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Bookshare’s eligibility categories are defined by copyright law, not education law. However, below are examples of how we might describe Bookshare’s eligibility criteria in terms more familiar to those who work in education.If a student finds it difficult to process or... more
A person who is temporarily disabled when it comes to reading print may utilize Bookshare services during the period of significant print disability. However, once an individual has regained the ability to read normally, he or she no longer qualifies for access to... more
To qualify for Bookshare, people with these conditions, as well as people whose first language is not English, must have an accompanying qualifying condition that significantly interferes with their ability to read or process printed text. For example, a person who is... more
The 95% of the population who can pick up a book and read it (or could if they learned to read) do not qualify for Bookshare. The copyright exception exists to help the small number of people whose conditions have a major impact on their ability to read. Other people... more
The full technical and legal details are available on the Library of Congress’ Chafee Amendment page and the supporting regulations (Section B.2.i.).  If you are certifying someone who has a physically-based disability (including dyslexia) that makes it difficult to... more
Students and adults with learning disabilities may qualify for Bookshare as long as a competent authority confirms that the learning disability significantly interferes with reading. Click here for examples of competent authorities.People with a significant learning... more
If you cannot pick up a book, turn pages, maintain visual focus on a book or do not have the physical stamina to work with printed material, you most likely qualify for Bookshare membership.
If you are legally blind, you qualify. In addition, if you don’t meet the legal blindness standard, a functional vision assessment that indicates a significant problem accessing text is also acceptable.
No! If you have checked out a book and no longer want to proofread it (because the subject matter doesn't interest you, because it's not what you expected, or for whatever reason), feel free to release it back to the Checkout Queue for someone else to proofread. To... more
Yes! Bookshare is a project of Benetech, which is a nonprofit organization. We are able to provide letters and sign paperwork confirming community service as needed, provided you follow our procedures.We can provide proof of your volunteer hours if you do the following... more
Probably! We very much enjoy having in-office volunteers, and have specific projects that can only be done at our office. However, we have limited in-office space at our Palo Alto, CA office.If you would like to volunteer at our office, please contact us and, if we... more
You may proofread any book in the Checkout Queue unless it has the words "HOLD FOR [someone's name]" before the book's title. These books are on "hold" for a particular proofreader. The scanner and proofreader have agreed beforehand to work together or the book has... more
Proofreaders have two weeks to proofread their book. At the end of two weeks you will receive an email stating that you have had the book for 2 weeks and you must either check the book in if you're finished proofing it, or renew it for more time to finish proofing it.... more
Once you have proofread your book, you must check it in for approval. A staff member or qualified volunteer will review it and either approve it or return it for more editing with notes about what to fix. Your book will typically reviewed within 7 business days of... more
It depends. Proofreaders may choose any book to proofread, just like scanners may choose any book to scan. The time in which your book will be proofread will depend on how well the book is scanned, how long or complicated the book is, and whether or not a proofreader... more