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Manifesto of the Communist Party

by Karl Marx

The Communist Manifesto was first published on February 21, and it is one of the world's most influential political tracts. Commissioned by the Communist League and written by communist theorists Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, it laid out the League's purposes and program. The Manifesto suggested a course of action for a proletarian (working class) revolution to overthrow the ruling class of bourgeoisie and to eventually bring about a classless society.

The Bhagavad Gita According to Gandhi

by Mohandas K. Gandhi

My first acquaintance with the Gita began in 1888-89 with the verse translation by Sir Edwin Arnold known as the Song Celestial. On reading it, I felt a keen desire to read a Gujarati translation. And I read as many translations as I could lay hold of. But all such reading can give me no passport for presenting my own translation. Then again my knowledge of Sanskrit is limited, my knowledge of Gujarati too is in no way scholarly. How could I then dare present the public with my translation? It has been my endeavor, as also that of some companions, to reduce to practice the teaching of the Gita as I have understood it. The Gita has become for us a spiritual reference book. I am aware that we ever fail to act in perfect accord with the teaching. The failure is not due to want of effort, but is in spite of it. Even though the failures we seem to see rays of hope. The accompanying rendering contains the meaning of the Gita message which this little band is trying to enforce in its daily conduct. --Mahatma Gandhi Wilder Publications is a green publisher. All of our books are printed to order. This reduces waste and helps us keep prices low while greatly reducing our impact on the environment.

Silas Marner

by George Eliot

Enduring Literature Illuminated by Practical Scholarship A young orphan transforms the life of a lonely, embittered man in this novel about faith and society set in nineteenth-century rural England. Each Enriched Classic Edition includes: &#149 A concise introduction that gives readers important background information &#149 A chronology of the author's life and work &#149 A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context &#149 An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations &#149 Detailed explanatory notes &#149 Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work &#149 Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction &#149 A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential. Series edited by Cynthia Brantley Johnson

Rhetoric

by Aristotle

Rhetoric is the counterpart of Dialectic. Both alike are concerned with such things that come, more or less, within the general ken of all men and belong to no definite science. Accordingly all men make use, more or less, of both; for, to a certain extent, all men attempt to discuss statements and to maintain them, to defend themselves, and to attack others. Ordinary people do this either at random or through practice and from acquired habit. Both ways being possible, the subject can plainly be handled systematically, for it is possible to inquire the reason why some speakers succeed through practice and others spontaneously; everyone will at once agree that such an inquiry is the function of an art.

Sickness Unto Death

by Soren Kierkegaard

Man is spirit. But what is spirit? Spirit is the self. But what is the self? The self is a relation which relates itself to its own self, or it is that in the relation [which accounts for it] that the relation relates itself to its own self; the self is not the relation but [consists in the fact] that the relation relates itself to its own self. Man is a synthesis of the infinite and the finite, of the temporal and the eternal, of freedom and necessity; in short, it is a synthesis.

The Story of the Amulet

by Edith Nesbit

While the childrens' mother and father are out of the country the children are staying with the "old nurse" in her boarding house. There is only one other boarder, an old Egyptoligist, whom the children soon befriend. They learn of an amulet that has the ability to grant their hearts desire, and soon buy it. After making the purchase, they learn that it is the only surviving half of the amulet. Though the half of the amulet cannot grant their hearts desire, it can serve as a magic portal permitting time travel. In this book, the five children, Cyril, Anthea, Robert, Jane, and the Lamb conclude their trilogy of adventures.

On Horsemanship

by Xenophon

On horsemanship deals with the selection, care, and training of horses in general. Military training and the duties of the cavalry commander are dealt with in the Hipparchicus. Written in about 350 BC, the treatises of Xenophon were considered the earliest extant works on horsemanship in any literature.

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

by Jules Verne

ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP A group of men set sail to solve the mystery of a sea monster in this amazing underwater adventure. EACH ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES: A concise introduction that gives readers important background information A chronology of the author's life and work A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations Detailed explanatory notes Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential. SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON

A Christmas Carol

by Charles Dickens

Classic tale featuring Tiny Tim, Ebenezer Scrooge, and the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Future.

A Will to Be Free

by Booker T. Washington

Collected here in this omnibus edition are three influential autobiographies of prominent men who rose up from slavery to greatness. Essential reading for anyone interested in African American Heritage. Included are Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington, Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup, and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave by Frederick Douglass. Up from Slavery is one of the most influential biographies ever written. On one level it is the life story of Booker T. Washington and his rise from slavery to accomplished educator and activist. On another level it the story of how an entire race strove to better itself. Washington was constantly, and often bitterly, criticized by his contemporaries for being too conciliatory to whites and not concerned enough about civil rights. It would not be until after his death that the world would find out that he had indeed worked a great deal for civil rights anonymously behind the scenes. Twelve Years a Slave is the harrowing true story of Solomon Northup, a free black man living in New York. He was kidnaped by unscrupulous slave hunters and sold into slavery where he endured unimaginable degradation and abuse until his rescue twelve years later. A powerful and riveting condemnation of American slavery. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is one of the most influential autobiographies ever written. This classic did as much as or more than any other book to motivate the abolitionist to continue to fight for freedom in American. Frederick Douglass was born a slave, he escaped a brutal system, and through sheer force of will educated himself and became an abolitionist, editor, orator, author, statesman, and reformer. This is one of the most unlikely and powerful success stories ever written.

The Art of War

by Sun Tzu

This is the most important book ever written about warfare and conflict. Lionel Giles' translation is the definitive edition. The Art of War can be used and adapted in every facet of your life. This book explains when and how to go to war, as well as when not to. Learn how to win any conflict whether it be on the battlefield or in the boardroom. This deluxe edition contains two versions of The Art of War. The first has no commentary so that you can immerse yourself directly in Sun Tzu's work. The second version includes Lionel Giles' indispensable commentary.

The Last of the Mohicans

by James Fenimore Cooper

The Last of the Mohicans is an epic novel by James Fenimore Cooper, first published in January 1826. It was one of the most popular English-language novels of its time, and helped establish Cooper as one of the first world-famous American writers. The story takes place in 1757 during the French and Indian War, when France and Great Britain battled for control of the American and Canadian colonies. During this war, the French often allied themselves with Native American tribes in order to gain an advantage over the British, with unpredictable and often tragic results.

The Souls of Black Folk

by W.E.B. Dubois

Enriched Classics offer readers accessible editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and commentary. Each book includes educational tools alongside the text, enabling students and readers alike to gain a deeper and more developed understanding of the writer and their work.With a dash of the Victorian and Enlightenment influences that peppered Du Bois's impassioned yet formal prose, the largely autobiographical chapters of The Souls of Black Folks take the reader through the momentous and moody maze of Afro-American life after the Emancipation Proclamation: from poverty, the neo-slavery of the sharecropper, illiteracy, mis-education, and lynching, to the heights of humanity reached by the spiritual "sorrow songs" that birthed gospel music and the blues. The capstone of The Souls of Black Folk is Du Bois's haunting, eloquent description of the concept of the black psyche's "double consciousness," which he described as "a peculiar sensation....One ever feels this twoness--an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder." Enriched Classics enhance your engagement by introducing and explaining the historical and cultural significance of the work, the author's personal history, and what impact this book had on subsequent scholarship. Each book includes discussion questions that help clarify and reinforce major themes and reading recommendations for further research. Read with confidence.

Famous Men of Greece

by John Haaren

Greeks were history's great men of thought. John Haaren has collected stories from the lives of thirty famous Greek Men, detailing the rise, Golden Age, and fall of Greece. Among these men are Aristotle, Ptolemy, Ulysses, Pericles, and Alexander the Great. Your children will be delighted to read and understand why the scope of Greek accomplishment is still known today as "The Greek Miracle."

Freckles

by Gene Stratton-Porter

Freckles is a one-handed, plucky waif of an orphan, who has been raised since infancy in a Chicago orphanage and yet speaks with a powerful Irish accent. He applies for a job guarding timber in the swamp, and is accepted despite his youth and the disability of his having only one hand. He insists that the name given him in the orphanage "is no more my name than it is yours." Freckles develops an interest in the wildlife of the swamp and in natural history, and falls in love with the Swamp Angel. The story's primary action involves his self-education, his loyalty to his employer, his growing love for the Angel (and hers for him) and his conviction that it's better and finer to deny his love than to court her "without knowledge of honorable birth." Though he is loved and admired by all he meets, he considers himself unworthy of the Angel because of his apparent bastardy and because his birth-parents seem to have abused him. Eventually he risks his life to save the Angel, and she goes on a quest to find his birthparents in order to ease his mind.

How to Know Higher Worlds

by Rudolf Steiner

There slumber in every human being faculties by means of which she can acquire for herself a knowledge of higher worlds. Mystics, Gnostics, Theosophists - all speak of a world of soul and spirit which for them is just as real as the world we see with our physical eyes and touch with our physical hands. At every moment the listener may say to herself: that, of which they speak, I too can learn, if I develop within myself certain powers which today still slumber within me. There remains only one question - how to set to work to develop such faculties.

Intuitive Thinking as a Spiritual Path

by Rudolf Steiner

Intuitive Thinking as a Spiritual Path is Rudolf Steiner's most important work. In it he explains the two aspects of free will: freedom of thought and freedom of action. This landmark book explores free will from a completely fresh and unique perspective. If an idea is to become action, man must first want it before it can happen. Such an act of will therefore has its grounds only in man himself. Man is then the ultimate determinant of his action. He is free. -Rudolf Steiner

Laddie: A True Blue Story

by Gene Stratton-Porter

This charming story is told by "Little Sister," a young girl who loves to learn but has no patience with schools. Her ideal classroom is nature itself. Join her as she learns about the world and her place in it.

Little Men

by Louisa May Alcott

Little Men follows the life of Jo Bhaer and the students who live and learn at the Plumfield School that she runs with her husband, Professor Bhaer. The mischievous children, whom she loves and cares for as her own, learn valuable lessons as they grow to adulthood. Each student has his or her own struggles: Nat lies; Demi, is so naïve that he finds it hard to live in the real world; Emil has a bad temper; Dan is rebellious and rude; Tommy is careless; Annie is too rambunctious; and Daisy is too prim. They all learn to cope with their faults as they grow into young men and women.

Little Women

by Louisa May Alcott

The novel follows the lives of four sisters - Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March - and is loosely based on the author's childhood experiences with her three sisters. At sixteen, Meg is the oldest sister. She is considered the beauty of the March household, and is well-mannered. Jo starts out as a tomboyish, hot-tempered, fifteen-year-old girl. Beth is even-tempered and has always been very close to Jo. Amy, the youngest sister, age twelve, is interested in art. Unabridged

Flatland

by Edwin A. Abbott

As a satire, Flatland offered pointed observations on the social hierarchy of Victorian culture. However, the novella's more enduring contribution is its examination of dimensions; in a foreword to one of the many publications of the novella, noted science writer Isaac Asimov described Flatland as "The best introduction one can find into the manner of perceiving dimensions." As such, the novella is still popular amongst mathematics, physics and computer science students. The story is about a two-dimensional world referred to as Flatland. The unnamed narrator, a humble square (the social caste of gentlemen and professionals), guides us through some of the implications of life in two dimensions. The Square has a dream about a visit to a one-dimensional world (Lineland), and attempts to convince the realm's ignorant monarch of a second dimension, but finds that it is essentially impossible to make him see outside of his eternally straight line.

The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy

by Jacob Burckhardt

The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy is an 1860 work on the Italian Renaissance by Swiss historian Jacob Burckhardt. Together with his History of the Renaissance in Italy (1867) it is counted among the classics of Renaissance historiography.

Cyrano de Bergerac

by Edmond Rostand

ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATEDBY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIPEdmond Rostand's classic romance tells the unforgettable story of one unique man's bravery, loyalty, and unspoken love.EACH ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES: A concise introduction that gives readers important background information A chronology of the author's life and work A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations Detailed explanatory notes Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experienceEnriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential.SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON

Essays of Francis Bacon

by Francis Bacon

This collection contains fifty-eight essays, published at various times between 1597 and 1625, on subjects ranging among state policy, personal conduct, and the appreciation of nature. Bacon has been referred to as the founder of modern inductivism and prophet of the industrial revolution, and all forms of knowledge are subjected to the interpretation of Bacon's views on life.

Framley Parsonage

by Anthony Trollope

Mark Robarts is a young vicar, newly arrived in the village of Framley in Barsetshire. Mark has ambitions to further his career and begins to seek connections in the county's high society. He is soon preyed upon by local Member of Parliament to guarantee a substantial loan, which Mark in a moment of weakness agrees to, even though he does not have the means. The consequences of this blunder play a major role in the plot, with Mark eventually being publicly humiliated when bailiffs begin to confiscate the Robarts' furniture. At the last moment, Lord Lufton forces a loan on the reluctant Mark.

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