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The German Export Engine

by Jonathan Schlefer Gunnar Trumbull

This case traces the economic history of modern Germany, from its beginnings in the 19th century to its strong performance during the financial crisis and its emergence as a de facto economic and political leader of Europe.

German For Dummies

by Paulina Christensen Anne Fox Wendy Foster

The fun and easy way to learn the fascinating language of German with integrated audio clips! German For Dummies, Enhanced Edition uses the renowned Berlitz approach to get you up and running with the language-and having fun too! Designed for the total beginner, this guide introduces you to basic grammar and then speedily has you making conversation. Integrated audio clips let you listen and learn as you hear pronunciations and real-life conversations. Fun and games sections ease your way into German fluency, phonetic spellings following expressions and vocabulary improve your pronunciation, and helpful boxes and sidebars cover cultural quirks and factoids.Master the nuts and bolts of German grammarLearn phrases that make you sound German-and know what never to say in GermanWhether you're just looking for a greeting besides "Guten tag" or you want to become a foreign exchange student, this enhanced edition of German For Dummies gives you what you need to learn the language-as much as you like, as fast as you like!

The German General Staff And Its Decisions, 1914-1916

by Anon Anon General Erich von Falkenhayn

Having had a long and distinguished military career, in 1914 General Erich von Falkenhayn assumed the post as chief of the German General Staff in the middle of the First World War. The German position was at a crisis point, the initial plan to win the war by a wide out-flanking movement through Belgium had been foiled; a new plan would have to decided on. In the West, increasing numbers of British troops poured to the Front; in the East, the ambitious team of generals Hindenburg and Ludendorff pushed for reinforcements to finally beat the Russians. Falkenhayn decided that significant efforts must be made in the Western theatre and came up with a brutal plan to decide the war: he conceived the idea of besieging the historic French city of Verdun in early 1916, of "bleeding it white", as he phrased it. He planned to draw the bulk of the French army into the Verdun salient, thus effectively tying up the French army, and then to methodically destroy them with concentrated artillery fire. The plan failed only by valiant sacrifices and fighting by the French and pressure applied by their allies in other sectors, not least the British effort during the battle of the Somme. Falkenhayn was thereafter removed from his supreme post and would fight on other front in charge of smaller forces.His memoirs of the period of his command are illuminating and give an insight of what was going on "on the other side of the hill" during the First World War.Author -- General von Falkenhayn, Erich, 1861-1922.Translator -- AnonText taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in London, Hutchinson 1919. Original Page Count - 299 pages.

The German Genius

by Peter Watson

Peter Watson's virtuoso sweep through modern German thought and culture, from 1750 to the present day, will challenge and confound both the stereotypes the world has of Germany and those that Germany has of itself.From the end of the Baroque era and the death of Bach to the rise of Hitler in 1933, Germany was transformed from a poor relation among Western nations into a dominant intellectual and cultural force--more creative and influential than France, Britain, Italy, Holland, and the United States. In the early decades of the twentieth century, German artists, writers, scholars, philosophers, scientists, and engineers were leading their freshly unified country to new and unimagined heights. By 1933, Germans had won more Nobel Prizes than any other nationals, and more than the British and Americans combined. Yet this remarkable genius was cut down in its prime by Adolf Hitler and his disastrous Third Reich--a brutal legacy that has overshadowed the nation's achievements ever since.How did the Germans transform their country so as to achieve such pre-eminence? In this absorbing cultural and intellectual history, Peter Watson goes back through time to explore the origins of the Germangenius, and he explains how and why it flourished, how it shaped our lives, and, most important, how it continues to influence our world. As he convincingly demonstrates, it was German thinking--from Beethoven and Kant to Diesel and Nietzsche, from Goethe and Wagner to Mendel and Planck, from Hegel and Marx to Freud and Schoenberg--that was paramount in the creation of the modern West. Moreover, despite World War II, figures such as Joseph Beuys, Jürgen Habermas, and Joseph Ratzinger ensure that the German genius still resonates intellectually today.

The German Genius

by Peter Watson

Peter Watson's virtuoso sweep through modern German thought and culture, from 1750 to the present day, will challenge and confound both the stereotypes the world has of Germany and those that Germany has of itself. From the end of the Baroque era and the death of Bach to the rise of Hitler in 1933, Germany was transformed from a poor relation among Western nations into a dominant intellectual and cultural force-more creative and influential than France, Britain, Italy, Holland, and the United States. In the early decades of the twentieth century, German artists, writers, scholars, philosophers, scientists, and engineers were leading their freshly unified country to new and unimagined heights. By 1933, Germans had won more Nobel Prizes than any other nationals, and more than the British and Americans combined. Yet this remarkable genius was cut down in its prime by Adolf Hitler and his disastrous Third Reich-a brutal legacy that has overshadowed the nation's achievements ever since. How did the Germans transform their country so as to achieve such pre-eminence? In this absorbing cultural and intellectual history, Peter Watson goes back through time to explore the origins of the German genius, and he explains how and why it flourished, how it shaped our lives, and, most important, how it continues to influence our world. As he convincingly demonstrates, it was German thinking-from Beethoven and Kant to Diesel and Nietzsche, from Goethe and Wagner to Mendel and Planck, from Hegel and Marx to Freud and Schoenberg-that was paramount in the creation of the modern West. Moreover, despite World War II, figures such as Joseph Beuys, JÜrgen Habermas, and Joseph Ratzinger ensure that the German genius still resonates intellectually today.

German Grammar in Context, Second Edition

by Carol Fehringer

German Grammar in Context presents an accessible and engaging approach to learning grammar. Each chapter opens with a real-life extract from a German newspaper, magazine, poem, book or internet source and uses this text as the starting point for explaining a particular key area of German grammar. A range of exercises follow at the end of the chapter, helping students to reinforce and test their understanding, and an answer key is also provided at the back of the book. This second edition features: Updated texts with current newspaper and magazine articles and new extracts from digital media such as chatrooms or blogs Inclusion of a wide-ranging selection of sources and topics to further students’ engagement with issues relevant to contemporary Germany and Austria Clear and user-friendly coverage of grammar, aided by a list of grammatical terms A wide variety of inventive exercises designed to thoroughly build up grammatical understanding, vocabulary acquisition and effective comprehension and communication skills Helpful 'keyword boxes' translating difficult vocabulary in the texts A recommended reading section offering advice on additional grammar resources and website links German Grammar in Context will be an essential resource for intermediate to advanced students of German. It is suitable for both classroom use and independent study. ?

German Grammar Made Easy

by Lisa Kahlen

German Grammar Made Easy is the ideal introduction to the basics of German grammar for anyone new to the language or looking to refresh their knowledge. The Grammar features: • concise and jargon-free explanations supported by examples • exercises throughout to reinforce learning • a "fast-track" option for more advanced learners • a full answer key, making the Grammar ideal for self-study. A companion website is available at http://cw.routledge.com/textbooks/9781138120525/ With over 200 additional exercises and audio, it provides ample grammar practice for learners as well as the opportunity to practise listening and pronunciation skills. German Grammar Made Easy presents the essential patterns and rules of the German language in a clear and accessible manner. It is the ideal Grammar for those wishing to supplement their learning and move beyond the phrasebook level.

German Heavy Cruisers 1939-45

by Gordon Williamson Ian Palmer

The development of this excellent and successful class of warship only became possible after the Anglo-German naval agreement of 1935 eased restrictions on the types of ship Germany could build; even then only five of the class were permitted: the Admiral Hipper, the Blücher, the Prinz Eugen, the Seydlitz and the Lützow. These Cruisers were designed for Atlantic operations and had eight 8 inch guns, 12 10.5 cm heavy anti-aircraft guns and 17 smaller calibre anti aircraft guns as well as twelve torpedo tubes and their own compliment of up to six aircraft. This title covers the design, development and operational history of the Heavy Cruisers of the Admiral Hipper class.

German Histories in the Age of Reformations, 1400–1650

by Thomas A. Brady Jr.

This book studies the connections between the political reform of the Holy Roman Empire and the German lands around 1500 and the sixteenth-century religious reformations, both Protestant and Catholic. It argues that the character of the political changes (dispersed sovereignty, local autonomy) prevented both a general reformation of the Church before 1520 and a national reformation thereafter. The resulting settlement maintained the public peace through politically structured religious communities (confessions), thereby avoiding further religious strife and fixing the confessions into the Empire's constitution. The Germans' emergence into the modern era as a people having two national religions was the reformation's principal legacy to modern Germany.

German History 1789-1871

by Eric Dorn Brose

During recent years, there has been a noticeable increase in interest in the nineteenth century, resulting in many fine monographs. However, these studies often gravitate toward Prussia or treat Germany's southern and northern regions as separate entities or else are thematically compartmentalized. This book overcomes these divisions, offering a wide-ranging account of this revolutionary century and skillfully combining narrative with analysis. Its lively style makes it very accessible and ideal for all students of nineteenth-century Germany.

German History in Global and Transnational Perspective

by David Lederer

This is a collection of essays from three of the world’s pre-eminent historians of Germany, which consider German history in global and transnational contexts. It is well known that transnationalism has exploded in the last decade or so as a new academic subfield of international and global history. What the transnationalism literature often ignores or downplays, however, is the role of the nation-state in making the transnational possible in the first place, as noted in its very etymological origins. This volume traces this dynamic from a different vantage-point, namely the relationship between German history and transnationalism. Each essay applies a transnational framework in fresh and original ways in order to illuminate different facets of the connections between Germany and the wider world in the modern period. Together they will encourage the rethinking of assumptions about key moments and developments in the history of modern Germany, and foster reflection on the evolving nature of German history as a subject studied in the twenty-first century.

The German Home Front 1939-45

by Brian Davis Malcolm Mcgregor

Osprey's examination of Germany's home front situation during World War II (1939-1945). At the outbreak of war in 1939 Germany was committed to the concept of Blitzkrieg - a swift and decisive war. Yet, the reality became something very different as every corner of German society was hit by the realities of war. This book details the critical civilian support that was necessary to maintain Nazi control of the civilian population and includes first-hand accounts of the experiences of civilians who suffered at the hands of their own government as well as enduring the deprivations and fears of wartime life. With analysis and descriptions of civil and home services, from air raid wardens to postwomen, this book provides a detailed, lavishly illustrated description of wartime life in Germany, exploring the tentacles of the Nazi state as they affected every man, woman and child.

German Idealism

by Frederick C. Beiser

One of the very few accounts in English of German idealism, this ambitious work advances and revises our understanding of both the history and the thought of the classical period of German philosophy. As he traces the structure and evolution of idealism as a doctrine, Frederick Beiser exposes a strong objective, or realist, strain running from Kant to Hegel and identifies the crucial role of the early romantics--Hölderlin, Schlegel, and Novalis--as the founders of absolute idealism. Traditionally, German idealism is understood as a radical form of subjectivism that expands the powers of the self to encompass the entire world. But Beiser reveals a different--in fact, opposite--impulse: an attempt to limit the powers of the subject. Between Kant and Hegel he finds a movement away from cosmic subjectivity and toward greater realism and naturalism, with one form of idealism succeeding another as each proved an inadequate basis for explaining the reality of the external world and the place of the self in nature. Thus German idealism emerges here not as a radical development of the Cartesian tradition of philosophy, but as the first important break with that tradition.Table of Contents: Introduction 1. Realism in German Idealism 2. Exorcising the Spirit 3. The Critique of Foundationalism 4. The Troublesome Hegelian Legacy 5. The Taxonomy of German Idealism I. KANT'S CRITIQUE OF IDEALISM Introduction: Kant and the Problem of Subjectivism 1. The Clash of Interpretations 2. Method and Results 3. Contemporary Kant Scholarship 1. Idealism in the Precritical Years 1. The Idealist Challenge 2. The First Refutation of Idealism 3. Idealist Dreams and Visions 4. The Critique of Idealism in the Inaugural Dissertation 5. Skeptical Ambivalence 6. David Hume, Transcendental Realist 2. Transcendental Idealism and Empirical Realism 1. The Case for Subjectivism 2. The First Edition Definitions of Transcendental Idealism 3. Transcendental versus Empirical Idealism 4. Empirical Realism in the Aesthetic 5. Empirical Realism and Empirical Dualism 3. The First Edition Refutation of Skeptical Idealism 1. The Priority of Skeptical Idealism 2. The Critique of the Fourth Paralogism 3. The Proof of the External World 4. A Cartesian Reply 5. Appearances and Spatiality 6. The Ambiguity of Transcendental Idealism 7. The Coherence of Transcendental Idealism 4. The First Edition Refutation of Dogmatic Idealism 1. The Missing Refutation 2. Kant's Interpretation of Leibniz 3. The Dispute in the Aesthetic 4. Dogmatic Idealism in the Antinomies 5. Kant and Berkeley 1. The Göttingen Review 2. Kant's Reaction 3. Berkeleyianism in the First Edition of the Kritik 4. The Argument of the Prolegomena 5. Kant's Interpretation of Berkeley 6. The Small but Real Differences? 6. The Second Edition Refutation of Problematic Idealism 1. The Problem of Interpretation 2. Kant's Motives 3. The Question of Kant's Realism 4. Realism in the Refutation 5. The New Strategy 6. The Argument of the Refutation 7. Outer vis-à-vis Inner Sense 8. Kant's Refutations in the Reflexionen, 1788-93 7. Kant and the Way of Ideas 1. The Theory of Ideas 2. Loyalty and Apostasy 3. The Transcendental versus the Subjective 4. The Question of Consistency 5. The Doctrine of Inner Sense 6. Kantian Self-Knowledge and the Cartesian Tradition 8. The Transcendental Subject 1. Persistent Subjectivism 2. Eliminating the Transcendental Subject 3. The Criteria of Subjectivity 4. The Subjectivity of the Transcendental 5. Restoring the Transcendental Subject 9. The Status of the Transcendental 1. The Problematic Status of the Categories 2. The Metaphysial Interpretation 3. The Psychological Interpretation 4. The Logical Interpretation 5. The Ineliminable Psychological Dimension 6. Problems of Transcendental Psychology 7. Transcendental Psychology and Transcendental Idealism 10. Kant's Idealism in the Opus postumum 1. Kant's Peruke 2. The Gap in the Critical System 3. The Transition Program and Its Implications 4. The Transition and Refutation 5. The Selbstsetzungslehre 6. Appearance of Appe...

German Infantryman (1) 1933-40

by David Westwood Adam Hook

The common German infantryman played a crucial role in the events that led to the outbreak of World War II (1939-1945), and the burden of duty lay on his shoulders during the opening moves of the conflict, in the invasion of Poland, the conquest of Norway and Denmark, the Low Countries and France. The Wehrmacht was unstoppable in this period, as it defeated almost every country that took the field against it. This volume examines the recruitment, training, weapons and equipment of the German infantryman in the eventful years building up to and including Blitzkrieg. Weaponry, team roles, tactics, training and personal equipment are all covered.

German Jewry and the Allure of the Sephardic

by John M. Efron

In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, as German Jews struggled for legal emancipation and social acceptance, they also embarked on a program of cultural renewal, two key dimensions of which were distancing themselves from their fellow Ashkenazim in Poland and giving a special place to the Sephardim of medieval Spain. Where they saw Ashkenazic Jewry as insular and backward, a result of Christian persecution, they depicted the Sephardim as worldly, morally and intellectually superior, and beautiful, products of the tolerant Muslim environment in which they lived. In this elegantly written book, John Efron looks in depth at the special allure Sephardic aesthetics held for German Jewry.Efron examines how German Jews idealized the sound of Sephardic Hebrew and the Sephardim's physical and moral beauty, and shows how the allure of the Sephardic found expression in neo-Moorish synagogue architecture, historical novels, and romanticized depictions of Sephardic history. He argues that the shapers of German-Jewish culture imagined medieval Iberian Jewry as an exemplary Jewish community, bound by tradition yet fully at home in the dominant culture of Muslim Spain. Efron argues that the myth of Sephardic superiority was actually an expression of withering self-critique by German Jews who, by seeking to transform Ashkenazic culture and win the acceptance of German society, hoped to enter their own golden age.Stimulating and provocative, this book demonstrates how the goal of this aesthetic self-refashioning was not assimilation but rather the creation of a new form of German-Jewish identity inspired by Sephardic beauty.

German Light Cruisers 1939-45

by Ian Palmer Gordon Williamson

The German Navy of World War II was small in number, but contained some of the most technologically advanced capital ships in the world. This meant that although the Kriegsmarine never felt capable of encountering the might of the British Navy in a fleet action, her ships were individually more than a match for the outdated vessels of the Royal Navy. Nowhere was this more the case than in Germany's fleet of light cruisers. There were only six vessels in this fleet: the Emden, Leipzig, Köln, Königsberg, Karlsruhe and Nurnberg. This book describes their design, development and varied operational history throughout the course of the Second World War.

German Made Simple: Learn to speak and understand German quickly and easily (Made Simple)

by Arnold Leitner

Learning German Has Never Been Easier! Whether you are studying the language in school, planning a trip to Germany or Austria, or trying to learn the basics of the language closest to English, German Made Simple is the perfect book for any self-learner. Void of all nonessentials and refreshingly easy to understand, German Made Simple includes:* Basics of German grammar* Modern German vocabulary* German pronunciation guide* German reading exercises* German economic information* Common German expressions* Review exercises* Complete answer key* German-English dictionaryFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

German Merchants in the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic (Publications of the German Historical Institute)

by Lars Maischak

This study brings to life the community of trans-Atlantic merchants who established strong economic, political and cultural ties between the United States and the city-republic of Bremen, Germany in the nineteenth century. Lars Maischak shows that the success of Bremen's merchants in helping make an industrial-capitalist world market created the conditions of their ultimate undoing: the new economy of industrial capitalism gave rise to democracy and the nation-state, undermining the political and economic power of this mercantile elite. Maischak argues that the experience of Bremen's merchants is representative of the transformation of the role of merchant capital in the first wave of globalization, with implications for our understanding of modern capitalism, in general.

German Mountain & Ski Troops 1939-45

by Gordon Williamson Stephen Andrew

Osprey's study of Germany's mountain and ski troops of World War II (1939-1945). Fighting in every theatre from the burning sands of North Africa to the icy wastes above the arctic circle the German Army's Gebirgstruppen troops were some of the most effective in the whole of the Wehrmacht. Their esprit de corps and morale were extremely high and their commanders, men such as Eduard Dietl, the 'Hero of Narvik', and Julius 'Papa' Ringel, were idolised by their men. Dietl himself was the first soldier of the Wehrmacht to be awarded the coveted Oakleaves to the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross. In this book Gordon Williamson details the uniforms, organisation and combat histories of these elite troops.

German-occupied Europe in the Second World War (Routledge Studies in Second World War History)

by Julia Torrie Fabien Théofilakis Raffael Scheck

Inspired by recent works on Nazi empire, this book provides a framework to guide occupation research with a broad comparative angle focusing on human interactions. Overcoming national compartmentalization, it examines Nazi occupations with attention to relations between occupiers and local populations and differences among occupation regimes. This is a timely book which engages in historical and current conversations on European nationalisms and the rise of right-wing populisms.

The German Officer's Boy

by Harlan Greene

What really happened that afternoon in November 1938, when the young Polish Jew walked into the German embassy in Paris and shots rang out? The immediate consequence was concrete: Nazi Germany retaliated with the "Night of Broken Glass," recognized as the beginning of the Holocaust. Lost and overlooked in the aftermath is the arresting story of Herschel Grynszpan, the confused teenager whose murder of Ernst vom Rath was used to justify Kristallnacht. In this historical novel, award-winning writer Harlan Greene may be the first author to take the Polish Jew at his word. Historians have tried to explain away Herschel Grynszpan's claim that he was involved in a love affair with vom Rath; Greene, instead, traces the lives of the underprivileged and persecuted Herschel Grynszpan and the wealthy German diplomat Ernst vom Rath as they move inevitably towards their ill-fated affair. In spare, vivid, and compelling prose, Greene imagines their world, their relationship, and their last horrific encounter, as they tried to wrest love and meaning from a world that would itself soon disappear in a whirlwind of disaster and madness.

The German Opposition to Hitler: An Appraisal

by Lawrence Wilson Hans Rothfels

More than a study of resistance among the upper ranks, author Hans Rothfels examines the unprecedented totalitarian state, armed with mid-20th century modern weapons, science, and industry.Professor Rothfels illustrates the true extent of the German resistance, its composition, aim, and the nature of its intent. He also considers the whole question of the moral and practical problems involved in opposing a totalitarian regime.

German Philosophy in the Twentieth Century: Weber to Heidegger

by Julian Young

The course of German philosophy in the twentieth century is one of the most exciting, diverse and controversial periods in the history of human thought. It is widely studied and its legacy hotly contested. In this outstanding introduction, Julian Young explains and assesses the two dominant traditions in modern German philosophy – critical theory and phenomenology – by examining the following key thinkers and topics: Max Weber’s setting the agenda for modern German philosophy: the ‘rationalization’ and ‘disenchantment’ of modernity resulting in ‘loss of freedom’ and ‘loss of meaning’ Horkheimer and Adorno: rationalization and the ‘culture industry’ Habermas’ defence of Enlightenment rationalization, the ‘unfinished project of modernity’ Marcuse: a Freud-based vision of a repression-free utopia Husserl: overcoming the ‘crisis of humanity’ through phenomenology Early Heidegger’s existential phenomenology: ‘authenticity’ as loyalty to ‘heritage’ Gadamer and ‘fusion of horizons’ Arendt: the human condition Later Heidegger: the re-enchantment of reality. German Philosophy in the Twentieth Century: Weber to Heidegger is essential reading for students of German philosophy, phenomenology and critical theory, and will also be of interest to students in related fields such as literature, religious studies, and political theory.

German Picture Word Book

by Barbara Steadman Hayward Cirker

Here's a pleasant and effective way for students of German to build and strengthen vocabulary skills. The book consists of 15 carefully rendered scenes -- 14 double-page and one single-page -- each devoted to a different theme of topic: Im Zoo (At the Zoo); Das Wohnzimmer (Living Room); Auf dern Bauernhof (On the Farm); Das Badezimmer (Bathroom); Das Schlafzimmer des Mädchens (Girl's Bedroom); Beim Abendessen (At Dinner); Das Schlafzimmer des Jungens (Boy's Bedroom); Der Supermarkt (Supermarket); Das Klassenzimmer (Classroom); Am Strand (At the Beach); and 5 more.Each illustration contains dozens of common objects, clearly labeled in German. By studying the illustrations, students can learn over 500 words for common household items, clothing, foods, vehicles, furniture, names of animals, parts of the body, types of stores and public buildings, and many more.To help reinforce words and meanings, all the scenes in this book are ideal for coloring. In addition, a complete list of German words (with definite articles) and English translations will be found at the back of the book. The result is an attractive and useful language resource that will appeal to any student of basic German, child or adult.

German Pietism and the Problem of Conversion (Pietist, Moravian, and Anabaptist Studies #3)

by Jonathan Strom

August Hermann Francke described his conversion to Pietism in gripping terms that included intense spiritual struggle, weeping, falling to his knees, and a decisive moment in which his doubt suddenly disappeared and he was “overwhelmed as with a stream of joy.” His account came to exemplify Pietist conversion in the historical imagination around Pietism and religious awakening. Jonathan Strom’s new interpretation challenges the paradigmatic nature of Francke’s narrative and seeks to uncover the more varied, complex, and problematic character that conversion experiences posed for Pietists in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.Grounded in archival research, German Pietism and the Problem of Conversion traces the way that accounts of conversion developed and were disseminated among Pietists. Strom examines members’ relationship to the pious stories of the “last hours,” the growth of conversion narratives in popular Pietist periodicals, controversies over the Busskampf model of conversion, the Dargun revival movement, and the popular, if gruesome, genre of execution conversion narratives. Interrogating a wide variety of sources and examining nuance in the language used to define conversion throughout history, Strom explains how these experiences were received and why many Pietists had an uneasy relationship to conversions and the practice of narrating them.A learned, insightful work by one of the world’s leading scholars of Pietism, this volume sheds new light on Pietist conversion and the development of piety and modern evangelical narratives of religious experience.

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