Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 1,551 through 1,575 of 2,642 results

Memory (Miles Vorkosigan #10)

by Lois Mcmaster Bujold

Even after Miles returns to military duty, his late death seems to be having a greater effect than he's willing to admit. His weakness reveals itself to the world at large at just the wrong time and in just the wrong way, and Miles is summoned home to face the Barrayarn Imperial Security chief.

Mended Wheels

by Ann Bell Judy Sagal

Christian romance set in Missouri in which one of the main characters is disabled.

Mental Retardation: Determining Eligibility For Social Security Benefits

by Committee on Disability Determination for Mental Retardation

Current estimates suggest that between one and three percent of people living in the United States will receive a diagnosis of mental retardation. Mental retardation, a condition characterized by deficits in intellectual capabilities and adaptive behavior, can be particularly hard to diagnose in the mild range of the disability. The U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) provides income support and medical benefits to individuals with cognitive limitations who experience significant problems in their ability to perform work and may therefore be in need of governmental support. Addressing the concern that SSA’s current procedures are consistent with current scientific and professional practices, this book evaluates the process used by SSA to determine eligibility for these benefits. It examines the adequacy of the SSA definition of mental retardation and its current procedures for assessing intellectual capabilities, discusses adaptive behavior and its assessment, advises on ways to combine intellectual and adaptive assessment to provide a complete profile of an individual's capabilities, and clarifies ways to differentiate mental retardation from other conditions.

A Menu Of Options For Grouping Gifted Students

by Karen B. Rogers

From grouping by ability, to grouping by interest, to grouping by learning style, the use of grouping in the gifted and regular education classroom has proven to be a successful method of instruction for students. Grouping provides teachers with an effective means of providing gifted students with challenging coursework and access to advanced content, and gives students an avenue to create a peer group of other gifted students. Karen B. Rogers, a leader in the field of gifted education, provides teachers with practical advice for choosing a grouping option that best fits their students and information on how to assess their grouping choices. This book gives teachers tips for grouping gifted students in and out of the classroom and provides a menu of options for serving gifted students. This is one of the books in Prufrock Press' popular Practical Strategies Series in Gifted Education. This series offers a unique collection of tightly focused books that provide a concise, practical introduction to important topics concerning the education of gifted children. The guides offer a perfect beginner's introduction to key information about gifted and talented education. Educational Resource

MEOW.ORG: The Cat-Napping Caper

by Darby Patterson

The Crew is a group of four friends that get together to solve mysteries. The four heroes have different physical disabilities, but use their teamwork and talent to investigate cases. In MEOW.ORG, they investigate the sudden disappearance of a number of foster cats.

The Mer-Child

by Robin Morgan

Love transcends all barriers in this modern fairy tale When the Mer-Child learned the story of the Little Mermaid, he recognized it as the account of his mother and father, the beautiful mermaid and the human man for whom she sacrificed everything. But that love had left their offspring, the Mer-Child, stranded between worlds, as unwelcome in the realm of the sea as in the earth above. Never fitting in, he has been left to wander, searching for friends, his silvery tail fluttering mournfully in the waves. One day he notices a little girl sitting on the beach. Her father must carry her to and from the shore each day because her legs are paralyzed. Her father is black, her mother white, and she is as much an outcast in both communities as the Mer-Child is in his own. Slowly, warily, they find kinship, both in their differences and in their similarities, and they form a bond that changes them forever. What each learns about the value of being different makes this modern-day fairy tale a new classic, with two memorable characters and an enduring message.

Messenger: The Legacy of Mattie J. T. Stepanek and Heartsongs

by Jeni Stepanek Larry Lindner

In Messenger, Jeni Stepanek shares the inspiring story of her son's life. Mattie was born with a rare disorder called Dysautonomic Mitochondrial Myopathy, and Jeni was advised to institutionalize him. Instead, she nurtured a child who transformed his hardships into a worldwide message of peace and hope.

Mexico by Touch: True Life Experiences of a Blind American Deejay

by Larry P. Johnson

My memories of Mexico are a montage of flavors, fragrances, sounds and sensations. There's nothing that can compare with the smell and taste of freshly made corn tortillas just before the mid-day meal. Nor are there many sounds more soothing and ethereal than the rippling melodies of a neighborhood marimba band playing a dawn serenade.

The Middle of Somewhere

by J. B. Cheaney

Veronica Sparks is hitting the road! She has practically memorizedSeize the Way: Ten Weeks to SuperSize Your Life!and she is going to shake the dust of her little town off her shoes and see the world! Well, someday. For now she's hitting the road in an RV with her cantankerous grandfather at the wheel and her hyperactive little brother in the backseat. Ronnie's grandfather is a wind prospector, and they are heading across Kansas in search of a good stiff breeze. Okay, so it's not the trip of her dreams. But with her newly affirmatized attitude, Ronnie figures that travelling somewhere is better than travelling nowhere. That is, until her little brother manages to disappear into thin air. . . . On one weird, windy, wild ride across the prairie, Ronnie discovers that there are some things you just can't plan for or seize control of--but that sometimes a little chaos is just what a girl needs.


by Tim Bowler

Subject to strange fits, physically abnormal, and psychologically disturbed from the constant torment and abuse of his older brother, fifteen-year-old Midget finds himself in control of his life for the first time when he gets his own sailboat and discovers untapped mental powers.

Midnight Eyes

by Sarah Brophy

During the turbulent, decadent reign of William II, a royal mercenary finds himself caught in the throes of an unexpected passion-and played as a pawn in a treacherous game... The bastard son of a Norman nobleman, Robert Beaumont has blossomed into one of England's fiercest killers-and has found himself well paid for his talents. But now the time has come for him to set aside his sword. The king has agreed to reward him for his last service with an estate...on one condition: Robert must marry the sitting tenant-the infamous Lady Deformed. For years, Imogen Colebrook has lived in the ramshackle Saxon keep, the virtual prisoner of her cruel, sadistic brother, the man responsible for her deformity-and for wedding her to a dangerous man. Yet, on Robert's arrival, Imogen nearly brings the hardened warrior to his knees. For she is a vision of unparalleled beauty-living in a world without sight. Drawn to her courageous spirit, Robert gently draws Imogen out of her tortured past. But with her brother always lurking in the shadows, Imogen's newfound sanctuary in Robert's arms is in danger of being destroyed-unless her salvaged heart can find a way out of the darkness...


by Millicent Collinsworth Jan Winebrenner

Like a modern-day Scarlett O'Hara, Millicent was born into a Southern world of privilege -- a moneyed environment of homesteads, servants, family tradition, and pride. The halcyon days of her childhood left Millicent ill-prepared for the tragedy that would stalk her family and almost destroy it. Like dark cloak, her father's manic depression shrouds her family in shame, forcing them to leave the home they love and journey into a world of poverty, fear, and danger. Millicent becomes a pawn in her family's struggle for survival, nourished only by her dream of restoring her family's honor. But the journey home is a long one. Millicent must overcome sexual and physical abuse, failed relationships, and a perfectionism that leads to bulimia. As if that were not enough, a freak accident leads her to question her sanity and eventually results in her blindness. And so she must learn to live in a world without light... but, in the end, not without live.

The Million Dollar Putt

by Dan Gutman

Blind golfing, anyone? Edward Bogard, Bogie for short, may be blind, but he can learn just about anything he sets his mind to: riding a bike, parasailing, playing guitar. Even though many things come easily to him, he stunned when he hits at a driving range and finds he has the swing of a pro. But blind golfing is a team sport, and Bogie needs a coach. Enter Birdie, the kooky and mysterious girl next door. A bit of a loner, Birdie creates elaborate worlds in miniature in her basement, and has managed to make it to age twelve without learning to ride a bike. Then someone anonymously enters Bogie in a golf tournament with a million dollar prize. If he can team up with Birdie to conquer the greens of Hawaii, could she be the unlikely key to victory?

Million-dollar Throw

by Mike Lupica

What would you do with a million dollars, if you were 13? Nate Brodie is nicknamed "Brady" not only for his arm, but also because he's the biggest Tom Brady fan. He's even saved up to buy an autographed football. And when he does, he wins the chance for something he's never dreamed of-to throw a pass through a target at a Patriots game for one million dollars. Nate should be excited. But things have been tough lately. His dad lost his job and his family is losing their home. It's no secret that a million dollars would go a long way. So all Nate feels is pressure, and just when he needs it most, his golden arm begins to fail him. Even worse, his best friend Abby is going blind, slowly losing her ability to do the one thing she loves most-paint. Yet Abby never complains, and she is Nate's inspiration. He knows she'll be there when he makes the throw of a lifetime. Mike Lupica's latest sports novel is also his most heartwarming. Watch a Video

Mind Apart

by Peter Szatmari

Why would a child refuse to talk about anything but wasp wings-or the color of subway train doors? What does it mean when a nine-year-old asks questions about death hundreds of times a day? And how can parents build a close relationship with a little girl who hates to be touched? In this compassionate book, leading autism authority Dr. Peter Szatmari shows that children with autism spectrum disorders act the way they do because they think in vastly different ways than other people. Dr. Szatmari shares the compelling stories of children he has treated who hear everyday conversation like a foreign language or experience hugs like the clamp of a vise. Understanding this unusual inner world-and appreciating the unique strengths that thinking differently can bestow-will help parents relate to their children more meaningfully, and make the "outer world" a less scary place.


by Jennifer Roy

Fourteen-year-old Nathaniel Clark, who has Asperger's Syndrome, tries to prove that he is a genius by writing songs for his rock band, so that he can become a member of the prestigious Aldus Institute, the premier organization for the profoundly gifted.

Mindfulness as Medicine: A Story of Healing Body and Spirit

by Sister Dang Nghiem

Before she became a Buddhist nun in the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh, Sister Dang Nghiem was a doctor. She'd traveled far in her 43 years.<P><P> Born during the Tet Offensive and part of the amnesty for Amerasian children of the late 1970s, Dang Nghiem arrived in this country virtually penniless and with no home. She lived with three foster families, but graduated high school with honors, earned two undergraduate degrees, and became a doctor. When the man she thought she'd spend her life with suddenly drowned, Sister Dang Nghiem left medicine and joined the monastic community of Thich Nhat Hanh.It is from this vantage point that Dang Nghiem writes about her journey of healing. Devastated by the diagnosis and symptoms of Lyme, she realized that she was also reliving many of the unresolved traumas from earlier in her life. She applied both her medical knowledge and her advanced understanding and practice of mindfulness to healing. Through meditation she finally came to understand what it means to "master" suffering.In Mindfulness as Medicine Sister Dang Nghiem leads readers through her profound journey of healing and shares step-by-step directions for the techniques she used to embrace and transform her suffering."Suffering can be transformed and cured at its roots...Suffering is an art that can be learned and mastered...We do not have to run away from it anymore...The art of suffering can bring about deep appreciation for life as well as profound peace, joy, and love for ourselves and other beings."-Sister Dang Nghiem

The Mind's Eye

by Oliver Sacks

In The Mind's Eye, Oliver Sacks tells the stories of people who are able to navigate the world and communicate with others despite losing what many of us consider indispensable senses and abilities: the power of speech, the capacity to recognize faces, the sense of three-dimensional space, the ability to read, the sense of sight. For all of these people, the challenge is to adapt to a radically new way of being in the world. There is Lilian, a concert pianist who becomes unable to read music and is eventually unable even to recognize everyday objects, and Sue, a neurobiologist who has never seen in three dimensions, until she suddenly acquires stereoscopic vision in her fifties. There is Pat, who reinvents herself as a loving grandmother and active member of her community, despite the fact that she has aphasia and cannot utter a sentence, and Howard, a prolific novelist who must find a way to continue his life as a writer even after a stroke destroys his ability to read. And there is Dr. Sacks himself, who tells the story of his own eye cancer and the bizarre and disconcerting effects of losing vision to one side. Sacks explores some very strange paradoxes-- people who can see perfectly well but cannot recognize their own children, and blind people who become hyper-visual or who navigate by tongue vision. He also considers more fundamental questions: How do we see? How do we think? How important is internal imagery or vision, for that matter? Why is it that, although writing is only five thousand years old, humans have a universal, seemingly innate, potential for reading? The Mind's Eye is a testament to the complexity of vision and the brain and to the power of creativity and adaptation. And it provides a whole new perspective on the power of language and communication, as we try to imagine what it is to see with another person's eyes, or another person's mind.

Mindsight: Near-Death and Out-of-Body Experiences in the Blind

by Kenneth Ring Sharon Cooper

Ring and Cooper explore evidence that even those blind from birth can "see" during near-death experiences. Their evidence reveals a unique type of perception. More than just "seeing", it involves a deep awareness and profound ability to know that the authors have called "Mindsight". This volume is a ground-breaking work in the field of near-death studies. It investigates the astonishing claim that blind persons, including those blind from birth, can actually "see" during near-death or out-of-body episodes. The authors present their findings in scrupulous detail, investigating case histories of blind persons who have actually reported visual experiences under these conditions.

Mine for a Year

by Susan Kuklin

From the book jacket: Doug the black labrador is just a pup when he comes to spend a year with twelve-year-old George and his foster family. At the end of that year, Doug will be trained as a dog guide for a blind person, so it's important that he be ready for training. George has to teach his dog manners, how to obey rules and how to get along with all kinds of people, but most of all, he has to give Doug tons of love and affection so that he will be trusting and want to learn. Since George has problems with his eyes, he knows it's possible that he will need a dog guide himself one day, and he and Doug develop a special relationship. This is the chronicle of George and Doug's year together, told as George sees it and illustrated with wonder fully warm and appealing photographs. It's a remarkable story of a boy and his dog. SUSAN KUKLIN is a photojournalist whose work has appeared in most major magazines in the United States and Europe. Her photographs have illustrated several books for young people, including the award-winning The Story of Nim, A Chimp Who Learned Language by Anna Michel. Mine for a Year is the first book she has both written and illustrated. Susan Kuklin and her husband live in New York City.

Mine For Keeps

by Jean Little

Away at school, Sally Copeland has always dreamed of going home, but now that she's there, she feels frightened and unsure of herself. Will her brother and sister accept her? Will she be able to do things for herself? And what will it be like to go to a regular school and be the only one with cerebral palsy?

Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education

by National Research Council

Special education and gifted and talented programs were designed for children whose educational needs are not well met in regular classrooms. From their inceptions, these programs have had disproportionate representation of racial and ethnic minority students. What causes this disproportion? Is it a problem?Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education considers possible contributors to that disparity, including early biological and environmental influences and inequities in opportunities for preschool and K-12 education, as well as the possibilities of bias in the referral and assessment system that leads to placement in special programs. It examines the data on early childhood experience, on differences in educational opportunity, and on referral and placement. The book also considers whether disproportionate representation should be considered a problem. Do special education programs provide valuable educational services, or do they set students off on a path of lower educational expectations? Would students not now placed in gifted and talented programs benefit from raised expectations, more rigorous classes, and the gifted label, or would they suffer failure in classes for which they are unprepared?By examining this important problem in U.S. education and making recommendations for early intervention and general education, as well as for changes in referral and assessment processes, Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education will be an indispensable resource to educators throughout the nation, as well as to policy makers at all levels, from schools and school districts to the state and federal governments.

Miracle in the Making: The Adam Taliaferro Story

by Scott Brown Sam Carchidi

On September 23, 2000, Adam Taliaferro had a lot going for him. He was a promising young football player on a full scholarship at Perm State University who seemed to have a career in the NFL in front of him. But after a jarring hit on an Ohio State running back, he woke up flat on his back in a hospital, unable to feel anything below his neck. His doctors said he would probably never walk again. Determined to prove those doctors wrong, Adam and his family embarked on a courageous journey of determination and faith that would end with Adam walking on his own two feet once again. Miracle in the Making is the remarkable story of that courageous achievement over incredibly long odds. It's the story of a recovery called miraculous by his doctors-a story of tragedy and triumph, of hope and inspiration, and a story that will remain with the reader long after the final page is turned.

The Miracle Worker: A Play in Three Acts

by William Gibson

NO ONE COULD REACH HER Twelve-year-old Helen Keller lived in a prison of silence and darkness. Born deaf, blind, and mute, with no way to express herself or comprehend those around her, she flew into primal rages against anyone who tried to help her, fighting tooth and nail with a strength born of furious, unknowing desperation. Then Annie Sullivan came. Half-blind herself, but possessing an almost fanatical determination, she would begin a frightening and incredibly moving struggle to tame the wild girl no one could reach, and bring Helen into the world at last....

Miracles Happen: One Mother, One Daughter, One Journey

by Brooke Elison Jean Elison

At age eleven, Brooke Elison was hit by a car on her way home from school. As a result, she was permanently paralyzed. This is her memoir, and also the story of Jean Elison, her mother, who worked tirelessly to ensure that Brooke would be a successful woman. This story chronicles their lives over the ten years following the accident, telling of countless trials and triumphs, ending when Brooke graduated from Harvard.

Showing 1,551 through 1,575 of 2,642 results


Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.