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The Shadow of God: A Journey Through Memory, Art, and Faith

by Charles Scribner

The Shadow of God is part memoir, part spiritual autobiography, and part tour of great works of art, literature, and music. In the form of a journal written over the course of a year, Charles Scribner shares childhood recollections of a household where figures like Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald were family friends. He tells stories from his own noteworthy publishing career, from his journey toward faith, and from his deep knowledge of Baroque art. Born an Episcopalian, he charts the story of his interior life and the importance of the arts in helping him choose the spiritual, emotional, and intellectual paths he would follow, including his Catholic conversion. He asks himself questions like "How far back can we trace the roots of faith?" Scribner writes with contagious enthusiasm about the pivotal truths he discovered in the novels of Graham Greene and Evelyn Waugh and the inspiration he found in art, music, opera, and the Bible. The Shadow of God is a journey through memory, art, and faith that shaped Scribner's year as it passed through the seasons, from Epiphany to Epiphany. It is a moving portrait of a man who has devoted his life to words and the Word and a work of rare power by a writer whose grace, humor, and candor will touch readers.

Shadow of the Sword: A Marine's Journey of War, Heroism, and Redemption

by Jeremiah Workman John R. Bruning

A Marine and recipient of the Navy Cross tells of his poignant journey to find inner peace and redemption after the trial of combat.

Shadows Bright as Glass

by Amy E Nutt

On a sunny fall afternoon in 1988, Jon Sarkin was playing golf when, without a whisper of warning, his life changed forever. As he bent down to pick up his golf ball, something strange and massive happened inside his head; part of his brain seemed to unhinge, to split apart and float away. For an utterly inexplicable reason, a tiny blood vessel, thin as a thread, deep inside the folds of his gray matter had suddenly shifted ever so slightly, rubbing up against his acoustic nerve. Any noise now caused him excruciating pain. After months of seeking treatment to no avail, in desperation Sarkin resorted to radical deep-brain surgery, which seemed to go well until during recovery his brain began to bleed and he suffered a major stroke. When he awoke, he was a different man. Before the stroke, he was a calm, disciplined chiropractor, a happily married husband and father of a newborn son. Now he was transformed into a volatile and wildly exuberant obsessive, seized by a manic desire to create art, devoting virtually all his waking hours to furiously drawing, painting, and writing poems and letters to himself, strangely detached from his wife and child, and unable to return to his normal working life. His sense of self had been shattered, his intellect intact but his way of being drastically altered. His art became a relentless quest for the right words and pictures to unlock the secrets of how to live this strange new life. And what was even stranger was that he remembered his former self. In a beautifully crafted narrative, award-winning journalist and Pulitzer Prize finalist Amy Ellis Nutt interweaves Sarkin's remarkable story with a fascinating tour of the history of and latest findings in neuroscience and evolution that illuminate how the brain produces, from its web of billions of neurons and chaos of liquid electrical pulses, the richness of human experience that makes us who we are. Nutt brings vividly to life pivotal moments of discovery in neuroscience, from the shocking "rebirth" of a young girl hanged in 1650 to the first autopsy of an autistic savant's brain, and the extraordinary true stories of people whose personalities and cognitive abilities were dramatically altered by brain trauma, often in shocking ways. Probing recent revelations about the workings of creativity in the brain and the role of art in the evolution of human intelligence, she reveals how Jon Sarkin's obsessive need to create mirrors the earliest function of art in the brain. Introducing major findings about how our sense of self transcends the bounds of our own bodies, she explores how it is that the brain generates an individual "self" and how, if damage to our brains can so alter who we are, we can nonetheless be said to have a soul. For Jon Sarkin, with his personality and sense of self permanently altered, making art became his bridge back to life, a means of reassembling from the shards of his former self a new man who could rejoin his family and fashion a viable life. He is now an acclaimed artist who exhibits at some of the country's most prestigious venues, as well as a devoted husband to his wife, Kim, and father to their three children. At once wrenching and inspiring, this is a story of the remarkable human capacity to overcome the most daunting obstacles and of the extraordinary workings of the human mind.

Shadows On The Koyukuk: An Alaskan Native's Life Along the River

by Sydney Huntington Jim Reardon

Jim Reardon: "Shortly after 1900, Klondike gold rusher James S. Huntington wandered down the Yukon River, where he met and married Anna, a Koyukon daughter of the land. Their son Sidney has now lived for three-quarters of a century in the Koyukuk country where he was born. His life's story is a fascinating slice of Alaskan history. Sidney grew up in a subarctic wildland of birchbark canoes, dog teams, trappers, gold miners, and Koyukon Indians. He continues to live in essentially the same culture, now modernized with snow machines, bush planes, and satellite TV. He is a product of the land, who thoroughly knows his region, the animals, and the people who live there. The memories he shares in this book bring alive a way of life that is gone forever, for as a teenager and young man he lived primarily off the land; his interest in traditional Koyukon tales provides an intriguing peek into Koyukon Indian prehistory. In addition to leading an incredibly adventurous life, Huntington is a special kind of person. His is a bootstraps-up, inspirational success story of survival. Despite this, Sidney has always found time to help others-a trait that in recent years has brought him statewide respect and an honorary doctorate from the University of Alaska. Long before he received that degree, I regarded Sidney as holding a doctorate in life, for he is self-educated, with knowledge that extends far beyond the horizons of Alaska's Koyukuk country." Note to parents: a few hells and damns pepper the dialogue in this book.

Shah Husain

by Harjinder Singh Dhillon

On the works of Shah Husain, 1539-1599, Panjabi Sufi poet; includes selections translated into English.

Shakedown: Exposing the Real Jesse Jackson

by Kenneth R. Timmerman

Few political figures in America today arouse as much passion as the Reverend Jesse Jackson. A hero to some in the black community, Jackson is credited with helping to break down barriers to political and economic access. But to other black leaders, Jackson has become a symbol for all that has gone wrong with their community. "Jesse virtually invented black racism," the Reverend Johnny Hunter, a black pastor from Virginia Beach, tells me. The Reverend Jesse Lee Peterson, a black conservative, calls Jackson a "gatekeeper of black progress" and a "race hustler"1 who has cashed in on white guilt to fund an opulent lifestyle and a personal power base. "He is really just a David Duke in black skin," Peterson says.

Shakespeare and Company

by Sylvia Beach

Sylvia Beach was intimately acquainted with the expatriate and visiting writers of the "Lost Generation", a label that she never accepted. Like moths of great promise, they were drawn to her well-lighted bookstore and warm hearth on the Left Bank. Shakespeare and Company evokes the zeitgeist of an era through its revealing glimpses of James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, Scott Fitzgerald, Sherwood Anderson, Andre Gide, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Alice B. Toklas, D. H. Lawrence, and others already famous or soon to be. In his introduction to this new edition, James Laughlin recalls his friendship with Sylvia Beach. Like her bookstore, his publishing house, New Directions, is considered a cultural touchstone.

Shakespeare at Work: 1592-1603

by G. B. Harrison

Provides discussion of the plays of Shakespeare written and performed during this period.

Shakespeare Never Did This

by Charles Bukowski

An account of Charles Bukowski's 1978 European trip. In 1978 Europe was new territory for Bukowski holding the secrets of his own personal ancestry and origins. En route to his birthplace in Andernach, Germany, he is trailed by celebrity-hunters and paparazzi, appears drunk on French television, blows a small fortune at a Dusseldorf racetrack and stands in a Cologne Cathedral musing about life and death.

The Shakespeare Wars: Clashing Scholars, Public Fiascoes, and Palace Coups

by Ron Rosenbaum

"[Ron Rosenbaum] is one of the most original journalists and writers of our time."-David Remnick. In The Shakespeare Wars, Ron Rosenbaum gives readers an unforgettable way of rethinking the greatest works of the human imagination. As he did in his groundbreaking Explaining Hitler, he shakes up much that we thought we understood about a vital subject and renews our sense of excitement and urgency. He gives us a Shakespeare book like no other. Rather than raking over worn-out fragments of biography, Rosenbaum focuses on cutting-edge controversies about the true source of Shakespeare's enchantment and illumination-the astonishing language itself. How best to unlock the secrets of its spell? With quicksilver wit and provocative insight, Rosenbaum takes readers into the midst of fierce battles among the most brilliant Shakespearean scholars and directors over just how to delve deeper into the Shakespearean experience-deeper into the mind of Shakespeare.Was Shakespeare the one-draft wonder of Shakespeare in Love? Or was he rather-as an embattled faction of textual scholars now argues-a different kind of writer entirely: a conscientious reviser of his greatest plays? Must we then revise our way of reading, staging, and interpreting such works as Hamlet and King Lear? Rosenbaum pursues key partisans in these debates from the high tables of Oxford to a Krispy Kreme doughnut shop in a strip mall in the Deep South. He makes ostensibly arcane textual scholarship intensely seductive-and sometimes even explicitly sexual. At an academic "Pleasure Seminar" in Bermuda, for instance, he examines one scholar's quest to find an orgasm in Romeo and Juliet. Rosenbaum shows us great directors as Shakespearean scholars in their own right: We hear Peter Brook-perhaps the most influential Shakespearean director of the past century-disclose his quest for a "secret play" hidden within the Bard's comedies and dramas. We listen to Sir Peter Hall, founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company, as he launches into an impassioned, table-pounding fury while discussing how the means of unleashing the full intensity of Shakespeare's language has been lost-and how to restore it. Rosenbaum's hilarious inside account of "the Great Shakespeare 'Funeral Elegy' Fiasco," a man-versus-computer clash, illustrates the iconic struggle to define what is and isn't "Shakespearean." And he demonstrates the way Shakespearean scholars such as Harold Bloom can become great Shakespearean characters in their own right. The Shakespeare Wars offers a thrilling opportunity to engage with Shakespeare's work at its deepest levels. Like Explaining Hitler, this book is destined to revolutionize the way we think about one of the overwhelming obsessions of our time.

Shakespeare: The World as Stage

by Bill Bryson

American native Bryson, alive and well in England, sets out what little is known about the life of the Elizabethan playwright and samples the voluminous scholarship about his work and its influence on English as a language and a body of literature. His approach is lighthearted and non-technical. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Shaking the Nickel Bush

by Ralph Moody

Skinny and suffering from diabetes, Ralph Moody is ordered by a Boston doctor to seek a more healthful climate. Going west again is a delightful prospect. His childhood adventures on a Colorado ranch were described in Little Britches and Man of the Family, also Bison Books. Now nineteen years old, he strikes out into new territory hustling odd jobs, facing the problem of getting fresh milk and leafy green vegetables. He scrapes around to survive, risking his neck as a stunt rider for a movie company. With an improvident buddy named Lonnie, he camps out in an Arizona canyon and "shakes the nickel bush" by sculpting plaster of Paris busts of lawyers and bankers. This is 1918, and the young men travel through the Southwest not on horses but in a Ford aptly named Shiftless. New readers and old will enjoy this entry in the continuing saga of Ralph Moody.

Shamba (Samba)

by Kalkut Saugata Ghosh

This book is an Assemese translation of the Sahitya Akademi award-winning Bengali novel: "Shamba" (aka "Samba"), by noted Bengali novelist Kalkut (Samaresh Basu).

Shame Lifter: Replacing Your Fears and Tears with Forgiveness, Truth, and Hope

by Marilyn Hontz

Do you ever berate yourself over minor happenings? Do you feel unworthy and wonder why God would love you? Do you struggle to overcome memories of verbal, emotional, or physical abuse? If so, you may be suffering from unhealthy shame which, if not corrected, can produce bitterness and negativity in your life. From the author of the acclaimed book Listening for God comes the life-transforming book Shame Lifter, based on author Marilyn Hontz's personal story of releasing her own shame and embarking instead on a life of freedom, forgiveness, and truth.

Shantung Compound

by Langdon Gilkey

This vivid diary of life in a Japanese internment camp during World War II examines the moral challenges encountered in conditions of confinement and deprivation.

The Shaolin Way: 10 Modern Secrets of Survival from a Shaolin Kung Fu Grandmaster

by Steve Demasco

DeMasco joins monks at the Shaolin Temple and learns their fighting techniques. In the process, he uncovers an ancient philosophy that helps him to learn, grow, and over come his past. In this book, he shares his philosophy and gives ten secrets for survival that will help others to live a more fulfilled life.

Shape Shifting: Shamanic Techniques for Global and Personal Transformation

by John Perkins

An exploration of the shamanic practice of shape shifting and the story of the author's transformation from a corporate executive to an environmental activist by practicing these techniques.

Shaquille O'Neal

by Pohla Smith Steve Wilson

Climb onto the shoulders of one of the NBA's biggest stars for a tour through his exciting world. Learn how hard work and perseverance made Shaq a high school and college standout, and learn about the obstacles he overcame on the road to consecutive championships.

Shaquille O'Neal (Revised Edition)

by Ross Bernstein

Some say his name means "little warrior," but there's nothing little about 7'1", 330-pound Shaquille O'Neal. He even wears a size 22 shoe. One of the greatest basketball players of all time, Shaquille O'Neal has played sixteen seasons with the NBA and has won multiple championships. He has also starred in movies, released several rap albums, and started his own record label and clothing line. Follow Shaq's life and career as he goes from being a big, clumsy kid to a dominating player in the NBA.

Shared Visions

by John Heilbrunn

Some specific books about individual persons and their experiences, achievements and struggles have emerged occasionally, but very few books have been published where a number of persons with a visual impairment tell their stories and paint a picture of their lives. Shared Visions contains 16 interviews with persons who are blind or have low vision from all continents of the world including Australia, Fiji, Iceland, Japan and Rwanda. The interviews depict the individual differences from one person to the other, but also show certain communalities and demonstrate the strong will and preparedness to struggle to fulfill dreams and participate in the fight for the improvement of conditions for visually impaired persons nationally and internationally. Shared Visions is edited by John Heilbrunn,Vice-President of Danish Association of the Blind, Denmark, as a tribute to brave and dedicated persons within the blindness movement around the World and a celebration of the 100 year anniversary of the organization.

Sharp

by David Fitzpatrick

David Fitzpatrick's Sharp is an extraordinary memoir--a fascinating, disturbing look into the mind of a man who, in his early 20s, began cutting himself due to a severe mental illness. A beautifully written treatment of a powerful subject, Fitzpatrick--whose symptoms included extreme depression and self-mutilation--writes movingly and honestly about his affliction and inspires readers with his courage, joining the literary ranks of Terri Cheney (Manic), Augusten Burroughs (Running with Scissors), Marya Hornbacher (Wasted), and Susanna Kaysen (Girl, Interrupted).

Shaun Alexander Football Star Estrella del futbol americano

by Mary Ann Hoffman Eduardo Alaman

Brief biography of the football running back, Shaun Alexander.

Shaun White

by Matt Doeden

Children's biography of the first athlete to earn a medal in both the Summer and Winter X Games, in skateboarding and snowboarding.

Shaw's People: Victoria to Churchill

by Stanley Weintraub

Shaw's opinions of, or actual relationships with notable Victorians including the Queen. Includes extensive quotes from a man whose life spanned later Victorian Britain and the first fifty years of the twentieth century.

Showing 7,626 through 7,650 of 9,531 results

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