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Living with Hearing Loss

by Marcia B. Dugan Howard E. Stone

People who are hard of hearing and their friends and relatives now can learn all they need to know about hearing loss in this easy to read guide. Newly updated and revised, Living with Hearing Loss takes the reader from A to Z on the kinds and causes of hearing loss and its common early signs. Written by Marcia B. Dugan, past president of Self Help for Hard of Hearing People (SHHH), this straightforward book provides thorough information on seeking professional evaluations and complete descriptions of hearing aids and other assistive technologies. Enhanced sections on the potential of cochlear implants and dealing with tinnitus distinguishes this very useful handbook. Readers also can take advantage of updated information on relevant Internet sites and a new list of resources on dealing with hearing loss. Living with Hearing Loss also suggests strategies for everyday situations and times of emergency. Chapters on speechreading, oral interpreters, assertive communication, and other tips for improving communication can enable people with hearing loss to make changes at work, home, and while traveling to cope with most situations. It can raise significantly the quality of the lives of hard of hearing people while also helping them to avoid dependency upon others.

Living with Impaired Vision: An Introduction

by Anne Yeadon Dava Grayson

Blind and visually impaired people: active, concerned about their jobs, their families, their communities, obtaining a good education, discovering interesting ways to use their leisure time, and above all, as different from one another as any other group of people who happen to have one characteristic in common. Today there are visually impaired people in every major area of employment from professional occupations to technical and clerical work. There are blind lawyers and college professors and insurance salesmen and social workers, blind typists and switchboard operators, auto mechanics and chemical engineers.

Living with Jonathan

by Sheila Barton

This is the heart-rending memoir of a family's journey with autism - from the dark lonely days of despair and ignorance to joy and liberation. This is a powerful plea for respecting and celebrating difference.

Living with Juvenile Arthritis

by Kimberly Poston Miller

Parenting a child with a chronic illness is not simply a full-time job; it's an all-time job.Quite unlike most other jobs in life, your first day as the parent of a child with juvenile arthritis usually begins with little or no training, no orientation, and no helpful coworkers or encouraging boss to lead you through the ropes. You'll be required to gain confidence and comfort in this job, day by day, through your own research and discoveries, your intuition, your inner strength, and your enduring love for your child.Living with Juvenile Arthritis: A Parent's Guide provides support to parents and caregivers of children with juvenile arthritis through helpful tips and guidance from a parent who has successfully navigated the challenges of raising two children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.Allow author Kimberly Poston Miller to help you and your family find your path. Learn more about arthritis, its symptoms, diagnosis scenarios, treatment options, managing pain, and handling flare-ups. Discover strategies for dealing with the unpredictability and individuality of your child's condition. Build a support team of health-care professionals, cultivate healthy relationships within your family, and focus on what's most important-raising a happy, well-adjusted child.

Living with Juvenile Arthritis

by Kimberly Poston Miller

Parenting a child with a chronic illness is not simply a full-time job; it's an all-time job.Quite unlike most other jobs in life, your first day as the parent of a child with juvenile arthritis usually begins with little or no training, no orientation, and no helpful coworkers or encouraging boss to lead you through the ropes. You'll be required to gain confidence and comfort in this job, day by day, through your own research and discoveries, your intuition, your inner strength, and your enduring love for your child.Living with Juvenile Arthritis: A Parent's Guide provides support to parents and caregivers of children with juvenile arthritis through helpful tips and guidance from a parent who has successfully navigated the challenges of raising two children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.Allow author Kimberly Poston Miller to help you and your family find your path. Learn more about arthritis, its symptoms, diagnosis scenarios, treatment options, managing pain, and handling flare-ups. Discover strategies for dealing with the unpredictability and individuality of your child's condition. Build a support team of health-care professionals, cultivate healthy relationships within your family, and focus on what's most important-raising a happy, well-adjusted child.

Living with Juvenile Diabetes: A Practical Guide for Parents and Caregivers

by Victoria Peurrung

In Living with Juvenile Diabetes, author Victoria Peurrung, mother to two children with juvenile diabetes, provides answers and coping strategies for families everywhere who are struggling with juvenile diabetes. Living with Juvenile Diabetes offers practical hints and ideas for parents, teachers, coaches and other caregivers who deal with children with Type 1 diabetes, as well as how to help their child deal with the condition on a daily basis. Read Living with Juvenile Diabetes for: * The latest facts and treatments * How to deal with the emotional roller-coaster * Step-by-step instructions for preparing insulin and giving injections * Tips on exercise and nutrition * Recipes, supplies, research trends and much more!

Living with Multiple Sclerosis: A Wellness Approach

by Marci Catanzaro George H. Kraft

This brand-new second edition incorporates many of the most recent developments in MS management and adds new material that reflects the explosion of new management strategies for MS and its new status as a treatable disease, and new concepts of "wellness" that are of general application as well as useful in managing chronic disease. With a broad base of topics, this guide systematically shows you how to live optimally with this neurologic disease. It offers advice on how to take control of your life in order to maximize your health. The book not only addresses the diverse choices for wellness, but also pinpoints the ramifications of various behaviors and activities. You'll find answers to the most commonly asked questions about living with multiple sclerosis, including causes and course symptom management wellness management emotional health disease treatments alternative therapies and social aspects. The authors suggest some avenues for optimizing your health through exercise, nutrition, and stress management. This excellent resource provides all of the guidelines you need to start developing your own individualized wellness program.

Living with Vision Problems: The Sourcebook for Blindness and Vision Impairment

by Jill Sardegna Susan Shelly Allan Rutzen Scott M. Steidl

Millions of Americans have a significant level of vision impairment. This revised edition of Living with Vision Problems is designed to provide students with helpful information such as: how to cope, causes and types of vision impairments, preventions, treatments and even LASIK procedures. It is an extensive sourcebook for all topics, including medical, concerning blindness.

Livvie Owen Lived Here

by Sarah Dooley

Olivia "Livvie" Owen feels things differently than her parents and two sisters. Livvie is autistic. Her family has had to move repeatedly because of her outbursts. When they again face eviction, Livvie is convinced she has a way to get back to a house where they were all happy, once. The problem is, Livvie burned down that house. But she's not giving up. Here is her story.

Lizzie!

by Maxine Kumin Elliott Gilbert

Lizzie, age eleven, does not let her wheelchair get in the way of her curiosity. After she is partially paralyzed in a diving accident, Lizzie and her single mom are starting life over in a small town in Florida, where Lizzie's thirst for knowledge and adventure makes her some unlikely friends and gets her into some sticky situations. Resilient and precocious, Lizzie has a passion for learning new words (especially those with Latin roots) and a propensity for finding trouble, which is how she ends up stumbling upon criminal activities involving seedy characters, beautiful golden monkeys, and murder. From the Hardcover edition.terious boy who cares for them. A man with a slick grin arrives on the scene, and Lizzie begins to uncover where the monkeys came from. With Josh and Digger's help, she puts the pieces together, but it's too late, the monkey thief strikes again and this time, it's Lizzie who's in danger.

Loamhedge (Redwall, Book 16)

by Brian Jacques

In which young haremaid Martha Braebuck, wheelchair-bound since infancy, learns that the cure for her condition may be found at the mysterious ancient Abbey of Loamhedge. Other books in this series are available from Bookshare.

Lobster Boy

by Fred Rosen

Lobster Boy recounts the disturbing story behind the sensational life and murder of Grady Stiles, Jr., the legendary carnival "freak." His wife, Teresa, and family revealed years of physical and emotional abuse that made her arrange for her husband's murder. Rosen mixes in short vignettes about Stiles's equally unfortunate acquaintances, including The World's Only Living Half Girl, Midget Man, the Electrified Girl and the Human Blockhead. During Teresa Stiles's dramatic murder trial, Rosen becomes a character in his own book, risking his life in pursuit of the truth.

Loneliness and Its Opposite: Sex, Disability, and the Ethics of Engagement

by Don Kulick Jens Rydström

Few people these days would oppose making the public realm of space, social services and jobs accessible to women and men with disabilities. But what about access to the private realm of desire and sexuality? How can one also facilitate access to that, in ways that respect the integrity of disabled adults, and also of those people who work with and care for them?Loneliness and Its Opposite documents how two countries generally imagined to be progressive engage with these questions in very different ways. Denmark and Sweden are both liberal welfare states, but they diverge dramatically when it comes to sexuality and disability. In Denmark, the erotic lives of people with disabilities are acknowledged and facilitated. In Sweden, they are denied and blocked. Why do these differences exist, and how do both facilitation and hindrance play out in practice?Loneliness and Its Opposite charts complex boundaries between private and public, love and sex, work and intimacy, and affection and abuse. It shows how providing disabled adults with access to sexual lives is not just crucial for a life with dignity. It is an issue of fundamental social justice with far reaching consequences for everyone.

Long Hand Writing for the Blind

by Elizabeth D. Freund

This guide, which accompanies the Handwriting kit, sould by APH, can be used on its own, with a piece of metal screening in place of the writing board, and plastic cursive letters purchased at most teacher stores. Outlines a way to learn all of the letters in lower case and Capital as well as the numbers in cursive. Good resource for learning how to write.

Long Shot for Paul

by Matthew F Christopher

Glen is determined to make his developmentally disabled brother a basketball player.

Long Time, No See

by Beth Finke

Long Time, No See is certainly an inspiring story, but Beth Finke does not aim to inspire. Eschewing reassuring platitudes and sensational pleas for sympathy, she charts her struggles with juvenile diabetes, blindness, and a host of other hardships, sharing her feelings of despair and frustration as well as her hard-won triumphs. Rejecting the label "courageous," she prefers to describe herself using the phrase her mother invoked in times of difficulty: "She did what she had to do. " With unflinching candor and acerbic wit, Finke chronicles the progress of the juvenile diabetes that left her blind at the age of twenty-six as well as the seemingly endless spiral of adversity that followed. First she was forced out of her professional job. Then she bore a multiply handicapped son. But she kept moving forward, confronting marital and financial problems and persevering through a rocky training period with a seeing-eye dog. Finke's life story and her commanding knowledge of her situation give readers a clear understanding of diabetes, blindness, and the issues faced by parents of children with significant disabilities. Because she has taken care to include accurate medical information as well as personal memoir, Long Time, No See serves as an excellent resource for others in similar situations and for professionals who deal with disabled adults or children.

Look At Me: A Resource Manual for the Development of Residual Vision in Children with Multiple Disabilities

by Audrey J. Smith Karen Shane Cote

Look at me is a complete resource for educators working with visually/multiply handicapped as well as those having low vision as their only disability. It provides the reader with basic, written information on the structure and function of the eye.

A Look Into Our "i's": A Compilation of Introspective Writings From a Group of Extraordinary Young People With Visual Impairments

by Delta Gamma Center for Children With Visual Impairments

Stories about how their visual impairments have affected their lives from a dozen teenagers aged 13 to 21.

Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's

by John Elder Robison

Ever since he was small, John Robison had longed to connect with other people, but by the time he was a teenager, his odd habits--an inclination to blurt out non sequiturs, avoid eye contact, dismantle radios, and dig five-foot holes (and stick his younger brother in them)--had earned him the label "social deviant. " No guidance came from his mother, who conversed with light fixtures, or his father, who spent evenings pickling himself in sherry. It was no wonder he gravitated to machines, which could, at least, be counted on. After fleeing his parents and dropping out of high school, his savant-like ability to visualize electronic circuits landed him a gig with KISS, for whom he created their legendary fire-breathing guitars. Later, he drifted into a "real" job, as an engineer for a major toy company. But the higher Robison rose in the company, the more he had to pretend to be "normal" and do what he simply couldn't: communicate. It wasn't worth the paycheck. It was not until he was forty that an insightful therapist told him he had the form of autism called Asperger's syndrome. That understanding transformed the way Robison saw himself--and the world. Look Me in the Eyeis the moving, darkly funny story of growing up with Asperger's at a time when the diagnosis simply didn't exist. A born storyteller, Robison takes you inside the head of a boy whom teachers and other adults regarded as "defective," who could not avail himself of KISS's endless supply of groupies, and who still has a peculiar aversion to using people's given names (he calls his wife "Unit Two"). He also provides a fascinating reverse angle on the younger brother he left at the mercy of their nutty parents--the boy who would later change his name to Augusten Burroughs and write the bestselling memoirRunning with Scissors. Ultimately, this is the story of Robison's journey from his world into ours, and his new life as a husband, father, and successful small business owner--repairing his beloved high-end automobiles. It's a strange, sly, indelible account--sometimes alien, yet always deeply human. From the Hardcover edition.

Look Up for Yes

by Julia Tavalaro Richard Tayson

A paralyzed stroke victim and poet tells her story of decades of being treated as a vegetable in a public hospital and her release from isolation when a speech therapist taught her to communicate. Julia Tavalaro had it all, a beautiful young daughter, and a loving husband, until two strokes left her in a coma for three years. When she finally emerged, she couldn't move her arms or legs, and couldn't speak except to groan. She had a tube that helped her breathe, and was being fed liquids to survive. For six years she was treated like a vegetable, until a speech therapist discovered she was cognizant, and so began her journey of learning to communicate.

Look Up, Move Forward

by Becky Andrews Amy Hackworth

When 18 year old Becky Andrews is diagnosed with the degenerative eye condition Retinitis Pigmentosa, she understands her childhood of softball strikeouts, notorious clumsiness, and why she's never been able to see the stars. This is Becky's remarkable story of living life to the fullest is a journey of courage and determination. Part memoir and part resilience manifestor, Look up, move forward will inspire readers to face their own lives with more creativity, grit, determination and joy.

Looking Ahead: Guide Dogs For The Blind

by Paula Harrington

Have you ever seen a handsome, intelligent dog wearing a leather harness and leading a blind person at a steady clip along a busy city street full of obstacles? That kind of training, trust and teamwork doesn't just happen It happens at Guide Dogs for the Blind of San Rafael, California. The story begins in 1941 in Los Gatos, ironically, a city named for cats. It is the story of determined, strong-minded pioneers who wanted a West Coast school that would train newly blinded servicemen who came home during and after World War II to achieve greater mobility and independence. It is the story of dogs--"Blondie," "Frank of Ledge Acres," "Abby," "Lee," "Dugan" and "Mozart"--of 4-H puppy raisers and adult volunteer puppy testers, of instructors and veterinarians. It is the story of the seven six-week-old yellow Labrador retriever puppies on the cover of this book. There are dogs everywhere on the Guide Dogs campus, and there are dogs everywhere in this book. They range from silly puppies who trip over their own paws to dignified adult Guide Dogs. This is a success story, one filled with courage, optimism, hope, humor and hard work, from dogs, instructors, staff, students and graduates alike. It is the story of a struggling school that started in a rented farm house with one trainer, two students and donated dogs, a school that today has graduated more than 6,000 teams of blind person and Guide Dog. It is the story of a group of graduates that includes people from all walks of life, from ranchers to college students, homemakers, attorneys and musicians.

Looking at Employment Through a Lifespan Telescope: Age, Health, and Employment Status of People with Serious Visual Impairment

by Corinne Kirchner Emilie Schmeidler Alexander Todorov

This book gathers representative survey data from the legally blind population on employment issues, and analyzes it using a lifespan perspective (considering age, career stage, and age-at-onset of visual impairment), which is critical to understanding widely different employment issues for subgroups of the blind and visually impaired population.

Looking Beyond Limitations: A New Understanding of Learning Disabilities in a Disabling School System

by Joan Kilbourne Steve Köehmstedt

An investigation into the ways in which educational institutions disable students with learning disabilities.

Looking Out For Sarah

by Glenna Lang

Perry a yellow labrador tells about a day in his life. Where he goes with his owner Sara to the park, to the post office, to a diner, and to a school where Sara tells about guide dogs. Perry also remembers the time Sara and him walked from Boston to New York to show what a Guide dog could do.<P><P> Winner of the Schneider Family Book Award

Showing 1,601 through 1,625 of 2,908 results

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