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Theodore Roosevelt and the Great White Fleet: American Sea Power Comes of Age

by Kenneth Wimmel

Kenneth Wimmel gives a new appraisal of the rise of the US Navy and Theodore Roosevelt's influence upon its development.

Theory and Research on the Causes of War

by Dean G. Pruitt

The collection is divided into seven parts. This provides a progress report on recent scholarly developments, particularly in the United States. Twenty selected readings and seven introductory essays are presented.

There's a War to be Won: The United States Army in World War II

by Geoffrey Perret

A look at the United States Army during world war II.

There's a War to Be Won: The United States Army in World War II

by Geoffrey Perret

THERE'S A WAR TO BE WON is the landmark story of one of the greatest armies in history, a conscript force of amateur soldiers who had an unparalleled record of combat success. Here -- for the first time in one volume -- is the chronicle of the United States Army's dramatic mobilization and stunning march to victory in World War II.In a lively and engrossing narrative that spans theaters of operations around the world, Geoffrey Perret tells how the Army was drafted, trained, organized, armed, and led at every stage of the war. Beginning with the prescient military planners of the 1930s, he offers vivid warts-and-all profiles of the farsighted commanders who would lead the way, men like Marshall, MacArthur, Eisenhower, Ridgway, Bradley, and Patton.Drawing heavily on important new source material in major archives throughout the United States, THERE'S A WAR TO BE WON offers new insights into the wartime Army, its commanders, and its battles. A major work of American military history."An immensely readable, well-researched history . . . Dramatic." -- Chicago TribuneFrom the Paperback edition.

They Are Soldiers

by Harold Coyle

Military fiction about the national guard and the middle east

They Died with Custer: Soldiers' Bones from the Battle of the Little Bighorn

by Douglas D. Scott P. Willey Melissa A. Connor

More than a hundred years after the Battle of the Little Bighorn, its secrets continue to unfold. In this book, Douglas D. Scott, P. Willey, and Melissa A. Connor blend historic sources, archeological evidence, and physical data to present new revelations about the men who rode and died with Custer. Although dead men tell no tales, their skeletons whisper entire life stories. Through painstaking analysis of the skeletal remains, the authors construct composite biographies of the soldiers, identifying their true ages, heights, states of health, and how they died. A vast selection of illustrations, including photographs, battlefield maps, drawings, & graphs, enhance the discussion. The authors also move beyond individual stories to consider our views regarding the appropriate treatment for the dead. They explain how Custer Battlefield National Monument, now Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, has always reflected shifts in cultural values. The planned monument to the American Indians who fought against the Seventh Cavalry is perhaps the most notable example. THEY DIED WITH CUSTER is important because it humanizes the cavalrymen who until now have been mere statistics. The first study of its kind, this volume not only makes a significant contribution to Little Bighorn scholarship but also offers a general model for new ways to interpret the past. Douglas D. K. Scott is Great Plains Team Leader, Midwest Archeological Center, National Park Service. He is widely know as an expert on military archeology. P. Willey is Professor of Anthropology, Chico State University, California. His specialties include forensic anthropology and human skeletal biology. Melissa A. Connor, an Archeologist with the Midwest Archeological Center, is currently studying the application of archeology to forensic work and the recovery of recent human remains.

They Just Don't Get It

by David Hunt

No more politics--just the truth about what we can and must do to protect ourselves.Fox News military analyst Colonel David Hunt has dedicated his career to fighting terrorism. A twenty-nine-year U.S. Army veteran, he has helped take out an active terrorist camp, trained the FBI and Special Forces in counterterrorism tactics, and served as security adviser to six different Olympic Games. And Colonel Hunt is angry. Why? Because even after the terrorist attacks on our country and on Americans around the world, the people charged with protecting us--the politicians and the bureaucrats in military and intelligence--still aren't getting the job done. They Just Don't Get It provides a much-needed wake-up call to all Americans. As politicians posture and pundits bicker, we're losing sight of the fundamental problem: We're still not equipped to win the War on Terror. In fact, the terrorist threat is far worse than we feared, as made frighteningly clear by the fifty pages of documents published here for the first time--including a shocking manual taken from the terrorists themselves.But instead of just complaining, Colonel Hunt tells us exactly what we must do--without regard to political game-playing--to emerge victorious in the challenge that history has given us. These are changes we can make at every level--as individual citizens, as a government, and as a military power. As he shows in this book, while the government and our military lead the fight to protect us, ordinary citizens can and must contribute.They Just Don't Get It reveals:* What you can do to keep your family safe* How many of the government's recent "reforms" are mere window dressing or, worse, counterproductive* How we can fight this war and still safeguard our civil liberties and the American way of life* How to fix the intelligence disaster (and yes, the politicians in D.C. still haven't fixed it)* How we got into this mess in the first place: it's mostly because our government let the problem fester for three decadesColonel Hunt is no cautious bureaucrat or finger-pointer looking for political gain. He is a straight shooter with deep insight into what's happening in the War on Terror--on the ground and in the government. They Just Don't Get It lays out in clear and compelling terms the steps we must take--all of us--to win the War on Terror and ensure our survival as a free, proud, and strong nation.From They Just Don't Get ItWe're fighting a war for our very survival, so we'd better figure out how to win. That's why I'm writing this book--to show us how we can win, how we can protect ourselves. As a Fox News military analyst, I'm paid to offer insight into how our armed forces are conducting the fight against our enemies. But this book shows that to win the War on Terror we need to concern ourselves with more than just military tactics. For one thing, we need to look at what our political leaders are doing. The sad truth is that they still don't get it. Then there's intelligence. You've heard about our intelligence failures, but I doubt you know how bad it really is--even after the "reforms." I'm going to tell you. And another critical dimension to this story usually gets overlooked--what you can do. The fact is, you can do a lot. Hell, you must do a lot. A selection of American CompassFrom the Hardcover edition.

They Marched into Sunlight: War and Peace: Vietnam and America

by David Maraniss

Here is the epic story of Vietnam and the sixties told through the events of a few tumultuous days in October 1967. David Maraniss takes the reader on an unforgettable journey to the battlefields of war and peace. With meticulous and captivating detail, They Marched Into Sunlight brings that catastrophic time back to life while examining questions about the meaning of dissent and the official manipulation of truth, issues that are as relevant today as they were decades ago. In a seamless narrative, Maraniss weaves together three very different worlds of that time: the death and heroism of soldiers in Vietnam, the anger and anxiety of antiwar students back home, and the confusion and obfuscating behavior of officials in Washington. In the literature of the Vietnam era, there are powerful books about soldiering, excellent analyses of American foreign policy in Southeast Asia, and many dealing with the sixties' culture of protest, but this is the first book to connect the three worlds and present them in a dramatic unity. To understand what happens to the people of this story is to understand America's anguish. In the Long Nguyen Secret Zone of Vietnam, a renowned battalion of the First Infantry Division is marching into a devastating ambush that will leave sixty-one soldiers dead and an equal number wounded. On the University of Wisconsin campus in Madison, students are staging an obstructive protest at the Commerce Building against recruiters for Dow Chemical Company, makers of napalm and Agent Orange, that ends in a bloody confrontation with club-wielding Madison police. And in Washington, President Lyndon Johnson is dealing with pressures closing in on him from all sides and lamenting to his war council, "How are we ever going to win?"Based on thousands of primary documents and 180 on-the-record interviews, the story unfolds day by day, hour by hour, and at times minute by minute, with a rich cast of characters -- military officers, American and Viet Cong soldiers, chancellors, professors, students, police officers, businessmen, mime troupers, a president and his men, a future mayor and future vice president -- moving toward battles that forever shaped their lives and evoked cultural and political conflicts that reverberate still.

They Poured Fire on Us from the Sky: The True Story of Three Lost Boys from Sudan

by Benjamin Ajak Benson Deng Alephonsion Deng

Benjamin, Alepho and Benson were raised among the Dinka tribe of Sudan. Their world was an insulated, close-knit community of grass-roofed cottages, cattle herders and tribal councils. The lions and pythons that prowled beyond the village fences were the greatest threat they knew. All that changed the night the government-armed Murahiliin began attacking their villages.<P>Amid the chaos, screams, conflagration and gunfire, five-year-old Benson and seven-year-old Benjamin fled into the dark night. Two yars later. Aleph aged seven, was forced to do the same. Across the Southern Sudan over the next five years, thousands of other boys did likewise, joining the stream of child refugees that became known as the Lost Boys. Their journey would take them over one thousand miles across a war-ravaged country, through landminesown paths, crocodile-intested waters and grotesque extremes of hunger, thirst and disease.The refugee camps they eventually filtered through offered little respite from the brutality they were fleeing.<P>In "They Poured Fire on Us from the Sky", Alephy, Benson and Benjamin by turn, recount their experiences along this unthinkable journey. They vividly recall the family, friends and tribal world they left far behind them and their desperate efforts to keep track of one another. This is a captivating memoir of Sudan and a powerful portrait of war as seen through the eyes of children. And it is, in the end, an inspiring and unforgettable tribute to the tenacity of even the youngest human spirits.

They Were Expendable

by W. L. White

Here is the first great story of our war as seen by the men fighting it. When the first Japanese planes roared over Manila Bay, Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron 3 went into action. And when General MacArthur was ordered to Australia, Squadron 3-what was left of it- was picked to take him on the perilous trip out of Bataan. Squadron 3 fought on the sea, but its members talked, in the comradeship of battle, with the men who fought on land and in the air. The result is more than the adventure story of this single squadron, for in the background is the whole tragic panorama of the Philippine Campaign-the hopelessness and the flaming courage around America's little Dunkirk. W. L. White has interviewed four of the survivors of Squadron 3-Bulkeley, Kelly, Akers, and Cox, names already known throughout the nation-and woven their fighting accounts into a memorable and moving pattern. Mr. White has never done a finer job of writing. He has caught the very accents of experience. It is plain talk, which becomes gallant talk for all that it does not say as well as for what is said. they were expendable is a document to stir all of us-a brave and grim story to put against all complacency.

Thieves of Mercy: A Novel of the Civil War at Sea

by James L. Nelson

Having survived the bloody Battle of New Orleans and the loss of their ironclad Yazoo River, captain Samuel Bowater, engineer Hieronymus Taylor, and the survivors of their crew are given new orders -- take command of an ironclad warship being built in Memphis, Tennessee. Bowater and his men take passage upriver from "Mississippi" Mike Sullivan, one of the wild, undisciplined captains of the River Defense Squadron, only to find, on their arrival, that their ship is not even half built and the enemy is closing fast. Against their better judgment, Bowater and crew join forces with the mercurial Sullivan on board his ad hoc river gunship the General Page. Outnumbered and outgunned, the Confederates once again fling themselves bravely at the overwhelming power of the Yankee invaders. The deadly back-and-forth fight along the Mississippi ends at last in the massive naval battle of Memphis, and the near-suicidal attempt by the Confederates to hold back the Northern flood. Filled with wild characters and heart-pounding action, and set against the bold backdrop of the Civil War, Thieves of Mercy is a worthy successor to the W. Y. Boyd Award-winning novel Glory in the Name, the book Bernard Cornwell lauded as "by far, the best Civil War novel I've read."

The Things a Brother Knows

by Dana Reinhardt

The story of a young marine's return from war in the Middle East and the psychological effects it has on his family. Finally, Levi Katznelson's older brother, Boaz, has returned. Boaz was a high school star who had it all and gave it up to serve in a war Levi can't understand. Things have been on hold since Boaz left. With the help of his two best friends Levi has fumbled his way through high school, weary of his role as little brother to the hero. But when Boaz walks through the front door after his tour of duty is over, Levi knows there's something wrong. Boaz is home, safe. But Levi knows that his brother is not the same. Maybe things will never return to normal. Then Boaz leaves again, and this time Levi follows him, determined to understand who his brother was, who he has become, and how to bring him home again. Award-winning author Dana Reinhardt introduces readers to Levi, who has never known what he believes, and whose journey reveals truths only a brother knows. From the Hardcover edition.

The Things They Cannot Say: Stories Soldiers Won't Tell You about What They've Seen, Done or Failed to Do in War

by Kevin Sites

What is it like to kill? What is it like to be under fire? How do you know what's right? What can you never forget? In The Things They Cannot Say, award-winning journalist and author Kevin Sites asks these difficult questions of eleven soldiers and marines, who--by sharing the truth about their wars--display a rare courage that transcends battlefield heroics. For each of these men, many of whom Sites first met while in Afghanistan and Iraq, the truth means something different. One struggles to recover from a head injury he believes has stolen his ability to love; another attempts to make amends for the killing of an innocent man; yet another finds respect for the enemy fighter who tried to kill him. Sites also shares the unsettling narrative of his own failures during war--including his complicity in a murder--and the redemptive powers of storytelling that saved him from a self-destructive downward spiral.

The Things They Carried

by Tim O'Brien

Tim O'Brien's modern classic that reset our understanding of fiction, nonfiction, and the way they can work together, as well as our understanding of the Vietnam war and its consequences. The Things They Carried now has well over a million copies in print. The writing is not only literary, but at times lyrical. This is a collection of short stories which hang together and leave a lasting impression upon the reader.

The Third Reich in Power, 1933-1939

by Richard J. Evans

From the front flap: THE DEFINITIVE ACCOUNT OF GERMANY'S MALIGN TRANSFORMATION UNDER HITLER'S TOTAL RULE AND THE IMPLACABLE MARCH TO WAR. BY THE MIDDLE OF 1933, the democracy of the Weimar Republic had been transformed into the police state of the Third Reich, mobilized around the cult of the leader, Adolf Hitler. If this could happen in less than a year, what would the future hold? Only the most fervent Nazi party loyalists would have predicted how radical the transformation ahead would be. In The Third Reich in Power, Richard J. Evans tells the story of Germany's radical reshaping under Nazi rule. Every area of life, from literature, culture and the arts to religion, education and science, was subordinated to the relentless drive to prepare Germany for war. His book shows how the Nazis attempted to penetrate and reorder every aspect of German society, encountering many kinds and degrees of resistance along the way, but gradually winning the acceptance of the German people in the long run. Those who were seen as unworthy to be counted among the German people were dealt with in increasingly brutal terms. The Nazi regime took more and more radical measures against the racially "unfit," including Germany's Jews, Gypsies, homosexuals, mentally ill, "asocial" and "habitual" criminals. After six years of foreign policy brinkmanship that took the Nazi regime from success to success, Hitler's drive to prepare Germany for the war that he saw as its destiny reached its fateful hour in September 1939. The war he unleashed was to plunge the world into a maelstrom of genocide and destruction. The Third Reich in Power is the fullest and most authoritative account yet written of how, in six years, Germany was brought to the edge of that terrible abyss.

Thirteen Days: A Memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis

by Robert F. Kennedy

When the United States confronted the Soviet Union over its installation of missiles in Cuba in October 1962, few people shared the behind-the-scenes story as it is told here by the late Senator Robert F. Kennedy. In this unique account, he describes the hour-by-hour negotiations, with particular attention to the actions and views of his brother, President John F. Kennedy.

This Mighty Scourge: Perspectives on the Civil War

by James M. Mcpherson

Now, in this collection of provocative and illuminating essays, McPherson offers fresh insight into many of the most enduring questions about one of the defining moments in our nation's history. McPherson sheds light on topics large and small, from the average soldier's avid love of newspapers to the postwar creation of the mystique of a Lost Cause in the South.

This New Ocean: The Story of the First Space Age

by William E. Burrows

In this extremely readable and interesting book, Burrows does a great job of describing the history of manned and unmanned space flight, beginning with poetic dreamers like Konstantin Tsiolkowsky to hard-nosed pragmatists like the German rocket scientists. But Burrows does even more -- he puts the history into context, giving the reader a good understanding of why the American and Russian space programs developed as they did. From the White House and the Kremlin, to astronauts walking on the moon, to geeky space scientists -- Burrows captures them perfectly in this book.

This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War

by Drew Gilpin Faust

An illuminating study of the American struggle to comprehend the meaning and practicalities of death in the face of the unprecedented carnage of the Civil War. During the war, approximately 620,000 soldiers lost their lives. An equivalent proportion of today's population would be six million. This Republic of Suffering explores the impact of this enormous death toll from every angle: material, political, intellectual, and spiritual. The eminent historian Drew Gilpin Faust delineates the ways death changed not only individual lives but the life of the nation and its understanding of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. She describes how survivors mourned and how a deeply religious culture struggled to reconcile the slaughter with its belief in a benevolent God, pondered who should die and under what circumstances, and reconceived its understanding of life after death. Faust details the logistical challenges involved when thousands were left dead, many with their identities unknown, on the fields of places like Bull Run, Shiloh, Antietam, and Gettysburg. She chronicles the efforts to identify, reclaim, preserve, and bury battlefield dead, the resulting rise of undertaking as a profession, the first widespread use of embalming, the gradual emergence of military graves registration procedures, the development of a federal system of national cemeteries for Union dead, and the creation of private cemeteries in the South that contributed to the cult of the Lost Cause. She shows, too, how the war victimized civilians through violence that extended beyond battlefields--from disease, displacement, hardships, shortages, emotional wounds, and conflicts connected to the disintegration of slavery. Throughout, the voices of soldiers and their families, of statesmen, generals, preachers, poets, surgeons, and nurses, of northerners and southerners, slaveholders and freed people, of the most exalted and the most humble are brought together to give us a vivid understanding of the Civil War's most fundamental and widely shared reality. Were he alive today, This Republic of Suffering would compel Walt Whitman to abandon his certainty that the "real war will never get in the books."

This Time, This Place: My Life in War, the White House, and Hollywood

by Jack Valenti

With the nation at war in the 1940s, twenty-two-year-old Jack Valenti flew fifty-one combat missions as the pilot of a B-25 attack bomber with the 12th Air Force based in Italy. In the 1960s, with the nation reeling from the assassination of a beloved president and becoming embroiled in a far different kind of war in Vietnam, he was in that fateful Dallas motorcade in 1963, flew back to Washington with the new president, and for three years worked in the inner circle of the White House as special assistant to President Lyndon Johnson. Then, for the next thirty-eight years, with American society and popular culture undergoing a revolutionary transformation, Valenti was the public face of Hollywood in his capacity as head of the Motion Picture Association of America. Been there, done that, indeed. Texas-born and Harvard-educated, Valenti has led several lives, any one of which could have provided ample material for an unforgettable memoir. As it is, This Time, This Place is the gripping story of a man who saw the terrible face of war while fighting with skill and bravery for his country; who was in the room, listening, participating, and remembering, as political decisions were made that would benefit or devastate countless lives in this country and on the other side of the world; and who championed the interest of the vast and globally influential movie industry with tenacity and vision. The list of boldface names whom Valenti knew and with whom he worked is as varied as it is astonishing in number. Aside from LBJ, there were Jack and Bobby Kennedy, Kirk Douglas, Frank Sinatra, Robert McNamara, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Julia Roberts, Cary Grant, Lew Wasserman, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Jack Nicholson, Michael Douglas, Warren Beatty, and Bill Clinton, to begin a very long list. The life of a man who earned both the Distinguished Flying Cross and his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame is inherently intriguing, but Valenti's warm, sometimes rueful, always engaging account gives this memoir a depth of humanity and a taste of life's unpredictability that will linger long after you turn the final page. From growing up poor but largely oblivious to that fact in a hardscrabble neighborhood of Greek and Italian immigrants in Houston to rising to the highest summits both of national government and Hollywood, This Time, This Place is a candid and clear-eyed reflection of the joys and sorrows, ambitions and disappointments, of a life fully recognizable in its extraordinary variety. It is also a sweeping and important historical record, written by a brilliantly successful man who helped to shape politics and entertainment in the second half of the twentieth century, and who always found himself in the center of the current storm. From the Hardcover edition.

The Thompson Submachine Gun: From Prohibition Chicago to World War II

by Martin Pegler

Osprey's new Weapon series provides a highly-detailed yet affordable overview of the development, use, and impact of small arms throughout history -- from the sword to the machine gun. Learn the true story of one of history's most well travelled weapons. Developed late in World War I to be a fearsome trench-warfare weapon, the Thompson submachine gun's fame and success came in unexpected quarters. An iconic and innovative design, the M1921 Thompson was soon adopted by Prohibition-era gangs and used ruthlessly on the streets of New York and Chicago. But its military career was relaunched with the outbreak of World War II, used by armies, commandos and resistance groups worldwide. Using expert knowledge and first-hand accounts, this chronicle of one of the world's greatest submachine guns analyzes the Thompson's development, its legacy, and the experiences of the men who used it in combat.

Those Angry Days: Roosevelt, Lindbergh, and America's Fight over World War II, 1939-1941

by Lynne Olson

From the acclaimed author of Citizens of London comes the definitive account of the debate over American intervention in World War II--a bitter, sometimes violent clash of personalities and ideas that divided the nation and ultimately determined the fate of the free world. At the center of this controversy stood the two most famous men in America: President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who championed the interventionist cause, and aviator Charles Lindbergh, who as unofficial leader and spokesman for America's isolationists emerged as the president's most formidable adversary. Their contest of wills personified the divisions within the country at large, and Lynne Olson makes masterly use of their dramatic personal stories to create a poignant and riveting narrative. While FDR, buffeted by political pressures on all sides, struggled to marshal public support for aid to Winston Churchill's Britain, Lindbergh saw his heroic reputation besmirched--and his marriage thrown into turmoil--by allegations that he was a Nazi sympathizer. Spanning the years 1939 to 1941, Those Angry Days vividly re-creates the rancorous internal squabbles that gripped the United States in the period leading up to Pearl Harbor. After Germany vanquished most of Europe, America found itself torn between its traditional isolationism and the urgent need to come to the aid of Britain, the only country still battling Hitler. The conflict over intervention was, as FDR noted, "a dirty fight," rife with chicanery and intrigue, and Those Angry Days recounts every bruising detail. In Washington, a group of high-ranking military officers, including the Air Force chief of staff, worked to sabotage FDR's pro-British policies. Roosevelt, meanwhile, authorized FBI wiretaps of Lindbergh and other opponents of intervention. At the same time, a covert British operation, approved by the president, spied on antiwar groups, dug up dirt on congressional isolationists, and planted propaganda in U.S. newspapers. The stakes could not have been higher. The combatants were larger than life. With the immediacy of a great novel, Those Angry Days brilliantly recalls a time fraught with danger when the future of democracy and America's role in the world hung in the balance.Advance praise for Those Angry Days "With this stirring book, Lynne Olson confirms her status as our era's foremost chronicler of World War II politics and diplomacy. Those Angry Days tells the extraordinary tale of America's internal debate about whether and how to stop Hitler. Filled with fascinating anecdotes and surprising twists, the text raises moral and practical questions that we still struggle with today. Compelling for students of history and casual readers alike."--Madeleine K. Albright, former U.S. Secretary of State "Lynne Olson has done it again. Those Angry Days is a riveting account of the political tensions and cast of historic figures engaged in an epic battle over the role of the United States in the early years of World War II. It's all here: FDR, Lindbergh, Churchill, Hitler, war in Europe and the Pacific. The stakes could not have been higher and the outcome was never certain. Modern leaders and citizens alike can learn so much from Those Angry Days."--Tom Brokaw, author of The Greatest Generation

The Thousand Names (Shadow Campaigns, Book 1)

by Django Wexler

Enter an epic fantasy world that echoes with the thunder of muskets and the clang of steel--but where the real battle is against a subtle and sinister magic ... Captain Marcus d'Ivoire, commander of one of the Vordanai empire's colonial garrisons, was resigned to serving out his days in a sleepy, remote outpost. But that was before a rebellion upended his life. And once the powder smoke settled, he was left in charge of a demoralized force clinging tenuously to a small fortress at the edge of the desert. To flee from her past, Winter Ihernglass masqueraded as a man and enlisted as a ranker in the Vordanai Colonials, hoping only to avoid notice. But when chance sees her promoted to command, she must win the hearts of her men and lead them into battle against impossible odds. The fates of both these soldiers and all the men they lead depend on the newly arrived Colonel Janus bet Vhalnich, who has been sent by the ailing king to restore order. His military genius seems to know no bounds, and under his command, Marcus and Winter can feel the tide turning. But their allegiance will be tested as they begin to suspect that the enigmatic Janus's ambitions extend beyond the battlefield and into the realm of the supernatural--a realm with the power to ignite a meteoric rise, reshape the known world, and change the lives of everyone in its path.

The Threat (A Dan Lenson Novel #9)

by David Poyer

From the bestselling author of The Circle, The Med, The Gulf, The Passage, Tomahawk, China Sea, Black Storm, and The Command ... a heart-stopping thriller of danger and conspiracy at the highest levels of command and government. Medal of Honor winner Commander Dan Lenson wonders who proposed that he be assigned to the White House military staff. It's a dubious honor-- serving a president the Joint Chiefs hate more than any other in modern history. Lenson reports to the West Wing to direct a multi-service team working to interdict the flow of drugs from Latin America. Never one to just warm a chair, he sets out to help destroy the Cartel-- and uncovers a troubling thread of clues that link cunning and ruthless drug lord Don Juan Nunez to an assault on a nuclear power plant in Mexico, an obscure Islamic relief agency in Los Angeles, and an air-cargo company's imminent flight plan across the United States. Lenson has to battle civilian aides and his own distaste for politics to derail a terrorist strike over the Mexican border. His punishment for breaking the rules is to be sent to the East Wing... as the military aide carrying the nuclear "football," the locked briefcase with the secret codes for a nuclear strike, for a president he suspects is having an affair with his wife. And something else is going on beneath the day-to-day turmoil and backstabbing. As his marriage deteriorates and his frustration with Washington builds, Lenson becomes an unwitting accomplice in a dangerous and subversive conspiracy. The U.S. military is responsible for its Commander in Chief's transportation and security. If someone felt strongly enough about it... it would be easy for the president to die.

Threat Factor (Executioner #382)

by Don Pendleton Mike Newton

A Somali pirate attack raises a red flag when the stolen cargo is Russian tanks and ammunition--enough to start a civil war. Called in to seek and destroy the weapons, Mack Bolan knows the only way to head off future bloodshed is to cause some deadly mayhem of his own. Dodging the local warlords in their own backyard isn't going to be easy, especially when their army of foot soldiers is seemingly endless. But Bolan is ready to end this lethal game. With the bidding about to begin, the Executioner is prepared to go all the way, and his price is death.

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