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The Tecumseh You Never Knew

by James Lincoln Collier

Tecumseh was fearless in battle. And like many, he was determined to save his land and his people from the American settlers. But Tecumseh, more than any of the others, worked out a realistic plan for keeping the settlers out of Indian lands, and he came closer to doing it than any other.

Ted Kennedy: The Dream That Never Died

by Edward Klein

This biography of Edward "Ted" Kennedy provides a more balanced portrait of the man than previous volumes by exploring both his achievements as a congressional leader and the more troubling events in his life. Klein, former editor of Newsweek and author of several Kennedy family biographies, reveals some of the more personal and secretive chapters in Kennedy's life such as his battle to overcome drinking and womanizing and volatile family discussions concerning Mary Jo Kopechne, the woman who died in the infamous Chappaquiddick incident. General readers will also appreciate the focus on recent events in the senator's life such as his battle with brain cancer and Caroline Kennedy's interest and eventual dismissal of Hillary Clinton's vacant New York Senate seat. Annotation ©2009 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Ted Williams: The Biography of an American Hero

by Leigh Montville

He was The Kid. The Splendid Splinter. Teddy Ballgame. One of the greatest figures of his generation, and arguably the greatest baseball hitter of all time. But what made Ted Williams a legend - and a lightning rod for controversy in life and in death? What motivated him to interrupt his Hall of Fame career twice to serve his country as a fighter pilot; to embrace his fans while tangling with the media; to retreat from the limelight whenever possible into his solitary love of fishing; and to become the most famous man ever to have his body cryogenically frozen after his death? New York Times bestselling author Leigh Montville, who wrote the celebrated Sports Illustrated obituary of Ted Williams, now delivers an intimate, riveting account of this extraordinary life. Still a gangly teenager when he stepped into a Boston Red Sox uniform in 1939, Williams's boisterous personality and penchant for towering home runs earned him adoring admirers--the fans--and venomous critics--the sportswriters. In 1941, the entire country followed Williams's stunning . 406 season, a record that has not been touched in over six decades. At the pinnacle of his prime, Williams left Boston to train and serve as a fighter pilot in World War II, missing three full years of baseball. He was back in 1946, dominating the sport alongside teammates Dominic DiMaggio, Johnny Pesky, and Bobby Doerr. But Williams left baseball again in 1952 to fight in Korea, where he flew thirty-nine combat missions--crash-landing his flaming, smoke-filled plane, in one famous episode. Ted Willams's personal life was equally colorful. His attraction to women (and their attraction to him) was a constant. He was married and divorced three times and he fathered two daughters and a son. He was one of corporate America's first modern spokesmen, and he remained, nearly into his eighties, a fiercely devoted fisherman. With his son, John Henry Williams, he devoted his final years to the sports memorabilia business, even as illness overtook him. And in death, controversy and public outcry followed Williams and the disagreements between his children over the decision to have his body preserved for future resuscitation in a cryonics facility--a fate, many argue, Williams never wanted. With unmatched verve and passion, and drawing upon hundreds of interviews, acclaimed best-selling author Leigh Montville brings to life Ted Williams's superb triumphs, lonely tragedies, and intensely colorful personality, in a biography that is fitting of an American hero and legend.

The Teen Whisperer: How to Break Through the Silence and Secrecy of Teenage Life

by Gary Brozek Mike Linderman

Mike Linderman is a teen therapist unlike any other. A real-life cowboy, he wakes up at the crack of dawn, works the cattle on his ranch, and then counsels some of the country's most troubled teens, approaching them with a unique blend of down-home honesty, straight-talk discipline, and pure intention that is rarely found in a therapist's office. Most of the teens Mike treats are angry, abused, violent, and dangerous, yet despite their difficult pasts, he has achieved extraordinary success with them, helping to turn their lives around and earning him the nickname the "Teen Whisperer." In this book, he shares the secrets behind his success with parents everywhere, demonstrating how his regimen of hard work, integrity, and effective communication has turned seriously at-risk kids into loving, well-balanced, and productive teens. More than just a plan to rein in bad behavior, The Teen Whisperer deconstructs the emotional barriers that adolescence has placed between you and your child, helping you work with teens on their level-instead of simply treating them as subordinates. With this straightforward and open perspective, both you and your teen will learn to offer each other mutual respect and kindness, as you work together to heal the troubled hearts of your family.

Tell Me a Story, Sing Me a Song: A Texas Chronicle

by William A. Owens

This book brings together both the songs William A. Owens gathered on his travels--many accompanied by music--and Owens' warm reminiscences of his travels in the Texas of the Thirties and early Forties.

Tell Me True: Memoir, History, and Writing a Life

by Patricia Hampl Elaine Tyler May

Memoir essays on areas such as a Cuban boy brought over to the US without his parents, growing up in the States, knowing you were adopted from overseas, and finding family history despite the European side being killed in WW II, and finding the truth about family history, against the tales you now know are wrong.

Tell Me True: Memoir, History, and Writing a Life

by D. J. Waldie Elaine Tyler May Patricia Hampl

"The memoir has been, on the one hand, a startling success story in American publishing in the past quarter century. But it has also been literature's changeling, the bad apple, ever suspect, slightly illegitimate, a brassy parvenu talking too much about itself." - Patricia Hampl, "You're History" Balancing precariously between history and literature, memoir writers have finally found their place on the bookshelf. But increased notoriety brings intense scrutiny: memoirists are expected to create a narrative worthy of fiction while also staying true to the facts. Historians, too, handle tricky issues of writing from "real life," when imagination must fill gaps in the historical record. In this landmark collection, Patricia Hampl and Elaine Tyler May have gathered fourteen original essays from award-winning memoirists and historians. Whether the record emerges from archival sources or from personal memory, these writers show how to make the leap to telling a good story, while also telling us true. Contributors: Andre Aciman, Matt Becker, June Cross, Carlos Eire, Helen Epstein, Samuel G Freedman, Patricia Hampl, Fenton Johnson, Alice Kaplan, Annette Kobak, Michael MacDonald, Elaine Tyler May, Cheri Register, D. J. Waldie Patricia Hampl is the author of three memoirs, including most recently The Florist's Daughter. Elaine Tyler May has written several books on twentieth-century American history. Both are Regents Professors at the University of Minnesota.

Tell My Sons: A Father's Last Letters

by Mark Weber Robin Robin Williams

At the pinnacle of a soaring career in the U. S. Army, Lt. Col. Mark M. Weber was tapped to serve in a high-profile job within the Afghan Parliament as a military advisor. Weeks later, a routine physical revealed stage IV intestinal cancer in the thirty-eight-year-old father of three. Over the next two years he would fight a desperate battle he wasn't trained for, with his wife and boys as his reluctant but willing fighting force. When Weber realized that he was not going to survive this final tour of combat, he began to write a letter to his boys, so that as they grew up without him, they would know what his life-and-death story had taught him--about courage and fear, challenge and comfort, words and actions, pride and humility, seriousness and humor, and viewing life as a never-ending search for new ideas and inspiration. This book is that letter. And it's not just for his sons. It's for everyone who can use the best advice a dying hero has to offer. Weber's stories illustrate that in the end you become what you are through the causes to which you attach yourself--and that you've made your own along the way. Through his example, he teaches how to live an ordinary life in an extraordinary way.

Tell Newt to Shut Up: Prize-winning Washington Post Journalists Reveal How Reality Gagged the Gingrich Revolution

by Michael Weisskopf David Maraniss

PRIZEWINNING WASHINGTON POST JOURNALISTS REVEAL HOW REALITY GAGGED THE GINGRICH REVOLUTION Speaker Newt Gingrich and his troops promised a revolution when they seized power in January 1995. The year that followed was one of the most fascinating and tumultuous in modern American history. After stunning early success with the Contract with America, the Republicans began to lose momentum; by year's end Gingrich was isolated and uncertain, and his closest allies were telling him to shut up. Here is an unprecedented, fly-on-the-wall look at the successes, sellouts, and perhaps fatal mistakes of Newt Gingrich's Republican Revolution. Based on the award-winning Washington Post series that documented the Republicans' day-to-day attempts to revolutionize the American government, "Tell Newt to Shut Up!" gets to the heart of the political process.

Telling: Confessions, Concessions, and Other Flashes of Light

by Marion Winik

Combining the insight of Anna Quindlen and the comic storytelling of Garrison Keillor with her own singularly outrageous humor, Marion Winik has captivated thousands of listeners on NPR's All Things Considered. Now, in Telling, she takes us on a journey both personal and universal, a tour of the minefield of chance and circumstance that make up a life. Along the way, she offers razor-sharp takes on everything from adolescence in suburban New Jersey ("Yes, I wanted to be a wild teenage rebel, but I wanted to do it with my parents' blessing") to hellish houseguests and bad-news boyfriends; from the joys of breastfeeding in public to the sometimes-salvation of motherhood. Candid, passionate, and breathtakingly funny, Marion Winik maintains an unshaken belief that following one's heart is more important than following the rules -- and a conviction that the secrets we try to hide often contain the deepest truths. "A born iconoclast, an aspiring artiste, a feminist vegetarian prodigal daughter, from early youth I considered myself destined to lead a startling life far outside the bounds of convention. I would be famous, dangerous, brilliant and relentlessly cool: a sort of cross between Emma Goldman, Jack Kerouac, and Georgia O'Keeffe. . . . So where did this station wagon come from?"

Telling Stories: Philip Guston's Later Works

by David Kaufmann

Guston was best known for abstract work and cartoons. In this book, the author follows the development of his painting from the early 1960s until the artist's death in 1980 and explores his intense and complicated relationship to Judaism.

Telling Young Lives: Portraits of Global Youth

by Craig Jeffrey Jane Dyson

Telling Young Lives presents more than a dozen fascinating, ethnographically informed portraits of young people facing rapid changes in society and politics from different parts of the world. From a young woman engaged in agricultural labour in the High Himalayas to a youth activist based in Tanzania, the distinctive voices from the U. K. , India, Germany, Sierra Leone, South Africa and Bosnia Herzegovina, provide insights into the active and creative ways these youths are addressing social and political challenges such as war, hunger and homelessness. Telling Young Lives has great appeal for classroom use in geography courses and makes a welcome contribution to the growing field of "young geographies," as well as to politics and political geography. Its focus on individual portraits gives readers a fuller, more vivid picture of the ways in which global changes are reshaping the actual experiences and strategies of young people around the world.

Temple Grandin: How the Girl Who Loved Cows Embraced Autism and Changed the World

by Temple Grandin Sy Montgomery

When Temple Grandin was born, her parents knew that she was different. Years later she was diagnosed with autism. While Temple's doctor recommended a hospital, her mother believed in her. Temple went to school instead. Today, Dr. Temple Grandin is a scientist and professor of animal science at Colorado State University. Her world-changing career revolutionized the livestock industry. As an advocate for autism, Temple uses her experience as an example of the unique contributions that autistic people can make. This compelling biography complete with Temple's personal photos takes us inside her extraordinary mind and opens the door to a broader understanding of autism.

Temple Stream: A Rural Odyssey

by Bill Roorbach

I call the stream ours because our house is in its valley and a corner of our land touches the stream at a dramatic bend, and because my wife and our daughter (always in the company of our dogs) walk down to that bend every morning, every season. The stream is our point of contact with all the waters of the world. Great blue herons, yellow birches, damselflies, and beavers are among the many runes by which Bill Roorbach discovers a universe of nature along the stream that runs by his home in Farmington, Maine. Populated by an oddball cast of characters to whom the generous-spirited Roorbach (aka "The Professor") and his family might always be outsiders, these pages chronicle one man's determination - sometimes with hilarious results - to follow his stream directly to its elusive source. Acclaimed essayist as well as award-winning author of fiction, Bill Roorbach brings his singular literary gifts to a book that is inspirational, funny, loving, and filled with the wonder of living side by side with the natural world. Praise for Bill Roorbach "Roorbach falls, for me, into that small category of writers whose every book I must read, then reread. " --Jay Parini, author of The Apprentice Lover "Here is a narrator who makes you glad to be alive, giddy to be in his presence, grateful to love friends and family and dogs with generosity and abandon, to show tenderness and thus be saved by strangers. " --Melanie Rae Thon, author of First, Body "Roorbach is a master at capturing and expressing joy. " --Hartford Courant "Roorbach has a knack for tapping into deep undercurrents and bringing them to the surface with the least amount of fanfare or fuss. " --L. A. Weekly From the Hardcover edition.

Tempting Faith: An Inside Story of Political Seduction

by David Kuo

From the Book Jacket: Kuo spent nearly three years as second in command at the president's Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. Yet his experience was deeply troubling. It took both the Bush White House and a severe health crisis to show him how his Christian values, and those of millions of Americans, were being corrupted by politics. Instead of following the teachings of Jesus to serve the needy, Kuo found himself helping to manipulate religious faith for political gain. Public funds were used in battleground states, for Republican campaign events. The legislative process was used as a football, not to pass laws but to deepen purely symbolic fault lines. Grants were incestuously recycled to political cronies. Both before and after 9/11, despite lofty rhetoric from the president claiming that his faith-based program was one of his most important initiatives, there was no serious attempt to fund valuable charities. Worst of all was the prevailing attitude in the White House and throughout Washington toward Christian leaders. Key Bush aides and Republican operatives spoke of them with contempt and treated them as useful idiots. It became clear, during regular conference calls arranged from the White House with a key group of Christian leaders, that many of these religious leaders had themselves been utterly seduced by politics. It is time, Kuo argues, for Christians to take a temporary step back from politics, to turn away from its seductions. Tempting Faith is equal parts headline-making exposé, political and spiritual memoir, and heartfelt plea for a Christian reexamination of political involvement. David Kuo served as Special Assistant to the President under George W. Bush from 2001 to 2003. He has worked for numerous conservative leaders, including John Ashcroft, William Bennett, Jack Kemp, Bob Dole, and Ralph Reed. He is the author of the Good Morning America Book Club selection Dot.Coming: My Days and Nights at an Internet Goliath. He currently serves as the Washington editor of the Beliefnet Web site.

Ten Hispanic American Authors

by Christine M. Hill

Biographies of Julia Alvarez, Rudolfo Anaya, Sandra Cisneros, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Oscar Hijuelos, Nicholasa Mohr, Richard Rodriguez, Esmeralda Santiago, Gary Soto, and Piri Thomas.

Ten Queens

by Milton Meltzer

Powerful female rulers interpreted in striking words. From the courage and beauty of Esther to the reforming spirit of Catherine the Great, here are essays about ten queens by an author who has been called, "arguably the best writer of social history for children and adolescents ever." Meltzer, by his own description, is accustomed to presenting history "from the bottom up," but he takes a "top down" approach for these monarchs, revealing the personal and political natures of women who commanded power not because "they happened to marry a king" but because they "ruled in their own right, by themselves. Or if they sat on thrones beside kings, they had as much or more to say about governing than their husbands." Most were, by today's standards, astonishingly young. Many were physically powerful, accomplished women. Some were schooled to rule, others not. But all were ambitious, passionate, and determined to hold power. All were subject to suspicion and envy. And all, in their successes and failures, ideals and compromises, assumptions and privileges, present interesting contrasts with the lives of women today.

The Tender Bar: A Memoir

by J. R. Moehringer

Autobiography of a news reporter abandoned by his father, a New York City disc jockey who vanished before J. R. spoke his first word.

Tending Lives: Nurses on the Medical Front

by Echo Heron

As the healthcare debate rages on with the growth of the HMO industry, nurses quietly continue to provide the day-to-day grit and deeply-felt passion that hold the healing profession together. Within these remarkable women and men are poignant, outrageous stories drawn from the edge of life. But fear of career backlash and reprisals have made them reluctant to talk to outsiders about their experience. Now Echo Heron, New York Times bestselling author of Intensive Care, draws truths far stranger than fiction out of her colleagues--and allows the nurses to speak to us in their own words.Ranging from inspiring to tragic to outrageously funny, these narratives are real life medical dramas as experienced by nurses across the country--each practicing in a variety of specialties, including cardiac care, labor and delivery, burns, the ER--even a nurse who works in dolphin care.Tending Lives portrays a penitentiary nurse responsible for orchestrating a murderer's execution; a stroke victim who rose out of his depression when his nurses began telling him jokes; and, perhaps the most riveting testimony, the moment-by-moment memories of several nurses who served in the aftermath of the Oklahoma City bombing--gripping accounts that give us new perspectives on the horror and heroism of that nightmare day.Pediatric nurses, psychiatric nurses, home-care nurses, intensive care nurses--all with distinct voices and unique stories to tell. Filled with both tears and laughter, and charged with the issues that afflict nursing care today, Tending Lives is a gripping, moving, inspiring book, a fitting tribute to a noble profession.From the Hardcover edition.

The Tennis Partner: A Doctor's Story of Friendship and Loss

by Abraham Verghese

When Abraham Verghese, a physician whose marriage is unraveling, relocates to El Paso, Texas, he hopes to make a fresh start as a staff member at the county hospital. There he meets David Smith, a medical student recovering from drug addition, and the two men begin a tennis ritual that allows them to shed their inhibitions and find security in the sport they love and with each other. This friendship between doctor and intern grows increasingly rich and complex, more intimate than two men usually allow. And just when it seems nothing more can go wrong, the dark beast from David's past emerges once again. As David spirals out of control, almost everything Verghese has come to trust and believe in is threatened. Compassionate and moving, The Tennis Partner is a unforgettable, illuminating story of how men live, and how they survive.

The Tenth Muse: My Life in Food

by Judith Jones

From the legendary editor who helped shape modern cookbook publishing---one of the food world's most admired figures---an evocative and inspiring memoir. Living in Paris after World War II, Judith Jones broke free of the bland American food she had been raised on and reveled in everyday French culinary delights. On returning to the States---hoping to bring some joie de cuisine to America---she published Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking. The rest is publishing and gastronomic history. A new world now opened up to Jones: discovering, with her husband, Evan, the delights of American food; working with the tireless Julia; absorbing the wisdom of James Beard; understanding food as memory through the writings of Claudia Roden and Madhur Jaffrey; demystifying the techniques of Chinese cookery with Irene Kuo; absorbing the Italian way through the warmth of Lidia Bastianich; and working with Edna Lewis, Marion Cunningham, Joan Nathan, and other groundbreaking cooks. Jones considers matters of taste (can it be acquired?). She discusses the vagaries of vegetable gardening in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont and the joys of foraging in the woods and meadows. And she writes about M. F. K. Fisher: as mentor, friend, and the source of luminous insight into the arts of eating, living, and aging. Embellished with fifty recipes---each with its own story and special tips---this is an absolutely charming memoir by a woman who was present at the creation of the American food revolution and played a seminal role in shaping it.

Tenzing and the Sherpas of Everest

by Judy Tenzing Tashi Tenzing

Biographical account of pioneer Everest climber Tenzing Norgay Sherpa, written by Sherpa's mountaineer grandson Tashi and Tashi's wife Judy. Tells the story of a poor and illiterate man who left his small ancestral village in a remote part of the Himalaya to climb the world's highest mountain. Includes descriptions of Tenzing's family and the Sherpa people.

The Terhune Omnibus

by Albert Payson Terhune Max J. Herzberg

In this collection of the work of Albert Pason Terhune, the author shares many of his favorite dog stories, as well, as some of the other stories of animal friends he has written over the years.

Terror of the Spanish Main: Sir Henry Morgan and His Buccaneers

by Albert Marrin

Henry Morgan, who was born in Wales in 1635 and died in Port Royal, Jamaica, in 1688, was an unusual sort of leader. Inspiring the respect and admiration of his fellows, he led them to undertake daring raids on Spain's possessions in the New World; yet he commanded neither an army nor a navy. Nor was he a political ruler, although his exploits affected the power politics of Europe and earned him a knighthood. In plain language, Henry Morgan was a leader of thieves, a 'prince' among a group of outcasts, desperadoes, and failed gentlemen known as buccaneers. Though movies and novels have romanticized them, the buccaneers were in fact a ruthless group who got their way by brutal means. Their motives were pure self-interest, yet they operated with the permission of certain European nations in order to break the Spanish monopoly in the West Indies. Vividly outlining the political and economic circumstances that allowed the buccaneers to flourish, and freshly evoking both life at sea and life in the colonies in the seventeenth century, Albert Marrin shows how Henry Morgan was a particular response to forces that are still with us. War, poverty, greed, bigotry, and oppression play themselves out, albeit differently, in our lives today. Albert Marrin is the chairman of the history department at Yeshiva University, and he has written many award-winning nonfiction books for young adults, including Commander in Chief: Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War (Dutton).

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