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Freedom in the Family: A Mother-Daughter Memoir of the Fight for Civil Rights

by Tananarive Due Patricia Stephens Due

Patricia Stephens Due fought for justice during the height of the Civil Rights era, surrendering her very freedom to ensure that the rights of others might someday be protected. Her daughter, Tananarive, grew up deeply enmeshed in the values of a family committed to making right whatever they saw as wrong. Together, they have written a paean to the movementuits struggles, its nameless foot-soldiers, and its achievementsuand an incisive examination of the future of justice in this country. Their mother-daughter journey spanning the struggles of two generations is an unforgettable story. In 1960, when she was a student at Florida AandM University, Patricia and her sister Priscilla were part of the movement's landmark jail-in,o the first time during the student sit-in movement when protestors served their time rather than paying a fine. She and her sister, and three FAMU students, spent forty-nine days behind bars rather than pay for the crimeo of sitting at a Woolworth lunch counter. Thus began a lifelong commitment to human rights. Patricia and her husband, civil rights lawyer John Due, worked tirelessly with many of the movement's greatest figures throughout the sixties to bring about change, particularly in the Deep Southern state of Florida. Freedom in the Family chronicles these years with fascinating, raw power. Featuring interviews with civil rights leaders like Black Panther Stokely Carmichael (later known as Kwame Ture) and ordinary citizens whose heroism has been largely unknown, this is a sweeping, multivoiced account of the battle for civil rights in America. It also reveals those leaders' potentially controversial feelings about the current state of our nation, a country where police brutality and crippling disparities for blacks and whites in health care, education, employment, and criminal justice still exist today. A mother writes so that the civil liberties she struggled for are not eroded, so that others will take up the mantle and continue to fight against injustice and discrimination. Her daughter, as part of the integration generation, writes to say thank you, to show the previous generation how very much they've done and how much better off she is for their effortudespite all the work that remains. Their combined message is remarkable, moving, and important. It makes for riveting reading.

Freedom Is Not Enough

by James Patterson

On June 4, 1965, President Lyndon Johnson delivered what he and many others considered the greatest civil rights speech of his career. Proudly, Johnson hailed the new freedoms granted to African Americans due to the newly passed Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act, but noted that "freedom is not enough. " The next stage of the movement would be to secure racial equality "as a fact and a result. " The speech was drafted by an assistant secretary of labor by the name of Daniel Patrick Moynihan, who had just a few months earlier drafted a scorching report on the deterioration of the urban black family in America. When that report was leaked to the press a month after Johnson's speech, it created a whirlwind of controversy from which Johnson's civil rights initiatives would never recover. But Moynihan's arguments proved startlingly prescient, and established the terms of a debate about welfare policy that have endured for forty-five years. The history of one of the great missed opportunities in American history, Freedom Is Not Enough will be essential reading for anyone seeking to understand our nation's ongoing failure to address the tragedy of the black underclass.

Freedom Not Far Distant: A Documentary History of Afro-Americans in New Jersey

by Clement Alexander Price

This book is an extensive compilation of documents which shed light on the lives of African Americans in New Jersey, from colonial times to the 1970s. It includes Quaker manifestos against slavery, slave narratives, speeches for and against emancipation, accounts of early schools for black children, writings about the civil rights movement of the 1960s, and much more.

Freedom Papers

by Rebecca J. Scott Jean M. Hebrard

Around 1785, a woman was taken from her home in Senegambia and sent to Saint-Domingue in the Caribbean. Those who enslaved her there named her Rosalie. Her later efforts to escape slavery were the beginning of a family's quest, across five generations and three continents, for lives of dignity and equality. Freedom Papers sets the saga of Rosalie and her descendants against the background of three great antiracist struggles of the nineteenth century: the Haitian Revolution, the French Revolution of 1848, and the Civil War and Reconstruction in the United States. Freed during the Haitian Revolution, Rosalie and her daughter Elisabeth fled to Cuba in 1803. A few years later, Elisabeth departed for New Orleans, where she married a carpenter, Jacques Tinchant. In the 1830s, with tension rising against free persons of color, they left for France. Subsequent generations of Tinchants fought in the Union Army, argued for equal rights at Louisiana's state constitutional convention, and created a transatlantic tobacco network that turned their Creole past into a commercial asset. Yet the fragility of freedom and security became clear when, a century later, Rosalie's great-great-granddaughter Marie-José was arrested by Nazi forces occupying Belgium. Freedom Papers follows the Tinchants as each generation tries to use the power and legitimacy of documents to help secure freedom and respect. The strategies they used to overcome the constraints of slavery, war, and colonialism suggest the contours of the lives of people of color across the Atlantic world during this turbulent epoch.

Freedom Seeker: A Story About William Penn (A Creative Minds Biography)

by Gwenyth Swain

The son of a wealthy, repected admiral, William Penn did what was forbidden in seventeenth-century England--he openly practiced the Quaker religion. Penn dreamed of a place with freedom of religion. He asked for land in the New World and was given a colony called Pennsylvania. His success in establishing a new and just government there later became the blueprint for thirteen newly independent colonies.

The Freedom Summer Murders

by Don Mitchell

To coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Freedom Summer murders, this will be the first book for young adults to explore the harrowing true story of three civil rights workers slain by the KKK. In June of 1964, three idealistic young men (one black and two white) were lynched by the Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi. They were trying to register African Americans to vote as part of the Freedom Summer effort to bring democracy to the South. Their disappearance and murder caused a national uproar and was one of the most significant incidents of the Civil Rights Movement, and contributed to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. THE FREEDOM SUMMER MURDERS will be the first book for young people to take a comprehensive look at the brutal murders of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner, through to the conviction in 2005 of mastermind Edgar Ray Killen.

Freedom Train: The Story of Harriet Tubman

by Dorothy Sterling

Born into slavery, young Harriet Tubman knew only hard work and hunger. Escape seemed impossible-- certainly dangerous. Yet Harriet did escape North, by the secret route called the Underground Railroad. Once she was free, Harriet didn't forget her people.

Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott

by Russell Freedman

On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to move to the back of a bus and give up her seat to a white man. Her quiet refusal to surrender her dignity sparked the Montgomery bus boycott, which eventually ended segregation on buses. But the boycott did not start or end there, and here Newbery Medalist Russell Freedman breathes life into all the key personalities and events that contributed to the yearlong struggle, a major victory in the civil rights movement. [This text is listed as an example that meets Common Core Standards in English language arts in grades 6-8 at http://www.corestandards.org.]

Freedom's Children

by Ellen Levine

In this inspiring collection of true stories, thirty African-Americans who were children or teenagers in the 1950s and 1960s talk about what it was like for them to fight segregation in the South-to sit in an all-white restaurant and demand to be served, to refuse to give up a seat at the front of the bus, to be among the first to integrate the public schools, and to face violence, arrest, and even death for the cause of freedom. "Thrilling. . . Nothing short of wonderful. "-The New York Times Awards: ( A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year ( A Booklist Editors' Choice .

Freedom’s Prophet

by Richard S. Newman

An Interview with the Author on the History News NetworkA Founding Father with a Vision of Equality: Richard Newman's op-ed in The Philadelphia InquirerAuthor Spotlight in The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle"Gold" Winner of the 2008 Foreword Magazine Book of the Year Award, Biography CategoryFreedom's Prophet is a long-overdue biography of Richard Allen, founder of the first major African-American church and the leading black activist of the early American republic. A tireless minister, abolitionist, and reformer, Allen inaugurated some of the most important institutions in African-American history and influenced nearly every black leader of the nineteenth century, from Douglass to Du Bois.Allen (1760-1831) was born a slave in colonial Philadelphia, secured his freedom during the American Revolution, and became one of the nations leading black activists before the Civil War. Among his many achievements, Allen helped form the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, co-authored the first copyrighted pamphlet by an African American writer, published the first African American eulogy of George Washington, and convened the first national convention of black reformers. In a time when most black men and women were categorized as slave property, Allen was championed as a black hero. As Richard S. Newman writes, Allen must be considered one of America's black Founding Fathers.In this thoroughly engaging and beautifully written book, Newman describes Allen's continually evolving life and thought, setting both in the context of his times. From Allen's early antislavery struggles and belief in interracial harmony to his later reflections on black democracy and black emigration, Newman traces Allen's impact on American reform and reformers, on racial attitudes during the years of the early republic, and on the black struggle for justice in the age of Adams, Jefferson, Madison, and Washington. Whether serving as Americas first black bishop, challenging slaveholding statesmen in a nation devoted to liberty, or visiting the President's House (the first black activist to do so), this important book makes it clear that Allen belongs in the pantheon of Americas great founding figures. Freedom's Prophet reintroduces Allen to today's readers and restores him to his rightful place in our nation's history.

Freedom's Prophet: Bishop Richard Allen, the AME Church, and the Black Founding Fathers

by Richard S. Newman

In this biography of Richard Allen, founder of the first major African-American church and the leading black activist of the early American republic, Newman describes Allen's continually evolving life and thought, setting both in the context of his times. From Allen's early antislavery struggles and belief in interracial harmony to his later reflections on black democracy and black emigration, Newman traces Allen's impact on American reform and reformers.

Freedom's Teacher

by Katherine Mellen Charron

In the mid-1950s, Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987), a former public school teacher, developed a citizenship training program that enabled thousands of African Americans to register to vote and then to link the power of the ballot to concrete strategies for individual and communal empowerment. In this vibrantly written biography, Katherine Charron demonstrates Clark's crucial role--and the role of many black women teachers--in making education a cornerstone of the twentieth-century freedom struggle. Using Clark's life as a lens, Charron sheds valuable new light on southern black women's activism in national, state, and judicial politics, from the Progressive Era to the civil rights movement and beyond.

Freedom's Teacher: The Life of Septima Clark

by Katherine Mellen Charron

Septima Poinsette Clark's gift to the civil rights movement was education. In the mid-1950s, this former public school teacher developed a citizenship training program that enabled thousands of African Americans to register to vote and then to link the power of the ballot to concrete strategies for individual and communal empowerment. This vibrantly written biography places Clark (1898-1987) in a long tradition of southern African American activist educators, women who spent their lives teaching citizenship by helping people to help themselves. Freedom's Teacher traces Clark's life from her earliest years as a student, teacher, and community member in rural and urban South Carolina to her increasing radicalization as an activist following World War II, highlighting how Clark brought her life's work to bear on the civil rights movement. Katherine Mellen Charron's engaging portrait demonstrates Clark's crucial role--and the role of many black women teachers--in making education a cornerstone of the twentieth-century freedom struggle. Drawing on autobiographies and memoirs by fellow black educators, state educational records, papers from civil rights organizations, and oral histories, Charron argues that the schoolhouse served as an important institutional base for the movement. Clark's program also fostered participation from grassroots southern black women, affording them the opportunity to link their personal concerns to their political involvement on the community's behalf. Using Clark's life as a lens, Charron sheds valuable new light on southern black women's activism in national, state, and judicial politics, from the Progressive Era to the civil rights movement and beyond.

A Freewheelin' Time: A Memoir of Greenwich Village in the Sixties

by Suze Rotolo

Rotolo, who was romantically involved with Bob Dylan from 1961 to 1964 (she's the girl on the cover of his debut album), has written this memoir of the rise of the folk music movement in Greenwich Village from a firsthand perspective. Exhibiting a writing style that is succinct yet impassioned, she vividly recreates that period in history while recounting her own growing political awareness, and explains how folk music eventually led her to a life of activism (she became involved in the Civil Rights Movement). Fans of Bob Dylan and folk music in general should enjoy this volume. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Fremantle Diary

by Walter Lord Col. James Fremantle

The fascinating diary of English colonel James Fremantle, who spent three months behind Confederate lines at the height of the American Civil WarThree hours after stepping onto American soil, James Fremantle saw his first corpse: that of a bandit lynched for taunting Confederate officers. But Fremantle was not shocked by this grisly introduction to the Civil War. On leave from Her Majesty's army, the Colonel had come to tour the fight, and see firsthand the gallant Southerners about whom he had read. In the next three months, he witnessed some of the most monumental moments of the entire war. Starting on the war's western fringe, Fremantle worked his way east, arriving on the Confederate lines in time for Gettysburg, which he watched with a telescope in a tree outside the tent of General Hood. Along the way he met Robert E. Lee, P. G. T. Beauregard, Jefferson Davis, and nearly every other Confederate leader at the time. Including an insightful introduction and notes by bestselling author Walter Lord, The Fremantle Diary is an elegant memoir and intimate portrait of one of the nation's most savage conflicts.

French Americans

by Ann Heinrichs

The richness of French American culture has given America some of its most colorful features. French Americans takes students on a trip through the past to learn why some of the French left their homeland to start new lives in the New World.

The French Executioner

by C. C. Humphreys

The last thing Jean Rombaud expects upon being summoned to behead Anne Boleyn is to dedicate his life to her. But the ill-fated queen has a mysterious request for her executioner: that after taking her life he also take her infamous six-fingered hand and bury it at a sacred crossroads in France. His oath will set Jean on the most dangerous journey of his life.In The French Executioner, C.C. Humphreys once again brings the past to life in all its glory and peril. This thrilling novel captures the breathtaking story of how courage, love, and loyalty bound Anne Boleyn to the man who ended her life--and saved her legacy."Humphreys has fashioned a rollicking good yarn that keeps the pages turning from start to finish."--Irish Examiner"A wonderful saga of magic and heroism. If you can find a first impression, hoard it and wait till it rises in value like a first edition of Lord of the Rings. This is as good."--Crime Time, UK"A brilliant, brutal, and absorbing historical thriller on the real-life figure of Jean Rombaud, the man who beheaded Anne Boleyn."--Northern Echo"An entertaining read--a charming page turner."--Edmonton Journal"Lightning paced."--Publishing News

The French House

by Don Wallace

"On a tiny French island, a couple of American dreamers redefine their lives by restoring a ruin--which in this lovely, shimmering story becomes a parable of a saner, greener, more sustainable path that we all can follow if we will but listen to the wisdom of the villagers the way the Wallaces did. The French House moves to a soulful, very funny rhythm all its own."--Meryl Streep "A brave, insightful, and very amusing memoir about a fantasy that many of us have had but not dared to attempt."--Jane Smiley When life hands you lemons, make citron pressé. Shortly after Don and Mindy Wallace move to Manhattan to jump-start their writing careers, they learn of a house for sale in a village they once visited on a tiny French island off the Brittany coast. Desperate for a life change, the Wallaces bravely (and impulsively) buy it almost sight unseen. What they find when they arrive is a ruin, and it isn't long before their lives begin to resemble it--with hilarious and heartwarming results. Redolent with the beauty and flavors of French country life, The French House is a lively, inspiring, and irresistibly charming memoir of a family that rises from the rubble, wins the hearts of a historic village, and finally finds the home they've been seeking off the wild coast of France. "Don Wallace has crafted a delicious French bonbon of a book...full of humor, hope, and lessons on how to live a life full of meaning."--Dani Shapiro, bestselling author of Devotion and Still Writing "The French House isn't a memoir. It's a vacation. Charming, gorgeous, perceptive, it is peppered with unforgettable characters and steeped in the deep red wine of long-term friendship, showing us how a remarkable place can make a life worth living."--Jennie Fields, author of The Age of Desire

French Impressions: The Adventures of an American Family

by John S. Littell

A must-read for armchair travelers...for "journal" buffs...for lovers of French history...for American adventurers and everyday dreamers-a true-life Innocents Abroad....<P> In 1950, John S. Littell dreamed of turning his life into a Hemingwayesque adventure. His wife Mary was an optimist who shared her husband's sense of fun. So what happens when they set off for the South of France with their two young sons? The result is French Impressions, a riveting, whimsical, and uproarious account of the Littells' time abroad, based on Mary's journals and diaries-with a marvelous collection of family photos.

French Kids Eat Everything

by Karen Le Billon

Moving her young family to her husband's hometown in northern France, Karen Le Billon is prepared for some cultural adjustment but is surprised by the food education she and her family (at first unwillingly) receive. In contrast to her daughters, French children feed themselves neatly and happily-eating everything from beets to broccoli, salad to spinach, mussels to muesli. The family's food habits soon come under scrutiny, as Karen is lectured for slipping her fussing toddler a snack-"a recipe for obesity!"-and forbidden from packing her older daughter a lunch in lieu of the elaborate school meal. The family soon begins to see the wisdom in the "food rules" that help the French foster healthy eating habits and good manners-from the rigid "no snacking" rule to commonsense food routines that we used to share but have somehow forgotten. Soon, the family cures picky eating and learns to love trying new foods. But the real challenge comes when they move back to North America-where their commitment to "eating French" is put to the test. The result is a family food revolution with surprising but happy results-which suggest we need to dramatically rethink the way we feed children, at home and at school.

A Frenchwoman's Imperial Story: Madame Luce in Nineteenth-Century Algeria

by Rebecca Rogers

Eugénie Luce was a French schoolteacher who fled her husband and abandoned her family, migrating to Algeria in the early 1830s. By the mid-1840s she had become a major figure in debates around educational policies, insisting that women were a critical dimension of the French effort to effect a fusion of the races. To aid this fusion, she founded the first French school for Muslim girls in Algiers in 1845, which thrived until authorities cut off her funding in 1861. At this point, she switched from teaching spelling, grammar, and sewing, to embroidery--an endeavor that attracted the attention of prominent British feminists and gave her school a celebrated reputation for generations. The portrait of this remarkable woman reveals the role of women and girls in the imperial projects of the time and sheds light on why they have disappeared from the historical record since then.

Fresh Off the Boat

by Eddie Huang

NOW AN ORIGINAL SERIES ON ABC * "Just may be the best new comedy of [the year] . . . based on restaurateur Eddie Huang's memoir of the same name . . . [a] classic fresh-out-of-water comedy."--People "Bawdy and frequently hilarious . . . a surprisingly sophisticated memoir about race and assimilation in America . . . as much James Baldwin and Jay-Z as Amy Tan . . . rowdy [and] vital . . . It's a book about fitting in by not fitting in at all."--Dwight Garner, The New York Times NATIONAL BESTSELLER * NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY KIRKUS REVIEWS Assimilating ain't easy. Eddie Huang was raised by a wild family of FOB ("fresh off the boat") immigrants--his father a cocksure restaurateur with a dark past back in Taiwan, his mother a fierce protector and constant threat. Young Eddie tried his hand at everything mainstream America threw his way, from white Jesus to macaroni and cheese, but finally found his home as leader of a rainbow coalition of lost boys up to no good: skate punks, dealers, hip-hop junkies, and sneaker freaks. This is the story of a Chinese-American kid in a could-be-anywhere cul-de-sac blazing his way through America's deviant subcultures, trying to find himself, ten thousand miles from his legacy and anchored only by his conflicted love for his family and his passion for food. Funny, moving, and stylistically inventive, Fresh Off the Boat is more than a radical reimagining of the immigrant memoir--it's the exhilarating story of every American outsider who finds his destiny in the margins. Praise for Fresh Off the Boat "Brash and funny . . . outrageous, courageous, moving, ironic and true."--New York Times Book Review "Mercilessly funny and provocative, Fresh Off the Boat is also a serious piece of work. Eddie Huang is hunting nothing less than Big Game here. He does everything with style."--Anthony Bourdain "Uproariously funny . . . emotionally honest."--Chicago Tribune "Huang is a fearless raconteur. [His] writing is at once hilarious and provocative; his incisive wit pulls through like a perfect plate of dan dan noodles."--Interview "Although writing a memoir is an audacious act for a thirty-year-old, it is not nearly as audacious as some of the things Huang did and survived even earlier. . . . Whatever he ends up doing, you can be sure it won't look or sound like anything that's come before. A single, kinetic passage from Fresh Off the Boat . . . is all you need to get that straight."--BookforumFrom the Hardcover edition.

Fresh Off the Boat

by Eddie Huang

"Long before I met him, I was a fan of his writing, and his merciless wit. He's bigger than food."--Anthony Bourdain Eddie Huang is the thirty-year-old proprietor of Baohaus--the hot East Village hangout where foodies, stoners, and students come to stuff their faces with delicious Taiwanese street food late into the night--and one of the food world's brightest and most controversial young stars. But before he created the perfect home for himself in a small patch of downtown New York, Eddie wandered the American wilderness looking for a place to call his own. Eddie grew up in theme-park America, on a could-be-anywhere cul-de-sac in suburban Orlando, raised by a wild family of FOB ("fresh off the boat") hustlers and hysterics from Taiwan. While his father improbably launched a series of successful seafood and steak restaurants, Eddie burned his way through American culture, defying every "model minority" stereotype along the way. He obsessed over football, fought the all-American boys who called him a chink, partied like a gremlin, sold drugs with his crew, and idolized Tupac. His anchor through it all was food--from making Southern ribs with the Haitian cooks in his dad's restaurant to preparing traditional meals in his mother's kitchen to haunting the midnight markets of Taipei when he was shipped off to the homeland. After misadventures as an unlikely lawyer, street fashion renegade, and stand-up comic, Eddie finally threw everything he loved--past and present, family and food--into his own restaurant, bringing together a legacy stretching back to China and the shards of global culture he'd melded into his own identity. Funny, raw, and moving, and told in an irrepressibly alive and original voice, Fresh Off the Boat recasts the immigrant's story for the twenty-first century. It's a story of food, family, and the forging of a new notion of what it means to be American.Praise for Fresh Off the Boat "Mercilessly funny and provocative, Fresh Off the Boat is also a serious piece of work--and an important one. Eddie Huang is hunting nothing less than Big Game here--a question, a conversation, an argument: Who are we? If somebody's going to put a thumb in your eye, it should probably be Eddie Huang. He does everything with style."--Anthony Bourdain "Brash, leading-edge, and unapologetically hip, Huang reconfigures the popular foodie memoir into something worthwhile and very memorable."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Fresh Talk, Daring Gazes: Conversations on Asian American Art

by Elaine H. Kim Margo Machida Sharon Mizota

Fresh Talk/Daring Gazes chronicles the blossoming of Asian American art and anticipates the growing democratization of American art and culture.

Freud

by Peter D. Kramer

Referred to as "the father of psychoanalysis," Sigmund Freud is credited with championing the "talking cure" and charting the human unconscious. Both revered and reviled, he was a brilliant innovator but also a man of troubling contradictions--sometimes tyrannical, often misrepresenting the course and outcome of his treatments to make the "facts" match his theories. Peter D. Kramer--acclaimed author, practicing psychiatrist, and a leading national authority on mental health--offers a stunning new take on this controversial figure. Kramer is at once critical and sympathetic, presenting Freud the mythmaker, the storyteller, the writer whose books will survive among the classics of our literature, and the genius who transformed the way we see ourselves.

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