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Bookshare Individual Memberships can now agree to the Bookshare Terms and Conditions online, and access the Proof of Disability form directly from their account.  Bookshare Organizational Membership and other forms can now be found within our Legal section at /legal/... more
The Individual Agreement form is no longer necessary; all Bookshare members can agree to our Terms of Use online. If the member is under 18 the Parent or Guardian must complete the online digital agreement.  You can complete the Individual Membership Agreement online... more
This issue has been resolved, please update to the latest version of Read2Go, version 1.1.0.  
Get Help from the Experts -- Our Volunteers!Join the Bookshare Volunteer Discussion List to connect by email with other Bookshare volunteers. Ask questions and share suggestions related to book scanning, proofreading, and accessibility.Subscribe: Send a blank email... more
Please note that there are no plans or funding to update Read:OutLoud Bookshare Edition at this time; please consider using Don Johnston's Snap&Read Universal tool in conjunction with Bookshare Web Reader, or look at the Reading Tools for Computers page for other... more
Bookshare’s eligibility categories are defined by copyright law, not education law. However, below are examples of how we might describe Bookshare’s eligibility criteria in terms more familiar to those who work in education.If a student finds it difficult to process or... more
A person who is temporarily disabled when it comes to reading print may utilize Bookshare services during the period of significant print disability. However, once an individual has regained the ability to read normally, he or she no longer qualifies for access to... more
To qualify for Bookshare, people with these conditions, as well as people whose first language is not English, must have an accompanying qualifying condition that significantly interferes with their ability to read or process printed text. For example, a person who is... more
The 95% of the population who can pick up a book and read it (or could if they learned to read) do not qualify for Bookshare. The copyright exception exists to help the small number of people whose conditions have a major impact on their ability to read. Other people... more
The full technical and legal details are available on the Library of Congress’ Chafee Amendment page and the supporting regulations (Section B.2.i.).  If you are certifying someone who has a physically-based disability (including dyslexia) that makes it difficult to... more
Students and adults with learning disabilities may qualify for Bookshare as long as a competent authority confirms that the learning disability significantly interferes with reading. Click here for examples of competent authorities.People with a significant learning... more
If you cannot pick up a book, turn pages, maintain visual focus on a book or do not have the physical stamina to work with printed material, you most likely qualify for Bookshare membership.
If you are legally blind, you qualify. In addition, if you don’t meet the legal blindness standard, a functional vision assessment that indicates a significant problem accessing text is also acceptable.
No! If you have checked out a book and no longer want to proofread it (because the subject matter doesn't interest you, because it's not what you expected, or for whatever reason), feel free to release it back to the Checkout Queue for someone else to proofread. To... more
Yes! Bookshare is a project of Benetech, which is a nonprofit organization. We are able to provide letters and sign paperwork confirming community service as needed, provided you follow our procedures.We can provide proof of your volunteer hours if you do the following... more