Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 7,626 through 7,650 of 22,883 results

Gnarr

by Jon Gnarr

In the epicenter of the world financial crisis, a comedian launched a joke campaign that didn't seem so funny to the country's leading politicians . . .It all started when Jón Gnarr founded the Best Party in 2009 to satirize his country's political system. The financial collapse in Iceland had, after all, precipitated the world-wide meltdown, and fomented widespread protest over the country's leadership.Entering the race for mayor of Reykjavík, Iceland's capital, Gnarr promised to get the dinosaurs from Jurassic Park into downtown parks, free towels at public swimming pools, a "drug-free Parliament by 2020" . . . and he swore he'd break all his campaign promises.But then something strange started happening: his campaign began to succeed. And in the party's electoral debut, the Best Party emerged as the biggest winner. Gnarr promptly proposed a coalition government, although he ruled out partners who had not seen all five seasons of The Wire.And just like that, a man whose previous foreign-relations experience consisted of a radio show (in which he regularly crank-called the White House and police stations in the Bronx to see if they had found his lost wallet) was soon meeting international leaders and being taken seriously as the mayor of a European capital.Here, Gnarr recounts how it all happened and, with admirable candor, describes his vision of a more enlightened politics for the future. The point, he writes, is not to be afraid to get involved--or to take on the system.

Go Ask Your Father

by Lennard J. Davis

At last the envelope from the lab arrives. My wife hands it to me, giving me an expectant and sympathetic look. My hands shake when I pick up this bland looking envelope, knowing that inside I will find the answer to the obsessive question I have been asking.

Go Down Together

by Jeff Guinn

Forget everything you think you know about Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker. Previous books and films, including the brilliant 1967 movie starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, have emphasized the supposed glamour of America's most notorious criminal couple, thus contributing to ongoing mythology. The real story is completely different -- and far more fascinating. In Go Down Together: The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde, bestselling author Jeff Guinn combines exhaustive research with surprising, newly discovered material to tell the real tale of two kids from a filthy Dallas slum who fell in love and then willingly traded their lives for a brief interlude of excitement and, more important, fame. Their timing could not have been better -- the Barrow Gang pulled its first heist in 1932 when most Americans, reeling from the Great Depression, were desperate for escapist entertainment. Thanks to newsreels, true crime magazines, and new-fangled wire services that transmitted scandalous photos of Bonnie smoking a cigar to every newspaper in the nation, the Barrow Gang members almost instantly became household names on a par with Charles Lindbergh, Jack Dempsey, and Babe Ruth. In the minds of the public, they were cool, calculating bandits who robbed banks and killed cops with equal impunity. Nothing could have been further from the truth. Clyde and Bonnie were perhaps the most inept crooks ever, and their two-year crime spree was as much a reign of error as it was of terror. Lacking the sophistication to plot robberies of big-city banks, the Barrow Gang preyed mostly on small mom-and-pop groceries and service stations. Even at that, they often came up empty-handed and were reduced to breaking into gum machines for meal money. Both were crippled, Clyde from cutting off two of his toes while in prison and Bonnie from a terrible car crash caused by Clyde's reckless driving. Constantly on the run from the law, they lived like animals, camping out in their latest stolen car, bathing in creeks, and dining on cans of cold beans and Vienna sausages. Yet theirs was a genuine love story. Their devotion to each other was as real as their overblown reputation as criminal masterminds was not. Go Down Together has it all -- true romance, rebellion against authority, bullets flying, cars crashing, and, in the end, a dramatic death at the hands of a celebrity lawman hired to hunt them down. Thanks in great part to surviving Barrow and Parker family members and collectors of criminal memorabilia who provided Jeff Guinn with access to never-before-published material, we finally have the real story of Bonnie and Clyde and their troubled times, delivered with cinematic sweep and unprecedented insight by a masterful storyteller.

Go Down Together: The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde

by Jeff Guinn

Forget everything you think you know about Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker. Previous books and films, including the brilliant 1967 movie starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, have emphasized the supposed glamour of America's most notorious criminal couple, thus contributing to ongoing mythology. The real story is completely different -- and far more fascinating. <P> In Go Down Together: The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde, bestselling author Jeff Guinn combines exhaustive research with surprising, newly discovered material to tell the real tale of two kids from a filthy Dallas slum who fell in love and then willingly traded their lives for a brief interlude of excitement and, more important, fame. Their timing could not have been better -- the Barrow Gang pulled its first heist in 1932 when most Americans, reeling from the Great Depression, were desperate for escapist entertainment. Thanks to newsreels, true crime magazines, and new-fangled wire services that transmitted scandalous photos of Bonnie smoking a cigar to every newspaper in the nation, the Barrow Gang members almost instantly became household names on a par with Charles Lindbergh, Jack Dempsey, and Babe Ruth. In the minds of the public, they were cool, calculating bandits who robbed banks and killed cops with equal impunity. <P> Nothing could have been further from the truth. Clyde and Bonnie were perhaps the most inept crooks ever, and their two-year crime spree was as much a reign of error as it was of terror. Lacking the sophistication to plot robberies of big-city banks, the Barrow Gang preyed mostly on small mom-and-pop groceries and service stations. Even at that, they often came up empty-handed and were reduced to breaking into gum machines for meal money. Both were crippled, Clyde from cutting off two of his toes while in prison and Bonnie from a terrible car crash caused by Clyde's reckless driving. Constantly on the run from the law, they lived like animals, camping out in their latest stolen car, bathing in creeks, and dining on cans of cold beans and Vienna sausages. Yet theirs was a genuine love story. Their devotion to each other was as real as their overblown reputation as criminal masterminds was not.<P> Go Down Together has it all -- true romance, rebellion against authority, bullets flying, cars crashing, and, in the end, a dramatic death at the hands of a celebrity lawman hired to hunt them down. Thanks in great part to surviving Barrow and Parker family members and collectors of criminal memorabilia who provided Jeff Guinn with access to never-before-published material, we finally have the real story of Bonnie and Clyde and their troubled times, delivered with cinematic sweep and unprecedented insight by a masterful storyteller.

Go Free or Die: A Story about Harriet Tubman

by Jeri Chase Ferris

A biography of the black woman whose cruel experiences as a slave in the South led her to seek freedom in the North for herself and for others through the Underground Railroad.

Go Long! My Journey Beyond the Game and the Fame

by Brian Curtis Jerry Rice

Jerry Rice has been called the best pro football player ever. In spite of Rice's legendary gridiron skills, or even his ability to transform himself into an instant ballroom-dance prodigy on ABC's hit TV series Dancing with the Stars, the surprising fact is, a guy like Jerry Rice is made and not just born. In Go Long!Rice shares the inspirational lessons and empowering practices that have helped him attain success, both on the football field and off.

The Goal of My Life

by Roger Lajoie Paul Henderson

Paul Henderson will forever be recognized and remembered for his goal with 34 seconds remaining in the 8th game of the 1972 Summit Series. This goal gave Canada the lead and won them the series and with that the team became known as "the Team of the Century." And Paul's goal as, "the Goal of the Century." But there is more to Paul Henderson than just that one goal and in The Goal of My Life, Henderson opens up about scoring both on and off the ice. A family man and man with deep faith, Henderson lives each day with tremendous appreciation for the gifts life has rewarded him and has not allowed his recent diagnosis with cancer to alter his positive demeanor. Henderson takes fans back to the moment 1972 when Canada won the Summit Series, though additionally shares memories from his entire life and his early days playing hockey through to his retirement from the game and his personal challenges with Leukemia. Henderson is a hero and his book is one that all fans of hockey and life will enjoy.

Goat

by Brad Land

Reeling from a terrifying assault that has left him physically injured and psychologically shattered, nineteen-year-old Brad Land must also contend with unsympathetic local police, parents who can barely discuss "the incident" (as they call it), a brother riddled with guilt but unable to slow down enough for Brad to keep up, and the feeling that he'll never be normal again. When Brad's brother enrolls at Clemson University and pledges a fraternity, Brad believes he's being left behind once and for all. ...

The Goat Lady

by Jane Bregoli

"From the day we moved into our new home, we were fascinated by a nearby farmhouse. Most of the homes in our neighborhood were new, freshly painted, with neatly mowed lawns, but the old farmhouse on the corner of Lucy Little Road was different from the others. That house's paint was peeling, its doors hung crookedly from their hinges, and the yard was full of white goats. We liked to watch the frisky baby goats. They pranced up the porch steps, hopped onto rusty barrels, and even jumped onto their mothers' backs! ..."

Goat Song: A Seasonal Life, A Short History of Herding, and the Art of Making Cheese

by Brad Kessler

Acclaimed novelist Brad Kessler lived in New York City but longed for a life on the land where he could grow his own food. After years of searching for a home, he and his wife, photographer Dona Ann McAdams, found a mountain farmhouse on a dead-end road, with seventy-five acres of land. One day, when Dona returned home with fresh goat milk from a neighbor's farm, Kessler made a fresh chèvre, and their life changed forever. They decided to raise dairy goats and make cheese.

The Goblin Reservation

by Clifford D. Simak

Professor Peter Maxwell is in desperate straits. En route to an interplanetary research mission, he was snatched by a strange, shadowy race to a previously uncharted planet. Ancient beyond comprehension, this planet is a storehouse of information that would be invaluable to the people of Earth-even an Earth so far advanced that perfected time travel allows goblins, dinosaurs, ghosts, even Shakespeare to coexist. His attempts to interest the rulers of Earth are thwarted, however, by a startling discovery- Maxwell was ingeniously duplicated. The "other" him came back before he did, and soon after was "accidentally" killed. Now no one will believe the original Maxwell really exists...

God and Hillary Clinton

by Paul Kengor

For nearly three decades political observers have sought to understand the complex relationship between Hillary Clinton's faith and her politics. Now, in this first spiritual biography of the former first lady, acclaimed historian Paul Kengor sets out to answer the elusive question: What does Hillary Clinton believe? Based on exhaustive research, God and Hillary Clinton tells the surprising story of Hillary's spiritual evolution, detailing the interaction between her lifelong religious beliefs and her personal history that has made her the politician she is today. Offering an in-depth spiritual chronology of Clinton's life, author Paul Kengor also analyzes the fraught relationship between her faith and her secular policies--most notably how she reconciles her pro-choice stance on abortion with her Christian beliefs--and scrutinizes how these policies have changed over the course of her political career. What emerges is an unexpected portrait of a political figure whose ideals have been shaped by both the power of her politics and the depth of her religious devotion.

God and Human Dignity: The Personalism, Theology, and Ethics of Martin Luther King, Jr

by Rufus Burrow

Although countless books have been devoted to the life and work of Martin Luther King, Jr. , few, if any, have focused on King's appropriation of, and contribution to, the intellectual tradition of personalism. Emerging as a philosophical movement in the early 1900s, personalism is a type of philosophical idealism that has a number of affinities with Christianity, such as a focus on a personal God and the sanctity of persons.

God and Ronald Reagan: A Spiritual Life

by Paul Kengor

In this groundbreaking book, political historian Paul Kengor draws upon Reagan's legacy of speeches and correspondence, and the memories of those who knew him well, to reveal a man whose Christian faith remained deep and consistent throughout his more than six decades in public life.

God and Sex

by Michael Coogan

For several decades, Michael Coogan's introductory course on the Old Testament has been a perennial favorite among students at Harvard University. In God and Sex, Coogan examines one of the most controversial aspects of the Hebrew Scripture: What the Old Testament really says about sex, and how contemporary understanding of those writings is frequently misunderstood or misrepresented. In the engaging and witty voice generations of students have appreciated, Coogan explores the language and social world of the Bible, showing how much innuendo and euphemism is at play, and illuminating the sexuality of biblical figures as well as God. By doing so, Coogan reveals the immense gap between popular use of Scripture and its original context. God and Sex is certain to provoke, entertain, and enlighten readers.

God Grew Tired of Us

by John Bul Dau Michael S. Sweeney

Published to coincide with the eponymous National Geographic Films/LBS production feature film, this memoir recounts the story of John Bul Dau, one of the "Lost Boys" of Sudan. The memoir describes how civil war forced him out of his village, leading to an odyssey through Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, and the United States, where he eventually settled, began raising a family, and began two foundations geared towards helping Sudanese children impacted by war. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

God Grew Tired of Us: A Memoir

by John Bul Dau Michael S. Sweeney

Published to coincide with the eponymous National Geographic Films/LBS production feature film, this memoir recounts the story of John Bul Dau, one of the "Lost Boys" of Sudan. The memoir describes how civil war forced him out of his village, leading to an odyssey through Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, and the United States, where he eventually settled, began raising a family, and began two foundations geared towards helping Sudanese children impacted by war. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

God, Guns & Rock'N'Roll

by Ted Nugent

Rock and Roll legend Ted Nugent contends that a lot of what is wrong with this country could be remedied by a simple, but controversial concept: gun ownership.

God Has a Dream: A Vision of Hope for Our Time

by Desmond Tutu Douglas Abrams

Desmond tutu is known the world over for freeing South Africa of Apartheid. He fought along with other South Africans to make their country a leader in the Civil Rights Movement of the late 1980's and into the new century. Tutu was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his works. In this short but powerful book, Tutu, who is also a prominent minister, tells of God's plan for everyone, and discusses God's love. He discusses how we should never lose hope and how we should treat the entire world as our family. He shows this love and world peace with many examples from his work in South Africa and his travels around the world.

The God I Love: A Lifetime Of Walking With Jesus

by Joni Eareckson Tada

A little girl on a big horse, cantering across a spring-green pasture. . . wide-eyed children gathered 'round a beach fire, listening to a father's stories of the high seas. . . an expansive, you-can-see-forever view from the top of Pike's Peak. . . Another view from a Stryker frame, where an active young woman learns she will never walk again. . . Heading down a church aisle to marry the man she loves. . . looking into the eyes of a child in a wheelchair, and seeing the family God has prepared for a loving heart. . . sitting by the pool of Bethesda, reflecting on the miracle of healing God has performed in her heart. . . "The God I Love" brings to life these and many other moments. It offers an eternal perspective from a woman in a wheelchair who affirms that the God she knows and loves is the Center, the Peacemaker, the Passport to adventure, the joy ride, and the Answer to her deepest longings. Raised in an active, adventurous family, Joni Eareckson Tada worked hard and played hard to keep up with her older sisters and athletic father--until one day a diving accident left her a quadriplegic. But the tragedy that could have ended her life was in reality the beginning of an amazing, constantly unfolding story of grace that has touched the lives of millions worldwide and brought Joni unexpected joy and fulfillment. In this book, Joni unveils the God whom she has found to be faithful through over thirty years as a paralytic. This is not the story of a woman who has all the answers or who is very different from you. Joni struggles with the same fears, questions, and heartaches we all have in common. But as the weeks and months turn into years, and the years into decades, she meets her Savior at every turn. In this book, you'll discover that He is there for you as well, no matter what your circumstance or situation may be. Written with beauty, feeling, and amazing honesty, "The God I Love" captures the heart and soul of one woman's powerful, deeply personal journey of hope.

God, If You're Not Up There, I'm F*cked

by Darrell Hammond

A raw, poignant, and often hilarious look inside the troubled life and mind of an American comic icon From his harrowing childhood filled with physical and emotional abuse at the hands of his parents, to a lifetime of alcoholism and self-mutilation, psychiatric hospitalizations, and misdiagnoses, to the peak of fame and success as the longest-tenured cast member of Saturday Night Live, Darrell Hammond delves into the darkest corners of his life, both in front of and behind the camera, with brutal honesty and fierce comic wit. On the back of his hilarious dead-on impressions of Bill Clinton, Dick Cheney, Chris Matthews, and a hundred other prominent figures, Hammond was invited into the inner sanctums of the country's political leaders, including three presidents, all the while suffering debilitating and largely undiagnosed mental anguish that resulted in horrifying flashbacks, shocking benders, a hair-raising stint in a Bahamian jail, and ultimately a dark night in a Harlem crack house. His long fight for sobriety, filled with heartbreaking relapses, was propelled by a desire to do right by his young daughter and to set the record straight about how he fell so low while achieving such heights. Throughout, Hammond lays bare the real inner workings of an iconic television show.

God In My Corner

by George Foreman

Everyone needs a second chance, even if your name is George Foreman."My second chance arrived unexpectedly in a Puerto Rican dressing room after a heavyweight boxing match. What happened to me in that room is so incredibly bizarre, it's unlikely you've ever before read anything like it. Simply stated, I died and went to the other side. The experience impacted me so profoundly that three decades later I can't go a single day without thinking about it."A childhood in grinding poverty. Two heavyweight boxing championships - twenty years apart. A life-changing encounter with God. A new life devoted to ministy. An inspiring comeback and then astounding success as an entrepreneur and trusted product pitchman.For the first time, George Foreman tells the whole story of his remarkable life. With the frankness, warmth, and humor you expect from Foreman, he shares the faith journey that has shaped his life, offering many life lessons along the way.What are the secrets to George Foreman's inspiring success?Why is he always smiling?Why did he name all five of his sons George?There is no one quiet like George Foreman. God in My Corner explains why. More importantly, it will open your eyes to the reality that God is there in your corner, just as He's been there for George all these years.

God is Not Here: A Soldier's Struggle with Torture, Trauma, and the Moral Injuries of War

by Thomas Ricks Bill Nash Lieutenant Colonel Edmonds George Lober

God Is Not Here is a powerful and intimate look into torture and its effect on both the tortured and the torturer. In May of 2005, the U.S. government finally acknowledged that the invasion of Iraq had spawned an insurgency. With that admission, training the Iraqi Forces suddenly became a strategic priority. Lt. Col. Bill Edmonds, then a Special Forces captain, was in the first group of "official" military advisors. He arrived in Mosul in the wake of Abu Ghraib, at the height of the insurgency, and in the midst of America's rapidly failing war strategy. Edmonds' job was to advise an Iraqi intelligence officer--to assist and temper his interrogations--but not give orders. But he wanted to be more than a wallflower, so he immersed himself in the experience, even learning Arabic. In a makeshift basement prison, over countless nights and predawn hours, Edmonds came to empathize with Iraqi rules: do what's necessary, do what works. After all, Americans and Iraqis were dying. Edmonds wanted to make a difference. Yet the longer he submerged himself in the worst of humanity, the more conflicted and disillusioned he became, slowly losing faith in everything and everyone. In the end, he lost himself. He returned home with no visible wounds, but on the inside he was different. He tried to forget--to soldier on--but memories from war never just fade away... In God Is Not Here, the weight of history is everywhere, but the focus is on a young man struggling to learn what is right when fighting wrong. Edmonds provides a disturbing and thought-provoking account of the morally ambiguous choices faced when living with and fighting within a foreign religion and culture, as well as the resulting psychological and spiritual impacts on a soldier. Transcending the genre of the traditional war memoir, Edmonds' eloquent recounting makes for one of the most insightful and moving books to emerge from America's long war against terrorism.

God Isn't Here: A Young Man's Entry into World War II and His Participation in the Battle for Iwo Jima

by Richard E. Overton

With attention to detail only an eyewitness can offer, Overton's gut-wrenching memoir of the battle at Iwo Jima captures the insufferable horrors of combat at the greatest battle of the modern era.

God Knows His Name: The True Story of John Doe No. 24

by Dave Bakke

Police found John Doe No. 24 in the early morning hours of October 11, 1945, in Jacksonville, Illinois. Unable to communicate, the deaf and mute teenager was labeled "feeble minded" and sentenced by a judge to the nightmarish jumble of the Lincoln State School and Colony in Lincoln. He remained in the Illinois mental health care system for over thirty years and died at the Sharon Oaks Nursing Home in Peoria on November 28, 1993. The young black man, who later became blind, survived institutionalized hell: beatings, hunger, overcrowding, and the dehumanizing treatment that characterized state institutions through the 1950s. In spite of his environment, he made friends, took on responsibilities, and developed a sense of humor. People who knew him found him remarkable. Award-winning journalist Dave Bakke reconstructs the life of John Doe No. 24 through research into a half-century of the state mental health system, personal interviews with people who knew him at various points during his life.

Showing 7,626 through 7,650 of 22,883 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.