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Dangerous Adventure! Lindbergh's Famous Flight

by Ruth Belov Gross

When Charles Lindbergh was 25 years old, he did something that no one had ever done before. He climbed into his small airplane, and then he flew all the way from New York City to Paris, France, without stopping. It was a dangerous adventure.

The Dangerous Book for Dogs: A Parody by Rex and Sparky

by Rex Sparky

A LAUGH-OUT-LOUD PARODY: AN lLLUSTRATED GUIDE FOR--AND BY--DOGS, UNLOCKING THE MYSTERIES OF DOGHOOD AND TEACHING THEM HOW TO DO THE VERY ACTIVITIES THAT HUMAN SOCIETY SAYS ARE WRONG. The Dangerous Book for Dogs asks a simple question: isn't there more to being a dog than wearing a mini cashmere sweater and riding around in a $400 evening clutch? What about the simple pleasures of life -- feeling the wind in your fur, digging up the grass beneath your paws, smelling another dog's butt? Isn't that part of the great joy of being a dog? Written (with help) by dogs and for dogs, The Dangerous Book For Dogs provides insight on everything from the tastiest styles of shoes to chew to the proper method for terrorizing squirrels. It also contains portraits of noble dogs throughout history, the mysteries of cats and humans, and everything else your dog ever wanted to know but was afraid to ask-like how to make toys out of human's household items, or how to escape from a humiliating reindeer costume. Generously illustrated with drawings by cartoonist Emily Flake, this hilarious parody is for good dogs, bad dogs, and the millions of people who love them. Rex and Sparky wrote this parody without authorization (because they are dogs and they do what they want.)

The Dappled World

by Nancy Cartwright

In this book Nancy Cartwright argues against a vision of a uniform world completely ordered under a single elegant theory, and proposes instead a patchwork of laws of nature. Combining classic and newly written essays, The Dappled World offers important methodological lessons for both the natural and the social sciences, and will interest anyone who wants to understand how modern science works.

Dark Ages: The Case for a Science of Human Behavior

by Lee Mcintyre

Lee McIntyre argues that today we are in a new Dark Ages; that we are as ignorant of the causes of human behavior as people centuries ago were of the causes of such natural phenomena as disease, famine, and eclipses.

The Dark Clone (Cloning Miranda #3)

by Carol Matas

The thrilling sequel to Cloning Miranda and The Second Clone. When Miranda is accused of vandalism on school property, she's confident she can clear her name - until she's shown the security tapes.

Dark Cosmos

by Dan Hooper

The twentieth century was astonishing in all regards, shaking the foundations of practically every aspect of human life and thought, physics not least of all. Beginning with the publication of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity, through the wild revolution of quantum mechanics, and up until the physics of the modern day (including the astonishing revelation, in 1998, that the Universe is not only expanding, but doing so at an ever-quickening pace), much of what physicists have seen in our Universe suggests that much of our Universe is unseen-that we live in a dark cosmos. Everyone knows that there are things no one can see-the air you're breathing, for example, or, to be more exotic, a black hole. But what everyone does not know is that what we can see-a book, a cat, or our planet-makes up only 5 percent of the Universe. The rest-fully 95 percent-is totally invisible to us; its presence discernible only by the weak effects it has on visible matter around it. This invisible stuff comes in two varieties-dark matter and dark energy. One holds the Universe together, while the other tears it apart. What these forces really are has been a mystery for as long as anyone has suspected they were there, but the latest discoveries of experimental physics have brought us closer to that knowledge. Particle physicist Dan Hooper takes his readers, with wit, grace, and a keen knack for explaining the toughest ideas science has to offer, on a quest few would have ever expected: to discover what makes up our dark cosmos.

Dark Energy

by Luca Amendola Shinji Tsujikawa

"Dark energy, the mysterious cause of the accelerating expansion of the Universe, is one of the most important fields of research in astrophysics and cosmology today. Introducing the theoretical ideas, observational methods and results, this textbook is ideally suited to graduate courses on dark energy, and will also supplement advanced cosmology courses. Providing a thorough introduction to this exciting field, the textbook covers the cosmological constant, quintessence, k-essence, perfect fluid models, extradimensional models, and modified gravity. Observational research is reviewed, from the cosmic microwave background to baryon acoustic oscillations, weak lensing, and cluster abundances. Every chapter ends with problems, with full solutions provided, and any calculations are worked through step-by-step. "--

Dark Hero of the Information Age

by Flo Conway Jim Siegelman

Wiener's 1948 Cybernetics had a profound influence on computer, information, and social science pioneers including John von Neumann, Claude Shannon, and Margaret Mead. His visionary problem solving set off a scientific and technological revolution. But he also warned of a dark side to the cybernetic era, foreseeing the social, political, and economic upheavals that would begin to appear with the large- scale application of computers and automation. The brilliant mathematician's work fell into obscurity for reasons that journalists Conway and Siegelman trace through interviews with his family and colleagues and through newly declassified documents that show how the CIA and FBI sought to quash Wiener's social activism during the cold war. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Dark Hero of the Information Age

by Flo Conway Jim Siegelman

Child prodigy and brilliant MIT mathematician, Norbert Wiener founded the revolutionary science of cybernetics and ignited the information-age explosion of computers, automation, and global telecommunications. His best-selling book, Cybernetics, catapulted him into the public spotlight, as did his chilling visions of the future and his ardent social activism.Based on a wealth of primary sources and exclusive access to Wiener's closest family members, friends, and colleagues, Dark Hero of the Information Age reveals this eccentric genius as an extraordinarily complex figure. No one interested in the intersection of technology and culture will want to miss this epic story of one of the twentieth century's most brilliant and colorful figures.

Dark Mission

by Richard C. Hoagland Mike Bara

The New York Times bestseller about the strange history of NASA and its cover-ups regarding its origins and extraterrestrial architecture found on the moon and Mars is even more interesting in its new edition.Authors Richard C. Hoagland and Mike Bara include a new chapter about the discoveries made by ex-Nazi scientist and NASA stalwart Wernher von Braun regarding what he termed "alternate gravitational solutions," or the rewriting of Newtonian physics into hyperdimensional spheres.

Dark Nebulae, Dark Lanes, and Dust Belts

by Antony Cooke

There are 'voids' obscuring all kinds of objects in the cosmos. Voids may be within an object, or between an object and us. Dark Nebulae, Dark Lanes, and Dust Lanes looks out into the deep sky at those apparent dark regions in space, which are among the most compelling telescopic destinations for amateur observers. One famous example is Barnard's dark nebulae - those striking dark clouds set against the background of stars in the Milky Way. But there are countless other less well known examples. These dark regions are often ignored altogether or commented upon only briefly in astronomy books, and it is all too easy to overlook the treasure trove they offer the observer. Dark Nebulae, Dark Lanes, and Dust Lanes is a great source of practical information for observers. Such voids may be successfully observed using conventional observing methods, but they are often far better seen with technologies such as light-pollution filters, CCD video cameras, and image intensifiers. This book explains the optimal ways to observe each object in detail.

A Dark Place in the Jungle

by Linda Spalding

Follow writer Linda Spalding to Borneo's threatened jungles on the trail of orangutan researcher Birute Galdikas, who together with Dian Fossey and Jane Goodall formed the famed trio of "angels" Louis Leakey encouraged to study great apes in the wild. She went into the jungle in 1971 and emerged decades later with a run-down empire crumbling around her. Spalding confronts the sad failure of a woman trying desperately to mother a species to survival; the dangers and temptations of eco-tourism; and the arrogance of our inclination to alter the things we set out to save.

Dark Pool of Light, Volume One

by Richard Grossinger Nick Herbert Jeffrey J. Kripal

In books like Embryogenesis and Embryos, Galaxies, and Sentient Beings, author Richard Grossinger brought together the subjects of biological embryology and the esoteric process of human consciousness becoming embodied ("The embryo is the universe writing itself on its own body"). In Dark Pool of Light, his latest creation, Grossinger weaves neuroscience-based behaviorism and the phenomenology of "being" and reality together with psychological and psychospiritual views of "that single thing which is most difficult to understand or vindicate: our own existence." In 2008 Grossinger began studying with noted psychic teacher John Friedlander, who helped him refine his vision of cerebral and somatic awareness to still-subtler levels. "Dark Pool of Light began unnamed in the journals of my psychic work with John Friedlander," says Grossinger, "not so much a record of actual practices as insights from them and extensions out of them." An expansive inquiry into the nature of consciousness, the series examines the tension between the scientific and philosophical, and psychic views of the same phenomena, and includes "field notes" and experiential exercises that invite the reader to make their own explorations. Dark Pool of Light is divided into three volumes, which the author calls "movements"; the allusion to music is apt, for the book unfolds in a truly symphonic manner. In Volume 1, Grossinger begins with the scientific and philosophical, analytical views of reality, exploring the science, parascience, philosophy, and psychology of consciousness. Covering topics as diverse as current discoveries in neuroscience and the philosophy of the ancient Greeks, the book gives a broad overview of the bodies of knowledge concerning the nature of reality and consciousness.

Dark Remedy

by Rock Brynner Trent Stephens

In this riveting medical detective story, Trent Stephens and Rock Brynner recount the history of thalidomide, from the epidemic of birth defects in the 1960's to the present day, as scientists work to create and test an alternative drug that captures thalidomide's curative properties without its cruel side effects. A parable about compassion-and the absence of it-Dark Remedy is a gripping account of thalidomide's extraordinary impact on the lives of individuals and nations over half a century.

Dark Remedy: The Impact of Thalidomide and Its Revival as a Vital Medicine

by Rock Brynner Trent Stephens

A remarkable medicine is now available that can successfully treat millions of people with multiple myeloma, brain tumors and other cancers, arthritis, lupus, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, leprosy, tuberculosis, and AIDS. It's thalidomide-a drug with a chilling history. In the 1950s, this "safe" sedative was all the rage in Europe. Then one baby was born without ears, another with stunted limbs, then another with no limbs at all. In all, ten thousand severely deformed babies were born before thalidomide was banned. But two years ago, this brutal toxin was approved by the FDA. How did the most infamous drug of all time become one of the major players in modern medicine?In this irresistible medical detective story, Trent Stephens and Rock Brynner recount the history of thalidomide, a fascinating tale filled with villains and heroes, and bring us up to the present day, as scientists-Stephens among them-work to create and test an alternative drug that captures thalidomide's curative properties without its cruel side effects. The chronicle of a tragic chapter in the history of public health, Dark Remedy ends with great promise, as we put thalidomide to work for us, in the treatment of over a hundred diseases.

Dark Side of the Moon: Wernher von Braun, the Third Reich, and the Space Race

by Wayne Biddle

A stunning investigation of the roots of the first moon landing forty years ago. This illuminating story of the dawn of the space age reaches back to the reactionary modernism of the Third Reich, using the life of "rocket scientist" Wernher von Braun as its narrative path through the crumbling of Weimar Germany and the rise of the Nazi regime. Von Braun, a blinkered opportunist who could apply only tunnel vision to his meteoric career, stands as an archetype of myriad twentieth century technologists who thrived under regimes of military secrecy and unlimited money. His seamless transformation from developer of the deadly V-2 ballistic missile for Hitler to an American celebrity as the supposed genius behind the golden years of the U.S. space program in the 1950s and 1960s raises haunting questions about the culture of the Cold War, the shared values of technology in totalitarian and democratic societies, and the imperatives of material progress.

Dark Sun

by Richard Rhodes

Here, for the first time, in a brilliant, panoramic portrait by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Making of the Atomic Bomb, is the definitive, often shocking story of the politics and the science behind the development of the hydrogen bomb and the birth of the Cold War. Based on secret files in the United States and the former Soviet Union, this monumental work of history discloses how and why the United States decided to create the bomb that would dominate world politics for more than forty years.

Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb

by Richard Rhodes

Here, for the first time, in a brilliant, panoramic portrait by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Making of the Atomic Bomb, is the definitive, often shocking story of the politics and the science behind the development of the hydrogen bomb and the birth of the Cold War. Based on secret files in the United States and the former Soviet Union, this monumental work of history discloses how and why the United States decided to create the bomb that would dominate world politics for more than forty years.

Darwin Among The Machines

by George B. Dyson

Darwin Among the Machines tells the story of humankind's journey into the digital wilderness. Introducing a cast of familiar and not-so-familiar characters, historian of science George B. Dyson traces the course of the information revolution, illuminating the lives and work of visionaries--from Thomas Hobbes to John von Neumann--who foresaw the development of artificial intelligence, artificial life, and artificial mind. This profound and elegant book derives both its title and its outlook from Samuel Butler's 1863 essay, "Darwin Among the Machines." Observing the beginnings of miniaturization, self-reproduction, and telecommunication among machines, Butler predicted that nature's intelligence, only temporarily subservient to technology, would resurface to claim our creations as her own. Updating Butler's arguments, Dyson distills the historical record to chronicle the origins of digital telecommunications and the evolution of digital computers, beginning long before the time of Darwin and exploring the limits of Darwinian evolution to suggest what lies beyond. Weaving a cohesive narrative of his brilliant predecessors, Dyson constructs a straightforward, convincing, and occasionally frightening view of the evolution of mind in the global network, on a level transcending our own. Dyson concludes that we are in the midst of an experiment that echoes the prehistory of human intelligence and the origins of life. Just as the exchange of coded molecular instructions brought life as we know it to the early earth's primordial soup, and as language and mind combined to form the culture in which we live, so, in the digital universe, are computer programs and worldwide networks combining to produce an evolutionary theater in which the distinctions between nature and technology are increasingly obscured. Nature, argues Dyson, is on the side of the machines.

Darwin Among The Machines

by George B. Dyson

Darwin Among the Machines tells the story of humankind's journey into the digital wilderness. Introducing a cast of familiar and not-so-familiar characters, historian of science George B. Dyson traces the course of the information revolution, illuminating the lives and work of visionaries--from Thomas Hobbes to John von Neumann--who foresaw the development of artificial intelligence, artificial life, and artificial mind. This profound and elegant book derives both its title and its outlook from Samuel Butler's 1863 essay, "Darwin Among the Machines." Observing the beginnings of miniaturization, self-reproduction, and telecommunication among machines, Butler predicted that nature's intelligence, only temporarily subservient to technology, would resurface to claim our creations as her own. Updating Butler's arguments, Dyson distills the historical record to chronicle the origins of digital telecommunications and the evolution of digital computers, beginning long before the time of Darwin and exploring the limits of Darwinian evolution to suggest what lies beyond. Weaving a cohesive narrative of his brilliant predecessors, Dyson constructs a straightforward, convincing, and occasionally frightening view of the evolution of mind in the global network, on a level transcending our own. Dyson concludes that we are in the midst of an experiment that echoes the prehistory of human intelligence and the origins of life. Just as the exchange of coded molecular instructions brought life as we know it to the early earth's primordial soup, and as language and mind combined to form the culture in which we live, so, in the digital universe, are computer programs and worldwide networks combining to produce an evolutionary theater in which the distinctions between nature and technology are increasingly obscured. Nature, argues Dyson, is on the side of the machines.

Darwin Among the Machines

by George Dyson

'Full of historical anecdotes . . . but this is much more than a history book. [George Dyson] weaves his threads together for a purpose. Using voices of the past and present, he describes a fresh and sometimes startling viewpoint of the emerging relationship between nature and machines. From vignettes about Olaf Stapledon, George Boole, John von Neumann, and Samuel Butler, a larger story develops in which the twin processes of intelligence and evolution are inseparably intertwined' Danny Hillis, Wired

The Darwin Archipelago

by Steve Jones

Charles Darwin is of course best known for The Voyage of the Beagle and The Origin of Species. But he produced many other books over his long career, exploring specific aspects of the theory of evolution by natural selection in greater depth. The eminent evolutionary biologist Steve Jones uses these lesser-known works as springboards to examine how their essential ideas have generated whole fields of modern biology. Earthwormshelped found modern soil science,Expression of the Emotionshelped found comparative psychology, andSelf-FertilizationandForms of Flowerswere important early works on the origin of sex. Through this delightful introduction to Darwin's oeuvre, one begins to see Darwin's role in biology as resembling Einstein's in physics: he didn't have one brilliant idea but many and in fact made some seminal contribution to practically every field of evolutionary study. Though these lesser-known works may seem disconnected, Jones points out that they all share a common theme: the power of small means over time to produce gigantic ends. Called a "world of wonders" by theTimesof London,The Darwin Archipelagowill expand any reader's view of Darwin's genius and will demonstrate how all of biology, like life itself, descends from a common ancestor.

Darwin, God and the Meaning of Life

by Steve Stewart-Williams

"If you accept evolutionary theory, can you also believe in God? Are human beings superior to other animals, or is this just a human prejudice? Does Darwin have implications for heated issues like euthanasia and animal rights? Does evolution tell us the purpose of life or does it imply that life has no ultimate purpose? Does evolution tell us what is morally right and wrong or does it imply that ultimately nothing is right or wrong? In this fascinating and intriguing book, Steve Stewart-Williams addresses these and other fundamental philosophical questions raised by evolutionary theory and the exciting new field of evolutionary psychology. Drawing on biology, psychology and philosophy, he argues that Darwinian science supports a view of a godless universe devoid of ultimate purpose or moral structure, but that we can still live a good life and a happy life within the confines of this view"--"Evolutionary theory answers one of the most profound and fundamental questions human beings have ever asked themselves, a question that has plagued reflective minds for as long as reflective minds have existed in the universe: Why are we here? How did we come to exist on this planet? In a lot of ways, this is a very ordinary planet"--

Darwin, His Daughter, and Human Evolution

by Randal Keynes

In a chest of drawers bequeathed by his grandmother, author Randal Keynes discovered the writing case of Charles and Emma Darwin's beloved daughter Annie Darwin, who died at the age of ten. He also found the notes Darwin kept throughout Annie's illness, the eulogy he delivered at her funeral-and provocative new insights into Darwin's views on nature, evolution, and the human condition. In Darwin, His Daughter & Human Evolution, Keynes shows that Darwin was not "a cold intellect with no place for love in his famous 'struggle for existence,' [but]. . . a man of uncommon warmth" (Scientific American). Creation: The True Story of Charles Darwin is now a major motion picture and the movie tie-in paperback is also available from Riverhead Books. .

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