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Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void

by Mary Roach

Space is a world devoid of the things we need to live and thrive: air, gravity, hot showers, fresh produce, privacy, beer. Space exploration is in some ways an exploration of what it means to be human. How much can a person give up? How much weirdness can they take? What happens to you when you can't walk for a year? Have sex? Smell flowers? What happens if you vomit in your helmet during a space walk? Is it possible for the human body to survive a bailout at 17,000 miles per hour? To answer these questions, space agencies set up all manner of quizzical and startlingly bizarre space simulations. As Mary Roach discovers, it's possible to preview space without ever leaving Earth. From the space shuttle training toilet to a crash test of NASA's new space capsule (cadaver filling in for astronaut), Roach takes us on a surreally entertaining trip into the science of life in space and space on Earth.

Pain Erasure

by Bonnie Prudden

"The amazing thing is that it works!" PREVENTION MAGAZINE Bonnie Prudden's revolutionary breakthrough in pain relief involves trigger points--tender areas where muscles have been damaged from falls, childhood ailments, poor posture, and the stresses of daily life. Requiring no special training or equipment, my therapy is a natural, simple technique that can be performed in the home. Illustrated with charts, photographs, and diagrams, Bonnie Prudden's step-by-step method has been hailed by doctors and patients across America for its extraordinary 95 percent success rate.

Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space

by Carl Sagan Ann Druyan

In Cosmos, the late astronomer Carl Sagan cast his gaze over the magnificent mystery of the Universe and made it accessible to millions of people around the world. Now in this stunning sequel, Carl Sagan completes his revolutionary journey through space and time.<P> Future generations will look back on our epoch as the time when the human race finally broke into a radically new frontier--space. In Pale Blue Dot Sagan traces the spellbinding history of our launch into the cosmos and assesses the future that looms before us as we move out into our own solar system and on to distant galaxies beyond. The exploration and eventual settlement of other worlds is neither a fantasy nor luxury, insists Sagan, but rather a necessary condition for the survival of the human race.

Paleoclimates: Understanding Climate Change Past and Present

by Thomas M. Cronin

The field of paleoclimatology relies on physical, chemical, and biological proxies of past climate changes that have been preserved in natural archives such as glacial ice, tree rings, sediments, corals, and speleothems. Paleoclimate archives obtained through field investigations, ocean sediment coring expeditions, ice sheet coring programs, and other projects allow scientists to reconstruct climate change over much of earth's history. When combined with computer model simulations, paleoclimatic reconstructions are used to test hypotheses about the causes of climatic change, such as greenhouse gases, solar variability, earth's orbital variations, and hydrological, oceanic, and tectonic processes. This book is a comprehensive, state-of-the art synthesis of paleoclimate research covering all geological timescales, emphasizing topics that shed light on modern trends in the earth's climate. Thomas M. Cronin discusses recent discoveries about past periods of global warmth, changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, abrupt climate and sea-level change, natural temperature variability, and other topics directly relevant to controversies over the causes and impacts of climate change. This text is geared toward advanced undergraduate and graduate students and researchers in geology, geography, biology, glaciology, oceanography, atmospheric sciences, and climate modeling, fields that contribute to paleoclimatology. This volume can also serve as a reference for those requiring a general background on natural climate variability.

A Palette of Particles

by Jeremy Bernstein

From molecules to stars, much of the cosmic canvas can be painted in brushstrokes of primary color: the protons, neutrons, and electrons we know so well. But for meticulous detail, we have to dip into exotic hues-leptons, mesons, hadrons, quarks. Bringing particle physics to life as few authors can, Jeremy Bernstein here unveils nature in all its subatomic splendor. In this graceful account, Bernstein guides us through high-energy physics from the early twentieth century to the present, including such highlights as the newly discovered Higgs boson. Beginning with Ernest Rutherford's 1911 explanation of the nucleus, a model of atomic structure emerged that sufficed until the 1930s, when new particles began to be theorized and experimentally confirmed. In the postwar period, the subatomic world exploded in a blaze of unexpected findings leading to the theory of the quark, in all its strange and charmed variations. An eyewitness to developments at Harvard University and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, Bernstein laces his story with piquant anecdotes of such luminaries as Wolfgang Pauli, Murray Gell-Mann, and Sheldon Glashow. Surveying the dizzying landscape of contemporary physics, Bernstein remains optimistic about our ability to comprehend the secrets of the cosmos-even as its mysteries deepen. We now know that over eighty percent of the universe consists of matter we have never identified or detected. A Palette of Particles draws readers into the excitement of a field where the more we discover, the less we seem to know.

The Panda's Thumb: More Reflections in Natural History

by Stephen Jay Gould

Were dinosaurs really dumber than lizards? Why, after ?all, are roughly the same number of men and women born into the world? What led the famous Dr. Down to his theory of mongolism, and its racist residue? What do the panda's magical "thumb" and the sea turtle's perilous migration tell us about imperfections that prove the evolutionary rule? The wonders and mysteries of evolutionary biology are elegantly explored in these and other essays by the celebrated natural history writer Stephen Jay Gould.

Pandas (World Life Library)

by Heather Angel

From the book jacket: Pandas is a fascinating introduction to these popular yet seldom-seen animals. Join wildlife photographer and zoologist Heather Angel on her personal adventure as she journeys into the depths of China to catch a glimpse of the endangered giant panda and the red panda. From this collection of glorious photographs and descriptive text, you'll learn details about the panda's eating habits, habitat, and behavior, as well as conservation issues relating to its survival and endangered species status. Foreword by Dr. Robin Pellew, Director of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF). Discover the world's animals in the WorldLife Library by Voyageur Press.This highly acclaimed series brings you the latest research from leading naturalists, along with stunning color photographs of your favorite animals.

Pandora's Seed: Why the Hunter-Gatherer Holds the Key to Our Survival

by Spencer Wells

Ten thousand years ago, our species made a radical shift in its way of life: We became farmers rather than hunter-gatherers. Although this decision propelled us into the modern world, renowned geneticist and anthropologist Spencer Wells demonstrates that such a dramatic change in lifestyle had a downside that we're only now beginning to recognize. Growing grain crops ultimately made humans more sedentary and unhealthy and made the planet more crowded. The expanding population and the need to apportion limited resources created hierarchies and inequalities. Freedom of movement was replaced by a pressure to work that is the forebear of the anxiety millions feel today. Spencer Wells offers a hopeful prescription for altering a life to which we were always ill-suited. Pandora's Seed is an eye-opening book for anyone fascinated by the past and concerned about the future.

Panic in Level 4: Cannibals, Killer Viruses, and Other Journeys to the Edge of Science

by Richard Preston

Panic in Level 4 is a grand tour through the eerie and unforgettable universe of Richard Preston, filled with incredible characters and mysteries that refuse to leave one's mind. Here are dramatic true stories from this acclaimed and award-winning author, including * the phenomenon of "self-cannibals," who suffer from a rare genetic condition caused by one wrong letter in their DNA that forces them to compulsively chew their own flesh--and why everyone may have a touch of this disease * the search for the unknown host of Ebola virus, an organism hidden somewhere in African rain forests, where the disease finds its way into the human species, causing outbreaks of unparalleled horror * the brilliant Russian brothers--"one mathematician divided between two bodies"--who built a supercomputer in their apartment from mail-order parts in an attempt to find hidden order in the number pi (π). In exhilarating detail, Preston portrays the frightening forces and constructive discoveries that are currently roiling and reordering our world, once again proving himself a master of the nonfiction narrative.

The Panic Virus: A True Story of Medicine, Science, and Fear

by Seth Mnookin

WHO DECIDES WHICH FACTS ARE TRUE? In 1998 Andrew Wakefield, a British gastroenterologist with a history of self-promotion, published a paper with a shocking allegation: the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine might cause autism. The media seized hold of the story and, in the process, helped to launch one of the most devastating health scares ever. In the years to come Wakefield would be revealed as a profiteer in league with class-action lawyers, and he would eventually lose his medical license. Meanwhile one study after another failed to find any link between childhood vaccines and autism. Yet the myth that vaccines somehow cause developmental disorders lives on. Despite the lack of corroborating evidence, it has been popularized by media personalities such as Oprah Winfrey and Jenny McCarthy and legitimized by journalists who claim that they are just being fair to "both sides" of an issue about which there is little debate. Meanwhile millions of dollars have been diverted from potential breakthroughs in autism research, families have spent their savings on ineffective "miracle cures," and declining vaccination rates have led to outbreaks of deadly illnesses like Hib, measles, and whooping cough. Most tragic of all is the increasing number of children dying from vaccine-preventable diseases. In The Panic Virus Seth Mnookin draws on interviews with parents, public-health advocates, scientists, and anti-vaccine activists to tackle a fundamental question: How do we decide what the truth is? The fascinating answer helps explain everything from the persistence of conspiracy theories about 9/11 to the appeal of talk-show hosts who demand that President Obama "prove" he was born in America. The Panic Virus is a riveting and sometimes heart-breaking medical detective story that explores the limits of rational thought. It is the ultimate cautionary tale for our time.

Paper

by Claire Llewellyn

Soft, warm, heavy, slimy. . . which of these words describe metal or plastic, rubber or wood? This series covers them all -- with big colorful photographs, "Fascinating Facts, " and easy "Try This" experiments that introduce simple science concepts in a fun and engaging way, and show how each material is produced, transformed for everyday use, and impacts the environment. That paper plate in the lunchroom will never seem the same again once readers really get to know their Material World!

Paperboy: Confessions of a Future Engineer

by Henry Petroski

Henry Petroski has been called "the poet laureate of technology." He is one of the most eloquent and inquisitive science and engineering writers of our time, illuminating with new clarity such familiar objects as pencils, books, and bridges. In Paperboy, he turns his intellectual curiosity inward, on his own past. Petroski grew up in the Cambria Heights section of New York City's borough of Queens during the 1950s, in the midst of a close and loving family. Educated at local Catholic schools, he worked as a delivery boy for the Long Island Press. The job taught him lessons about diligence, labor, commitment, and community-mindedness, lessons that this successful student could not learn at school. From his vantage point as a professor, engineer, and writer, Petroski reflects fondly on these lessons, and on his near-idyllic boyhood. Paperboy is also the story of the intellectual maturation of an engineer. Petroski's curiosity about how things work--from bicycles to Press-books to newspaper delivery routes--was evident even in his youth. He writes with clear-eyed passion about the physical surroundings of his world, the same attitude he has brought to examining the quotidian objects of our world. Paperboy is a delightful memoir, telling the dual story of an admirable family in a more innocent, bygone America, and the making of an engineer and writer. This is a book to cherish and reread.

Parade of Life: Monerans, Protists, Fungi, and Plants (3rd edition)

by Prentice Hall

This edition contains chapters on Classification of Living Things, Viruses and Monerans, Protists, Fungi, Plants Without Seeds and Plants With Seeds. The book also contains Activity Bank, Reference Section, etc.

The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less

by Barry Schwartz

A sociologist-psychologist studies the explosion of choices consumers face in western, particularly U.S., culture and the resulting stress and how individuals can respond.

Parallel Worlds: The Science of Alternative Universes and Our Future in the Cosmos

by Michio Kaku

Getting a grip on the creation and ultimate fate of the universe is one of the great scientific stories of the twentieth century. In the twenty-first, the story is expanding to enfold many universes. Michio Kaku's dazzling book tells that new story. Using the latest astronomical data, he explores the Big Bang, theories of everything, and our cosmic future. His wonderfully clear scientific account leads to some mind-boggling speculations about the human implications of this story. Are we condemned to watch a single universe slowly run down, becoming a dark, cold wasteland? Or can we dream of escaping into one of many parallel universes, each born of a new Big Bang, or even existing in another dimension? Kaku shows how the new cosmology points to these and other astonishing possibilities.

Parasitic Flatworms: Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, Immunology and Physiology

by Aaron G. Maule Nikki J. Marks

Parasitic flatworms include Cestodes (tapeworms) and trematodes (flukes, schistosomes, etc) and are the cause of a number of major diseases of medical and veterinary significance. Much recent research has focused on molecular biology and genomics. this book aims to review advances in our understanding of these and related topics such as flatworm biochemistry, immunology and physiology. Where appropriate, comparisons are made between different parasitic flatworms and between parasitic and free-living species. Contributors to the book include leading authorities from Europe, North and South America, and Australia.

Paratexts: Thresholds of Interpretation

by Gérard Genette

Paratexts are those liminal devices and conventions, both within and outside the book, that mediate between book, author and reader: titles, forewords and publishers' jacket copy form part of a book's private and public history. In this first English translation of Paratexts, Gérard Genette offers a global view of these liminal mediations and their relation to the reading public. With precision, clarity and through wide reference, he shows how paratexts interact with general questions of literature as a cultural institution. Richard Macksey's foreword situates Genette in contemporary literary theory.

Partnerships For Reducing Landslide Risk: Assessment of the National Landslide Hazards Mitigation Strategy

by Committee on the Review of the National Landslide Hazards Mitigation Strategy

Landslides occur in all geographic regions of the nation in response to a wide range of conditions and triggering processes that include storms, earthquakes, and human activities. Landslides in the United States result in an estimated average of 25 to 50 deaths annually and cost $1 to 3 billion per year. In addition to direct losses, landslides also cause significant environmental damage and societal disruption. This report reviews the U.S. Geological Survey&rsquo;s (USGS) National Landslide Hazards Mitigation Strategy, which was created in response to a congressional directive for a national approach to reducing losses from landslides. Components of the strategy include basic research activities, improved public policy measures, and enhanced mitigation of landslides.The NRC report commends the USGS for creating a national approach based on partnerships with federal, state, local, and non-governmental entities, and finds that the plan components are the essential elements of a national strategy. The report recommends that the plan should promote the use of risk analysis techniques, and should play a vital role in evaluating methods, setting standards, and advancing procedures and guidelines for landslide hazard maps and assessments. The NRC panel suggests that substantially increased funding will be required to implement a national landslide mitigation program, and that as part of a 10-year program the funding mix should transition from research and guideline development to partnership-based implementation of loss reduction measures.

The Passage to Cosmos: Alexander Von Humboldt and the Shaping of America

by Laura Dassow Walls

Humboldt espoused the idea that, while the universe of nature exists apart from human purpose, its beauty and order, the very idea of the whole it composes, are human achievements: cosmos comes into being in the dance of world and mind, subject and object, science and poetry.

Passing the Maryland High School Assessment in Biology

by Liz Thompson Michelle Gunter

Passing the Maryland Biology High School Assessment will help students who are learning or reviewing Core learning goals for the Biology sections of the Maryland High School Assessment Test in Biology. The materials in this book are based on the biology assessment goals, expectations and indicators as published by the Maryland Department of Education.

A Passion For Mars: Intrepid Explorers Of The Red Planet

by Andrew Chaikin James Cameron

The quest for Mars is chronicled by bestselling author Andrew Chaikin in this story of a passionate band of Earthbound explorers caught in the irresistible pull of the Red Planet. They include celebrated figures: astronomer Carl Sagan, who champions the idea of life on Mars-; rocket scientist Wernher von Braun, drawing up plans for human Mars expeditions; and science-fiction author Ray Bradbury, standard-bearer for Mars's crucial place in human destiny. Readers also meet the rogue grad students known as the Mars Underground," keepers of the flame when Mars falls off NASA's radar; biologist Jerry Soffen, looking for signs of life in a Martian meteorite; geologist Mike Malin, who defies skeptics to reveal a Mars no one imagines; and many others, including Chaikin himself, who served on the first Viking Mars landing and covered Mars exploration as a science journalist. Based on extensive interviews, illustrated with compelling images, and animated by the author's own passion, Chaikin's account will resonate with anyone who has ever dreamed of a journey to Mars.

Past To Present: Ideas That Changed Our World

by Stuart Hirschberg Terry Hirschberg

Comprehensive and accessible, Past to Present encapsulates for readers essential readings from the fields of humanities, social science, and science in a single book- putting a "human face" on the great ideas that have changed our world. The book is divided into seven thematic parts that trace the history of important ideas from their roots to their current incarnations. Each of the 73 readings includes discussions that focus on the history of the idea, the writer's rhetorical strategies, and the context in which the piece was written. For anyone who is interested in exploring the evolutions of the great ideas of our world.

Pasteur and Modern Science

by Rene Dubos

This is a fresh account of the extraordinary life of Louis Pasteur, and the monumental impact he had on biochemistry, microbiology, bacteriology and immunology.

Pathology for the Physical Therapist Assistant

by Penelope J. Lescher

With other texts written at either too high or too low a level, this book meets the needs of PTA students for usable, understandable pathology related to clinical application. Extensively illustrated, this book allows students to more easily comprehend and maintain interest in otherwise complicated pathological processes. The fourteen chapter format effectively fits within a chapter per week course structure, or each chapter may be used as a stand alone module within any course. And as your students prepare to graduate, encourage them to keep this book to use as a clinically relevant reference as practicing PTAs!

Showing 3,351 through 3,375 of 4,955 results

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