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Showing 2,751 through 2,775 of 3,197 results

Three Wishes: Palestinian and Israeli Children Speak

by Deborah Ellis

Deborah Elli recounts the experiences of young people of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. After visiting the region to conduct interviews, she presents their stories here in their own words. Twelve-year-old Nora, eleven-year-old Mohammad, and many others speak directly about their lives - which prove to be both ordinary and extraordinary: They argue with their siblings. They hate spinach. They have wishes for the future. Yet they have also seen their homes destroyed and families killed, and live amidst constant upheaval and violence.This simple, telling book allows young readers everywhere to see that the children caught in this conflict are just like them - but living far more difficult and dangerous lives. Without taking sides, it presents an unblinking portrait of children victimized by the endless struggle around them.

Through Dakota Eyes: Narative Accounts of the Minnesota Indian War of 1862

by Clayton Anderson Alan R. Woolworth

Selection of narratives from a very violent time in Minnesota and Dakota history, that is not well known.

Through The Darkness (The World At War, Book 3)

by Harry Turtledove

A young Kaunian girl is forced to remain hidden while her Forthwegian savior braves the rough, Algarvian-controlled streets to earn their keep. The scholars of Kuusamo are no closer to understanding the bloodless magic that may win the war-and time is short. Kuusamo has joined into an unsteady alliance with Lagoas and Unkerlant. No one kingdom trusts another, but they must unite, for it is only together that they can defeat the Algarvian threat.The war is no longer confined to soldiers and sorcerers. Common folk are joining together to fight from underneath their oppressors, whether they be Algarve or Unkerlant. What those farmer soldiers lack in skill, they make up for in dedication. A dedication that will carry them . . . through the darkness.

Thunder in the Deep

by Joe Buff

In his electrifying first novel Joe Buff instantly established himself as the ultimate chronicler of 21st-century warfare by taking military fiction and submarine combat to a new level of authenticity, vision, and power. Thunder in the Deep picks up where Deep Sound Channel left off, bringing to life a frightening seascape where technology pushes warriors to new extremes, and warriors push technology to the max. This time the difference between victory and defeat hinges on the two most advanced nuclear attack submarines in the world. THUNDER IN THE DEEP The Challenger is the weapon of the future, a ceramic-hulled nuclear attack submarine whose electronic eyes and ears are the most advanced ever created. It is commanded by acting captain Jeffrey Fuller, a former SEAL turned submariner whose aggressiveness has made him a rising star-and sometimes scares the hell out of his crew. Fuller's mission is to rescue the Virginia-class fast attack sub Texas, now lying on the bottom of the Atlantic just off the Azores. But the enemy-a newly resurrected and fanatically militaristic Germany-knows where the Texas is, too, and knows the Challenger is coming. It is Challenger the Germans want, dispatching their own high-tech supersub, the Deutschland, to destroy her. In this war your enemy is a blip on a console hardwired into an integrated nuclear weapons system. Ships are vaporized off the surface of the sea, nuclear shock waves unleash deadly tsunami waves, and smart submarines do battle with smart aircraft sent to hunt them down. For Jeffrey Fuller and the Challenger, for the men on board the Deutschland, the race beneath the ocean's surface across a horrific underwater war zone will demand every bit of courage and skill they can muster just to survive. Before it's over, the Challenger's mission is radically redefined: Fuller, his SEALs, and freedom fighter Use Reebeck are sent into Germany itself-to plant a nuke right in the gut of the enemy's power structure. Thunder in the Deep plunges the reader into the middle of some of the fiercest and most thrilling depictions of underwater warfare ever written. It is an electrifying novel of military strategy and action, a powerful tale of technology and humanity that will have you breathlessly turning pages until the explosive climax.

Thunder in the Sky

by K. M. Peyton

Sam, too young to enlist in 1914, signs on as a bargehand on The Flower of Ipswich carrying ammunition from England to the French port of Calais. To his dismay he observes that his skipper, Bunyard, is a German sympathizer. Soon, however, Sam finds it is not Bunyard he has to fear--but a member of Sam's own family. His discoveries unleash a dangerous chain of events that plunge Sam closer and closer to the actual scene of war, and eventually involve him in a harrowing sea chase across the Channel, and a perilous mission to the trenches of Bethune. And as Sam struggles with his deep personal conflict, he grows far beyond his years and learns what sacrifices are demanded by loyalty, courage, and honor. Told against the background of World War I and with the same vitality and authenticity of detail that also marked the author's earlier works, Thunder in the Sky is a gripping story of adventure on land and sea. The excellent characterizations, brisk pace, intensely vivid scenes, and the realistic portrayal of young Sam's ordeal--touched by humor as well as by deep insight--make this a powerful story.

Thunder on the Tennessee

by G. Clifton Wisler

Willie Delamer dreams of honor and glory as he leaves home to fight the Yankees with his father. Outfitted in a dashing uniform, Willie marches proudly with the Second Texas regiment to take a stand beside the Tennessee River. Willie couldn't have imagined what war was really like, the horrors he would encounter in battle, and the tragedy that would strike his family.

Thura's Diary: My Life in Wartime Iraq

by Thura Al-Windawi Robin Bray

This is the diary of a 19-year-old girl living in Iraq during the Iraqi war, who describes the changes in her life.

The Tide At Sunrise

by Denis Warner Peggy Warner

An excellant description of the war between Russia and Japan in 1905 and its causes and effects.

Tidings Of Peace

by Tracie Peterson

Coming Home David receives a hero's welcome from the family of a friend lost at Pearl Harbor. Hope and truth abound in their home and in the eyes of a young woman who sees only a hero in need of grace. Remember Me Stationed in the dangerous South Pacific, Erik Anderson fears the fiancee he left behind may have found someone new. Can a childhood dth--and a long-sought love-be renewed when his very survival is at stake? Shadow of His Wings While her husband, Collin, battles in the air over Europe, Melody Thompson must welcome their child into the world on her own. Scorned by her family, Melody longs to find forgiveness and face the future before her.... Parachutes and Lace Clara Campbell is thrilled to be working with the Red Cross in England until she discovers that her beloved Michael is to be shipped out within hours. With images of a "proper wedding" dancing through her head, will Clara's dreams disguise what matters most?

Tiger Force: A True Story of Men and War

by Michael Sallah Mitch Weiss

In a story sadly relevant to other wars past and present, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporters chronicle the long covered-up tale of a short-lived (May-November 1967) experimental Army unit in the Vietnam War, whose mission it was to seek out the enemy for better-targeted bombing runs. The book includes maps of the Tiger Force operations area, a cast of characters, several photos, and the gory details of the Force's descent into being barbarous killers of civilians. Sallah is now an editor for the Miami Herald; Weiss is with the Charlotte Observer. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Tiger's Claw

by Dale Brown

Set in the near future, Tiger's Claw imagines a scenario in which tensions escalate between an economically powerful China and a United States weakened by a massive economic downfall, bringing the two superpowers to the brink of total destruction. Brown's popular protagonist, retired Air Force lieutenant-general Patrick McLanahan (of A Time for Patriots, Rogue Forces, and other Brown bestsellers), is back and preparing for the impending apocalyptic clash of men and military technology.

A Time for Patriots (Patrick McLanahan Series #17)

by Dale Brown

Welcome to Battlefield America. When murderous bands of militiamen begin roaming the western United States and attacking government agencies, it will take a dedicated group of the nation's finest and toughest civilian airmen to put an end to the homegrown insurgency. U.S. Air Force Lieutenant-General Patrick McLanahan vows to take to the skies to join the fight, but when his son, Bradley, also signs up, they find themselves caught in a deadly game against a shadowy opponent. When the stock markets crash and the U.S. economy falls into a crippling recession, everything changes for newly elected president Kenneth Phoenix. Politically exhausted from a bruising and divisive election, Phoenix must order a series of massive tax cuts and wipe out entire cabinet-level departments to reduce government spending. With reductions in education and transportation, an incapacitated National Guard, and the loss of public safety budgets, entire communities of armed citizens band together for survival and mutual protection. Against this dismal backdrop, a SWAT team is ambushed and radioactive materials are stolen by a group calling themselves the Knights of the True Republic. Is the battle against the government about to be taken to a new and deadlier level? In this time of crisis, a citizen organization rises to the task of protecting their fellow countrymen: the Civil Air Patrol (CAP), the U.S. Air Force auxiliary. The Nevada Wing-led by retired Air Force Lieutenant-General Patrick McLanahan, his son, Bradley, and other volunteers-uses their military skills in the sky and on the ground to hunt down violent terrorists. But how will Patrick respond when extremists launch a catastrophic dirty bomb attack in Reno, spreading radiological fallout for miles? And when Bradley is caught in a deadly double-cross that jeopardizes the CAP, Patrick will have to fight to find out where his friends' loyalties lie: Are they with him and the CAP or with the terrorists? With A Time for Patriots, the New York Times bestselling master of the modern thriller Dale Brown brings the battle home to explore a terrifying possibility-the collapse of the American Republic.

A Time for Peace: The Legacy of the Vietnam War

by Robert D. Schulzinger

A Time for Peace: The Legacy of the Vietnam War tells the story of how the American War in Vietnam has been remembered and the effects different memories have had on current events. This book is divided into four parts: Part I, "International Affairs", Part II, "Veterans and Vietnamese Americans", Part III, "Cultural Legacies", and Part IV, "Conclusion: Political Echoes of a War".

A Time for War (Jack Hatfield #2)

by Michael Savage

From Michael Savage, The New York Times bestselling author of Abuse of Power and radio host of The Savage Nation, comes a powerful new thriller, A Time for War. A Chinook helicopter carrying a squad of Navy Seals suddenly plummets to earth in Afghanistan. A car driven by FBI agents tailing a suspicious vehicle is mysteriously rendered immobile in San Francisco. The body of a Chinese agent is found floating miles from the Golden Gate Bridge after being fed to sharks. The U. S. is under secret attack and only Jack Hatfield, a popular television host hounded from his position by left-wing forces in the media for speaking the truth, suspects the danger of this lethal conspiracy. With the help of Dover Griffith, an idealistic young woman staffer at the Office of Naval Intelligence, Hatfield pursues a trail leading to a billionaire American electronics entrepreneur who has sold out his own country with the help of officials at the highest level of the American government. As enemy operatives plan a two pronged attack that will disarm the American military and release a deadly toxin killing hundreds of thousands of civilians, Hatfield and Dover race to locate this new Ground Zero and save an unsuspecting country.

A Time of Our Choosing: America's War in Iraq

by Todd S. Purdum

It was a war like no other the United States had ever fought. It began with the bombing of Saddam Hussein's bunker and ended with statues of the Iraqi dictator being toppled in downtown Baghdad, and it marked a turning point in America's relations with its enemies, its allies, and its sense of itself. Yet most Americans experienced the war as impressionistic and often confusing--the story of one battle here, one unit there, a report from one city, then another, without the larger context we so urgently needed. Each reporter had his "slice" of the war, it seemed, but no one had the whole story or the broad view. A Time of Our Choosing fills that gap brilliantly, drawing on the unparalleled resources and reportage of The New York Times. Todd S. Purdum, one of the paper's most gifted storytellers, traces the war in Iraq from the first rumblings after 9/11, to the diplomatic recriminations at the United Nations, to the battles themselves and their aftermath. He deftly rolls out the whole canvas before our eyes, showing how the individual "slices" fit together into a single, gripping drama. Purdum also explores the complex legacy of America's near-unilateral action. Since the 9/11 attacks, President George W. Bush has vowed that the United States would confront its enemies "at a time of our choosing," and Purdum shows in vivid terms what this choice has meant for our now transformed world.

Time to Kill (Sniper Series #6)

by Jack Coughlin Donald A. Davis

From the bestselling authors of Shooter and Running the Maze comes a chillingly realistic thriller about Islamic terrorists bent on delivering Egypt into the hands of America's archenemy--Iran. In the newest page-turner in the New York Times bestselling series featuring American sniper Kyle Swanson, an American accountant is murdered in his Maryland home by Iranian assassins. A goodwill visit to Cairo by Iran's national soccer team ends in a bloodbath. Egyptian missiles rain down on an Iranian Navy ship in the Red Sea, and Iran retaliates by landing elite troops at a popular Egyptian resort and attacking tourist hotels. The Muslim Brotherhood is on the march to bring Egypt under the political control of powerful Iran. Running the coup is a ruthless double agent called the Pharaoh, who will stop at nothing to establish an obedient puppet regime on Israel's border, and take complete control of the Suez Canal, the choke point for the world's oil flow. The United States will never allow that to happen, but options are limited and things are moving fast. Washington turns to Marine master sniper Kyle Swanson and the beautiful Egyptologist Tianha Bialy, a British Secret Service agent, who have been trapped behind the lines. Given free rein to attack the Iranian invaders, Swanson goes on a dangerous mission to prevent a total war in the Middle East, no matter what the cost.

Tippy Lemmey

by Patricia C. Mckissack Susan Keeter

A New Dog in Town Tippy Lemmey is no ordinary dog. Not only is he the only dog Leandra, Paul, and Jeannie have ever met with a first and a last name, he's a living, breathing monster! When they ride their bikes, he chases them, snapping at their heels. When they run, he runs. If they cross the street, he follows. There's no getting away from him -- over him or under him. He's their number one enemy. Leandra, Paul, and Jeannie try to come up with a plan to stop Tippy Lemmey, but nothing works. But then Tippy does something totally unexpected, and the kids realize that maybe he's not their enemy after all. Picture descriptions added.

To America: Personal Reflections of an Historian

by Stephen E. Ambrose

In To America, Stephen E. Ambrose, one of the country's most influential historians, reflects on his long career as an American historian and explains what an historian's job is all about. He celebrates America's spirit, which has carried us so far. He confronts its failures and struggles. As always in his much acclaimed work, Ambrose brings alive the men and women, famous and not, who have peopled our history and made the United States a model for the world. Taking a few swings at today's political correctness, as well as his own early biases, Ambrose grapples with the country's historic sins of racism, its neglect and ill treatment of Native Americans, and its tragic errors (such as the war in Vietnam, which he ardently opposed on campus, where he was a professor). He reflects on some of the country's early founders who were progressive thinkers while living a contradiction as slaveholders, great men such as Washington and Jefferson. He contemplates the genius of Andrew Jackson's defeat of a vastly superior British force with a ragtag army in the War of 1812. He describes the grueling journey that Lewis and Clark made to open up the country, and the building of the railroad that joined it and produced great riches for a few barons. Ambrose explains the misunderstood presidency of Ulysses S. Grant, records the country's assumption of world power under the leadership of Theodore Roosevelt, and extols its heroic victory of World War II. He writes about women's rights and civil rights and immigration, founding museums, and nation- building. He contrasts the presidencies of Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, and Lyndon B. Johnson. Throughout, Ambrose celebrates the unflappable American spirit. Most important, Ambrose writes about writing history. "The last five letters of the word 'history' tell us that it is an account of the past that is about people and what they did, which is what makes it the most fascinating of subjects." To America is an instant classic for all those interested in history, patriotism, and the love of writing.

To Dare and To Conquer: Special Operations and the Destiny of Nations, from Achilles to Al Qaeda

by Derek Leebaert

Writing for a general audience, Leebaert (Georgetown U.) profiles the role of small military forces utilizing surprise, stealth, and other means of force leverage in achieving victories against numerically superior enemies, occasionally changing the direction of history in the process. The narrative, which places special operations in history in the context of wider military and political organization, temporally ranges from the Trojan Horse to the US Special Operations Command and primarily focuses on the Western experience. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

To Destroy A City

by Herman Knell

Herman Knell was nineteen and living in Würtzburg in March of 1945 when hundreds of Allied planes arrived overhead, unleashing a torrent of bombs on the city. Würtzburg's tightly packed medieval housing exploded in a firestorm, killing six thousand people in one night and destroying 92 percent of the city's structures. Despite the fact that Würtzburg had no strategic value, the city emerged from World War II second only to Dresden in material destruction inflicted from the air. The experience led Knell to years of research on the history, development, and effects of the strategy of area bombing.To Destroy a City is the result of the author's long and unrelenting investigation. His analysis of this form of warfare, which reached its zenith during World War II, covers the history and the development of wide-area bombing since 1914, examines its wartime effectiveness and the consequences. But the extra dimension that Knell's book offers is his firsthand experience of the tension, fear, tentative defiance, and, finally, utter catastrophe of being on the receiving end of overwhelming air power. For Americans, who fortunately did not experience bombing during the war, this is essential reading.

To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918

by Adam Hochschild

World War I stands as one of history's most senseless spasms of carnage, defying rational explanation. In a riveting, suspenseful narrative with haunting echoes for our own time, Adam Hochschild brings it to life as never before. He focuses on the long-ignored moral drama of the war's critics, alongside its generals and heroes. Thrown in jail for their opposition to the war were Britain's leading investigative journalist, a future winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature, and an editor who, behind bars, published a newspaper for his fellow inmates on toilet paper. These critics were sometimes intimately connected to their enemy hawks: one of Britain's most prominent women pacifist campaigners had a brother who was commander in chief on the Western Front. Two well-known sisters split so bitterly over the war that they ended up publishing newspapers that attacked each other. Today, hundreds of military cemeteries spread across the fields of northern France and Belgium contain the bodies of millions of men who died in the "war to end all wars." Can we ever avoid repeating history?

To Kill the Leopard

by Theodore Taylor

An account of the hunt for the elusive leopard U-boat as told from both the Allied and German sides.

To Shake Their Guns in the Tyrant's Face: Libertarian Political Violence and the Origins of the Militia Movement

by Robert H. Churchill

After the bombings of Oklahoma City in 1995, most Americans were shocked to discover that tens of thousands of their fellow citizens had banded together in homegrown militias. Within the next few years, numerous studies and media reports appeared revealing the unseen world of the American militia movement, a loose alliance of groups with widely divergent views. Not surprisingly, it was the movement's most extreme voices that attracted the lion's share of attention. In reality the militia movement was neither as irrational nor as new as it was portrayed in the press, Robert Churchill writes. What bound the movement together was the shared belief that citizens have a right, even a duty, to take up arms against wanton exercise of unconstitutional power by the federal government. Many were motivated to join the movement by what they saw as a rise in state violence, illustrated by the government assaults at Ruby Ridge, Idaho in 1992, and Waco, Texas in 1993. It was this perception and the determination to deter future state violence, Churchill argues, that played the greatest role in the growth of the American militia movement. Churchill uses three case studies to illustrate the origin of some of the core values of the modern militia movement: Fries' Rebellion in Pennsylvania at the end of the eighteenth century, the Sons of Liberty Conspiracy in Civil War-era Indiana and Illinois, and the Black Legion in Michigan and Ohio during the Depression. Building on extensive interviews with militia members, the author places the contemporary militia movement in the context of these earlier insurrectionary movements that, animated by a libertarian interpretation of the American Revolution, used force to resist the authority of the federal government. A historian of early America, Robert H. Churchill has published numerous articles on American political violence and the right to keep and bear arms. He is currently Associate Professor of History at the University of Hartford. "This book is about how we think about the past, how cultural memories are formed and evolve, and how these memories then come to impact current understandings of issues. Churchill provides an enlightening analysis of the ideology, structure, and purpose of the militia movement. Where much scholarship has categorized it as a cohesive, single movement, Churchill begins the process of unraveling its complexity. " ---Steve Chermak, Michigan State University"To Shake Their Guns in the Tyrant's Faceaddresses an area---the relationship of American political violence to American ideology---that is of growing importance and that is commanding an ever increasing audience, and it does so in a way like nothing else in the field. " ---David Williams, Indiana University Bloomington

To the Last Man: A Novel of the First World War

by Jeff Shaara

Spring 1916, and three great armies--French, British and, on the other side of the wire, German--are locked in a stalemate of mud and blood on Europe's Western Front. On the ground, young British soldiers lose their innocence in the hell that is No Man's Land, while in the skies above the trenches a new breed of warrior, armed with a devastating new weapon, comes of age. As the conflict stretches into its third year, a neutral but woefully unprepared and ill-equipped America is slowly goaded into war...

To Try Men's Souls: A Novel of George Washington and the Fight for American Freedom

by Newt Gingrich William R. Forstchen Albert S. Hanser

After two bestselling series examining the Civil War and WWII, Newt Gingrich and William R. Forstchen have turned their sharp eye for detail on the Revolutionary War. Their story follows three men with three very different roles to play in history: General George Washington, Thomas Paine, and Jonathan Van Dorn, a private in Washington's army. The action focuses on one of the most iconic events in American history: Washington cross - ing the Delaware. Unlike the bold, courageous General in Emanuel Leutze's painting, Washington is full of doubt on the night of December 25, 1776. After five months of defeat, morale is dangerously low. Each morning muster shows that hundreds have deserted in the night. While Washington prepares his weary troops for the attack on Trenton, Thomas Paine is in Philadelphia, overseeing the printing of his newest pamphlet, The Crisis. And Jonathan Van Dorn is about to bring the war to his own doorstep. In the heat of battle, he must decide between staying loyal to the cause and sparing his brother who has joined up with the British. Through the thoughts and private fears of these three men, Gingrich and Forstchen illuminate the darkest days of the Revolution. With detailed research and an incredible depth of military insight, this novel provides a rare and personal perspective of the men who fought for, and founded the United States of America.

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