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Showing 87,051 through 87,075 of 146,249 results

Human Rights as Politics and Idolatry

by Kwame Anthony Appiah Amy Gutmann Michael Ignatieff Thomas W. Laqueur David A. Hollinger Diane F. Orentlicher

Michael Ignatieff draws on his extensive experience as a writer and commentator on world affairs to present a penetrating account of the successes, failures, and prospects of the human rights revolution. Since the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, this revolution has brought the world moral progress and broken the nation-state's monopoly on the conduct of international affairs. But it has also faced challenges. Ignatieff argues that human rights activists have rightly drawn criticism from Asia, the Islamic world, and within the West itself for being overambitious and unwilling to accept limits. It is now time, he writes, for activists to embrace a more modest agenda and to reestablish the balance between the rights of states and the rights of citizens.Ignatieff begins by examining the politics of human rights, assessing when it is appropriate to use the fact of human rights abuse to justify intervention in other countries. He then explores the ideas that underpin human rights, warning that human rights must not become an idolatry. In the spirit of Isaiah Berlin, he argues that human rights can command universal assent only if they are designed to protect and enhance the capacity of individuals to lead the lives they wish. By embracing this approach and recognizing that state sovereignty is the best guarantee against chaos, Ignatieff concludes, Western nations will have a better chance of extending the real progress of the past fifty years. Throughout, Ignatieff balances idealism with a sure sense of practical reality earned from his years of travel in zones of war and political turmoil around the globe.Based on the Tanner Lectures that Ignatieff delivered at Princeton University's Center for Human Values in 2000, the book includes two chapters by Ignatieff, an introduction by Amy Gutmann, comments by four leading scholars--K. Anthony Appiah, David A. Hollinger, Thomas W. Laqueur, and Diane F. Orentlicher--and a response by Ignatieff.

Human Rights: Concepts, Contests, Contingencies

by Austin Sarat Thomas R. Kearns

Today the language of human rights, if not human rights themselves, is nearly universal. Human Rights brings together essays that attend to both the allure and criticism of human rights. They examine contestation and contingency in today's human rights politics and help us rethink some of the basic concepts of human rights. Questions addressed in Human Rights include: Can national self-determination be reconciled with human rights? Can human rights be advanced without thwarting efforts to develop indigenous legal traditions? How are the forces of modernization associated with globalization transforming our understanding of human dignity and personal autonomy? What does it mean to talk about culture and cultural choice? Is the protection of culture and cultural choice an important value in human rights discourse? How do human rights figure in local political contests and how are those contests, in turn, shaped by the spread of capitalism and market values? What contingencies shape the implementation of human rights in societies without a strong tradition of adherence to the rule of law? What are the conditions under which human rights claims are advanced and under which nations respond to their appeal?

Human Rights: Fact or Fancy?

by Henry B. Veatch

Henry B. Veatch finds the basis for human rights in natural law. He builds his argument step by step, carefully laying the foundation for his central assertion that our basic rights are discoverable directly in the facts of nature.

Human Rights in the Constitutional Law of the United States

by Michael J. Perry

In the period since the end of the Second World War, there has emerged what never before existed: a truly global morality. Some of that morality - the morality of human rights - has become entrenched in the constitutional law of the United States. This book explicates the morality of human rights and elaborates three internationally recognized human rights that are embedded in U. S. constitutional law: the right not to be subjected to cruel, inhuman, or degrading punishment; the right to moral equality; and the right to religious and moral freedom. The implications of one or more of these rights for three great constitutional controversies - capital punishment, same-sex marriage, and abortion - are discussed in-depth. Along the way, Michael J. Perry addresses the question of the proper role of the Supreme Court of the United States in adjudicating these controversies.

Human Rights in the Twentieth Century

by Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann

Has there always been an inalienable "right to have rights" as part of the human condition, as Hannah Arendt famously argued? The contributions to this volume examine how human rights came to define the bounds of universal morality in the course of the political crises and conflicts of the twentieth century. Although human rights are often viewed as a self-evident outcome of this history, the essays collected here make clear that human rights are a relatively recent invention that emerged in contingent and contradictory ways. Focusing on specific instances of their assertion or violation during the past century, this volume analyzes the place of human rights in various arenas of global politics, providing an alternative framework for understanding the political and legal dilemmas that these conflicts presented. In doing so, this volume captures the state of the art in a field that historians have only recently begun to explore.

Human Rights Obligations of Business

by Surya Deva David Bilchitz

In recent years, the UN Human Rights Council has approved the 'Respect, Protect, and Remedy' Framework and endorsed the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. These developments have been welcomed widely, but do they adequately address the challenges concerning the human rights obligations of business? This volume of essays engages critically with these important developments. The chapters revolve around four key issues: the process and methodology adopted in arriving at these documents; the source and justification of corporate human rights obligations; the nature and extent of such obligations; and the implementation and enforcement thereof. In addition to highlighting several critical deficits in these documents, the contributing authors also outline a vision for the twenty-first century in which companies have obligations to society that go beyond the responsibility to respect human rights.

Human Rights, State Compliance, and Social Change

by Thomas Pegram Ryan Goodman

National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) - human rights commissions and ombudsmen - have gained recognition as a possible missing link in the transmission and implementation of international human rights norms at the domestic level. They are also increasingly accepted as important participants in global and regional forums where international norms are produced. By collecting innovative work from experts spanning international law, political science, sociology and human rights practice, this book critically examines the significance of this relatively new class of organizations. It focuses, in particular, on the prospects of these institutions to effectuate state compliance and social change. Consideration is given to the role of NHRIs in delegitimizing - though sometimes legitimizing - governments' poor human rights records and in mobilizing - though sometimes demobilizing - civil society actors. The volume underscores the broader implications of such cross-cutting research for scholarship and practice in the fields of human rights and global affairs in general.

Human Rights under State-Enforced Religious Family Laws in Israel, Egypt and India

by Yüksel Sezgin

About one-third of the world's population currently lives under pluri-legal systems where governments hold individuals subject to the purview of ethno-religious rather than national norms in respect to family law. How does the state-enforcement of these religious family laws impact fundamental rights and liberties? What resistance strategies do people employ in order to overcome the disabilities and limitations these religious laws impose upon their rights? Based on archival research, court observations and interviews with individuals from three countries, Yüksel Sezgin shows that governments have often intervened in order to impress a particular image of subjectivity upon a society, while people have constantly challenged the interpretive monopoly of courts and state-sanctioned religious institutions, re-negotiated their rights and duties under the law, and changed the system from within. He also identifies key lessons and best practices for the integration of universal human rights principles into religious legal systems.

Human Rights: A Very Short Introduction

by Andrew Clapham

From the controversial incarceration of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, to the brutal ethnic cleansing being practiced in Darfur, to the widespread denial of equal rights to women in many areas of the world, human rights violations are a constant presence in the news and in our lives. Taking an international perspective, and focusing on highly topical issues such as torture, arbitrary detention, privacy, health, and discrimination, this Very Short Introduction will help readers to understand for themselves the controversies and complexities behind this vitally relevant issue. Looking at the philosophical justification for rights, the historical origins of human rights and how they are formed in law, Andrew Clapham explains what our human rights actually are, what they might be, and where the human rights movement is heading.

Human: The Science Behind What Makes Us Unique

by Michael S. Gazzaniga

What happened along the evolutionary trail that made humans so unique? In his accessible style, Michael Gazzaniga pinpoints the change that made us thinking, sentient humans different from our predecessors. He explores what makes human brains special, the importance of language and art in defining the human condition, the nature of human consciousness, and even artificial intelligence.

The Human Services Internship: Getting the Most from Your Experience (Third Edition)

by Pamela Myers Kiser

Covering information from the beginning to the end of an internship, this practical, hands-on book engages readers in a process of thinking and reflection--helping them analyze different experiences and situations they encounter day to day in their field work. A unique six-step model guides readers in enhancing self-awareness, integrating the knowledge and values of the profession, recognizing challenging and dissonant situations, decision-making, and follow-through.

Human Services Management: Organizational Leadership in Social Work Practice

by David Austin

This book assists participants in human service organizations in understanding the dynamics that are shaping such organizations. Austin's comprehensive analysis of human services management examines the historical development and program structures of such organizations; their stakeholders, including users, personnel, funders, and policy boards; and the organizational processes of accountability and dealing with change.

Human Sexuality: Diversity in Contemporary America 5th ed.

by Bryan Strong Christine Devault Barbara W. Sayad William L. Yarber

A non-judgmental introduction to human sexuality that features integration of ethnic, cultural, gender, and sexual orientation differences and similarities.

Human Sexuality: Diversity in Contemporary America (Seventh Edition)

by Bryan Strong William L. Yarber Barbara J. Sayad

Human Sexuality: Diversity in Contemporary America presents a forward thinking, open approach to Human Sexuality for today's student. The new lead authors, Bill Yarber and Barbara Sayad, continue to bring their research experience to the book while maintaining the engaging writing style that original author Bryan Strong brought to this best-selling text for years. The first text to achieve a full integration of cutting-edge research with a contemporary"sex-positive"approach, it also strives to represent the modern, diverse world that students encounter outside the classroom. Both within the text itself and throughout the exemplary art and photo program, the focus is on inclusion. Human Sexuality has been lauded by students and instructors alike for providing the most integrated and non-judgmental view of sexual orientation available. The seventh edition maintains these themes while adding a new contemporary design, streamlined format and significant content and feature revisions and updates.

Human Sexuality in a World of Diversity (8th Edition)

by Lois Fichner-Rathus Jeffrey S. Nevid Spencer A. Rathus

Human Sexuality in a World of Diversity, 8e examines the rich diversity found in human sexuality and helps students develop their own opinions by promoting critical thinking skills, personal sexual health awareness, and responsible decision-making. Firmly rooted in science, the text systematically encourages students to apply the research to their own lives.

Human Sexuality: Responsible Life Choices

by Verdene Ryder Peggy B. Smith

Provides teenage readers with basic information about sexual development and reproductive health. Chapters explain the sexual decision-making process and examine the outcomes and risks of sexual activity. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR.

The Human Stain

by Philip Roth

It is 1998, the year in which America is whipped into a frenzy of prurience by the impeachment of a president, and in a small New England town, an aging classics professor, Coleman Silk, is forced to retire when his colleagues decree that he is a racist. The charge is a lie, but the real truth about Silk would have astonished his most virulent accuser. Coleman Silk has a secret. But it's not the secret of his affair, at seventy-one, with Faunia Farley, a woman half his age with a savagely wrecked past - a part-time farmhand and a janitor at the college where, until recently, he was the powerful dean of faculty. And it's not the secret of Coleman's alleged racism, which provoked the college witch-hunt that cost him his job and, to his mind, killed his wife. Nor is it the secret of misogyny, despite the best efforts of his ambitious young colleague, Professor Delphine Roux, to expose him as a fiend. Coleman's secret has been kept for fifty years: from his wife, his four children, his colleagues, and his friends, including the writer Nathan Zuckerman, who sets out to understand how this eminent, upright man, esteemed as an educator for nearly all his life, had fabricated his identity and how that cannily controlled life came unraveled. Set in 1990s America, where conflicting moralities and ideological divisions are made manifest through public denunciation and rituals of purification, The Human Stain concludes Philip Roth's eloquent trilogy of postwar American lives that are as tragically determined by the nation's fate as by the "human stain" that so ineradicably marks human nature. This harrowing, deeply compassionate, and completely absorbing novel is a magnificent successor to his Vietnam-era novel, American Pastoral, and his McCarthy-era novel, I MARRIED A COMMUNIST.

The Human Story: Our History, from the Stone Age to Today

by James J. Davis

In this overview of world events, a history professor describes how various groups of people built cities, conquered neighbors, developed technologies, created religions, and more. Written in a humorous narrative style meant to be easily understood by all.

Human-System Integration in the System Development Process: A NEW LOOK

by National Research Council of the National Academies

In April 1991 BusinessWeek ran a cover story entitled, “I Can't Work This ?#!!@ Thing,” about the difficulties many people have with consumer products, such as cell phones and VCRs. More than 15 years later, the situation is much the same--but at a very different level of scale. The disconnect between people and technology has had society-wide consequences in the large-scale system accidents from major human error, such as those at Three Mile Island and in Chernobyl. To prevent both the individually annoying and nationally significant consequences, human capabilities and needs must be considered early and throughout system design and development. One challenge for such consideration has been providing the background and data needed for the seamless integration of humans into the design process from various perspectives: human factors engineering, manpower, personnel, training, safety and health, and, in the military, habitability and survivability. This collection of development activities has come to be called human-system integration (HSI). Human-System Integration in the System Development Process reviews in detail more than 20 categories of HSI methods to provide invaluable guidance and information for system designers and developers.

The Human Touch: Today's Most Unusual Program for Productivity and Profit

by William W. Arnold Jeanne M. Plas

How to improve employee motivation and morale, labor productivity and leadership.

Human Traces

by Sebastian Faulks

Sixteen-year-old Jacques Rebière is living a humble life in rural France, studying butterflies and frogs by candlelight in his bedroom. Across the Channel, in England, the playful Thomas Midwinter, also sixteen, is enjoying a life of ease-and is resigned to follow his father's wishes and pursue a career in medicine. A fateful seaside meeting four years later sets the two young men on a profound course of friendship and discovery; they will become pioneers in the burgeoning field of psychiatry. But when a female patient at the doctors' Austrian sanatorium becomes dangerously ill, the two men's conflicting diagnosis threatens to divide them--and to undermine all their professional achievements. From the bestselling author of Birdsong comes this masterful novel that ventures to answer challenging questions of consciousness and science, and what it means to be human.

Human Trafficking

by Louise Shelley

This book examines all forms of human trafficking globally, revealing the operations of the trafficking business and the nature of the traffickers themselves. Using a historical and comparative perspective, it demonstrates that there is more than one business model of human trafficking and that there are enormous variations in human trafficking in different regions of the world. Drawing on a wide body of academic research - actual prosecuted cases, diverse reports, and field work and interviews conducted by the author over the last sixteen years in Asia, Latin America, Africa, Europe, and the former socialist countries - Louise Shelley concludes that human trafficking will grow in the twenty-first century as a result of economic and demographic inequalities in the world, the rise of conflicts, and possibly global climate change. Coordinated efforts of government, civil society, the business community, multilateral organizations, and the media are needed to stem its growth.

Human Trafficking in Ohio

by Erin Dalton Jeremy M. Wilson

Wilson and Dalton explore the extent and characteristics of human trafficking in Ohio through both a content analysis of newspaper accounts and interviews with criminal justice officials and social service providers. The authors identify and discuss sex-trafficking cases in Toledo and forced-labor cases in Columbus, and compare the two cities' responses to human trafficking. They conclude with suggestions on how these responses might be improved.

The Human Venture, Volume 1: A Global History to 1500 (5th Edition)

by Anthony Esler

An understanding of the history of the world--and understanding why this knowledge is important--has become essential for today's students. Benefiting from the unifying viewpoint of a single author, this lively two-volume narrative tells the story of human events on the move--the exciting event history of wars and politics, booms and busts, the rise and fall of empires, and more. It also reaches beyond the events that have shaped world history to trace the broader development of human institutions and ideas as they evolve through time. Special attention to art and ideas in each period and civilization.

Showing 87,051 through 87,075 of 146,249 results

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