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Culture of Animal Cells

by R. Ian Freshney

Since the publication of the sixth edition of this benchmark text, numerous advances in the field have been made - particularly in stem cells, 3D culture, scale-up, STR profiling, and culture of specialized cells. Culture of Animal Cells: A Manual of Basic Technique and Specialized Applications, Seventh Edition is the updated version of this benchmark text, addressing these recent developments in the field as well as the basic skills and protocols. This eagerly awaited edition reviews the increasing diversity of the applications of cell culture and the proliferation of specialized techniques, and provides an introduction to new subtopics in mini-reviews. New features also include a new chapter on cell line authentication with a review of the major issues and appropriate protocols including DNA profiling and barcoding, as well as some new specialized protocols. Because of the continuing expansion of cell culture, and to keep the bulk of the book to a reasonable size, some specialized protocols are presented as supplementary material online. Culture of Animal Cells: A Manual of Basic Technique and Specialized Applications, Seventh Edition provides the most accessible and comprehensive introduction available to the culture and experimental manipulation of animal cells. This text is an indispensable resource for those in or entering the field, including academic research scientists, clinical and biopharmaceutical researchers, undergraduate and graduate students, cell and molecular biology and genetics lab managers, trainees and technicians.

The Culture of Diagram

by John Bender Michael Marrinan

The diagram, write Bender (interdisciplinary studies, Stanford U.) and Marrinan (art history, Stanford U.), "is a proliferation of manifestly selective packets of dissimilar data correlated in an explicitly process-oriented array that has some of the attributes of a representation but is situated in the world like an object." They present here an "archaeology of the diagram" that centers on this understanding of diagram as process. Their discussion ranges across 250 years, from the diagrams of Diderot's Encylopédie to diagrammatic forms of representation in quantum mechanics, and across multiple fields of human endeavor, including mathematics, art, and medicine. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

The Culture of Our Discontent

by Meredith F. Small

By many estimations, the Western medical model of mental health is dangerously incomplete. If we step outside of the traditional disease model there are many new and different ways to understand, treat, and even accept mental illness. Culture--how we collectively live, interact, and view the world--frames our mental outlook. Arguably, culture even creates it. Western culture, for example, has completely embraced the medical model of mental illness. We quickly turn to physicians if we are unhappy or otherwise mentally discomfited, seeking solutions on a prescription pad. We expect brain chemistry to be at the root of any mental malady, forgetting the deeply entwined relationship between the biology of the brain and the environment in which we think, feel, and react. But every culture has a different view of the world, a lens through which normal or insane are viewed and defined. Anthropologist Meredith Small contends there is much to be learned from stepping away from the traditional Western medical model to explore and embrace alternative perspectives. By examining culture itself, rather than focusing on biology and medicine, we can fully understand the nature of our discontent. Looking at social, evolutionary, cross-cultural, and nutritional influences, Small deconstructs mental illnesses like depression and anxiety conditions that appear in different forms and for different reasons within the culture that defines them. By rethinking assumptions and questioning standard treatment programs, she helps us gradually relax our grip on the medical model to discover a new perspective on mental illness.

Culture, Politics, and Climate Change : How Information Shapes our Common Future

by Maxwell T. Boykoff Deserai A. Crow

Focusing on cultural values and norms as they are translated into politics and policy outcomes, this book presents a unique contribution in combining research from varied disciplines and from both the developed and developing world.<P> This collection draws from multiple perspectives to present an overview of the knowledge related to our current understanding of climate change politics and culture. It is divided into four sections - Culture and Values, Communication and Media, Politics and Policy, and Future Directions in Climate Politics Scholarship - each followed by a commentary from a key expert in the field. The book includes analysis of the challenges and opportunities for establishing successful communication on climate change among scientists, the media, policy-makers, and activists.<P> With an emphasis on the interrelation between social, cultural, and political aspects of climate change communication, this volume should be of interest to students and scholars of climate change, environment studies, environmental policy, communication, cultural studies, media studies, politics, sociology.

Cultures and Globalization: Conflicts and Tensions: Vol. 1

by Helmut K. Anheier Yudhishthir Raj Isar

The world's cultures and their forms of creation, presentation, and preservation are deeply affected by globalization in ways that are inadequately documented and understood. The Cultures and Globalization Series is designed to fill this void in our knowledge.<P> Analyzing the relationship between globalization and cultures is the aim of the Series. In each volume, leading experts as well as young scholars will track cultural trends connected to globalization throughout the world, covering issues ranging from the role of cultural difference in politics and governance to the evolution of the cultural economy and the changing patterns of creativity and artistic expression. Each volume will also include an innovative presentation of newly developed 'indicator suites' on cultures and globalization that will be presented in a user-friendly form with a high graphics content to facilitate accessibility and understanding.<P> The inaugural theme is 'Conflicts and Tensions': the cultural dimensions of conflict and the conflictual dimensions of culture. Like so many phenomena linked to globalization, conflicts over and within the cultural realms crystallize great anxieties and illusions, through misplaced assumptions, inadequate concepts, unwarranted simplifications and instrumental readings. The aim here is to marshal evidence from different disciplines and perspectives about the culture, conflict and globalization relationships in conceptually sensitive ways. Thus, in a broad and genuine sense, the Cultures and Globalization Series means not only to promote better understanding of contemporary cultural change but also to serve the cause of peace and security through informed, open and diversified debate.

Cultures and Globalization: Heritage, Memory & Identity: Vol. 4

by Helmut K. Anheier Yudhishthir Raj Isar

'This volume of one of the most comprehensive in the field. Its three themes are critical for the study of culture and globalization with its condensation of space, time and memory. Exploring the intersection between these three processes, the essays are learned, deeply researched and insightful, and the comparative range is impressive. The volume is certain to become a standard reference text for scholars and the general reader alike' - Professor Stuart Hall, Emeritus Professor of Sociology, The Open University<P> Heritage, memory and identity are closely connected keywords of our time, each endowed with considerable rhetorical power. Different human groups define certain objects and practices as 'heritage'; they envision heritage to reflect some form of collective memory, either lived or imagined; and they combine both to construct cultural identities. Today, the three terms raise conjoined issues of practice, policy and politics in an increasingly globalized world.<P> Bringing together a truly global range of scholars, this volume explores heritage, memory and identity through a diverse set of subjects, including heritage sites, practices of memorialization, museums, sites of contestation, and human rights.

Cultures of the West: A History Volume 2 : Since 1350

by Clifford R. Backman

The book highlights on the ways in which the major ideas like religion, science, and philosophy and passions of Western culture developed, internally, and how they interacted with the rest of the world.

Cure

by Jo Marchant

A rigorous, skeptical, deeply reported look at the new science behind the mind's extraordinary ability to heal the bodyHave you ever felt a surge of adrenaline after narrowly avoiding an accident? Salivated at the sight (or thought) of a sour lemon? Felt turned on just from hearing your partner's voice? If so, then you've experienced how dramatically the workings of your mind can affect your body. Yet while we accept that stress or anxiety can damage our health, the idea of "healing thoughts" was long ago hijacked by New Age gurus and spiritual healers. Recently, however, serious scientists from a range of fields have been uncovering evidence that our thoughts, emotions, and beliefs can ease pain, heal wounds, fend off infection and heart disease, even slow the progression of AIDS and some cancers. In Cure, award-winning science writer Jo Marchant travels the world to meet the physicians, patients, and researchers on the cutting edge of this new world of medicine. We learn how meditation protects against depression and dementia, how social connections increase life expectancy, and how patients who feel cared for recover from surgery faster. We meet Iraq war veterans who are using a virtual arctic world to treat their burns and children whose ADHD is kept under control with half the normal dose of medication. We watch as a transplant patient uses the smell of lavender to calm his hostile immune system and an Olympic runner shaves vital seconds off his time through mind-power alone. Drawing on the very latest research, Marchant explores the vast potential of the mind's ability to heal, acknowledges its limitations, and explains how we can make use of the findings in our own lives.From the Hardcover edition.

The Cure in the Code

by Peter W. Huber

Never before have two revolutions with so much potential to save and prolong human life occurred simultaneously. The converging, synergistic power of the biochemical and digital revolutions now allows us to read every letter of life's code, create precisely targeted drugs to control it, and tailor their use to individual patients. Cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's and countless other killers can be vanquished--if we make full use of the tools of modern drug design and allow doctors the use of modern data gathering and analytical tools when prescribing drugs to their patients. But Washington stands in the way, clinging to outdated drug-approval protocols developed decades ago during medicine's long battle with the infectious epidemics of the past. Peter Huber, an expert in science, technology, and public policy, demonstrates why Washington's one-size-fits-all drug policies can't deal with diseases rooted in the complex molecular diversity of human bodies. Washington is ill-equipped to handle the torrents of data that now propel the advance of molecular medicine and is reluctant to embrace the statistical methods of the digital age that can. Obsolete economic policies, often rationalized as cost-saving measures, stifle innovation and suppress investment in the medicine that can provide the best cures at the lowest cost. In the 1980s, an AIDS diagnosis was a death sentence, until the FDA loosened its throttling grip and began streamlining and accelerating approval of life-saving drugs. The Cure in the Code shows patients, doctors, investors, and policy makers what we must now do to capture the full life-saving and cost-saving potential of the revolution in molecular medicine. America has to choose. At stake for America is the power to lead the world in mastering the most free, fecund, competitive, dynamic, and intelligent natural resource on the planet--the molecular code that spawns human life and controls our health.

The Cure in the Code

by Peter W. Huber

Never before have two revolutions with so much potential to save and prolong human life occurred simultaneously. The converging, synergistic power of the biochemical and digital revolutions now allows us to read every letter of life's code, create precisely targeted drugs to control it, and tailor their use to individual patients. Cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's and countless other killers can be vanquished-if we make full use of the tools of modern drug design and allow doctors the use of modern data gathering and analytical tools when prescribing drugs to their patients.But Washington stands in the way, clinging to outdated drug-approval protocols developed decades ago during medicine's long battle with the infectious epidemics of the past. Peter Huber, an expert in science, technology, and public policy, demonstrates why Washington's one-size-fits-all drug policies can't deal with diseases rooted in the complex molecular diversity of human bodies. Washington is ill-equipped to handle the torrents of data that now propel the advance of molecular medicine and is reluctant to embrace the statistical methods of the digital age that can. Obsolete economic policies, often rationalized as cost-saving measures, stifle innovation and suppress investment in the medicine that can provide the best cures at the lowest cost.In the 1980s, an AIDS diagnosis was a death sentence, until the FDA loosened its throttling grip and began streamlining and accelerating approval of life-saving drugs. The Cure in the Code shows patients, doctors, investors, and policy makers what we must now do to capture the full life-saving and cost-saving potential of the revolution in molecular medicine. America has to choose. At stake for America is the power to lead the world in mastering the most free, fecund, competitive, dynamic, and intelligent natural resource on the planet-the molecular code that spawns human life and controls our health.

Cured

by Nathalia Holt

Is the end of HIV upon us? Award-winning research scientist and HIV fellow at the Ragon Institute, Nathalia Holt, reveals the science behind the discovery of a functional cure and what it means for the millions affected by HIV and the history of the AIDS pandemic. Two men, known in medical journals as the Berlin Patients, revealed answers to a functional cure for HIV. Their cures came twelve years apart, the first in 1996 and the second in 2008. Each received his own very different treatment in Berlin, Germany, and each result spurred a new field of investigation, fueling innovative lines of research and sparking hope for the thirty-four million people currently infected with HIV. For the first time, Nathalia Holt, who has participated in some of the most fruitful research in the field, tells the story of how we came to arrive at this astounding and controversial turning point. Holt explores the two men's stories on a personal level, looking at how their experiences have influenced HIV researchers worldwide#151;including one very special young family doctor who took the time to look closely at his patients#151;and how they responded to their medications. Based on extensive interviews with the patients and their doctors as well as her own in-depth research, this book is an unprecedented look at how scientists pursue their inquiries, the human impact their research has, and what is and is not working in the relationship between Big Pharma and medical care.

Curing MS: How Science Is Solving the Mysteries of Multiple Sclerosis

by Howard L. Weiner

What causes multiple sclerosis? When will there be a cure? Dr. Howard Weiner has spent nearly three decades trying to find answers to the mysteries of multiple sclerosis, an utterly confounding and debilitating disease that afflicts almost half a million Americans. Curing MS is his moving, personal account of the long-term scientific quest to pinpoint the origins of the disease and to find a breakthrough treatment for its victims. Dr. Weiner has been at the cutting edge of MS research and drug development, and he describes in clear and illuminating detail the science behind the symptoms and how new drugs may hold the key to "taming the monster." From the "Twenty-one Points" of MS--a concise breakdown of the knowns and unknowns of the disease--to stories from the frontlines of laboratories and hospitals, Curing MS offers a message of hope about new treatments and makes a powerful argument that a cure can--and will--be found.

Curiosity

by Rod Pyle

The story of the people who designed, built, launched, landed, and are now operating the Mars rover CuriosityAward-winning science writer Rod Pyle provides a behind-the-scenes look into the recent space mission to Mars of Curiosity--the unmanned rover that is now providing researchers with unprecedented information about the red planet. Pyle follows the team of dedicated scientists whose job it is to explore new vistas on Mars. Readers will also join Curiosity, the most advanced machine ever sent to another planet, on its journey of discovery. Drawing on his contacts at NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the author provides stunning insights into how this enthusiastic team of diverse individuals uses a revolutionary onboard laboratory of chemistry, geology, and physics instruments to unravel the profound secrets of the Red Planet.Readers will meet: Robert Manning, chief engineer for every rover mission since Pathfinder; John Grotzinger, the chief scientist of the entire mission; Vandi Tompkins, the software designer who keeps the rover on track; Bobak Ferdowsi, famed "Mohawk Guy" from Mission Control; Adam Steltzner, the Elvis-like Entry, Descent and Landing Lead; Al Chen, chief of flight dynamics and the voice of JPL during Curiosity's treacherous landing; and many others.And of course, Pyle describes the adventures of the Curiosity rover itself, from landing through the first samples, drilling, and discovering a habitable past on the planet, to reaching the ultimate target: Mount Sharp, in the center of Gale Crater. America is once again at the forefront of a new space age and Curiosity is just the beginning of many exciting new discoveries to come.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Curiosity: How Science Became Interested in Everything

by Philip Ball

With the recent landing of the Mars rover Curiosity, it seems safe to assume that the idea of being curious is alive and well in modern scienceOCothat itOCOs not merely encouraged but is seen as an essential component of the scientific mission. Yet there was a time when curiosity was condemned. Neither Pandora nor Eve could resist the dangerous allure of unanswered questions, and all knowledge wasnOCOt equalOCofor millennia it was believed that there were some things we should not try to know. In the late sixteenth century this attitude began to change dramatically, and in "Curiosity: ""How Science Became Interested in Everything, "Philip Ball investigates how curiosity first became sanctionedOCowhen it changed from a vice to a virtue and how it became permissible to ask any and every question about the world. aLooking closely at the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries, Ball vividly brings to life the age when modern science began, a time that spans the lives of Galileo and Isaac Newton. In this entertaining and illuminating account of the rise of science as we know it, Ball tells of scientists both legendary and lesser known, from Copernicus and Kepler to Robert Boyle, as well as the inventions and technologies that were inspired by curiosity itself, such as the telescope and the microscope. The so-called Scientific Revolution is often told as a story of great geniuses illuminating the world with flashes of inspiration. But "Curiosity" reveals a more complex story, in which the liberationOCoand subsequent tamingOCoof curiosity was linked to magic, religion, literature, travel, trade, and empire. Ball also asks what has become of curiosity today: how it functions in science, how it is spun and packaged for consumption, how well it is being sustained, and how the changing shape of science influences the kinds of questions it may continue to ask. aThough proverbial wisdom tell us that it was through curiosity that our innocence was lost, that has not deterred us. Instead, it has been completely the contrary: today we spend vast sums trying to reconstruct the first instants of creation in particle accelerators, out of a pure desire to "know. " Ball refuses to let us take this desire for granted, and this book is a perfect homage to such an inquisitive attitude. "

Curious Behavior

by Robert R. Provine

Robert Provine boldly goes where other scientists seldom tread-in search of hiccups, coughs, yawns, sneezes, and other lowly, undignified human behaviors. Upon investigation, these instinctive acts bear the imprint of our evolutionary origins and can be uniquely valuable tools for understanding how the human brain works and what makes us different from other species. Many activities showcased in Curious Behavior are contagious, but none surpasses yawning in this regard-just reading the word can make one succumb. Though we often take it as a sign of sleepiness or boredom, yawning holds clues to the development of our sociality and ability to empathize with others. Its inescapable transmission reminds us that we are sometimes unaware, neurologically programmed beasts of the herd. Other neglected behaviors yield similar revelations. Tickling, we learn, may be the key to programming personhood into robots. Coughing comes in musical, medical, and social varieties. Farting and belching have import for the evolution of human speech. And prenatal behavior is offered as the strangest exhibit of all, defying postnatal logic in every way. Our earthiest acts define Homo sapiens as much as language, bipedalism, tool use, and other more studied characteristics. As Provine guides us through peculiarities right under our noses, he beckons us to follow with self-experiments: tickling our own feet, keeping a log of when we laugh, and attempting to suppress yawns and sneezes. Such humble investigations provide fodder for grade school science projects as well as doctoral dissertations. Small Science can yield big rewards.

Curious George and the Kite (CGTV Reader)

by H. A. Rey

Curious George loves a good windy day. There are many things he can practice flying-like a kite. Now if only he doesn't get too carried away! This early reader explores the concepts of flight and experimentation.

The Curious Little Dolphin (Little Animal Adventures)

by Patricia Jensen

When a Curious Little Dolphin leaves his family to explore on his own, a shark follows him. His mother comes to the rescue, and he understands how important it is to stay with the family.

Curious Minds: How a Child Becomes a Scientist

by John Brockman

A fascinating collection of essays from twenty-seven of the world's most interesting scientists about the moments and events in their childhoods that set them on the paths that would define their lives. What makes a child decide to become a scientist? *For Robert Sapolsky--Stanford professor of biology--it was an argument with a rabbi over a passage in the Bible. *Physicist Lee Smolin traces his inspiration to the volume of Einstein's work he picked up as a diversion from heartbreak. *Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, a psychologist and the author of Flow, found his calling through Descartes. *Mary Catherine Bateson--author of Composing a Life--discovered that she wanted to be an anthropologist while studying Hebrew. *Janna Levin--author of How the Universe Got Its Spots--felt impelled by the work of Carl Sagan to know more. Murray Gell-Mann, Nicholas Humphrey, Freeman Dyson, Daniel C. Dennett, Lynn Margulis, V. S. Ramachandran, Howard Gardner, Richard Dawkins, and more than a dozen others tell their own entertaining and often inspiring stories of the deciding moment. Illuminating memoir meets superb science writing in essays that invite us to consider what it is--and isn't--that sets the scientific mind apart and into action.

A Curious Robot on Mars!

by Bethany Straker James Duffett-Smith

Far off into space--186 million miles to be precise--a fearless robot rover travels all by his lonesome. He is on a crucial mission from Earth, eagerly seeking to answer the much-anticipated question: Does life exist on Mars? But there is nothing to be seen on this planet except miles of rocks. He loses support from mission control and finds himself alone and cut off from civilization. But the curious little robot is resilient! After noticing a flash of light shining brilliantly through the crack of a rock, he instantly realizes his mission is far from over. He slowly inches towards the edge, but then suddenly falls perilously into the darkness! What will he discover?Bethany Straker's vibrant illustrations accompany James Duffett-Smith's suspenseful tale of discovery and hope. A Curious Robot on Mars! will motivate any and all readers to strive for one's ambitions--and most importantly, to always be curious!

Current Concepts in Forensic Entomology

by Carlo P. Campobasso M. Lee Goff Martin Grassberger Jens Amendt

Twenty years ago the use of entomology in a crime scene investigation was considered bizarre, despite the solid scientific background and documented historical applications. Today, the use of insect evidence is an accepted sub-discipline in modern forensic science. Nevertheless, forensic entomology is still growing and remains a living scientific discipline with many branches. The present book highlights this diversity by collecting contributions dealing with novel aspects, for example, marine biology, chemical ecology and acarology, as well as the basic disciplines like entomotoxiciology and decomposition. It also offers keys for immature insects, discussions of important pitfalls and introductions to the statistical evaluation of data sets. Many topics are covered in depth for the first time. All the authors are leading experts in their respective fields of research. Their chapters show directions for future research for both new and veteran forensic entomologists. Undoubtedly, forensic entomology will continue to grow and attract new professionals, students, as well as interested observers. This book is written for all of them.

Current Ornithology Volume 17

by Charles F. Thompson

Current Ornithology publishes authoritative, up-to-date, scholarly reviews of topics selected from the full range of current research in avian biology. Topics cover the spectrum from the molecular level of organization to population biology and community ecology. The series seeks especially to review (1) fields in which an abundant recent literature will benefit from synthesis and organization, or (2) newly emerging fields that are gaining recognition as the result of recent discoveries or shifts in perspective, or (3) fields in which students of vertebrates may benefit from comparisons of birds with other classes. All chapters are invited, and authors are chosen for their leadership in the subjects under review.

Current Practice in Forensic Medicine

by Jason Payne-James John Gall

Although forensic medicine has been in existence for centuries in one guise or another, it is only with the recent growth in international research that it has begun to be acknowledged as a specific discipline in its own right. Many areas of progress are being made and this text aims to provide a unique, in-depth and critical update on selected topics that are of direct relevance to those practicing in the field including lawyers, police, medical and dental practitioners, forensic scientists and postgraduate/undergraduate medical students and undergraduate law students preparing for forensic medicine examinations.This volume is designed to cover the wider aspects of forensic medicine, including the law, science, medicine (forensic pathology, clinical forensic medicine and forensic psychiatry) and dentistry. Topics covered include subjects of debate and/or uncertainty in areas where significant advances have been made and in those of current relevance to the forensic profession, Chapters provide a variety of approaches to the areas under discussion with reviews of current knowledge, information on significant changes and pointers to the future that the reader should be aware of.Features:An authoritative review, for forensic medicine practitioners throughout the world, from leading international experts in the field.Provides critical commentary and updates on current practice.Topics include: a guide to the presentation of forensic medical evidence, bioterrorism, the paediatric hymen, assessment and interpretation of bone trauma in children, adult sexual assault, genital photography, forensic photography, common errors in injury interpretation, self-inflicted injuries and associated psychological profiles, bite marks and the role of the pathologist in aviation disasters.Includes a wealth of four colour figures to illustrate key points discussed within the text.

Current Topics in Complement II

by John D. Lambris

Complement has long been regarded as a pivotal effector arm of the innate immune response, eliciting important immunoregulatory functions in the context of inflammation and also serving as a vital link between the innate and adaptive immune response. In the post-genomic era, our knowledge of the innate immune system is enriched by findings that point to novel functions that do not strictly correlate with immunological defense and surveillance, immune modulation or Inflammation. Several studies indicate that complement proteins exert functions that are either more complex than previously thought, or go well beyond the innate immune character of the system. The advent of high-throughput platforms for genome and proteome-wide profiling, together with the enormous amount of raw genetic information that has accumulated in the databases, have stirred new expectations in biomedical research. They have led complementologists to revisit established biological systems, such as the complement system, from a global and integrative perspective. Complement research is now faced with the challenge of trying to integrate isolated biochemical pathways into complex gene and protein regulatory circuits. In this respect, scientists from around the world convened at the Fourth Aegean Conferences Workshop on Complement Associated Diseases, Animal Models, and Therapeutics (June 10-15, 2007), to discuss recent advances in this fast evolving field. This volume represents a collection of topics on the "novel" functions of complement, patho-physiology, protein structures, design of complement inhibitors, and complement assays discussed during the conference.

Current Topics in Innate Immunity II

by John D. Lambris George Hajishengallis

Mounting evidence in the past decade indicates that innate immunity mediates functions above and beyond first-line defense against infection. It is now appreciated that innate immune mechanisms are critically involved in the development of adaptive immunity and, moreover, the regulation of diverse physiological and homeostatic processes. The latter explains why deregulation of innate immunity may lead to pathological disorders that are not necessarily or directly related to host defense. This Volume compiles the latest advances in this rapidly evolving field as presented by eminent scientists at the 7th International Aegean Conference on Innate Immunity in Rhodes, Greece. It includes topics related to the biology and function of Toll-like and other pattern-recognition receptors, complement and its crosstalk with other physiological systems, inflammatory mechanisms and diseases, natural killer cells, and the cooperative interplay between innate and adaptive immune cells. This book is an excellent source of information for researchers and clinicians with interests in immunology, host-microbe interactions, and infectious and inflammatory diseases.

The Curse of the Labrador Duck

by Glen Chilton

In an obsessive 82,000-mile quest for dead birds, how much trouble can one scientist get into? Finally, the world's leading authority on the extinct Labrador Duck, Dr. Glen Chilton, shares the story of his frenzied obsession to reveal the histories behind the mysterious bird -- a saga wherein he sets out to examine the remains of every Labrador Duck, conduct genetic analysis on every Labrador Duck egg, and visit every site where the duck was shot...with many a (mis)adventure along the way. More elusive than the Passenger Pigeon, the Dodo, or the Great Auk and breeding in places so obscure that no certain records exist of its nests, the Labrador Duck succumbed to extinction almost before anyone realized it was in decline. When Chilton began his travels, there were thought to be approximately fifty stuffed specimens, scattered among the museums of Europe and North America. However, as his search progressed, it became clear that some specimens had been lost to war and theft, while others lay hidden in far-flung collections, overseen by secretive curators. After traveling the equivalent of 3.3 times around the world with a series of oddball companions, Chilton finally began to close in on every known specimen...but not before he risked heavy-metal poisoning in Russia, swam naked in a glacier-fed stream, corresponded with a millionaire murderer, and narrowly avoided arrest in New York City. A magnificent blend of travel writing, science, detective work, and mishap, The Curse of the Labrador Duck is the zany adventure of one biologist's obsessive quest to uncover the mysteries of one of the world's most enigmatic birds.

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