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Showing 626 through 650 of 1,028 results

Leonardo's Horse

by Jean Fritz

Fritz (And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?) again calls upon her informal yet informative style to spotlight a scintillating sliver of history, recounted in two related tales. Her narrative opens as the ultimate Renaissance man, Leonardo da Vinci, earns a commission from the duke of Milan to create a sculpture to honor the duke's father a bronze horse three times larger than life. Though this creative genius spent years on the project, he died without realizing his dream and, writes Fritz, "It was said that even on his deathbed, Leonardo wept for his horse." The author then fast-forwards to 1977: an American named Charles Dent vows to create the sculpture and make it a gift from the American people to the residents of Italy. How his goal was accomplished (alas, posthumously) makes for an intriguing tale that Fritz deftly relays. Talbott's (Forging Freedom) diverse multimedia artwork includes reproductions of da Vinci's notebooks, panoramas revealing the Renaissance in lavish detail and majestic renderings of the final equine sculpture. Talbott makes creative use of the book's format a rectangle topped by a semi-circle: the rounded space by turns becomes a window through which da Vinci views a cloud shaped like a flying horse; the domed building that was Dent's studio and gallery; and a globe depicting the route the bronze horse travels on its way from the U.S. to Italy. An inventive introduction to the Renaissance and one of its masters.

Let There Be Light: A Book about Windows

by James Cross Giblin

Windows are our eyes on the world. Through them we can gaze at our surroundings and, looking out, feel connected to the larger world outside. Windows transform our interiors, filling a room with light and letting cool breezes in. Windows protect us. But windows are vulnerable, too. A well-aimed rock can shatter one in an instant. For as long as there have been buildings, there have been windows. A simple roof hole, a narrow slit-these served as windows in early structures. Later windows might be covered with anything from mica to paper to a fish bladder; the transparent pane of glass we take for granted today took many centuries to develop. In the Middle Ages, with the achievement of stained glass, windows became the focus of a great outpouring of artistic expression. Today the "walls of glass" of the modern skyscraper represent the ultimate window. In this wide-ranging history, we also learn of the role windows have played in many dramatic events, from castle sieges to the infamous Kristallnacht of Nazi Germany to riots that scarred American cities in the 1960s. With the aid of splendid pictures, James Cross Giblin traces the intriguing development of windows-in our homes, our houses of worship, our offices, and public buildings, and shows how they illuminate our lives.

The Life and Work of Francis Willey Kelsey: Archaeology, Antiquity, and the Arts

by John Griffiths Pedley

President of the Archaeological Institute of America, professor at the University of Michigan from 1889 to 1927, and president of the American Philological Association, Francis Kelsey was crucially involved in the founding or growth of major educational institutions. He came to maturity in a period of great technological change in communications, transportation, and manufacturing. Kelsey took full advantage of such innovations in his ceaseless drive to promote education for all, to further the expansion of knowledge, and to champion the benefits of the study of antiquity. A vigorous traveler around the United States, Europe, and the Mediterranean, Kelsey strongly believed in the value of personally viewing sites ancient and modern and collecting artifacts that could be used by the new museums and universities that were springing up in the United States. This collecting habit put him in touch with major financiers of the day, including Charles Freer, Andrew Carnegie, and J. P. Morgan, as he sought their help for important projects. Drawing heavily on Kelsey's daily diaries now held at the University of Michigan's Bentley Historical Library, John Griffiths Pedley gives us a biography that records the wide-ranging activities of a gifted and energetic scholar whose achievements mirrored the creative and contributive innovations of his contemporary Americans.

Life Is a Miracle: An Essay Against Modern Superstition

by Wendell Berry

Actually consisting of a set of wide-ranging, sentimental essays in which farmer, poet and writer Wendell Berry argues for greater dialogue between the arts and sciences, attempts to show that E.O. Wilson's "Consilience" is no more than the subjugation of religion and art by science, and advocates a new "emancipation proclamation" to free people from enslavement by corporations.

A Life of Picasso

by John Richardson

John Richardson draws on the same combination of lively writing, critical astuteness, exhaustive research, and personal experience which made a bestseller out of the first volume and vividly recreates the artist's life and work during the crucial decade of 1907-17 - a period during which Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque invented Cubism and to that extent engendered modernism. Richardson has had unique access to untapped sources and unpublished material. By harnessing biography to art history, he has managed to crack the code of cubism more successfully than any of his predecessors. And by bringing a fresh light to bear on the artist's often too sensationalised private life, he has succeeded in coming up with a totally new view of this paradoxical man of his paradoxical work. Never before has Picasso's prodigious technique, his incisive vision and not least his sardonic humour been analysed with such clarity.

Lift Every Voice: The History of African American Music

by Burton W. Peretti

Since their enslavement in West Africa and transport to plantations of the New World, black people have made music that has been deeply entwined with their religious, community, and individual identities. Music was one of the most important constant elements of African American culture in the centuries-long journey from slavery to freedom. It also continued to play this role in blacks' post-emancipation odyssey from second-class citizenship to full equality. Lift Every Voice traces the roots of black music in Africa and slavery and its evolution in the United States from the end of slavery to the present day. The music's creators, consumers, and distributors are all part of the story. Musical genres such as spirituals, ragtime, the blues, jazz, gospel, rhythm and blues, rock, soul, and hip-hop-as well as black contributions to classical, country, and other American music forms-depict the continuities and innovations that mark both the music and the history of African Americans. A rich selection of documents help to define the place of music within African American communities and the nation as a whole.

Lighthouse Ghosts and Legends

by Nina Costopoulos

From the Book jacket: There is something mystical and romantic about the soft glow of a lighthouse spinning out across the ocean. Beyond that protective light, however, many of America's lighthouses are plagued by a dark history of vicious storms, violent shipwrecks, and, in some cases, even murder. Today, the ghosts of the past still linger in the lonely corridors of many American lighthouses, making their history known. In 1899, Muriel, the sweet-tempered daughter of a sea captain disappeared from the Yaquina Bay Lighthouse in Newport, Oregon, leaving behind only a small pool of blood and her white handkerchief. Today, she is seen on dark stormy nights and has been known to bolt the lighthouse door, allowing no one in-not even those with a key. The sounds of former Captain William Robinson's footsteps and the methodical tap of his cane can still be heard walking the corridors of the White River Light in Whitehall, Michigan. Ernie, the ghost of the former keeper of Ledge Light, near New London, Connecticut, polishes brass, swabs the decks, leaves tools about the lighthouse, and rearranges books on bookshelves. Following on the heels of Crane Hill's bestselling Lighthouse Ghosts, Lighthouse Ghosts and Legends brings fans of watery hauntings more of their favorite lore. Author Costopoulos weaves eighteen tales of mystery surrounding some of America's best known beacons, including St. Simon's Island, Alcatraz Island Light, Owl's Head Lighthouse, Hendricks Head Light Station, and more. Covering the extent of coastal America and the Great Lakes, Lighthouse Ghosts and Legends runs the gamut of sprites, spirits, mysteries, miracles, and madness.

Live Through This: On Creativity and Self-Destruction

by Sabrina Chapadjiev

A visceral look at the bizarre entanglement of destructive and creative forces, Live Through This (a finalist for the 2008 Lambda Literary Awards) is a collection of original stories, essays, artwork, and photography. It explores the use of art to survive abuse, incest, madness and depression, and the often deep-seated impulse toward self-destruction including cutting, eating disorders, and addiction. Here, some of our most compelling cartoonists, novelists, poets, dancers, playwrights, and burlesque performers traverse the pains and passions that can both motivate and destroy women artists, and mark a path for survival. Taken together, these artful reflections offer an honest and hopeful journey through a woman's silent rage, through the power inherent in struggles with destruction, and the ensuing possibilities of transforming that burning force into the external release of art. With contributions by Nan Goldin, bell hooks, Patricia Smith, Cristy C. Road, Carol Queen, Annie Sprinkle, Elizabeth Stephens, Carolyn Gage, Eileen Myles, Fly, Diane DiMassa, Bonfire Madigan Shive, Inga Muscio, Kate Bornstein, Toni Blackman, Nicole Blackman, Silas Howard, Daphne Gottleib, and Stephanie Howell.

Lives of the Artists: Masterpieces, Messes (And What the Neighbors Thought)

by Kathleen Krull

In this entertaining, informative collection, readers discover the idiosyncrasies-- sometimes humorous, sometimes tragic-- of twenty famous artists, including Michelangelo, Cassatt, van Gogh, Kahlo, and Warhol. Fresh, spirited, and unconventional.

The Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects

by Giorgio Vasari Philip Jacks Gaston du de Vere

A painter and architect in his own right, Giorgio Vasari (1511-74) achieved immortality for this book on the lives of his fellow Renaissance artists, first published in Florence in 1550. Although he based his work on a long tradition of biographical writing, Vasari infused these literary portraits with a decidedly modern form of critical judgment. The result is a work that remains to this day the cornerstone of art historical scholarship. Spanning the period from the thirteenth century to Vasari's own time, the Lives opens a window on the greatest personalities of the period, including Giotto, Brunelleschi, Mantegna, Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, and Titian. This Modern Library edition, abridged from the original text with notes drawn from earlier commentaries, as well as current research, reminds us why The Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects is indispensable to any student interested in Renaissance art.

The Lives of the Muses: Nine Women and the Artists They Inspired

by Francine Prose

There is no ideal muse, but rather as many variations on the theme as there are individual women who have had the luck, or misfortune, to find their destiny conjoined with that of a particular artist. What are we to make of the relationship between the child Alice Liddell, who inspired Alice in Wonderland, and the Oxford don who became Lewis Carroll? Or the so-called serial muse, Lou Andreas-Salome, who captivated Nietzsche, Rilke, and Freud -- as impressive a list as any muse can boast? Salvador Dali was the only artist to sign his art with his muse's name, and Gala Dali certainly knew how to market her artist and his work while simultaneously burnishing her own image and celebrity. Lou, Gala, and Yoko Ono all defy the feminist stereotype of the muse as a passive beauty put on a pedestal and oppressed by a male artist. However, it's rare to find an artist and muse who are genuine partners, true collaborators, such as ballerina Suzanne Farrell and choreographer George Balanchine. What do the nine muses chosen by Francine Prose have in common? They were all beautiful, or sexy, or gifted with some more unconventional appeal. All loved, and were loved by, their artists, and inspired them with an intensity of emotion akin to Eros. For these artists, the love of -- or for -- their muses provided an essential element required for the melding of talent and technique necessary to create art.

Living at a Lighthouse: Oral Histories from the Great Lakes

by Luanne Gaykowski Kozma

Oral histories talking about the everyday life while living at a lighthouse.

Living with Art (9th Edition)

by Mark Getlein

Living with Art provides the tools to help students think critically about the visual arts. Using a wealth of examples, the first half of the text examines the nature, vocabulary, and elements of art, offering a foundation for students to learn to analyze art effectively. The latter half sets out a brief but comprehensive history of art, leading students to understand art within the context of its time and place of origin. High quality images from a wide range of periods and cultures bring the art to life, and topical essays throughout the text foster critical thinking skills. Taken together, all of these elements help students to better appreciate art as a reflection of the human experience and to realize that living with art is living with ourselves.

Living with Art (Eighth Edition)

by Mark Getlein

This textbook discusses many different forms or art such as oil paint, watercolors, carvings, pottery, etc.

London's Statues and Monuments

by Peter Matthews

The streets and public spaces of London are rich with statues and monuments commemorating the great people of history. From the monumental Nelson's Column in Trafalgar Square and Sir Christopher Wren's Great Fire Monument to the charming Peter Pan statue in Kensington Gardens, and the bronze of Paddington Bear on the lawn of the railway station that gave him his name, the range of London's statues and monuments is huge. Some commemorate events, while others celebrate people, real and fictional. Some take the form of small reliefs, while others are huge pedimented bronzes, larger than life size. Executed in stone, bronze and a range of other materials, London's statues and monuments include work by some of the greatest sculptors.Shire first published a book on this subject in 1968, and for forty years it was a stalwart of the list, opening the eyes of countless Londoners and visitors to the capital to the sculptural splendour of the city. Peter Matthews has now produced an entirely new book on the subject, reorganised, rewritten, and reillustrated with a completely new set of specially taken photographs. Over 500 statues and monuments feature in this indispensible guide, and fascinating information about the sculptors and the stories behind the monuments make this book a uniquely useful resource for anyone wanting to gain a deeper insight into these wonderful adornments to the streets of the capital.

Looking at Laughter: Humor, Power, and Transgression in Roman Visual Culture, 100 B. C. - A. D. 250

by John R. Clarke

Looking at Laughter examines a heterogeneous corpus of visual material, from the crudely obscene to the exquisitely sophisticated and from the playful to the deadly serious--everything from street theater to erudite paintings parodying the emperor.

Lost

by Ian Phillips

Despite all the visual distractions of the digital age, one low-tech form of mass communication remains as popular as ever: the lost pet poster. Stapled to telephone poles and bulletin boards in cities and suburbs worldwide, these often hastily made signs are quirky combinations of hand-drawn illustration, emotional longing, and surprisingly offbeat humor. For more than a decade, artist and animal lover Ian Phillips collected lost and found pet posters from around the world.LOST features the most notable selections from Phillips's collection chosen for their cleverness, humor, sorrow, entreaties, rewards, and--in several instances--sheer outlandishness. Featuring a veritable Noah's ark of animals--from everyday pets such as dog, cats, hamsters, and turtles to more unusual companions, including ferrets, parrots, cows, and cockatiels--these remarkable posters are their own form of folk art. Telling tales of friendship, loss, and hope, they are a powerful testament to the love and devotion shared by pet owners everywhere.

Lost and Found: The 9,000 Treasures of Troy: Heinrich Schliemann and the Gold That Got Away

by Caroline Moorehead

In this book, journalist and biographer Caroline Moore Head explores Schliemann's extraordinary life and tells how he contrived to smuggle part of the treasure from his dig in Asia Minor to his government in Berlin.

The Luminous Portrait: Capture the Beauty of Natural Light for Glowing, Flattering Photographs

by Jacqueline Tobin Ulrica Wihlborg Elizabeth Messina

Infuse your images with glowing, luminous light, From high-profile wedding and portrait photographer Elizabeth Messina comes this beautiful guide to shooting lush, romantic portraits exclusively in natural light. Whether you're photographing children, weddings, maternity and boudoir, or portraits of any kind, The Luminous Portrait will inspire you with Elizabeth's personal approach and award-wining images, sharing the art to making flattering portraits that appear "lit from within."

Lust Unearthed

by Thomas Waugh

On the heels of his bestselling and award-winning book Out/Lines: Underground Gay Graphics From Before Stonewall, Thomas Waugh offers more historic and erotically charged drawings, depicting aspects of gay male sexuality that were once hidden from public view.<P> The more than 200, never-before-published images in Lust Unearthed are from the private collection of Ambrose DuBek, a Hollywood costume and set designer (his work included George Cukor's 1939 film The Women) who died in 2002 at the age of 87, and whose estate included a wealth of erotic materials, including books, periodicals, prints, and films. DuBek was a passionate advocate and patron of the arts who felt that life and the body were to be celebrated; he had no patience for other people's attempts to make him feel guilty for his attractions and desires, nor any qualms about the different worlds in which he operated. The images from DuBek's collection published here are remarkably frank and explicit depictions of gay men "in action" created by numerous artists both famous and unknown, and produced during a time when even nude images of men were illegal, and thus rare. Lust Unearthed brings these images out of the boxes in which they were carefully kept and into the light of present-day, where expressions of gay male sexuality can be validated and indeed, celebrated.<P> Waugh's text is a remarkable history lesson that illuminates a once-furtive underground culture. Gay porn for the thinking man, Lust Unearthed will beguile and arouse.<P> Features an introduction by Willie Walker, the founding archivist at the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender History Society in San Francisco, where DuBek's erotic materials were donated.

Lyrics: 1962-2001

by Bob Dylan

This collection contains Bob Dylan's lyrics, from his first album, Bob Dylan, to 2001's "Love and Theft. "

Magic in the Margins: A Medieval Tale of Bookmaking

by W. Nikola-Lisa

Simon is anxious to draw in one of Father Anselm's manuscripts. But before he can do that, he must solve Father Anselm's puzzle.

The Magic Paintbrush

by Robin Muller

Long ago there lived an orphan boy called Nib. He couldn't read, he couldn't write.. .But he did know how to draw... and more than anything else in the world, he wanted to be an artist. One day, as a reward for an act of bravery and an act of kindness, Nib is given the answer to his dream- or so it seems. With the magic paintbrush anything he paints looks as real and beautiful as life itself- so real that the painting leaps off the page. But so great a gift also brings danger. Hearing of the beautiful animals and objects that fly off Nib's canvas, a greedy king determines to have the boy's talents for his own. So Nib is launched on a journey of escape and adventure that opens his eyes to a world of wonder and of cruelty, a world where magic can bring justice or imprisonment- or can bring a dream to life. Note that this book is for young children and does not contain picture descriptions.

Magic Trash

by J. H. Shapiro

Vacant lots. Abandoned houses. Trash--lots of trash. Heidelberg Street was in trouble! Tyree Guyton loved his childhood home--that's where his grandpa Sam taught him to "paint the world. " So he wanted to wake people up. . . to make them see Detroit's crumbling communities. Paintbrush in hand, Tyree cast his artistic spell, transforming everday junk into magic trash. Soon local kids and families joined Tyree in rebuilding their neighborhood, discovering the healing power of art along the way. This picture book biography of Tyree Guyton, an urban environmental artist, shows how he transformed his decaying, crime-ridden neighborhood into the Heidelberg Project, an interactive sculpture park. The story spans from Tyree's childhood in 1950s Detroit to his early efforts to heal his community through art in the 1980s.

Mail-Order Homes

by Rebecca Hunter

At the turn of the last century, the American middle class was expanding rapidly as homesteaders moved west and as trains took travellers across the country, where they established themselves in the depot towns that erupted along train lines. With that growth came the demand for new homes, and from that demand grew a new industry: mail-order homes. Sold by such makers as Sears, Roebuck & Co., Aladdin, and Montgomery Wards, these kit homes were shipped by train, arriving in two boxcars, which then were off-loaded by the purchasers, usually with a team of horse and wagon. In the boxcars was absolutely everything needed to assemble a house, whether it be a vacation cottage, modest bungalow, or two-and-a-half storey home. Literally tens of thousands of these affordable homes were sold in the early 1900s, with most built between 1910-40. In Mail-Order Homes, historical architectural researcher Rebecca Hunter brings to life the history of these charming homes, many of which still stand in communities across the country. From the manufacturers of mail-order homes to the customers who bought and built them, and from the styles and designs to the boom and bust of the industry, Hunter explains the history of these forgotten homes. Filled with illustrations from mail-order home catalogs and contemporary photos, this book tells the story of a bygone era of residential architecture.

Showing 626 through 650 of 1,028 results

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