Richard Little assesses Adam Watson's career as a diplomat and examines how his work as a practitioner shaped his subsequent thinking about the nature of international society. It then contextualises Watson's original work, situates it alongside current work in the area and identifies the originality of Watson's key arguments, helping us to understand Watson's place within the canon.

Using Statistics in Small-Scale Language Education Research: Focus on Non-Parametric Data (ESL & Applied Linguistics Professional Series)

by Jean L. Turner

Assuming no familiarity with statistical methods, this text for language education research methods and statistics courses provides detailed guidance and instruction on principles of designing, conducting, interpreting, reading, and evaluating statistical research done in classroom settings or with a small number of participants. While three different types of statistics are addressed (descriptive, parametric, non-parametric) the emphasis is on non-parametric statistics because they are appropriate when the number of participants is small and the conditions for use of parametric statistics are not satisfied. The emphasis on non-parametric statistics is unique and complements the growing interest among second and foreign language educators in doing statistical research in classrooms. Designed to help students and other language education researchers to identify and use analyses that are appropriate for their studies, taking into account the number of participants and the shape of the data distribution, the text includes sample studies to illustrate the important points in each chapter and exercises to promote understanding of the concepts and the development of practical research skills. Mathematical operations are explained in detail, and step-by-step illustrations in the use of R (a very powerful, online, freeware program) to perform all calculations are provided. A Companion Website extends and enhances the text with PowerPoint presentations illustrating how to carry out calculations and use R; practice exercises with answer keys; data sets in Excel MS-DOS format; and quiz, midterm, and final problems with answer keys.

Understanding Semantics, Second Edition

by Sebastian Loebner

Understanding Semantics, Second Edition, provides an engaging and accessible introduction to linguistic semantics. The first part takes the reader through a step-by-step guide to the main phenomena and notions of semantics, covering levels and dimensions of meaning, ambiguity, meaning and context, logical relations and meaning relations, the basics of noun semantics, verb semantics and sentence semantics. The second part provides a critical introduction to the basic notions of the three major theoretical approaches to meaning: structuralism, cognitive semantics and formal semantics. Key features include: A consistent mentalist perspective on meaning Broad coverage of lexical and sentence semantics, including three new chapters discussing deixis, NP semantics, presuppositions, verb semantics and frames Examples from a wider range of languages that include German, Japanese, Spanish and Russian. Practical exercises on linguistic data Companion website including all figures and tables from the book, an online dictionary, answers to the exercises and useful links at routledge.com/cw/loebner This book is an essential resource for all undergraduate students studying semantics. Sebastian Löbner is a Professor of Linguistics at the Institute for Language and Information at the University of Düsseldorf, Germany

Non-Governmental Organizations and Development

by David Lewis Nazneen Kanji

Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are high profile actors in the field of international development, both as providers of services to vulnerable individuals and communities and as campaigning policy advocates. This book provides a critical introduction to the wide-ranging topic of NGOs and development. Written by two authors with more than twenty years experience of research and practice in the field, the book combines a critical overview of the main research literature with a set of up-to-date theoretical and practical insights drawn from experience in Asia, Europe, Africa and elsewhere. It highlights the importance of NGOs in development, but it also engages fully with the criticisms that the increased profile of NGOs in development now attracts. Non-Governmental Organizations and Development begins with a discussion of the wide diversity of NGOs and their roles, and locates their recent rise to prominence within broader histories of struggle as well as within the ideological context of neo-liberalism. It then moves on to analyze how interest in NGOs has both reflected and informed wider theoretical trends and debates within development studies, before analyzing NGOs and their practices, using a broad range of short case studies of successful and unsuccessful interventions. David Lewis and Nazneen Kanji then moves on to describe the ways in which NGOs are increasingly important in relation to ideas and debates about ‘civil society’, globalization and the changing ideas and practices of international aid. The book argues that NGOs are now central to development theory and practice and are likely to remain important actors in development in the years to come. In order to appreciate the issues raised by their increasing diversity and complexity, the authors conclude that it is necessary to deploy a historically and theoretically informed perspective. This critical overview will be useful to students of development studies at undergraduate and masters levels, as well as to more general readers and practitioners. The format of the book includes figures, photographs and case studies as well as reader material in the form of summary points and questions. Despite the growing importance of the topic, no single short, up-to-date book exists that sets out the main issues in the form of a clearly written, academically-informed text: until now.

An Introduction to the Ancient World

by Lukas De Blois R.J. van der Spek L De Blois R. J. van der Spek

Integrating the results of scholarly work from the past decade, the authors of An Introduction to the Ancient World, Lukas de Blois and R.J. van der Spek, have fully-updated and revised all sixteen chapters of this best-selling introductory textbook. Covering the history and culture of the ancient Near East, Greece and Rome within the framework of a short narrative history of events, this book offers an easily readable, integrated overview for students of history, classics, archaeology and philosophy, whether at college, at undergraduate level or among the wider reading public. This revised second edition offers a new section on early Christianity and more specific information on the religions, economies, and societies of the ancient Near East. There is extended coverage of Greek, Macedonian and Near Eastern history of the fourth to second centuries BC and the history of the Late Roman Republic. The consequences of Julius Caesar's violent death are covered in more detail, as are the history and society of Imperial Rome. This new edition is: comprehensive: covers 3,000 years of ancient history and provides the basis for a typical one-semester course lavishly illustrated: contains maps, line drawings and plates to support and supplement the text, with updated captions clearly and concisely written: two established and respected university teachers with thirty years' experience in the subject areas well-organized: traces the broad outline of political history but also concentrates on particular topics user-friendly: includes chapter menus, an extensive and expanded bibliography organized by subject area and three appendices, an improved introduction and the addition of an epilogue.

Writing for Journalists

by Tim Holmes Sally Adams Harriett Gilbert Wynford Hicks

Praise for the first edition: 'There are books that are badly written, books that are well written and books that you wish you'd written. This is one of the latter. Hicks and his co-writers produce a book that is a joy to read and is packed full of helpful advice.' - Chris Frost, Journalist 'You don't have to be a journalist to read this book. Anyone with an interest in improving their writing skills and developing a sense of good style will find it useful Wynford Hicks takes a no-nonsense, sleeves rolled up approach to writing which has no time for preciousness.' - Roy Johnson, Mantex'Writing for Journalists neatly fills a gap in the market for a no-nonsense book for trainees written by trainers who genuinely understand the industry and who have moved with the times.' - Sharon Wheeler, Journalism Studies Writing for Journalists is about the craft of journalistic writing: how to put one word after another so that the reader gets the message - or the joke - goes on reading and comes back for more. It is a practical guide for all those who write for newspapers, periodicals and websites, whether students, trainees or professionals. This revised and updated edition introduces the reader to the essentials of good writing. Based on critical analysis of news stories, features and reviews from daily and weekly papers, consumer magazines, specialist trade journals and a variety of websites, Writing for Journalists includes: advice on how to start writing and how to improve and develop your style how to write a news story which is informative, concise and readable tips on feature writing from researching profiles to writing product round-ups how to structure and write reviews a new chapter on writing online copy.

Genocidal Crimes

by Alex Alvarez

Genocide has emerged as one of the leading problems of the twentieth century. No corner of the world seems immune from this form of collective violence. While many individuals are familiar with the term, few people have a clear understanding of what genocide is and how it is carried out. This book clearly discusses the concept of genocide and dispels the widely held misconceptions about how these crimes occur and the mechanisms necessary for its perpetration. Genocidal Crimes differs from much of the writing on the subject in that it explicitly relies upon the criminological literature to explain the nature and functioning of genocide. Criminology, with its focus on various types of criminality and violence, has much to offer in terms of explaining the origins, dynamics, and facilitators of this particular form of collective violence. Through application of a number of criminological theories to various elements of genocide Alex Alvarez presents a comprehensive analysis of this particular crime. These criminological perspectives are underpinned by a variety of psychological, sociological, and political science based insights in order to present a more complete discussion of the nature and functioning of genocide.

Offenders on Offending: Learning about Crime from Criminals

by Wim Bernasco

Our knowledge of crime is based on three types of sources: the criminal justice system, victims, and offenders. For technological and other reasons the criminal justice system produces an increasing stream of information on crime. The rise of the victimization survey has given the victims a much larger role in our study of crime. There is, however, no concomitant development regarding offenders. This is unfortunate because offenders are the experts when it comes to offending.In order to understand criminal behavior, we need their perspective. This is not always a straightforward process, however, and information from offenders is often unreliable. This book is about what we can do to maximise the validity of what offenders tell us about their offending. Renowned experts from various countries present their experiences and insights, with a clear focus on methodological issues of fieldwork among various types of offender populations. Each contribution deals with with a few central issues: How can offenders be motivated to participate in research? How can offenders be motivated to tell the truth on their offending? How can the information that offenders provide be checked and validated? What can we learn from offenders that cannot be accessed from other sources? With the aim of obtaining valid and reliable information, how, where and under which conditions should we observe offenders and talk to them?

Maurice Mandelbaum and American Critical Realism

by Ian F. Verstegen

Many have wondered about the similarity in name of American critical realism and the movement of the same name begun by Roy Bhaskar. The figure of Maurice Mandelbaum complicates the relationship, not only due to his career bridging the two movements but also Mandelbaum’s concern not only with traditional concerns of American critical realism (epistemology and philosophy of science) but the nature of society, the nature of social explanation, and naturalism. This volume reflects both on Mandelbaum’s own career and the relation of his thought to Bhaskar’s critical realism. By examining Mandelbaum’s commitments to phenomenology within critical realism, as well as his goal to enlighten social scientific and above all historiographical categories, it is possible to see how Mandelbaum went beyond the scientific realism of his predecessors. At the same time, a fruitful comparison with Bhaskar’s and others’ thought is undertaken by examining mandelbaum’s solutions to the problems of the ontology of sociology and social laws, the dynamics of cultural change and the overriding master narratives that govern late capitalism. By explaining Mandelbaum’s scrupulous attempt to address the horrors of the twentieth century, it is possible to appreciate his significance for the twenty-first. A timely and important book, Maurice Mandelbaum and American Critical Realism is essential reading for all serious students of critical realism and twentieth century philosophy.

Bertrand Russell's Best

by Bertrand Russell

Bertrand Russell is regarded as one of the twentieth century’s greatest minds. Well-known for his profound knowledge and controversial approach to myriad of different issues and subjects such as sex, marriage, religion, education and politics, his prolific works also exhibit great intellectual wit and humour. First published in 1958, Bertrand Russell’s Best is a delightfully funny and entertaining book, and a striking testament to the remarkable life work and wit of Bertrand Russell.

Unpopular Essays

by Bertrand Russell

A classic collection of Bertrand Russell’s more controversial works, reaffirming his staunch liberal values, Unpopular Essays is one of Russell’s most characteristic and self-revealing books. Written to "combat… the growth in Dogmatism", on first publication in 1950 it met with critical acclaim and a wide readership and has since become one of his most accessible and popular books.

Our Knowledge of the External World

by Bertrand Russell

Our Knowledge of the External World is a compilation of lectures Bertrand Russell delivered in the US in which he questions the very relevance and legitimacy of philosophy. In it he investigates the relationship between ‘individual’ and ‘scientific’ knowledge and questions the means in which we have come to understand our physical world. This is an explosive and controversial work that illustrates instances where the claims of philosophers have been excessive, and examines why their achievements have not been greater.

ABC of Relativity

by Bertrand Russell

First published in 1925, Bertrand Russell’s ABC of Relativity was considered a masterwork of its time, contributing significantly to the mass popularisation of science. Authoritative and accessible, it provides a remarkable introductory guide to Einstein’s theory of Relativity to a general readership. One of the most definitive reference guides of its kind, and written by one of the twentieth century’s most influential philosophers, ABC of Relativity continues to be as relevant today as it was on first publication.

Supermax: Controlling Risk Through Solitary Confinement

by Sharon Shalev

This book examines the rise and proliferation of 'Supermaxes', large prisons dedicated to holding prisoners in prolonged and strict solitary confinement, in the United States since the late 1980s. Drawing on unique access to two Supermax prisons and on in-depth interviews with prison officials, prison architects, current and former prisoners, mental health professionals, penal, legal, and human rights experts, it provides a holistic view of the theory, practice and consequences of these prisons. Given the historic uses of solitary confinement, the book also traces continuities and discontinuities in its use on both sides of the Atlantic over the last two centuries. It argues that rather than being an entirely 'new' form of imprisonment, Supermax prisons draw on principles of architecture, surveillance and control which were set out in the early 19th century but which are now enhanced by the most advanced technologies available to current day prison planners and administrators. It asks why a form of confinement which had been discredited in the past is now proposed as the best solution for dealing with 'difficult', 'dangerous' or 'disruptive' prisoners, and assesses the true costs of Supermax confinement.

Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits

by Bertrand Russell

How do we know what we "know"? How did we –as individuals and as a society – come to accept certain knowledge as fact? In Human Knowledge, Bertrand Russell questions the reliability of our assumptions on knowledge. This brilliant and controversial work investigates the relationship between ‘individual’ and ‘scientific’ knowledge. First published in 1948, this provocative work contributed significantly to an explosive intellectual discourse that continues to this day.

The Scientific Outlook

by Bertrand Russell

According to Bertrand Russell, science is knowledge; that which seeks general laws connecting a number of particular facts. It is, he argues, far superior to art, where much of the knowledge is intangible and assumed. In The Scientific Outlook, Russell delivers one of his most important works, exploring the nature and scope of scientific knowledge, the increased power over nature that science affords and the changes in the lives of human beings that result from new forms of science. Insightful and accessible, this impressive work sees Russell at his very best.

Critical Theorists and International Relations

by Jenny Edkins Nick Vaughan-Williams

A wide range of critical theorists is used in the study of international politics, and until now there has been no text that gives concise and accessible introductions to these figures. Critical Theorists and International Relations provides a wide-ranging introduction to thirty-two important theorists whose work has been influential in thinking about global politics. Each chapter is written by an expert with a detailed knowledge of the theorist concerned, representing a range of approaches under the rubric ‘critical’, including Marxism and post-Marxism, the Frankfurt School, hermeneutics, phenomenology, postcolonialism, feminism, queer theory, poststructuralism, pragmatism, scientific realism, deconstruction and psychoanalysis. Key features of each chapter include: a clear and concise biography of the relevant thinker an introduction to their key writings and ideas a summary of the ways in which these ideas have influenced and are being used in international relations scholarship a list of suggestions for further reading Written in engaging and accessible prose, Critical Theorists and International Relations is a unique and invaluable resource for undergraduates, postgraduates and scholars of international relations.

Interviewing for Journalists

by Adams Sally

Interviewing for Journalists details the central journalistic skill of how to ask the right question in the right way. It is a practical and concise guide for all print and online journalists - professionals, students and trainees - whether writing news stories or features for newspapers and magazines, print and web. Interviewing for Journalists focuses on the many types of interviewing, from the routine street interview, vox pop and press conference to the interview used as the basis of an in-depth profile. Drawing on previously published material and featuring interviews with successful columnists such as Emma Brockes, who writes for the Guardian and the New York Times and Andrew Duncan of Radio Times. Interviewing for Journalists covers every stage of interviews including research, planning and preparation, structuring questions, the importance of body language, how to get a vivid quote, checking material and editing it into different formats. Interviewing for Journalists includes: a discussion about the significance and importance of the interview for journalism advice on how to handle face-to-face interviewees with politicians, celebrities and vulnerable people advice on dealing with PRs how to carry out the telephone and online interview tips on note-taking and recording methods including shorthand a discussion of ethical, legal and professional issues such as libel, doorstepping, off-the-record briefings and the limits of editing a glossary of journalistic terms and notes on further reading.

Arabic-English-Arabic-English Translation: Issues and Strategies

by Ronak Husni Daniel L. Newman

Arabic-English-Arabic-English Translation: Issues and Strategies is an accessible coursebook for students and practitioners of Arabic-English-Arabic translation. Focusing on the key issues and topics affecting the field, it offers informed guidance on the most effective methods to deal with such problems, enabling users to develop deeper insights and enhance their translation skills. Key features include: A focus on Arabic-English translation in both directions, preparing students for the real-life experiences of practitioners in the field In-depth discussion of the core issues of phraseology, language variation and translation, legal translation and translation technology in Arabic and English translation Authentic sample texts in each chapter, taken from a variety of sources from across the Arabic-speaking world to provide snapshots of real-life language use Source texts followed by examples of possible translation strategies, with extensive commentaries, to showcase the best translation practices and methodologies A range of supporting exercises to enable students to practise their newly acquired knowledge and skills Inclusion of a wide range of themes covering both linguistic and genre issues, offering multidimensional perspectives and depth and breadth in learning List of recommended readings and resources for each of the topics under discussion Comprehensive glossary and bibliography at the back of the book. Lucid and practical in its approach, Arabic-English-Arabic-English Translation: Issues and Strategies will be an indispensable resource for intermediate to advanced students of Arabic. It will also be of great interest to professional translators working in Arabic-English-Arabic translation.

Issues in Green Criminology

by Nigel South Piers Beirne

Issues in Green Criminology: confronting harms against environments, humanity and other animals aims to provide, if not a manifesto, then at least a significant resource for thinking about green criminology, a rapidly developing field. It offers a set of specially written introductions and a variety of current and new directions, wide-ranging in scope and international in terms of coverage and contributors. It provides focused discussions of current and cutting edge issues that will influence the emergence of a coherent perspective on green issues. The contributors are drawn from the leading thinkers in the field. The twelve chapters of the book explore the myriad ways in which governments, transnational corporations, military apparatuses and ordinary people going about their everyday lives routinely harm environments, other animals and humanity. The book will be essential reading not only for students taking courses in colleges and universities but also for activists in the environmental and animal rights movements. Its concern is with an ever-expanding agenda ? the whys, the hows and the whens of the generation and control of the many aspects of harm to environments, ecological systems and all species of animals, including humans. These harms include, but are not limited to, exploitation, modes of discrimination and disempowerment, degradation, abuse, exclusion, pain, injury, loss and suffering. Straddling and intersecting these many forms of harm are key concepts for a green criminology such as gender inequalities, racism, dominionism and speciesism, classism, the north/south divide, the accountability of science, and the ethics of global capitalist expansion. Green criminology has the potential to provide not only a different way of examining and making sense of various forms of crime and control responses (some well known, others less so) but can also make explicable much wider connections that are not generally well understood. As all societies face up to the need to confront harms against environments, other animals and humanity, criminology will have a major role to play. This book will be an essential part of this process.

Understanding Post-Communist Transformation: A Bottom Up Approach

by Richard Rose

The fall of the Berlin Wall launched the transformation of government, economy and society across half of Europe and the former Soviet Union. This text deals with the process of change in former Communist bloc countries, ten of which have become new European Union (EU) democracies while Russia and her neighbours remain burdened by their Soviet legacy. Drawing on more than a hundred public opinion surveys from the New Europe Barometer, the text compares how ordinary people have coped with the stresses and opportunities of transforming Communist societies into post-Communist societies and the resulting differences between peoples in the new EU member states and Russia. Subjects covered by Understanding Post-Communist Transformation include: Stresses and opportunities of economic transformation Social capital and the development of civil society Elections and the complexities of party politics The challenges for the EU of raising standards of democratic governance Differences between Russia’s and the West’s interpretation of political life Written by one of the world's most renowned authorities on this subject, this text is ideal for courses on transition, post-communism, democratization and Russian and Eastern European history and politics.

Institutionalizing Restorative Justice

by Tom Daems Luc Robert Ivo Aertsen

This new book aims to explore the key issues and debates surrounding the question of the incorporation and institutionalisation of restorative justice within existing penal and criminal justice systems, an increasingly pressing issue given the rapid spread of restorative justice worldwide at both national and international levels. In doing so it aims to build bridges between those concerned with the practical institutionalisation of restorative justice on the one hand, and those engaged in more theoretical aspects of penal development and analysis on the other. It offers conceptual tools and a theoretical framework to help make sense of these developments, reflecting expertise drawn from analysis of developments in Europe, North America and Australasia.

Refine Search

Showing 99,976 through 100,000 of 100,000 results