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Sherman: Soldier's Life

by Lee B. Kennett

Lee Kennett offers a brilliant new interpretation of the general's life and career, one that probes his erratic, contradictory nature. Here we see the making of a true soldier, beginning with the frontier society and the extraordinary family from which he came, his formative years at West Point, and the critical period leading up to the Civil War. Throughout the spirited battles at Bull Run and Shiloh, the siege of Vicksburg, and ultimately, the Great March, Sherman displayed a blend of drive, determination, and mastery of detail unique in the annals of war. By drawing upon previously unexploited materials and maintaining a sharp, lively narrative, Lee Kennett presents a rich, authoritative portrait of Sherman -- the man and the soldier -- who emerges from this work more human and more fascinating than ever before.

She's Got Next: A Story of Getting In, Staying Open, and Taking a Shot

by Melissa King

When Melissa King, a transplanted southerner in search of connection, finds herself on the lean, mean streets of Chicago, she turns to her childhood passion for basketball.

She's Not the Man I Married: My Life with a Transgender Husband

by Helen Boyd

This book is a sequel to "My Husband Betty", but delves deeper into the author's own relationship with her husband, and less on the histories of various others. Now we really meet Helen, a rather tomboy-ish adult woman, who falls in love with a man, and later finds out he is a cross-dresser. They marry, as a heterosexual couple. He becomes more and more comfortable in his women's persona, "Betty." This causes Helen to go through a very thoughtful time of learning about and questioning gender issues of all types. How masculine of a woman can she be and still be "woman"? At what point is she labeled Butch" Is that true or not? Does it bother her? How does "trans" change people? Transsexuals, genderqueers who prefer the non-binary middle ground rather than the either/or of male/female, transfolks taking hormones or not, transfolks planning just "top surgery" but not "bottom surgery," safety issues, mainstream America's perceptions, etc. If Betty becomes a full time woman, does that mean they are a lesbian couple, even though they and particularly Helen are heterosexual? Throughout, Helen and Betty remain married and a loving couple, even though they don't know what will happen with them. This non-fiction book, told from the 1st person, presents valid questions of gender vs. sexual orientation, "queer community" vs. mainstream America, Cross-dressers vs. full post-surgical transsexuals, etc. There is much more of Helen's ponderings than there is of their day to day life, although that is included as examples. By the end, it is still unknown whether Betty will fully transition to a female gender or not. This is a very thought provoking book.

She's Not There: A Life in Two Genders

by Jennifer Finney Boylan

The provocative bestseller She's Not There is the winning, utterly surprising story of a person changing genders. By turns hilarious and deeply moving, Jennifer Finney Boylan explores the territory that lies between men and women, examines changing friendships, and rejoices in the redeeming power of family. Told in Boylan's fresh voice, She's Not There is about a person bearing and finally revealing a complex secret. Through her clear eyes, She's Not There provides a new window on the confounding process of accepting our true selves."Probably no book I've read in recent years has made me so question my basic assumptions about both the centrality and the permeability of gender, and made me recognize myself in a situation I've never known and have never faced . . . The universality of the astonishingly uncommon: that's the trick of She's Not There. And with laughs, too. What a good book." --Anna Quindlen, from the Introduction to the Book-of-the-Month-Club edition.

She's Not There: A Life in Two Genders

by Jennifer Finney Boylan

The exuberant memoir of a man named James who became a woman named Jenny. She's Not There is the story of a person changing genders, the story of a person bearing and finally revealing a complex secret; above all, it is a love story. By turns funny and deeply moving, Jennifer Finney Boylan explores the remarkable territory that lies between men and women, examines changing friendships, and rejoices in the redeeming power of family. She's Not There is a portrait of a loving marriage--the love of James for his wife, Grace, and, against all odds, the enduring love of Grace for the woman who becomes her "sister," Jenny. To this extraordinary true story, Boylan brings the humorous, fresh voice that won her accolades as one of the best comic novelists of her generation. With her distinctive and winning perspective, She's Not There explores the dramatic outward changes and unexpected results of life as a woman: Jenny fights the urge to eat salad, while James consumed plates of ribs; gone is the stability of "one damn mood, all the damn time." While Boylan's own secret was unusual, to say the least, she captures the universal sense of feeling uncomfortable, out of sorts with the world, and misunderstood by her peers. Jenny is supported on her journey by her best friend, novelist Richard Russo, who goes from begging his friend to "Be a man" (in every sense of the word) to accepting her as an attractive, buoyant woman. "The most unexpected thing," Russo writes in his Afterword to the book, "is in how Jenny's story we recognize our shared humanity." As James evolves into Jennifer in scenes that are by turns tender, startling, and witty, a marvelously human perspective emerges on issues of love, sex, and the fascinating relationship between our physical and our intuitive selves. Through the clear eyes of a truly remarkable woman, She's Not There provides a new window on the often confounding process of accepting ourselves.

She's the Boss: The Disturbing Truth About Nancy Pelosi

by Rochelle Schweizer

Why Is Nancy Pelosi the Most Dangerous Woman in America? Most people see Pelosi exactly the way she wants them to: a cultured San Franciscan politician from an esteemed family. But underneath the Chanel suit and Mikimoto pearls is a true political boss-as in Tweed. Don't be fooled by her image as a caring, grandmotherly public servant. Nancy Pelosi is all business. She's the Boss charts Pelosi's carefully orchestrated rise to power as a uniquely American ruling-class diva who is not so subtly replacing "by the people, for the people" with "have your people call my people." From her father-- a congressman and then mayor of Baltimore whose political machine was tainted by scandal--Pelosi learned about patronage, ruthlessness, and the credo of the party boss: never admit to anything, never apologize, and attack when challenged. As Speaker of the House, Pelosi once pounded her gavel so hard it left a dent in the lectern. She frightens even those who agree with her on almost everything. She punishes those who stand in her way. And her hypocrisy knows no bounds: While Pelosi spends millions in taxpayers' dollars to green up the capital and expects Americans to pay for their carbon footprints, she demands a bigger jet for her trips across the globe as well as military G5s for holiday weekends. She claims to act for the benefit of the American people, yet enriches her family's portfolio through pet legislation and personal financial dealings. She tried to enact taxpayer funding for abortions, defying the teachings of the Catholic Church, of which she is a member. With promises of utopia, she drives massive legislation deals through Congress by stiff arm twisting, knowing she and her allies will profit at the expense of the electorate. It will be clear after reading She's the Boss that the party works for Pelosi.

Sheymes

by Elizabeth Wajnberg

The daughter of Holocaust survivors, Elizabeth Wajnberg was born in postwar Poland. Evoking the past from the present, she gathers her family's history as it moves from the prewar years through the war to their arrival in Montreal. She traces through their own voices the memories that echo and have shaped their lives to present a portrait of a family whose bonds were both soldered and sundered by their wartime experiences. The people in this book are living sheymes - fragments of a holy book that are not to be discarded when old, but buried in consecrated ground. While embodying the world they have lost and the remnants that they carried with them, Wajnberg follows her family through their last decades. As her parents age and the author becomes their active and anxious caregiver, the book changes its perspective to accent the present - now the scene of trauma - when her parents join another demeaned group. Knowing their history, she senses that society turns away from the elderly the same way it looks away from the details of the Holocaust. Rich with humour and Yiddish idioms, Sheymes is a compelling and beautifully written memoir. In its illumination of the legacy of the Holocaust and the universal aspect of Jewish suffering, it resonates far beyond her family.

Shimmering Images: A Handy Little Guide to Writing Memoir

by Lisa Dale Norton

Rich, funny, and moving, personal narratives depend on a few key moments in time to anchor the story and give it impact. Shimmering Images teaches the aspiring memoirist how to locate key memories using Lisa's technique for finding, linking, and fleshing out those vibrant recollections of important moments and situations. Shimmering Images will address: *the difference between memoir and autobiography *how to claim your voice *the art of storytelling *honesty, truth, and compassion in writing *authentic dialogue and the need for specificity Readers will learn how to craft a short piece of narrative nonfiction grounded in their core memories and master a technique they can use over and over again for writing other narratives. A must-have book for anyone who has treasured Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott or Writing Down the Bones by Natalie Goldberg.

A Ship in the Harbor, Mother and Me: Book II

by Julian Padowicz

"Mother and Me recounts a chilling journey during the war." A story of escape from the Nazis during WWII continues.

Ship Of Gold In The Deep Blue Sea: The History And Discovery Of The World's Richest Shipwreck

by Gary Kinder

Originally published in 1998 and a best seller in its hardcover and paperback publications, Gary Kinder's Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea tells the story of the sinking of the SS Central America, a side-wheel steamer carrying nearly six hundred passengers returning from the California Gold Rush, two hundred miles off the Carolina coast in September 1857. Over four hundred lives and twenty-one tons of California gold were lost. It was the worst peacetime disaster at sea in American history, a tragedy that remained lost in legend for over a century. In the 1980s, a young engineer from Ohio set out to do what no one, not even the U. S. Navy, had been able to do: establish a working presence on the deep ocean floor and open it to science, archaeology, history, medicine, and recovery. The SS Central America became the target of his project. After years of intensive efforts, Tommy Thompson and the Columbus-America Discovery Group found the Central America in eight thousand feet of water, and in October 1989 they sailed into Norfolk with her recovered treasure: gold coins, bars, nuggets, and dust, plus steamer trunks filled with period clothes, newspapers, books, journals, and even an intact cigar sealed under water for 130 years. Life magazine called it "the greatest treasure ever found. " Gary Kinder tells an extraordinary tale of history, human drama, heroic rescue, scientific ingenuity, and individual courage. Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea is a testament to the human will to triumph over adversity. It is also a great American adventure story of the opening of Earth's last frontier.

A Ship without a Sail: The Life of Lorenz Hart

by Gary Marmorstein

An unforgettable portrait of an exuberant yet troubled artist who so enriched the American songbook "Blue Moon, " "Where or When, " "The Lady Is a Tramp," "My Funny Valentine," "Isn't It Romantic?," "My Romance," "There's a Small Hotel," "Falling in Love with Love," "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered"--lyricist Lorenz Hart, together with composer Richard Rodgers, wrote some of the most memorable songs ever created. More than half a century after their collaboration ended, Rodgers & Hart songs are indispensable to the repertoire of nightclub singers everywhere. A Ship Without a Sail is the story of the complicated man who was Lorenz Hart. His lyrics spin with brilliance and sophistication, yet at their core is an unmistakable wistfulness. The sweetness of "My Romance" and "Isn't It Romantic?" is unsurpassed in American song, but Hart's lyrics could also be cynical, funny, ironic. He brought a unique wit and elegance to popular music. Larry Hart and Richard Rodgers wrote approximately thirty Broadway musicals and dozens of songs for Hollywood films. At least four of their musicals--On Your Toes, Babes in Arms, The Boys from Syracuse, and Pal Joey-- have become classics. But despite their prodigious collaboration, Rodgers and Hart were an odd couple. Rodgers was precise, punctual, heterosexual, handsome, and eager to be accepted by Society. Hart was barely five feet tall, alcoholic, homosexual, and more comfortable in a bar or restaurant than anywhere else. Terrified of solitude, he invariably threw the party and picked up the check. His lyrics are all the more remarkable considering that he never sustained a romantic relationship, living his entire life with his mother, who died only months before he died at age forty-eight. Gary Marmorstein's revelatory biography includes many of the lyrics that define Hart's legacy--those clever, touching stanzas that still move us or make us laugh.

Shirley Jones: A Memoir

by Shirley Jones

A candid and provocative memoir by the Oscar-winning actress and beloved Partridge Family icon, Shirley Jones.Shirley Jones is an American film legend of the first order, having starred in Oklahoma!, Carousel, The Music Man, and her Oscar-winning role as a prostitute in Elmer Gantry long before the iconic The Partridge Family. On the show, she portrayed the epitome of American motherhood, a symbol to generations of families in the 1970s, and she remains a cult icon today. But for those who only think of Shirley as the prim and proper Marion the librarian or the chaste and demure Mrs. Partridge, a massive surprise is in store. Here, in this candid memoir, the real flesh and blood Shirley Jones is revealed at last. In this hilarious and heartwarming, shocking and intimate memoir, Shirley dishes the raw truth about her own highly charged sexuality, her two husbands--the charismatic and deeply troubled Broadway star Jack Cassidy and the wacky TV comic Marty Ingels--her legendary Hollywood co-stars, and her interactions with the cast of The Partridge Family, including her rock star stepson David Cassidy. From smuggling marijuana across the Mexican border to infidelity and her wild sexual escapades, movie and television icon Shirley Jones gives us an unparalleled look beyond the America's sweetheart exterior.

The Shirley MacLaine Collection

by Shirley Maclaine

The Camino: The story of Shirley Maclaine's riveting and difficult pilgrimage along the Santiago de Compostela Camino in Spain, a journey that proved as much spiritual as physical. Following in the footsteps of the legendary figures who took the Camino before her, Shirley leads us with her trademark grace and insight on a sacred adventure that promises readers the journey of a thousand lifetimes. Out on a Leash: The fun, comical, and surprisingly inspiring account of how Shirley Maclaine found true, unconditional love in a furry bundle of canine charms--her dog Terry. This charming, witty, and ultimately wise memoir is an irresistible bonbon for the legions of MacLaine readers, and for dog lovers everywhere. Sage-ing While Age-ing: Sparked by the experience of moving into a new house, in this book Shirley Maclaine is inspired to look back across the remarkable professional and personal milestones she has experienced so far; doing so, she confronts the realities and rewards of growing older, and reflects on the greater understanding of her own place in the universe.

Shirley Temple Black: Actress to Ambassador (Women of Our Time)

by Jim Haskins

Shirley Temple, "America's Sweetheart," was the most popular movie star of the 1930s. During the Great Depression, her bubbly personality, blond curls, and dimples helped Americans forget their own hard times. As an adult, she entered politics, serving as the first woman Chief of Protocol at the White House; she went on to become the U.S. delegate to the United Nations and then Ambassador to Ghana. Today she remains active in many causes and is a well-know political figure -- cherished by millions as their favorite child star.

Shiv Kumar Rai

by Monica Mukhia

Life and works of Shiv Kumar Rai.

The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American Revolution

by Alfred F. Young

George Robert Twelves Hewes, a Boston shoemaker who participated in such key events of the American Revolution as the Boston Massacre and the Tea Party, might have been lost to history if not for his longevity and the historical mood of the 1830's. When the Tea Party became a leading symbol of the Revolutionary ear fifty years after the actual event, this "common man" in his nineties was "discovered" and celebrated in Boston as a national hero. Young pieces together this extraordinary tale, adding new insights about the role that individual and collective memory play in shaping our understanding of history.

Shoes for Everyone: A Story about Jan Matzeliger

by Barbara Mitchell

A biography of the half-Dutch/half-black Surinamese man who, despite the hardships and prejudice he found in his new Massachusetts home, invented a shoe-lasting machine that revolutionized the shoe industry in the late nineteenth century.

Shooting Stars

by Buzz Bissinger Lebron James

From the ultimate team- basketball superstar LeBron James and Buzz Bissinger, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Friday Night Lights and Three Nights in August--a poignant, thrilling tale of the power of teamwork to transform young lives, including James's own. The Shooting Stars were a bunch of kids--LeBron James and his best friends--from Akron, Ohio, who first met on a youth basketball team of the same name when they were ten and eleven years old. United by their love of the game and their yearning for companionship, they quickly forged a bond that would carry them through thick and thin (a lot of thin) and, at last, to a national championship in their senior year of high school. They were a motley group who faced challenges all too typical of inner-city America. LeBron grew up without a father and had moved with his mother more than a dozen times by the age of ten. Willie McGee, the quiet one, had left both his parents behind in Chicago to be raised by his older brother in Akron. Dru Joyce was outspoken, and his dad was ever present; he would end up coaching all five of the boys in high school. Sian Cotton, who also played football, was the happy-go-lucky enforcer, while Romeo Travis was unhappy, bitter, even surly, until he finally opened himself up to the bond his teammates offered him. In the summer after seventh grade, the Shooting Stars tasted glory when they qualified for a national championship tournament in Memphis. But they lost their focus and had to go home early. They promised one another they would stay together and do whatever it took to win a national title. They had no idea how hard it would be to pursue that promise. In the years that followed, they would endure jealousy, hostility, exploitation, resentment from the black community (because they went to a "white" high school), and the consequences of their own overconfidence. Not least, they would all have to wrestle with LeBron's outsize success, which brought too much attention and even a whiff of scandal their way. But together these five boys became men, and together they claimed the prize they had fought for all those years--a national championship.

Shooting Straight: Guns, Gays, God, and George Clooney

by Piers Morgan

As host of the CNN show "Piers Morgan Live," Piers Morgan has come a long way from his days as a British tabloid editor and judge on "America's Got Talent." Love him or hate him, it's undeniable that Morgan is one of the most talked-about, controversial figures in the media today. From gun control and gay marriage to religion and pop icons, he tackles the hot-button topics head on. In "Shooting Straight," he discusses candidly his refusal to bend to public pressure or political correctness, from his childhood in England to his career as a tabloid editor to his meteoric rise to fame in the United States. Offering an inside view of the real-time drama behind covering huge breaking news stories such as the killing of Osama bin Laden, Hurricane Sandy, and the massacre at Newtown, Morgan's account is a riveting, no-holds-barred depiction of an adrenaline-fueled life anchoring a nightly news show in the world's most ruthless, competitive, and pressurized media marketplace. Written in a compelling diary format, "Shooting Straight" provides a heartfelt account of Morgan's extraordinary new life and his continuing love affair with America. Shocking, funny, and incisive, it proves once again why Piers Morgan has taken the world by storm.

Shooting the Sun

by Max Byrd

Charles Babbage was an English genius of legendary eccentricity. He invented the cowcatcher, the ophthalmoscope, and the "penny post." He was an expert lock picker, he wrote a ballet, he pursued a vendetta against London organ-grinders that made him the laughingstock of Europe. And all his life he was in desperate need of enormous sums of money to build his fabled reasoning machine, the Difference Engine, the first digital computer in history. To publicize his Engine, Babbage sponsors a private astronomical expedition--a party of four men and one remarkable woman--who will set out from Washington City and travel by wagon train two thousand miles west, beyond the last known outposts of civilization. Their ostensible purpose is to observe a total eclipse of the sun predicted by Babbage's computer, and to photograph it with the newly invented camera of Louis Daguerre. The actual purpose, however... Suffice it to say that in Shooting the Sun nothing is what it seems, eclipses have minds of their own, and even the best computer cannot predict treachery, greed, and the fickle passions of the human heart.

Shooting to Kill: The Making of Velvet Goldmine

by Christine Vachon

Complete with behind-the-scenes diary entries from the set of Vachon's best-known films, Shooting to Kill offers all the satisfaction of an intimate memoir from the frontlines of independent film making, from one of its most successful agent provocateurs -- and survivors. Hailed by the New York Times as the "godmother to the politically committed film" and by Interview as a true "auteur producer," Christine Vachon has made her name with such bold, controversial, and commercially successful films as "Poison," "Swoon," Kids," "Safe," "I Shot Andy Warhol," and "Velvet Goldmine." Over the last decade, she has become a driving force behind the most daring and strikingly original independent filmmakers--from Todd Haynes to Tom Kalin and Mary Harron--and helped put them on the map. So what do producers do? "What don't they do?" she responds. In this savagely witty and straight-shooting guide, Vachon reveals the guts of the film making process--from developing a script, nurturing a director's vision, getting financed, and drafting talent to holding hands, stoking egos, stretching every resource to the limit and pushing that limit. Along the way, she offers shrewd practical insights and troubleshooting tips on handling everything from hysterical actors and disgruntled teamsters to obtuse marketing executives.

Shoplifting from American Apparel

by Tao Lin

Set mostly in Manhattan, this autobiographical novella spans two years in the life of a young, hip writer who is trying to both not be a bad person and find some kind of happiness or something.

Shore Chronicles: Diaries and Travelers' Tales from the Jersey Shore, 1764-1955

by Margaret Thomas Buchholz

This anthology gathers a wide assortment of articles, letters, and journal entries all related to life along the New Jersey shore. Included are pieces by such well-known writers as Robert Louis Stevenson, Walt Whitman, and Stephen Crane, and ordinary vacationers. Arranged chronologically, the writings trace the long history of the shore as a lure to visitors, and the changes that intensive human use have brought about.

The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace: A Brilliant Young Man Who Left Newark for the Ivy League

by Jeff Hobbs

A heartfelt, and riveting biography of the short life of a talented young African-American man who escapes the slums of Newark for Yale University only to succumb to the dangers of the streets--and of one's own nature--when he returns home.<P> When author Jeff Hobbs arrived at Yale University, he became fast friends with the man who would be his college roommate for four years, Robert Peace. Robert's life was rough from the beginning in the crime-ridden streets of Newark in the 1980s, with his father in jail and his mother earning less than $15,000 a year. But Robert was a brilliant student, and it was supposed to get easier when he was accepted to Yale, where he studied molecular biochemistry and biophysics. But it didn't get easier. Robert carried with him the difficult dual nature of his existence, "fronting" in Yale, and at home.<P> Through an honest rendering of Robert's relationships--with his struggling mother, with his incarcerated father, with his teachers and friends and fellow drug dealers--The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace encompasses the most enduring conflicts in America: race, class, drugs, community, imprisonment, education, family, friendship, and love. It's about the collision of two fiercely insular worlds--the ivy-covered campus of Yale University and Newark, New Jersey, and the difficulty of going from one to the other and then back again. It's about poverty, the challenges of single motherhood, and the struggle to find male role models in a community where a man is more likely to go to prison than to college. It's about reaching one's greatest potential and taking responsibility for your family no matter the cost. It's about trying to live a decent life in America. But most all the story is about the tragic life of one singular brilliant young man. His end, a violent one, is heartbreaking and powerful and unforgettable.

A Short Autobiography

by F. Scott Fitzgerald James L. West

A self-portrait of a great writer. A Short Autobiography charts Fitzgerald's progression from exuberant and cocky with "What I think and Feel at 25", to mature and reflective with "One Hundred False Starts" and "The Death of My Father." Compiled and edited by Professor James West, this revealing collection of personal essays and articles reveals the beloved author in his own words.

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