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City Girl (The Yellow Rose Trilogy #3)

by Lori Wick

Reagan knows her way around 19th-century New York City---but nothing back East has prepared her for the land of armadillos and God-fearing Texans! When rancher Cash Rawlings comes into her life, she's intrigued by his gentle, prayerful ways---but could she ever share his faith---or his life? 278 pages, softcover from Harvest.

City Girls Need Not Apply

by Rita Rainville

HOW TO HOOK A COWBOY Dr. Kathryn Wainwright didn't know much about men. Then her research took her out of the lab and into the wild—under the care of rugged cowboy Mac Ryder. Now the petty scientist had a lot to learn: like how to rope a red-blooded bachelor who'd sworn never to settle down. The sexy little genius living under his roof had Mac's male instincts working overtime. But though he wanted Kat in his bed, he'd be damned if he'd marry again. He and his little boy were doing find on their own. But once Kat left, would they ever be the same again?

City Green

by Dyanne Disalvo-Ryan

Right in the middle of Marcy's city block is a vacant lot, littered and forlorn. Sometimes just looking at it makes Marcy feel sad. Then one spring, Marcy has a wonderful idea: Instead of a useless lot, why not a green and growing space for everyone to enjoy? With her warm, hopeful text and inviting illustrations, DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan shows how a whole neighborhood blossoms when people get involved.

The City Homesteader

by Scott Meyer

The City Homesteader is the handbook for the world of self-sufficient living. It's about living tangibly in a virtual world. It's about being resourceful, saving money, reducing consumption, and increasing self-reliance. Join the many who are raising backyard chickens in the city and tilling their side yards: tapping into natural energy, managing homes more efficiently, and getting back to the earth. Explore the homesteading arts: gardening on small and large scales, raising dwarf fruit trees, sprouting grains, smoking meats and fish, grinding grains for flour, making cheese, making wine, cellaring, heating without fossil fuel, harvesting rainwater, composting, and much moreThe City Homesteader provides all the basics, including how to find supplies and step-by-step instructions that make it easy to follow along. Original illustrations throughout help you create your very own homestead on any piece of earth.

The City Homesteader

by Scott Meyer

A handbook for the world of self-sufficient living, "The City Homesteader" provides all the basics--from gardening and composting to green cleaning--including how to find supplies and step-by-step instructions that make it easy to follow along.

The City Homesteader

by Scott Meyer

The City Homesteader is the handbook for the world of self-sufficient living. It's about living tangibly in a virtual world. It's about being resourceful, saving money, reducing consumption, and increasing self-reliance. Join the many who are raising backyard chickens in the city and tilling their side yards: tapping into natural energy, managing homes more efficiently, and getting back to the earth.Explore the homesteading arts: gardening on small and large scales, raising dwarf fruit trees, sprouting grains, smoking meats and fish, grinding grains for flour, making cheese, making wine, cellaring, heating without fossil fuel, harvesting rainwater, composting, and much moreThe City Homesteader provides all the basics, including how to find supplies and step-by-step instructions that make it easy to follow along. Original illustrations throughout help you create your very own homestead on any piece of earth.

The City in History: Its Origins, Its Transformations, and Its Prospects

by Lewis Mumford

The city's development from ancient times to the modern age. Winner of the National Book Award. "One of the major works of scholarship of the twentieth century" (Christian Science Monitor). Index; illustrations.<P><P> Winner of the National Book Award

The City In Slang: New York Life And Popular Speech

by Irving Lewis Allen

The American urban scene, and in particular New York's, has given us a rich cultural legacy of slang words and phrases, a bonanza of popular speech. Hot dog, rush hour, butter-and-egg man, gold digger, shyster, buttinsky, smart aleck, sidewalk superintendent, yellow journalism, breadline, straphanger, tar beach, the Tenderloin, the Great White Way, to do a Brodie--these are just a few of the hundreds of popular words and phrases that were born or took on new meaning in the streets of New York.<P><P>In The City in Slang, Irving Lewis Allen traces this flowering of popular expressions that accompanied the emergence of the New York metropolis from the early nineteenth century down to the present. This unique account of the cultural and social history of America's greatest city provides in effect a lexicon of popular speech about city life. With many stories Allen shows how this vocabulary arose from city streets, often interplaying with vaudeville, radio, movies, comics, and the popular songs of Tin Pan Alley.<P> Some terms of great pertinence to city people today have unexpectedly old pedigrees. Rush hour was coined by 1890, for instance, and rubberneck dates to the late 1890s and became popular in New York to describe the busloads of tourists who craned their necks to see the tall buildings and the sights of the Bowery and Chinatown. The Big Apple itself (since 1971 the official nickname of New York) appeared in the 1920s, though first in reference to the city's top racetracks and to Broadway bookings as pinnacles of professional endeavor. Allen also tells fascinating stories behind once-popular slang that is no longer in use. Spielers, for example, were the little girls in tenement districts who danced ecstatically on the sidewalks to the music of the hurdy-gurdy men and, when they were old enough, frequented the dance halls of the Lower East Side.<P> Following the trail of these words and phrases into the city's East Side, West Side, and all around the town, from Harlem to Wall Street, and into the haunts of its high and low life, The City in Slang is a fascinating look at the rich cultural heritage of language about city life.

A City in Terror: Calvin Coolidge and the 1919 Boston Police Strike

by Francis Russell

On September 9, 1919, an American nightmare came true. The entire Boston police force deserted their posts, leaving the city virtually defenseless. Women were raped on street corners, stores were looted, and pedestrians were beaten and robbed while crowds not only looked on but cheered. The police strike and the mayhem that followed made an inconspicuous governor, Calvin Coolidge, known throughout America, turning him into a national hero and, eventually, a president. It also created a monster: for two days, more than 700,000 residents of Boston's urban core were without police protection, and the mob ruled the streets.

The City in the Classical and Post-Classical World

by Claudia Rapp H. A. Drake

This volume examines the evolving role of the city and citizenship from classical Athens through fifth-century Rome and medieval Byzantium. Beginning in the first century CE, the universal claims of Hellenistic and Roman imperialism began to be challenged by the growing role of Christianity in shaping the primary allegiances and identities of citizens. An international team of scholars considers the extent of urban transformation, and with it, of cultural and civic identity, as practices and institutions associated with the city-state came to be replaced by those of the Christian community. The twelve essays gathered here develop an innovative research agenda by asking new questions: What was the effect on political ideology and civic identity of the transition from the city culture of the ancient world to the ruralized systems of the middle ages? How did perceptions of empire and oikoumene respond to changed political circumstances? How did Christianity redefine the context of citizenship?

The City in the Lake

by Rachel Neumeier

THE KINGDOM'S HEART is the City. The City's heart is the King. The King's heart is the Prince. The Prince is missing. Ever since the Prince disappeared, nothing has been right in the Kingdom. Something has disturbed the strange, old magic that whispers around its borders . . . something cunning and powerful. And the disturbance extends to the farthest reaches of the Kingdom, including the idyllic village where Timou is learning to be a mage under her father's tutelage. When Timou's father journeys to the City to help look for the Prince, but never returns, Timou senses that the disturbance in the Kingdom is linked to her--and to the undiscovered heritage of the mother she never knew. She must leave her village, even if it means confronting powers greater than her own, even though what she finds may challenge everything she knows. Even if it means leaving love behind. From the Hardcover edition.

The City in Which I Love You

by Li-Young Lee

ContentsI.Furious VersionisII.The InterrogationThis Hour And What Is DeadArise, Go DownMy Father, In Heaven, Is Reading Out LoudFor A New Citizen Of These United StatesWith RuinsIII.This Room And Everything In ItThe City In Which I Love YouIV.The WaitingA StoryGoodnightYou Must SingHere I AmA Final ThingV.The Cleaving

City Kids: Transforming Racial Baggage

by Maria Kromidas

Cosmopolitanism--the genuine appreciation of cultural and racial diversity--is often associated with adult worldliness and sophistication. Yet, as this innovative new book suggests, children growing up in multicultural environments might be the most cosmopolitan group of all. City Kids profiles fifth-graders in one of New York City's most diverse public schools, detailing how they collectively developed a sophisticated understanding of race that challenged many of the stereotypes, myths, and commonplaces they had learned from mainstream American culture. Anthropologist Maria Kromidas spent over a year interviewing and observing these young people both inside and outside the classroom, and she vividly relates their sometimes awkward, often playful attempts to bridge cultural rifts and reimagine racial categories. Kromidas looks at how children learned race in their interactions with each other and with teachers in five different areas--navigating urban space, building friendships, carrying out schoolwork, dealing with the school's disciplinary policies, and enacting sexualities. The children's interactions in these areas contested and reframed race. Even as Kromidas highlights the lively and quirky individuals within this super-diverse group of kids, she presents their communal ethos as a model for convivial living in multiracial settings. By analyzing practices within the classroom, school, and larger community, City Kids offers advice on how to nurture kids' cosmopolitan tendencies, making it a valuable resource for educators, parents, and anyone else who is concerned with America's deep racial divides. Kromidas not only examines how we can teach children about antiracism, but also considers what they might have to teach us.

City Light

by Harry Mazer

George feels as if he's going through life with his eyes half closed--but sometimes that's how you bump into the best surprises George has been in love with Julie since they were twelve years old. For six years, they've barely taken a step without each other, and and every time George imagines his future, he sees Julie in it. She'll be a doctor and they'll stay in their small town and always be able to see the bright lights of New York City across the Hudson River. The two of them are so close, they're like two parts of the same person--only whole when they're together. But when Julie suddenly calls off their relationship, everything George thought was certain starts to crumble away. In desperation, he starts exchanging online messages with a stranger, someone right across the river in the big city. On the Internet, George discovers, you can be anyone you want--or you can be exactly who you are, even if you're still finding out just who that is.

City Limits

by Paul E. Peterson

Winner of the 1981 Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award for the best book published in the United States on government, politics, or international affairs. ""City Limits" radically reinterprets urban politics by deriving its dominant forces from the logic of the American federal structure. It is thereby able to explain some pervasive tendencies of urban political outcomes that are puzzling or scarcely noticed at all when cities are viewed as autonomous units, outside the federal framework. Professor Peterson's analysis is imaginativelyfor conceived and skillfully carried through. His beautifully finished volume will lastingly alter our understanding of urban affairs in America. " from the citation by the selection committee for the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award"

City Love

by Susane Colasanti

Three teenage girls learn how to navigate their hearts and NYC. Book one of the trilogy, City Love, is the start of a romantic new series for fans of Sarah Dessen, Stephanie Perkins, and the Carrie Diaries, from bestselling author Susane Colasanti.Roommates Sadie, Darcy, and Rosanna have big plans for their summer before college. Sadie is looking for love, Darcy is living for the next adventure, and Rosanna is reinventing herself. There will be plenty of distractions--irresistible guys, wrong guys, awkward encounters, 2 a.m. breakfasts, fangirl moments, Nasty Girl, and more--but if they look up they will discover the true meaning of city love.e would never get to experience on her own. If Rosanna doesn't resist, she may find herself in city love.Told from alternating points of view, City Love captures the moments in each girl's life when everything is thrilling, amazing, and terrifying all at once . . . in a way it will never be again.

The City Machine

by Louis Trimble

Imagine a world without hunger. With clothing and shelter for everyone. A world that is never too warm or too cold. A world where there are no decisions to be made, because everything is decided upon for the inhabitants.A utopia? Or a prison? Because paradise has a price.The story of one man: the last who can read the secret language of the machine that created the City - the last man who can change it.

The City Machine

by Louis Trimble

Imagine a world without hunger. With clothing and shelter for everyone. A world that is never too warm or too cold. A world where there are no decisions to be made, because everything is decided upon for the inhabitants.A utopia? Or a prison? Because paradise has a price.The story of one man: the last who can read the secret language of the machine that created the City - the last man who can change it.

The City Machine

by Louis Trimble

Imagine a world without hunger. With clothing and shelter for everyone. A world that is never too warm or too cold. A world where there are no decisions to be made, because everything is decided upon for the inhabitants. A utopia? Or a prison? Because paradise has a price. The story of one man: the last who can read the secret language of the machine that created the City - the last man who can change it.

The City Man's Guide to the Farm Problem

by Willard W. Cochrane

It is a book about farmers and their very difficult problems in the complex of modern agriculture. The purpose of this book is to give the city man a basis for understanding farm policy issues .

The City, Not Long After

by Pat Murphy

In an abandoned San Francisco, the city's rebirth is powered by artA young man strides across the Golden Gate Bridge, roller in hand, painting the famous structure a thousand shades of blue. A woman stands on the edge of the sea, sending messages to far-off lands in corked wine bottles. And a sleeping man dreams of building an angel from the spare parts that are the last remnants of a vanished civilization. A plague has passed through San Francisco, leaving only the artists, eccentrics, and dreamers to build the city anew. But when war threatens to overtake this quiet metropolis, the artists must learn to fight back.The bloodthirsty General Miles wants the city for himself and will destroy all those who stand in his way. To protect their whimsical paradise, the citizens band together in a curious form of guerilla warfare, fighting hate with the favorite weapon of bohemia: an open heart.

City Notebook: A Reporter's Portrait of a Vanishing New York

by Mccandlish Phillips

McCandlish Phillips, whose by-line has been familiar to readers of The New York Times since 1955, has looked into just about every corner of the city and has written about nearly every aspect of its life. New York is not the same city today as it was yesterday. You cannot set foot in the same New York twice. Yet you can capture its momentary essence in City Notebook. One of the best metropolitan reporters of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s has brought together his best pieces on the City's life. You will learn, for example, about the "rainbow rain" that sometimes falls on the City, about the Great Bee Roundup, the Case of the Garrulous Parrot, the Small World of Melvin Krulewitch, and the fate of the Gowanus Canal. The reality of New York is made up of millions of such instances, a mosaic of people, places, and things. The ones in this book have been chosen because they are compulsively fascinating, utterly irreplaceable, or just very funny. Gay Talese has called McCandlish Phillips "one of the best reporters" on The Times. People who know his byline relish his crisp style and dry wit.

City of a Thousand Dolls

by Miriam Forster

An exotic treat set in an entirely original, fantastical world brimming with deadly mystery, forbidden romance, and heart-stopping adventure.

City of a Thousand Suns (Volume Three of The Fall of the Towers)

by Samuel R. Delany

This book is a science fiction novel by Samuel R. Delany, and is the final novel in the "Fall of the Towers" trilogy.

City of Ambition: FDR, LaGuardia, and the Making of Modern New York

by Mason B. Williams

"Fascinating. . . . Williams tells the story of La Guardia and Roosevelt with insight and elegance."--Edward Glaeser, New York Times Book Review City of Ambition is a brilliant history of the New Deal and its role in the making of modern New York City. The story of a remarkable collaboration between Franklin Roosevelt and Fiorello La Guardia, this is a case study in creative political leadership in the midst of a devastating depression. Roosevelt and La Guardia were an odd couple: patrician president and immigrant mayor, fireside chat and tabloid cartoon, pragmatic Democrat and reform Republican. But together, as leaders of America's two largest governments in the depths of the Great Depression, they fashioned a route to recovery for the nation and the master plan for a great city. Roosevelt and his "Brain Trust"--shrewd, energetic advisors such as Harold Ickes and Harry Hopkins--sought to fight the Depression by channeling federal resources through America's cities and counties. La Guardia had replaced Tammany Hall cronies with policy experts, such as the imperious Robert Moses, who were committed to a strong public sector. The two leaders worked closely together. La Guardia had a direct line of communication with FDR and his staff, often visiting Washington carrying piles of blueprints. Roosevelt relied on the mayor as his link to the nation's cities and their needs. The combination was potent. La Guardia's Gotham became a laboratory for New Deal reform. Roosevelt's New Deal transformed city initiatives into major programs such as the Works Progress Administration, which changed the physical face of the United States. Together they built parks, bridges, and schools; put the unemployed to work; and strengthened the Progressive vision of government as serving the public purpose. Today everyone knows the FDR Drive as a main route to La Guardia Airport. The intersection of steel and concrete speaks to a pair of dynamic leaders whose collaboration lifted a city and a nation. Here is their story.

Showing 94,676 through 94,700 of 324,645 results

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