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Cosmic Numbers

by James D. Stein

Stein (mathematics, California State U. ) recounts the stories of how famous mathematicians and physicists discovered numerical constants and equations that define the laws of physical science and astronomy. Appropriate for the general reader with a basic understanding of algebra, the 13 chapters explain the logic behind the speed of light, the ideal gas constant, absolute zero, Avogadro's number, the Planck constant, the Schwarzschild radius, and the Chandrasekhar limit. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Cosmic Numbers

by James D. Stein

Our fascination with numbers begins when we are children and continues throughout our lives. We start counting our fingers and toes and end up balancing checkbooks and calculating risk. So powerful is the appeal of numbers that many people ascribe to them a mystical significance. Other numbers go beyond the supernatural, working to explain our universe and how it behaves. In Cosmic Numbers, mathematics professor James D. Stein traces the discovery, evolution, and interrelationships of the numbers that define our world. Everyone knows about the speed of light and absolute zero, but numbers like Boltzmann's constant and the Chandrasekhar limit are not as well known, and they do far more than one might imagine: They tell us how this world began and what the future holds. Much more than a gee-whiz collection of facts and figures, Cosmic Numbers illuminates why particular numbers are so important-both to the scientist and to the rest of us.

Cosmic Numbers

by James D. Stein

Our fascination with numbers begins when we are children and continues throughout our lives. We start counting our fingers and toes and end up balancing checkbooks and calculating risk. So powerful is the appeal of numbers that many people ascribe to them a mystical significance. Other numbers go beyond the supernatural, working to explain our universe and how it behaves. In Cosmic Numbers, mathematics professor James D. Stein traces the discovery, evolution, and interrelationships of the numbers that define our world. Everyone knows about the speed of light and absolute zero, but numbers like Boltzmann's constant and the Chandrasekhar limit are not as well known, and they do far more than one might imagine: They tell us how this world began and what the future holds. Much more than a gee-whiz collection of facts and figures, Cosmic Numbers illuminates why particular numbers are so important-both to the scientist and to the rest of us.

The Cosmic Serpent: DNA and the Origins of Knowledge

by Jeremy Narby

This adventure in science and imagination, which the Medical Tribune said might herald "a Copernican revolution for the life sciences," leads the reader through unexplored jungles and uncharted aspects of mind to the heart of knowledge. In a first-person narrative of scientific discovery that opens new perspectives on biology, anthropology, and the limits of rationalism, The Cosmic Serpent reveals how startlingly different the world around us appears when we open our minds to it.

The Cosmic Time of Empire: Modern Britain and World Literature

by Adam Barrows

Combining original historical research with literary analysis, Adam Barrows takes a provocative look at the creation of world standard time in 1884 and rethinks the significance of this remarkable moment in modernism for both the processes of imperialism and for modern literature. As representatives from twenty-four nations argued over adopting the Prime Meridian, and thereby measuring time in relation to Greenwich, England, writers began experimenting with new ways of representing human temporality. Barrows finds this experimentation in works as varied as Victorian adventure novels, high modernist texts, and South Asian novels--including the work of James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, H. Rider Haggard, Bram Stoker, Rudyard Kipling, and Joseph Conrad. Demonstrating the investment of modernist writing in the problems of geopolitics and in the public discourse of time, Barrows argues that it is possible, and productive, to rethink the politics of modernism through the politics of time.

The Cosmic Web

by J. Richard Gott

J. Richard Gott was among the first cosmologists to propose that the structure of our universe is like a sponge made up of clusters of galaxies intricately connected by filaments of galaxies--a magnificent structure now called the "cosmic web" and mapped extensively by teams of astronomers. Here is his gripping insider's account of how a generation of undaunted theorists and observers solved the mystery of the architecture of our cosmos.The Cosmic Web begins with modern pioneers of extragalactic astronomy, such as Edwin Hubble and Fritz Zwicky. It goes on to describe how, during the Cold War, the American school of cosmology favored a model of the universe where galaxies resided in isolated clusters, whereas the Soviet school favored a honeycomb pattern of galaxies punctuated by giant, isolated voids. Gott tells the stories of how his own path to a solution began with a high-school science project when he was eighteen, and how he and astronomer Mario Jurič measured the Sloan Great Wall of Galaxies, a filament of galaxies that, at 1.37 billion light-years in length, is one of the largest structures in the universe.Drawing on Gott's own experiences working at the frontiers of science with many of today's leading cosmologists, The Cosmic Web shows how ambitious telescope surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are transforming our understanding of the cosmos, and how the cosmic web holds vital clues to the origins of the universe and the next trillion years that lie ahead.

Cosmochemistry

by Gary R. Huss Harry Y. Mcsween Jr.

How did the Solar System's chemical composition evolve? This textbook provides the answers in the first interdisciplinary introduction to cosmochemistry. It makes this exciting and evolving field accessible to undergraduate and graduate students from a range of backgrounds, including geology, chemistry, astronomy and physics. The authors - two established leaders who have pioneered developments in the field - provide a complete background to cosmochemical processes and discoveries, enabling students outside geochemistry to understand and explore the Solar System's composition. Topics covered include: - synthesis of nuclides in stars - partitioning of elements between solids, liquids and gas in the solar nebula - overviews of the chemistry of extraterrestrial materials - isotopic tools used to investigate processes such as planet accretion and element fractionation - chronology of the early Solar System - geochemical exploration of planets Boxes provide basic definitions and mini-courses in mineralogy, organic chemistry, and other essential background information for students. Review questions and additional reading for each chapter encourage students to explore cosmochemistry further.

Cosmogenic Nuclides

by Tibor J. Dunai

This is the first book to provide a comprehensive and state-of-the-art introduction to the novel and fast-evolving topic of in-situ produced cosmogenic nuclides. It presents an accessible introduction to the theoretical foundations, with explanations of relevant concepts starting at a basic level and building in sophistication. It incorporates, and draws on, methodological discussions and advances achieved within the international CRONUS (Cosmic-Ray Produced Nuclide Systematics) networks. Practical aspects such as sampling, analytical methods and data-interpretation are discussed in detail and an essential sampling checklist is provided. The full range of cosmogenic isotopes is covered and a wide spectrum of in-situ applications are described and illustrated with specific and generic examples of exposure dating, burial dating, erosion and uplift rates and process model verification. Graduate students and experienced practitioners will find this book a vital source of information on the background concepts and practical applications in geomorphology, geography, soil-science, and geology.

Cosmological Physics

by J. A. Peacock

This eagerly-awaited textbook provides advanced undergraduate and graduate students with a complete introduction to modern cosmology. It successfully bridges the gap between undergraduate and advanced graduate texts by discussing topics of current research, starting from first principles. Throughout this authoritative volume, emphasis is given to the simplest, most intuitive explanation for key equations used by researchers. The first third of the book carefully develops the necessary background in general relativity and quantum fields. The rest of the book then provides self-contained accounts of all the key topics in contemporary cosmology, including inflation, topological defects, gravitational lensing, galaxy formation, large-scale structure and the distance scale. To aid understanding, the book is well illustrated with helpful figures and includes outline solutions to nearly 100 problems. All necessary astronomical jargon is clearly explained, ensuring the book is self-contained for any student with undergraduate physics.

Cosmology

by Edward Harrison

Cosmology: The Science of the Universe is a broad introduction to the science of modern cosmology, with emphasis on its historical origins. The first edition of this best-selling book received worldwide acclaim for its lucid style and wide-ranging exploration of the universe. This eagerly awaited second edition updates and greatly extends the first with seven new chapters that explore early scientific cosmology, Cartesian and Newtonian world systems, cosmology after Newton and before Einstein, special relativity, observational cosmology, inflation and creation of the universe. All chapters conclude with a section entitled Reflections containing provocative topics that will foster lively debate. The new Projects section, also at the end of each chapter, raises questions and issues to challenge the reader.

Cosmology and the Evolution of the Universe

by Martin Ratcliffe

Written with college students in mind, this reference offers a nonmathematical introduction to cosmology, designed to be accessible to nonspecialists. It begins with an overview of early ideas about the universe, from the ancient Egyptians to the modern era; the rest of book covers the 20th century and the early 21st century. Thematic chapters cover topics such as the large-scale structure of the universe, the discovery and importance of cosmic microwave background radiation, and the forces and particles involved in the evolution of the universe. Each chapter concludes with a list of print and electronic resources, and an annotated general bibliography at the end of the book lists general works or those of particular significance. Sidebars provide more in-depth information on key people and ideas without interrupting the flow of the main narrative. A glossary of scientific terms is included. The book's 66 b&w illustrations and images are more technical rather than awe-inspiring. Ratcliffe teaches cosmology at Wichita State University. Annotation c2009 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Cosmology: A Very Short Introduction

by Peter Coles

Written in simple and accessible language, this non-technical introduction to cosmology, or the creation and development of the universe, explains the discipline, covers its history, details the latest developments, and explains what is known, what is believed, and what is purely speculative. In addition, the author discusses the development of the Big Bang theory, and more speculative modern issues like quantum cosmology, superstrings, and dark matter.

The Cosmos

by Jay M. Pasachoff Alex Filippenko

Jay Pasachoff and Alex Filippenko combine extensive research experience (including years of research in such areas as radio astronomy, solar eclipses, supernovae, active galaxies, black holes, and cosmology), teaching experience, and textbook-writing experience to offer a book that is unparalleled in its ability to present the latest science in a way that students can understand. This brief and beautifully illustrated text ? one of the briefest available for the course ? offers concise coverage of a wide range of astronomical topics. An early discussion of the scientific method stresses its importance in the verification of observations. The authors emphasize the study of origins in this text, first by singling out specifics in the headings of each chapter and then by dealing with a variety of relevant material in the text itself. This new edition includes a new chapter on the dozens of exoplanets that are being discovered around other stars. Automatically packaged with TheSky? CD-ROM and four months' free access to InfoTrac College Edition, the new edition extends student learning opportunities beyond the walls of the classroom.

Cosmos

by Carl Sagan

This visually stunning book with over 250 full-color illustrations, many of them never before published, is based on Carl Sagan's thirteen-part television series. Told with Sagan's remarkable ability to make scientific ideas both comprehensible and exciting, Cosmos is about science in its broadest human context, how science and civilization grew up together.The book also explores spacecraft missions of discovery of the nearby planets, the research in the Library of ancient Alexandria, the human brain, Egyptian hieroglyphics, the origin of life, the death of the Sun, the evolution of galaxies and the origins of matter, suns and worlds.Sagan retraces the fifteen billion years of cos-mic evolution that have transformed matter into life and consciousness, enabling the Cosmos to wonder about itself. He considers the latest findings on life elsewhere and how we might communicate with the beings of other worlds.Cosmos is the story of our long journey of discovery and the forces and individuals who helped to shape modern science, including Democritus, Hypatia, Kepler, Newton, Huygens, Champollion, Lowell and Humason. Sagan looks at our planet from an extra-terrestrial vantage point and sees a blue jewel-like world, inhabited by a lifeform that is just beginning to discover its own unity and to ven-ture into the vast ocean of space.

Cosmos: An Illustrated History of Astronomy and Cosmology

by John D. North

For millennia humans have studied the skies to help them grow crops, navigate the seas, and earn favor from their gods. We still look to the stars today for answers to fundamental questions: How did the universe begin? Will it end, and if so, how? What is our place within it? John North has been examining such questions for decades. In Cosmos, he offers a sweeping historical survey of the two sciences that help define our place in the universe: astronomy and cosmology. Organizing his history chronologically, North begins by examining Paleolithic cave drawings that clearly chart the phases of the moon. He then investigates scientific practices in the early civilizations of Egypt, Greece, China, and the Americas (among others), whose inhabitants developed sophisticated methods to record the movements of the planets and stars. Trade routes and religious movements, North notes, brought these ancient styles of scientific thinking to the attention of later astronomers, whose own theories-- such as Copernicus' planetary theory-- led to the Scientific Revolution. The work of master astronomers, including Ptolemy, Galileo, Kepler, and Newton, is described in detail, as are modern-day developments in astrophysics, such as the advent of radio astronomy, the brilliant innovations of Einstein, and the many recent discoveries brought about with the help of the Hubble telescope. This new edition brings North's seminal book right up to the present day, as North takes a closer look at last year's reclassification of Pluto as a "dwarf" planet and gives a thorough overview of current research. With more than two hundred illustrations and a comprehensive bibliography, Cosmos is the definitive history of astronomy and cosmology. It is sure to find an eager audience among historians of science and astronomers alike.

Cotton

by Usha Barwale Zehr

The growing global population poses the challenge to the scientific community of doubling or tripling the food, feed and fiber production by the year 2050. Biotechnology can make a significant contribution to this effort. This volume reviews the use of biotechnology in cotton, which is the leading plant fiber crop worldwide and grown commercially in more than 50 countries. Renowned experts highlight the success of Bt cotton, the introduction of second and third generation traits and the impact at all levels of farming. Furthermore, the molecular advances being made in cotton biotechnology and the potential traits that will come to market in the next decade are described in detail.

Cottontails

by Ron Fisher

How the cottontail rabbit explores its environment, eats, washes, senses danger, rests, and cares for its young. Also describes wild and domestic rabbits around the world. Images are described.

Cottontails and Their Relatives (World Book's Animals of the World)

by Meish Goldish

Is a Jack Rabbit a true rabbit? What is a Pika? What is the largest kind of wild rabbit? Find out the answers to these and many more questions as you explore the world of rabbits and their relatives in this fun and easy to read book.

Cougar: Ecology and Conservation

by Maurice Hornocker Sharon Negri

This compilation of recent findings, stunning photographs, and firsthand accounts of field research unravels the mysteries of the magnificent animal Cougar and emphasizes its importance in healthy ecosystem processes and in our lives.

Counseling And Educational Research: Evaluation And Application, 3rd Edition

by Rick A. Houser

The Third Edition of Counseling and Educational Research: Evaluation and Application emphasizes the importance of being a good consumer of research and teaches readers how to conduct research in practice. Written in an engaging, conversational tone, the book uses concrete examples from professional literature to demonstrate how to effectively evaluate and interpret research articles--without relying on discipline-specific jargon. The Third Edition features new examples, updated research, a new chapter on single-subject research, a new chapter on the use of technology and research, and much more.

A Counselor's Introduction to Neuroscience

by Bill Mchenry Angela M. Sikorski Jim Mchenry

The book is about the complexities of human brain and counselling. The authors have clearly explained the overlap of these two fields, that is easily comprehensible by a lay man.

Countdown to Extinction

by Barbara Gaines Winkelman

Children's book about the study and research into dinosaurs that have become extinct.

The Counter-Creationism Handbook

by Mark Isaak

Isaak, editor of the Index of Creationist Claims on the Web site Talkorigins.org, notes that arguments for intelligent design and other creationist pseudoscience often sound powerful and convincing; many students, teachers, parents, and administrators who support the teaching of evolution lack the background to respond. Isaak's guide hands them that background, taking on claims made about the disciplines of philosophy, biology, paleontology, geology, astronomy, physics and mathematics, history, linguistics, and folklore. The material is organized thematically, with extensive cross-referencing. Some 400 claims are included, each followed by a succinct and valid scientific rebuttal. An introduction covers how to address creationism in different venues and why accurate science is important. Annotation ©2005 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Couple Therapy for Infertility

by Ronny Diamond David Kezur Mimi Meyers Constance N. Scharf Margot Weinshel

Examines the experiences of couples who are unable to conceive children and looks at possibilities for them.

The Courtiers' Anatomists: Animals and Humans in Louis XIV's Paris

by Anita Guerrini

"The Courtiers' Anatomists" is about dead bodies and live animals in Louis XIV's Paris--and the surprising links between them. Examining the practice of seventeenth-century anatomy, Anita Guerrini reveals how anatomy and natural history were connected through animal dissection and vivisection. Driven by an insatiable curiosity, Parisian scientists, with the support of the king, dissected hundreds of animals from the royal menageries and the streets of Paris. Guerrini is the first to tell the story of Joseph-Guichard Duverney, who performed violent, riot-inducing dissections of both animal and human bodies before the king at Versailles and in front of hundreds of spectators at the King's Garden in Paris. At the Paris Academy of Sciences, meanwhile, Claude Perrault, with the help of Duverney s dissections, edited two folios in the 1670s filled with lavish illustrations by court artists of exotic royal animals. Through the stories of Duverney and Perrault, as well as those of Marin Cureau de la Chambre, Jean Pecquet, and Louis Gayant, "The Courtiers' Anatomists" explores the relationships between empiricism and theory, human and animal, as well as the origins of the natural history museum and the relationship between science and other cultural activities, including art, music, and literature. "

Showing 3,201 through 3,225 of 16,227 results

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