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The Language of Literature (California Edition)

by James Marshall Arthur N. Applebee Judith A. Langer Sheridan Blau Andrea B. Bermudez Rebekah Caplan Peter Elbow Susan Hynds

This book is also part of the Literature Connections series published by McDougal Littell. It offers reading strategies, exercises, summaries, a collection of stories, key terms, key standards and assessment.

The Language of Literature (California Edition) (Level 9)

by James Marshall Arthur N. Applebee Judith A. Langer Sheridan Blau Andrea B. Bermudez Rebekah Caplan Peter Elbow Susan Hynds

Literature textbook geared toward California's Reading & Language Arts Program Standards.

The Language of Literature (Grade 6)

by James Marshall Arthur N. Applebee Judith A. Langer Sheridan Blau Rebekah Caplan Peter Elbow Susan Hynds Andrea B. Berrnúdez

Each of the books in the Literature Connections series combines a novel or play with related readings-poems, stories, plays, personal essays, articles-- that add new perspectives on the theme or subject matter of the longer work.

The Language of Literature (Grade 8)

by James Marshall Arthur N. Applebee Judith A. Langer Andrea B. Bermúdez Sheridan Blau Rebekah Caplan Peter Elbow Susan Hynds

This volume combines a novel or play with related readings-poems, stories, plays, personal essays, articles--that add new perspectives on the theme or subject matter of the longer work.

The Language of Literature (Grade 9)

by James Marshall Arthur N. Applebee Judith A. Langer Sheridan Blau Andrea B. Bermudez Rebekah Caplan Peter Elbow Susan Hynds

Why did Homer's Odyssey show up thousands of years later as a made-for-television movie? Why has the story of Romeo and Juliet been told and retold throughout generations? Why is this week's mountain-climbing expedition next week's bestselling novel? People everywhere love a good story, whether it is as ancient as the tale of Odysseus or as current as today's news. Perhaps this is because a powerful story, no matter when it was written, explores conflicts, relationships, and emotions that all of us have experienced in our own lives. This is why some stories seem to live forever. And this is why we keep reading them.

A Laramie, Texas Christmas

by Cathy Gillen Thacker

All Kevin McCabe wants for Christmas is to get closer to Noelle Kringle. A party planner from Houston, she and her young son are in Laramie to help out a friend. Kevin can't stop thinking about her, and he can tell the feeling is mutual. But as quickly as he's falling for her, Kevin can't help but think she's hiding something. All Noelle Kringle wants for Christmas is a distraction from the very sexy Deputy McCabe. She hasn't felt anything like this since the death of her husband several years ago. And she sees her son, Mikey, responding to him like a father figure. However, despite what her heart tells her, Noelle knows it can never go anywhere. She has secrets in her past that make it impossible for her to be with a lawman like Kevin. Then again, you can never underestimate the power of a Laramie, Texas Christmas. . . .

Larklight: A Rousing Tale of Dauntless Pluck in the Farthest Reaches of Space

by Philip Reeve

In an alternate Victorian England, young Arthur and his sister Myrtle, residents of Larklight, a floating house in one of Her Majesty's outer space territories, uncover a spidery plot to destroy the solar system.

Las hijas de Juan: Daughters Betrayed

by Josie Méndez-Negrete

Las hijas de Juan shatters the silence surrounding experiences of incest within a working-class Mexican American family. Both a feminist memoir and a hopeful meditation on healing, it is Josie Mndez-Negrete's story of how she and her siblings and mother survived years of violence and sexual abuse at the hands of her father. Mndez-Negrete was born in Mexico, in the state of Zacatecas. She recalls a joyous childhood growing up in the midst of Tabasco, a vibrant town filled with extended family. Her father, though, had dreams of acquiring wealth in el norte. He worked sun-up to sun-down in the fields of south Texas. Returning home to Mexico, his pockets full of dollars, he spent evenings drinking and womanizing. When Mndez-Negrete was eleven, her father moved the family to the United States, where they eventually settled in California's Santa Clara Valley. There her father began molesting his daughters, viciously beating them and their mother. Within the impoverished immigrant family, the abuse continued for years, until a family friend brought it to the attention of child welfare authorities. Mndez-Negrete's father was tried, convicted, and imprisoned. Las hijas de Juan is told chronologically, from the time Mndez-Negrete was a child until she was a young adult trying, along with the rest of her family, to come to terms with her father's brutal legacy. It is a harrowing story of abuse and shame compounded by cultural and linguistic isolation and a system of patriarchy that devalues the experiences of women and girls. At the same time, Las hijas de Juan is an inspiring tale, filled with strong women and hard-won solace found in traditional Mexican cooking, songs, and storytelling.

The Last Assassin (John Rain Thriller #5)

by Barry Eisler

This is an excellent action-adventure novel that rips you from Barcelona to New York to Japan and back again, while the protagonist must contend with the Japaneze Yakuza, Chinese triads, the anger and bitterness of an ex-love, the jealousy of his current flame, and most difficult of all, the unaswerable questions in his own heart caused by the revelation that he has an infant son in New York. This is the fifth in Eisler's wonderful series featuring John Rain, the half-American half-Japanese professional assassin.

The Last Brother: A Civil War Tale (Tales of Young Americans Series)

by Trinka Hakes Noble

By the summer of 1863 the Civil War had raged for two years, yet the peaceful little town of Gettysburg seemed beyond its reach. But on the morning of July 1, two massive clouds of dust herald the arrival of Union and Confederate troops. The stage is now set for what becomes one of the pivotal battles of the Civil War. Though he's only eleven years old, Gabe is a bugler in the Union Army. He takes his responsibility very seriously; after all, there are over 60 different battle calls for buglers to learn. But what is even more important to Gabe is watching over his older brother Davy who, as a foot soldier, is right in the thick of the fighting. With their other brothers lost in earlier battles, Davy is Gabe's last brother. He'll do whatever it takes to protect Davy. But when Gabe meets Orlee, a young Confederate bugler, what was so definite and clear before is now complicated by friendship and compassion. Does one have to choose between service to country, to kin, or even to a new friend? Once again, the superb author-illustrator team who brought us The Scarlet Stockings Spy combines their talents to bring American history to vivid life. Masterful storyteller Trinka Hakes Noble brings the events of the past into present-day suspense. Incredible, true-to-life illustrations from artist Robert Papp take the young reader from armchair reading to center stage at one of America's most memorable events.

Last Chance (Robyn Hunter Mystery #1)

by Norah Mcclintock

A new series from Norah McClintock, five-time winner of the Arthur Ellis Award for Crime Fiction! When a protest march goes awry and a store is accidentally damaged, Robyn Hunter finds herself on the hook for the mishap. To make amends, she reluctantly agrees to volunteer at an animal shelter for the summer. Robyn is terrified of dogs, so working at the shelter is no picnic. But bigger problems surface when she think she sees a boy with a troubled past "stealing" from the donations to the shelter. It turns out that Robyn was wrong about the boy, but now he's in more trouble with the law and it's up to Robyn to clear his name.

The Last Dance: Behind the Scenes at the Final Four

by John Feinstein

There is no event in sports quite like the Final Four. John Feinstein explores what it means to a school, a coach, and a player to be in the Final Four or even at The Final. There are the moving stories of players and coaches who thought they'd never make it to college basketballs final weekend, the spectacular triumphs of the winning teams, and the heartbreaking defeats for those who missed the cut. Feinstein also brings us inspiring and dramatic stories from the people behind the scenes: from the officials and referees to the scouts and ticket-scalpers. With the unflinching eye of a seasoned reporter and the remarkable skill of a true storyteller, Feinstein exposes the driving forces behind one of the most revered events in American sports.

The Last "Darky": Bert Williams, Black-On-Black Minstrelsy, and the African Diaspora

by Louis Chude-Sokei

The Last "Darky" establishes Bert Williams, the comedian of the late nineteenth century and early twentieth, as central to the development of a global black modernism centered in Harlem's Renaissance. Before integrating Broadway in 1910 via a controversial stint with the Ziegfeld Follies, Williams was already an international icon. Yet his name has faded into near obscurity, his extraordinary accomplishments forgotten largely because he performed in blackface. Louis Chude-Sokei contends that Williams's blackface was not a display of internalized racism nor a submission to the expectations of the moment. It was an appropriation and exploration of the contradictory and potentially liberating power of racial stereotypes. Chude-Sokei makes the crucial argument that Williams's minstrelsy negotiated the place of black immigrants in the cultural hotbed of New York City and was replicated throughout the African diaspora, from the Caribbean to Africa itself. Williams was born in the Bahamas. When performing the "darky," he was actually masquerading as an African American. This black-on-black minstrelsy thus challenged emergent racial constructions equating "black" with African American and marginalizing the many diasporic blacks in New York. It also dramatized the practice of passing for African American common among non-American blacks in an African American-dominated Harlem. Exploring the thought of figures such as Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and Claude McKay, Chude-Sokei situates black-on-black minstrelsy at the center of burgeoning modernist discourses of assimilation, separatism, race militancy, carnival, and internationalism. While these discourses were engaged with the question of representing the "Negro" in the context of white racism, through black-on-black minstrelsy they were also deployed against the growing international influence of African American culture and politics in the twentieth century.

Last Days in Babylon: The History of a Family, The Story of a Nation

by Marina Benjamin

Marina Benjamin grew up in London feeling estranged from her family's exotic Middle Eastern ways. She refused to speak the Arabic her mother and grandmother spoke at home. She rejected the peculiar food they ate in favor of hamburgers and beer. But when Benjamin had her own child a few years ago, she realized that she was losing her link to the past. In Last Days in Babylon, Benjamin delves into the story of her family's life among the Jews of Iraq in the first half of the twentieth century. When Iraq gained independence in 1932, Jews were the largest and most prosperous ethnic group in Baghdad. They dominated trade and finance, hobnobbed with Iraqi dignitaries, and lived in grandiose villas on the banks of the Tigris. Just twenty years later the community had been utterly ravaged, its members effectively expelled from the country by a hostile Iraqi government. Benjamin's grandmother Regina Sehayek lived through it all. Born in 1905, when Baghdad was still under Ottoman control, her childhood was a virtual idyll. This privileged existence was barely touched when the British marched into Iraq. But with the rise of Arab nationalism and the first stirrings of anti-Zionism, Regina, then a young mother, began to have dark premonitions of what was to come. By the time Iraq was galvanized by war, revolution, and regicide, Regina was already gone, her hair-raising escape a tragic exodus from a land she loved -- and a permanent departure from the husband whose gentle guiding hand had made her the woman she was. Benjamin's keen ear and fluid writing bring to life Regina's Baghdad, both good and bad. More than a stirring story of survival, Last Days in Babylon is a bittersweet portrait of Old World Baghdad and its colorful Jewish community, whose roots predate the birth of Islam by a thousand years and whose culture did much to make Iraq the peaceful desert paradise that has since become a distant memory. In 2004 Benjamin visited Baghdad for the first time, searching for the remains of its once vital Jewish community. What she discovered will haunt anyone who seeks to understand a country that continues to command the world's attention, just as it did when Regina Sehayek proudly walked through Baghdad's streets. By turns moving and funny, Last Days in Babylon is an adventure story, a riveting history, and a timely reminder that behind today's headlines are real people whose lives are caught -- too often tragically -- in the crossfire of misunderstanding, age-old prejudice, and geopolitical ambition.

The Last Dragon

by Silvana De Mari Shaun Whiteside

The elf village that the young Yorsh lived in was destroyed in a flood caused by the continual rain. Yorsh has no one to help him. When Yorsh meets a human woman who is in equally desperate circumstances, she takes pity on him and helps him out.

Last Evenings on Earth

by Roberto Bolaño Chris Andrews

The first short-story collection in English by the acclaimed Chilean author Roberto Bolano. Winner of a 2005 PEN Translation Fund Award. "The melancholy folklore of exile," as Roberto Bolano once put it, pervades these fourteen haunting stories. Bolano's narrators are usually writers grappling with private (and generally unlucky) quests, who typically speak in the first person, as if giving a deposition, like witnesses to a crime. These protagonists tend to take detours and to narrate unresolved efforts. They are characters living in the margins, often coming to pieces, and sometimes, as in a nightmare, in constant flight from something horrid. In the short story "Silva the Eye," Bolano writes in the opening sentence: "It's strange how things happen, Mauricio Silva, known as The Eye, always tried to escape violence, even at the risk of being considered a coward, but the violence, the real violence, can't be escaped, at least not by us, born in Latin America in the 1950s, those of us who were around 20 years old when Salvador Allende died." Set in the Chilean exile diaspora of Latin America and Europe, and peopled by Bolano's beloved "failed generation," the stories of Last Evenings on Earth have appeared in The New Yorker and Grand Street.

The Last Godfather

by Simon Crittle

As head of the Bonanno clan, Joey Massino was the last don, and ran his world with an iron hand--until he got hit with a murder rap, and turned on his own people. Here, for the first time, is his shocking true story--a glimpse inside the world of organized crime that we may never see again.

Last Kiss Goodbye

by Rita Herron

Ivy Stanton returns to the small Appalachian town she left 15 years ago--the night her parents were murdered. But she's not alone in her search for the truth: Matt Malone, the man who saved her life was wrongfully accused of the crime. Now he's back demanding justice. Original.

The Last Landry

by Kelsey Roberts

THE LAST LANDRYShane Landry's life was simple: He ran the Lucky 7 ranch and steered clear of his tempting housekeeper, Taylor Reese. The first was embedded in his blood, the second almost impossible to resist, considering Taylor slept right down the hall.Then everything changed. Shane's long-missing parents were discovered to have been murdered years ago and his paternity was suddenly put into question. As suspect number one in a double homicide, he had to clear his name...and only one woman could help.Would Taylor be his salvation...or the last Landry's undoing?

The Last Lecture

by Randy Pausch

"We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand."--Randy Pausch A lot of professors give talks titled "The Last Lecture." Professors are asked to consider their demise and to ruminate on what matters most to them. And while they speak, audiences can't help but mull the same question: What wisdom would we impart to the world if we knew it was our last chance? If we had to vanish tomorrow, what would we want as our legacy? When Randy Pausch, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon, was asked to give such a lecture, he didn't have to imagine it as his last, since he had recently been diagnosed with terminal cancer. But the lecture he gave--"Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams"--wasn't about dying. It was about the importance of overcoming obstacles, of enabling the dreams of others, of seizing every moment (because "time is all you have...and you may find one day that you have less than you think"). It was a summation of everything Randy had come to believe. It was about living. In this book, Randy Pausch has combined the humor, inspiration and intelligence that made his lecture such a phenomenon and given it an indelible form. It is a book that will be shared for generations to come.

Showing 83,651 through 83,675 of 190,607 results

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