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Midnight Eyes

by Sarah Brophy

During the turbulent, decadent reign of William II, a royal mercenary finds himself caught in the throes of an unexpected passion-and played as a pawn in a treacherous game... The bastard son of a Norman nobleman, Robert Beaumont has blossomed into one of England's fiercest killers-and has found himself well paid for his talents. But now the time has come for him to set aside his sword. The king has agreed to reward him for his last service with an estate...on one condition: Robert must marry the sitting tenant-the infamous Lady Deformed. For years, Imogen Colebrook has lived in the ramshackle Saxon keep, the virtual prisoner of her cruel, sadistic brother, the man responsible for her deformity-and for wedding her to a dangerous man. Yet, on Robert's arrival, Imogen nearly brings the hardened warrior to his knees. For she is a vision of unparalleled beauty-living in a world without sight. Drawn to her courageous spirit, Robert gently draws Imogen out of her tortured past. But with her brother always lurking in the shadows, Imogen's newfound sanctuary in Robert's arms is in danger of being destroyed-unless her salvaged heart can find a way out of the darkness...


by Millicent Collinsworth Jan Winebrenner

Like a modern-day Scarlett O'Hara, Millicent was born into a Southern world of privilege -- a moneyed environment of homesteads, servants, family tradition, and pride. The halcyon days of her childhood left Millicent ill-prepared for the tragedy that would stalk her family and almost destroy it. Like dark cloak, her father's manic depression shrouds her family in shame, forcing them to leave the home they love and journey into a world of poverty, fear, and danger. Millicent becomes a pawn in her family's struggle for survival, nourished only by her dream of restoring her family's honor. But the journey home is a long one. Millicent must overcome sexual and physical abuse, failed relationships, and a perfectionism that leads to bulimia. As if that were not enough, a freak accident leads her to question her sanity and eventually results in her blindness. And so she must learn to live in a world without light... but, in the end, not without live.

The Million Dollar Putt

by Dan Gutman

Blind golfing, anyone? Edward Bogard, Bogie for short, may be blind, but he can learn just about anything he sets his mind to: riding a bike, parasailing, playing guitar. Even though many things come easily to him, he stunned when he hits at a driving range and finds he has the swing of a pro. But blind golfing is a team sport, and Bogie needs a coach. Enter Birdie, the kooky and mysterious girl next door. A bit of a loner, Birdie creates elaborate worlds in miniature in her basement, and has managed to make it to age twelve without learning to ride a bike. Then someone anonymously enters Bogie in a golf tournament with a million dollar prize. If he can team up with Birdie to conquer the greens of Hawaii, could she be the unlikely key to victory?

Million-dollar Throw

by Mike Lupica

What would you do with a million dollars, if you were 13? Nate Brodie is nicknamed "Brady" not only for his arm, but also because he's the biggest Tom Brady fan. He's even saved up to buy an autographed football. And when he does, he wins the chance for something he's never dreamed of-to throw a pass through a target at a Patriots game for one million dollars. Nate should be excited. But things have been tough lately. His dad lost his job and his family is losing their home. It's no secret that a million dollars would go a long way. So all Nate feels is pressure, and just when he needs it most, his golden arm begins to fail him. Even worse, his best friend Abby is going blind, slowly losing her ability to do the one thing she loves most-paint. Yet Abby never complains, and she is Nate's inspiration. He knows she'll be there when he makes the throw of a lifetime. Mike Lupica's latest sports novel is also his most heartwarming. Watch a Video

Mind Apart

by Peter Szatmari

Why would a child refuse to talk about anything but wasp wings-or the color of subway train doors? What does it mean when a nine-year-old asks questions about death hundreds of times a day? And how can parents build a close relationship with a little girl who hates to be touched? In this compassionate book, leading autism authority Dr. Peter Szatmari shows that children with autism spectrum disorders act the way they do because they think in vastly different ways than other people. Dr. Szatmari shares the compelling stories of children he has treated who hear everyday conversation like a foreign language or experience hugs like the clamp of a vise. Understanding this unusual inner world-and appreciating the unique strengths that thinking differently can bestow-will help parents relate to their children more meaningfully, and make the "outer world" a less scary place.


by Jennifer Roy

Fourteen-year-old Nathaniel Clark, who has Asperger's Syndrome, tries to prove that he is a genius by writing songs for his rock band, so that he can become a member of the prestigious Aldus Institute, the premier organization for the profoundly gifted.

Mindfulness as Medicine: A Story of Healing Body and Spirit

by Sister Dang Nghiem

Before she became a Buddhist nun in the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh, Sister Dang Nghiem was a doctor. She'd traveled far in her 43 years.<P><P> Born during the Tet Offensive and part of the amnesty for Amerasian children of the late 1970s, Dang Nghiem arrived in this country virtually penniless and with no home. She lived with three foster families, but graduated high school with honors, earned two undergraduate degrees, and became a doctor. When the man she thought she'd spend her life with suddenly drowned, Sister Dang Nghiem left medicine and joined the monastic community of Thich Nhat Hanh.It is from this vantage point that Dang Nghiem writes about her journey of healing. Devastated by the diagnosis and symptoms of Lyme, she realized that she was also reliving many of the unresolved traumas from earlier in her life. She applied both her medical knowledge and her advanced understanding and practice of mindfulness to healing. Through meditation she finally came to understand what it means to "master" suffering.In Mindfulness as Medicine Sister Dang Nghiem leads readers through her profound journey of healing and shares step-by-step directions for the techniques she used to embrace and transform her suffering."Suffering can be transformed and cured at its roots...Suffering is an art that can be learned and mastered...We do not have to run away from it anymore...The art of suffering can bring about deep appreciation for life as well as profound peace, joy, and love for ourselves and other beings."-Sister Dang Nghiem

The Mind's Eye

by Oliver Sacks

In The Mind's Eye, Oliver Sacks tells the stories of people who are able to navigate the world and communicate with others despite losing what many of us consider indispensable senses and abilities: the power of speech, the capacity to recognize faces, the sense of three-dimensional space, the ability to read, the sense of sight. For all of these people, the challenge is to adapt to a radically new way of being in the world. There is Lilian, a concert pianist who becomes unable to read music and is eventually unable even to recognize everyday objects, and Sue, a neurobiologist who has never seen in three dimensions, until she suddenly acquires stereoscopic vision in her fifties. There is Pat, who reinvents herself as a loving grandmother and active member of her community, despite the fact that she has aphasia and cannot utter a sentence, and Howard, a prolific novelist who must find a way to continue his life as a writer even after a stroke destroys his ability to read. And there is Dr. Sacks himself, who tells the story of his own eye cancer and the bizarre and disconcerting effects of losing vision to one side. Sacks explores some very strange paradoxes-- people who can see perfectly well but cannot recognize their own children, and blind people who become hyper-visual or who navigate by tongue vision. He also considers more fundamental questions: How do we see? How do we think? How important is internal imagery or vision, for that matter? Why is it that, although writing is only five thousand years old, humans have a universal, seemingly innate, potential for reading? The Mind's Eye is a testament to the complexity of vision and the brain and to the power of creativity and adaptation. And it provides a whole new perspective on the power of language and communication, as we try to imagine what it is to see with another person's eyes, or another person's mind.

Mindsight: Near-Death and Out-of-Body Experiences in the Blind

by Kenneth Ring Sharon Cooper

Ring and Cooper explore evidence that even those blind from birth can "see" during near-death experiences. Their evidence reveals a unique type of perception. More than just "seeing", it involves a deep awareness and profound ability to know that the authors have called "Mindsight". This volume is a ground-breaking work in the field of near-death studies. It investigates the astonishing claim that blind persons, including those blind from birth, can actually "see" during near-death or out-of-body episodes. The authors present their findings in scrupulous detail, investigating case histories of blind persons who have actually reported visual experiences under these conditions.

Mine for a Year

by Susan Kuklin

From the book jacket: Doug the black labrador is just a pup when he comes to spend a year with twelve-year-old George and his foster family. At the end of that year, Doug will be trained as a dog guide for a blind person, so it's important that he be ready for training. George has to teach his dog manners, how to obey rules and how to get along with all kinds of people, but most of all, he has to give Doug tons of love and affection so that he will be trusting and want to learn. Since George has problems with his eyes, he knows it's possible that he will need a dog guide himself one day, and he and Doug develop a special relationship. This is the chronicle of George and Doug's year together, told as George sees it and illustrated with wonder fully warm and appealing photographs. It's a remarkable story of a boy and his dog. SUSAN KUKLIN is a photojournalist whose work has appeared in most major magazines in the United States and Europe. Her photographs have illustrated several books for young people, including the award-winning The Story of Nim, A Chimp Who Learned Language by Anna Michel. Mine for a Year is the first book she has both written and illustrated. Susan Kuklin and her husband live in New York City.

Mine For Keeps

by Jean Little

Away at school, Sally Copeland has always dreamed of going home, but now that she's there, she feels frightened and unsure of herself. Will her brother and sister accept her? Will she be able to do things for herself? And what will it be like to go to a regular school and be the only one with cerebral palsy?

Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education

by National Research Council

Special education and gifted and talented programs were designed for children whose educational needs are not well met in regular classrooms. From their inceptions, these programs have had disproportionate representation of racial and ethnic minority students. What causes this disproportion? Is it a problem?Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education considers possible contributors to that disparity, including early biological and environmental influences and inequities in opportunities for preschool and K-12 education, as well as the possibilities of bias in the referral and assessment system that leads to placement in special programs. It examines the data on early childhood experience, on differences in educational opportunity, and on referral and placement. The book also considers whether disproportionate representation should be considered a problem. Do special education programs provide valuable educational services, or do they set students off on a path of lower educational expectations? Would students not now placed in gifted and talented programs benefit from raised expectations, more rigorous classes, and the gifted label, or would they suffer failure in classes for which they are unprepared?By examining this important problem in U.S. education and making recommendations for early intervention and general education, as well as for changes in referral and assessment processes, Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education will be an indispensable resource to educators throughout the nation, as well as to policy makers at all levels, from schools and school districts to the state and federal governments.

Miracle in the Making: The Adam Taliaferro Story

by Scott Brown Sam Carchidi

On September 23, 2000, Adam Taliaferro had a lot going for him. He was a promising young football player on a full scholarship at Perm State University who seemed to have a career in the NFL in front of him. But after a jarring hit on an Ohio State running back, he woke up flat on his back in a hospital, unable to feel anything below his neck. His doctors said he would probably never walk again. Determined to prove those doctors wrong, Adam and his family embarked on a courageous journey of determination and faith that would end with Adam walking on his own two feet once again. Miracle in the Making is the remarkable story of that courageous achievement over incredibly long odds. It's the story of a recovery called miraculous by his doctors-a story of tragedy and triumph, of hope and inspiration, and a story that will remain with the reader long after the final page is turned.

The Miracle Worker: A Play in Three Acts

by William Gibson

NO ONE COULD REACH HER Twelve-year-old Helen Keller lived in a prison of silence and darkness. Born deaf, blind, and mute, with no way to express herself or comprehend those around her, she flew into primal rages against anyone who tried to help her, fighting tooth and nail with a strength born of furious, unknowing desperation. Then Annie Sullivan came. Half-blind herself, but possessing an almost fanatical determination, she would begin a frightening and incredibly moving struggle to tame the wild girl no one could reach, and bring Helen into the world at last....

Miracles Happen: One Mother, One Daughter, One Journey

by Brooke Elison Jean Elison

At age eleven, Brooke Elison was hit by a car on her way home from school. As a result, she was permanently paralyzed. This is her memoir, and also the story of Jean Elison, her mother, who worked tirelessly to ensure that Brooke would be a successful woman. This story chronicles their lives over the ten years following the accident, telling of countless trials and triumphs, ending when Brooke graduated from Harvard.

Miracles of Mind: Exploring Nonlocal Consciousness and Spiritual Healing

by Russell Targ Jane Katra

From the Table of Contents: chapter one The Illusion of Separation A Physicists Description of His Psi Experiences chapter two Our Astonishing Nonlocal Mind CIA Spying at SRI Yields Unequivocal Proof of TSP. chapter three What We Have Learned about Remote Viewing How You Can Learn to Do It Yourself chapter four The Masters of the Universe and the Mystery of Psi The Golden Experiments in Psi from This Century chapter five Precognition: Time and Time Again What Does It Mean to Look into the Future chapter six Are Psychic Abilities Using Psychic Abilities in the World, Including Spiritual Healing chapter seven The Making of a Healer Becoming a Healer Cosmic Consciousness, Mystical Experiences chapter eight The Healing Experience Mind-to-Mind Connections: Jane's Healing Experiences Chapter nine Minding the Body Significant Mind-Body Experiments and Distant Influence chapter ten Ways of Healing Spiritual and Energy Healing, Therapeutic Touch, Diseases chapter eleven a Prayer and the Healing Connection Healing Prayer Love and Surrender How to Do Spiritual Healing chapter twelve The Physics of Miracles and the Magic of Mind A Theory of Unity Consciousness and Hope for the Future The book also include an extensive bibliography.

Mirror Dance (Miles Vorkosigan #8)

by Lois Mcmaster Bujold

It's not easy dying. Coming back to life is even harder. Miles, Mark, and the Dendarii get tangled up in Jackson's Hole politics, with disastrous results.<P><P> The exciting follow-up to Brothers in Arms. Miles Vorkosigan is in trouble. His brother, a cloned stranger formed from tissue stolen from Miles when he was a child, wants to murder and replace him. Unfortunately, Mark has learned that without Miles, he is... nothing.<P> Hugo Award winner.

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: The Diary of Bess Brennan (Dear America)

by Barry Denenberg

After Bess is blinded in a sledding accident, she must face a frightening, much-altered world at the Perkins School for the Blind in 1932.

Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children and Adults

by James Webb Edward R. Amend Nadia E. Webb Jean Goerss Paul Beljan F. Richard Olenchak

Describes how to guard against misdiagnosing gifted children and adults, and how to treat gifted persons with and without dual diagnoses.

Miss Laney Is Zany (My Weird School Daze #8)

by Dan Gutman

The weirdness never stops! A. J. has to go see Miss Laney, the speech teacher, which makes no sense at all because he already knows how to talk. Miss Laney has him say weird tongue twisters and forces him to be the lead in the third-grade play, Romeo & Juliet. And you'll never guess in a million hundred years who's going to play Juliet. Will there be kissing? Ew, disgusting!

Miss Spitfire

by Sarah Miller

Annie Sullivan was little more than a half-blind orphan with a fiery tongue when she arrived at Ivy Green in 1887. Desperate for work, she'd taken on a seemingly impossible job--teaching a child who was deaf, blind, and as ferocious as any wild animal. But if anyone was a match for Helen Keller, it was the girl who'd been nicknamed Miss Spitfire. In her efforts to reach Helen's mind, Annie lost teeth to the girl's raging blows, but she never lost faith in her ability to triumph. Told in first person, Annie Sullivan's past, her brazen determination, and her connection to the girl who would call her Teacher are vividly depicted in this powerful novel.

Missing Pieces: A Chronicle of Living With a Disability

by Irving Kenneth Zola

he personal odyssey of a man with a disability, this passionate book tries to tell as well as analyze what it is like to have a disability in a world that values vigor and health. Zola writes, "Missing Pieces is an unraveling of a social problem in the manner of Black Like Me. Like its author, I, too, am a trained social observer, but for me 'passing' was not an issue. For I already have the stigmata of the disable - the braces, the limp, the cane - though I have spent much of my life denying their existence." The author started out in the role of a social scientist on a seven-day excursion to acquaint himself with an extraordinary experiment in living - Het Dorp, one of the few places in the world designed to promote "the optimum happiness" of those with severe physical disabilities. Neither a medial center nor a nursing home, Het Dorp is a village in the western-most part of the Netherlands. What began as a sociological attempt to describe this unusual setting became, through the author's growing awareness, what can only be called a socio-autobiography. Resuming his prior dependence on a wheelchair, the author experienced his own transformation from someone who is "normal" and "valid" to someone who is "invalid." The routine of Het Dorp became his: he lived in an architecturally modified home, visited the workshops, and shared meals, social events, conversation, and perceptions with the remarkably diverse residents. The author confronts some rarely discussed issues - the self-image of a person with a chronic disability, how one fills one's time, how one deals with authority and dependence, and love and sex. Missing Pieces offers striking insights into an aspect of the human condition shared by nearly 30 million Americans. It is must reading for the general reader, as well as for the rehabilitation counselor, social worker, or social scientist. Author note: Irving Kenneth Zola (1935-1994) was Professor of Sociology at Brandeis University and a founding member and counselor at the Boston Self-Help Center. Nancy Mairs is the author of seven books, including Waist-High in the World: A Life Among the Disabled, and most recently, A Troubled Guest: Life and Death Stories. She lives in Tucson with her husband, George.

The Mission Adventure (Darcy and Friends)

by Joni Eareckson Tada Steve Jensen

Although beeing in a wheelchair will make the trip difficult, Darcy feels called to go with members of her church on a mission to Guatemala where she and her sister help a deaf orphan.

The Misunderstood Child, Fourth Edition: Understanding and Coping With Your Child’s Learning Disabilities

by Larry B. Silver

The fully revised and updated must-have resource to help you become a supportive and assertive advocate for your childIn print for more than twenty years, The Misunderstood Child has become the go-to reference guide for families of children with learning disorders. This newly revised edition provides the latest research and new and updated content, including:* How to identify and address specific disabilities, from dyslexia to sensory integration disorder* New information on the genetics of learning disorders* Expanded sections on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)* The most recent neurological discoveries about how the brain functions in children with learning disabilities* Insights about other neurological disorders common among individuals with learning disabilities, such as anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive behaviors, anger-control problems, depression, and tic disorders* Resources, Web sites, and organizations that can aid the treatment process and offer support for both parent and childFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

The Mitten String

by Kristina Swarner Jennifer Rosner

An original Jewish folktale about a girl who knits, a deaf woman, and a piece of blue yarn. When her family invites a deaf woman and her baby to stay, Ruthie, a talented knitter of mittens, wonders how the mother will know if her child wakes in the night. The surprising answer inspires Ruthie to knit a special gift that offers great comfort to mother and baby--and to Ruthie herself. With language and imagery reminiscent of stories told long ago, this modern Jewish folktale will resonate with those who love crafts, anyone who's encountered someone who is physically challenged--and with everyone who has ever lost a mitten in the depths of winter.

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