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Darwin's Armada: Four Voyages and the Battle for the Theory of Evolution

by Iain Mccalman

"Sparkling . . . an extraordinary true-adventure story, complete with trials, tribulations and moments of exultation."--Kirkus Reviews, starred review Award-winning cultural historian Iain McCalman tells the stories of Charles Darwin and his staunchest supporters: Joseph Hooker, Thomas Huxley, and Alfred Wallace. Beginning with the somber morning of April 26, 1882--the day of Darwin's funeral--Darwin's Armada steps back and recounts the lives and scientific discoveries of each of these explorers, who campaigned passionately in the war of ideas over evolution and advanced the scope of Darwin's work.

Darwin's Black Box

by Michael J. Behe

The groundbreaking, "seminal work" (Time) on intelligent design that dares to ask, was Darwin wrong? In 1996, Darwin's Black Box helped to launch the intelligent design movement: the argument that nature exhibits evidence of design, beyond Darwinian randomness. It sparked a national debate on evolution, which continues to intensify across the country. From one end of the spectrum to the other, Darwin's Black Box has established itself as the key intelligent design text -- the one argument that must be addressed in order to determine whether Darwinian evolution is sufficient to explain life as we know it. In a major new Afterword for this edition, Behe explains that the complexity discovered by microbiologists has dramatically increased since the book was first published. That complexity is a continuing challenge to Darwinism, and evolutionists have had no success at explaining it. Darwin's Black Box is more important today than ever.

Darwin's Cathedral: Evolution, Religion, and the Nature of Society

by David Sloan Wilson

One of the great intellectual battles of modern times is between evolution and religion. Until now, they have been considered completely irreconcilable theories of origin and existence. David Sloan Wilson's Darwin's Cathedral takes the radical step of joining the two, in the process proposing an evolutionary theory of religion that shakes both evolutionary biology and social theory at their foundations. The key, argues Wilson, is to think of society as an organism, an old idea that has received new life based on recent developments in evolutionary biology. If society is an organism, can we then think of morality and religion as biologically and culturally evolved adaptations that enable human groups to function as single units rather than mere collections of individuals? Wilson brings a variety of evidence to bear on this question, from both the biological and social sciences. From Calvinism in sixteenth-century Geneva to Balinese water temples, from hunter-gatherer societies to urban America, Wilson demonstrates how religions have enabled people to achieve by collective action what they never could do alone. He also includes a chapter considering forgiveness from an evolutionary perspective and concludes by discussing how all social organizations, including science, could benefit by incorporating elements of religion. Religious believers often compare their communities to single organisms and even to insect colonies. Astoundingly, Wilson shows that they might be literally correct. Intended for any educated reader, Darwin's Cathedral will change forever the way we view the relations among evolution, religion, and human society.

Darwin's Dangerous Idea

by Daniel C. Dennett

In a book that is both groundbreaking and accessible, Daniel C. Dennett, whom Chet Raymo of The Boston Globe calls "one of the most provocative thinkers on the planet," focuses his unerringly logical mind on the theory of natural selection, showing how Darwin's great idea transforms and illuminates our traditional view of humanity's place in the universe. Dennett vividly describes the theory itself and then extends Darwin's vision with impeccable arguments to their often surprising conclusions, challenging the views of some of the most famous scientists of our day.

Darwin's Dangerous Idea: Evolution and the Meanings of Life

by Daniel Clement Dennett

Dennett demonstrates the power of the theory of natural selection and shows how Darwin's idea transforms and illuminates our traditional view of our place in the universe.

Darwin's Demise

by Joe White Nicholas Comninellis

For people confused by the contradictory messages they hear from secular science and church teaching, evolution can be intimidating. The truth is that Darwin's ideas are based upon faulty science, and that creationists have solid evidence to support their claims. Finally, a brilliant defense of Genesis and the Bible's teaching about origins is waiting for those who are soon to understand how Darwinism is fraudulent faith masquerading as science. Authors Joe White and Nicholas Comninellis have a passion for truth, and for sharing it with students and their parents. In Darwin's Demise,they succeed in showing why real science is burning down the House of Darwin.

Darwin's Devices

by John Long

What happens when we let robots play the game of life? The challenge of studying evolution is that the history of life is buried in the past--we can't witness the dramatic events that shaped the adaptations we see today. But biorobotics expert John Long has found an ingenious way to overcome this problem: he creates robots that look and behave like extinct animals, subjects them to evolutionary pressures, lets them compete for mates and resources, and mutates their 'genes'. In short, he lets robots play the game of life. In Darwin's Devices, Long tells the story of these evolving biorobots--how they came to be, and what they can teach us about the biology of living and extinct species. Evolving biorobots can replicate creatures that disappeared from the earth long ago, showing us in real time what happens in the face of unexpected environmental challenges. Biomechanically correct models of backbones functioning as part of an autonomous robot, for example, can help us understand why the first vertebrates evolved them. But the most impressive feature of these robots, as Long shows, is their ability to illustrate the power of evolution to solve difficult technological challenges autonomously--without human input regarding what a workable solution might be. Even a simple robot can create complex behavior, often learning or evolving greater intelligence than humans could possibly program. This remarkable idea could forever alter the face of engineering, design, and even warfare. An amazing tour through the workings of a fertile mind, Darwin's Devices will make you rethink everything you thought you knew about evolution, robot intelligence, and life itself.

Darwin's Doubt

by Stephen C. Meyer

Charles Darwin knew that there was a significant event in the history of life that his theory did not explain. In what is known today as the "Cambrian explosion," 530 million years ago many animals suddenly appeared in the fossil record without apparent ancestors in earlier layers of rock. In Darwins Doubt Stephen C. Meyer tells the story of the mystery surrounding this explosion of animal life--a mystery that has intensified, not only because the expected ancestors of these animals have not been found, but also because scientists have learned more about what it takes to construct an animal. Expanding on the compelling case he presented in his last book, Signature in the Cell, Meyer argues that the theory of intelligent design--which holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection--is ultimately the best explanation for the origin of the Cambrian animals.

Darwin's Enigma

by Luther Sunderland

Evolutionists have long known that Charles Darwin's original argument against his own theory - that a lack of fossil evidence of transitional forms would reduce him to an embarrassing footnote in history - was screamingly true. No legitimate fossil evidence exists that shows one species changing into another. This startling realization led Luther Sunderland to an exhaustive search of the subject, and his findings show clearly that evolution is a theory in disarray. From his own interviews with leading evolutionists, and an examination of the fossil evidence, Sunderland shows that the Enigma of Darwin's anti-God philosophy is that the facts show it is anything but rock-solid. Before is death in 1987, Luther Sunderland had garnered the respect of creationists worldwide for his investigative writing of the evolution controversy. After obtaining an engineering degree from Penn State University, Sunderland spent 30 years developing automatic flight control systems for the General Electric Company. DARWIN'S ENIGMA remains on intensely popular work on the theory of origins.

Darwin's Ghosts

by Rebecca Stott

Christmas, 1859. Just one month after the publication of On the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin received an unsettling letter. He had expected criticism; in fact, letters were arriving daily, most expressing outrage and accusations of heresy. But this letter was different. It accused him of failing to acknowledge his predecessors, of taking credit for a theory that had already been discovered by others. Darwin realized that he had made an error in omitting from Origin of Species any mention of his intellectual forebears. Yet when he tried to trace all of the natural philosophers who had laid the groundwork for his theory, he found that history had already forgotten many of them. Darwin's Ghosts tells the story of the collective discovery of evolution, from Aristotle, walking the shores of Lesbos with his pupils, to Al-Jahiz, an Arab writer in the first century, from Leonardo da Vinci, searching for fossils in the mine shafts of the Tuscan hills, to Denis Diderot in Paris, exploring the origins of species while under the surveillance of the secret police, and the brilliant naturalists of the Jardin de Plantes, finding evidence for evolutionary change in the natural history collections stolen during the Napoleonic wars. Evolution was not discovered single-handedly, Rebecca Stott argues, contrary to what has become standard lore, but is an idea that emerged over many centuries, advanced by daring individuals across the globe who had the imagination to speculate on nature's extraordinary ways, and who had the courage to articulate such speculations at a time when to do so was often considered heresy. With each chapter focusing on an early evolutionary thinker, Darwin's Ghosts is a fascinating account of a diverse group of individuals who, despite the very real dangers of challenging a system in which everything was presumed to have been created perfectly by God, felt compelled to understand where we came from. Ultimately, Stott demonstrates, ideas--including evolution itself--evolve just as animals and plants do, by intermingling, toppling weaker notions, and developing over stretches of time. Darwin's Ghosts presents a groundbreaking new theory of an idea that has changed our very understanding of who we are.From the Hardcover edition.

Darwin's Gift

by Francisco Ayala

With the publication in 1859 of On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, Charles Darwin established evolution by common descent as the dominant scientific explanation for nature's diversity. This was to be his gift to science and society; at last, we had an explanation for how life came to be on Earth. Scientists agree that the evolutionary origin of animals and plants is a scientific conclusion beyond reasonable doubt. They place it beside such established concepts as the roundness of the earth, its revolution around the sun, and the molecular composition of matter. That evolution has occurred, in other words, is a fact. Yet as we approach the bicentennial celebration of Darwin's birth, the world finds itself divided over the truth of evolutionary theory. Consistently endorsed as "good science" by experts and overwhelmingly accepted as fact by the scientific community, it is not always accepted by the public, and our schools continue to be battlegrounds for this conflict. From the Tennessee trial of a biology teacher who dared to teach Darwin's theory to his students in 1925 to Tammy Kitzmiller's 2005 battle to keep intelligent design out of the Dover district schools in Pennsylvania, it's clear that we need to cut through the propaganda to quell the cacophony of raging debate. With the publication of Darwin's Gift, a voice at once fresh and familiar brings a rational, measured perspective to the science of evolution. An acclaimed evolutionary biologist with a background in theology, Francisco Ayala offers clear explanations of the science, reviews the history that led us to ratify Darwin's theories, and ultimately provides a clear path for a confused and conflicted public.

Darwin's On the Origin of Species

by Olivia Judson Daniel Duzdevich

Charles Darwin's most famous book On the Origin of Species is without question, one of the most important books ever written. While even the grandest works of Victorian English can prove difficult to modern readers, Darwin wrote his text in haste and under intense pressure. For an era in which Darwin is more talked about than read, Daniel Duzdevich offers a clear, modern English rendering of Darwin's first edition. Neither an abridgement nor a summary, this version might best be described as a "translation" for contemporary English readers. A monument to reasoned insight, the Origin illustrates the value of extensive reflection, carefully gathered evidence, and sound scientific reasoning. By removing the linguistic barriers to understanding and appreciating the Origin, this edition aims to bring 21st-century readers into closer contact with Darwin's revolutionary ideas.

Darwin's Orchids: Then and Now

by Retha Edens-Meier Peter Bernhardt

For biologists, 2009 was an epochal year: the bicentennial of Charles Darwin's birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of a book now known simply as The Origin of Species. But for many botanists, Darwin's true legacy starts with the 1862 publication of another volume: On the Various Contrivances by Which British and Foreign Orchids Are Fertilised by Insects and on the Good Effects of Intercrossing, or Fertilisation of Orchids. This slim but detailed book with the improbably long title was the first in a series of plant studies by Darwin that continues to serve as a global exemplar in the field of evolutionary botany. In Darwin's Orchids, an international group of orchid biologists unites to celebrate and explore the continuum that stretches from Darwin's groundbreaking orchid research to that of today. Mirroring the structure of Fertilisation of Orchids, Darwin's Orchids investigates flowers from Darwin's home in England, through the southern hemisphere, and on to North America and China as it seeks to address a set of questions first put forward by Darwin himself: What pollinates this particular type of orchid? How does its pollination mechanism work? Will an orchid self-pollinate or is an insect or other animal vector required? And how has this orchid's lineage changed over time? Diverse in their colors, forms, aromas, and pollination schemes, orchids have long been considered ideal models for the study of plant evolution and conservation. Looking to the past, present, and future of botany, Darwin's Orchids will be a vital addition to this tradition.

Darwin's Pictures: Views of Evolutionary Theory, 1837-1874

by Julia Voss

In this first-ever examination of Charles Darwin's sketches, drawings, and illustrations, Julia Voss presents the history of evolutionary theory told in pictures. Darwin had a life-long interest in pictorial representations of nature, sketching out his evolutionary theory and related ideas for over forty years. Voss details the pictorial history of Darwin's theory of evolution, starting with his notebook sketches of 1837 and ending with the illustrations inThe Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals(1872). These images were profoundly significant for Darwin's long-term argument for evolutionary theory; each characterizes a different aspect of his relationship with the visual information and constitutes what can be called an "icon" of evolution. Voss shows how Darwin "thought with his eyes" and how his pictorial representations and the development and popularization of the theory of evolution were vitally interconnected. Voss explores four of Darwin's images in depth, and weaves about them a story on the development and presentation of Darwin's theory, in which she also addresses the history of Victorian illustration, the role of images in science, the technologies of production, and the relationship between specimen, words, and images.

Darwin's Pious Idea: Why the Ultra-Darwinists and Creationists Both Get It Wrong

by Conor Cunningham

In "Darwin's Pious Idea," Cunningham puts forth a compelling, cutting-edge case for both creation and evolution, drawing skillfully on an array of philosophical, theological, historical, and scientific sources to buttress his arguments.

Darwin's Sacred Cause

by James Moore Adrian Desmond

An astonishing new portrait of a scientific iconIn this remarkable book, Adrian Desmond and James Moore restore the missing moral core of Darwin's evolutionary universe, providing a completely new account of how he came to his shattering theories about human origins.There has always been a mystery surrounding Darwin: How did this quiet, respectable gentleman, a pillar of his parish, come to embrace one of the most radical ideas in the history of human thought? It's difficult to overstate just what Darwin was risking in publishing his theory of evolution. So it must have been something very powerful--a moral fire, as Desmond and Moore put it--that propelled him. And that moral fire, they argue, was a passionate hatred of slavery.To make their case, they draw on a wealth of fresh manuscripts, unpublished family correspondence, notebooks, diaries, and even ships' logs. They show how Darwin's abolitionism had deep roots in his mother's family and was reinforced by his voyage on the Beagle as well as by events in America--from the rise of scientific racism at Harvard through the dark days of the Civil War.Leading apologists for slavery in Darwin's time argued that blacks and whites had originated as separate species, with whites created superior. Darwin abhorred such "arrogance." He believed that, far from being separate species, the races belonged to the same human family. Slavery was therefore a "sin," and abolishing it became Darwin's "sacred cause." His theory of evolution gave all the races--blacks and whites, animals and plants--an ancient common ancestor and freed them from creationist shackles. Evolution meant emancipation.In this rich and illuminating work, Desmond and Moore recover Darwin's lost humanitarianism. They argue that only by acknowledging Darwin's Christian abolitionist heritage can we fully understand the development of his groundbreaking ideas. Compulsively readable and utterly persuasive, Darwin's Sacred Cause will revolutionize our view of the great naturalist.

Darwin's Sciences

by Peter Graham Duncan Porter

A complete scientific biography of Darwin that takes into account the latest research findings, both published and unpublished, on the life of this remarkable man. Considered the first book to thoroughly emphasize Darwin's research in various fields of endeavor, what he did, why he did it, and its implications for his time and ours. Rather than following a strictly chronological approach - a narrative choice that characteristically offers an ascent to On the Origin of Species (1859) with a rapid decline in interest following its publication and reception - this book stresses the diversity and full extent of Darwin's career by providing a series of chapters centering on various intellectual topics and scientific specializations that interested Darwin throughout his life. Authored by academics with years of teaching and discussing Darwin, Darwin's Sciences is suited to any biologist who is interested in the deeper inplications of Darwin's research.

Data Analysis for Research Designs: Analysis of Variance and Multiple Regression/Correlation Approaches

by Geoffrey Keppel Sheldon Zedeck

Data Analysis for Research Designs covers the analytical techniques for the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple regression/correlation (MRC), emphasizing single-degree-of-freedom comparisons so that students focus on clear research planning. This text is designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students of the behavioral and social sciences who have an understanding of algebra and statistics.

Data Analysis in Vegetation Ecology

by Otto Wildi

The first edition of Data Analysis in Vegetation Ecology provided an accessible and thorough resource for evaluating plant ecology data, based on the author's extensive experience of research and analysis in this field. Now, the Second Edition expands on this by not only describing how to analyse data, but also enabling readers to follow the step-by-step case studies themselves using the freely available statistical package R. The addition of R in this new edition has allowed coverage of additional methods for classification and ordination, and also logistic regression, GLMs, GAMs, regression trees as well as multinomial regression to simulate vegetation types. A package of statistical functions, specifically written for the book, covers topics not found elsewhere, such as analysis and plot routines for handling synoptic tables. All data sets presented in the book are now also part of the R package 'dave', which is freely available online at the R Archive webpage. The book and data analysis tools combined provide a complete and comprehensive guide to carrying out data analysis students, researchers and practitioners in vegetation science and plant ecology.Summary:A completely revised and updated edition of this popular introduction to data analysis in vegetation ecologyNow includes practical examples using the freely available statistical package 'R'Written by a world renowned expert in the fieldComplex concepts and operations are explained using clear illustrations and case studies relating to real world phenomenaHighlights both the potential and limitations of the methods used, and the final interpretationsGives suggestions on the use of the most widely used statistical software in vegetation ecology and how to start analysing dataPraise for the first edition: "This book will be a valuable addition to the shelves of early postgraduate candidates and postdoctoral researchers. Through the excellent background material and use of real world examples, Wildi has taken the fear out of trying to understand these much needed data analysis techniques in vegetation ecology." Austral Ecology

Data-Handling in Biomedical Science

by Peter White

Packed with worked examples and problems, this book will help the reader improve their confidence and skill in data-handling. The mathematical methods needed for problem-solving are described in the first part of the book, with chapters covering topics such as indices, graphs and logarithms. The following eight chapters explore data-handling in different areas of microbiology and biochemistry including microbial growth, enzymes and radioactivity. Each chapter is fully illustrated with worked examples that provide a step-by-step guide to the solution of the most common problems. Over 30 exercises, ranging in difficulty and length, allow you to practise your skills and are accompanied by a full set of hints and solutions.

Data Mining for Systems Biology

by Charles Delisi Minoru Kanehisa Hiroshi Mamitsuka

The post-genomic revolution is witnessing the generation of petabytes of data annually, with deep implications ranging across evolutionary theory, developmental biology, agriculture, and disease processes. Data Mining for Systems Biology: Methods and Protocols, surveys and demonstrates the science and technology of converting an unprecedented data deluge to new knowledge and biological insight. The volume is organized around two overlapping themes, network inference and functional inference. Written in the highly successful Methods in Molecular BiologyTM series format, chapters include introductions to their respective topics, lists of the necessary materials and reagents, step-by-step, readily reproducible protocols, and key tips on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls. Authoritative and practical, Data Mining for Systems Biology: Methods and Protocols also seeks to aid researchers in the further development of databases, mining and visualization systems that are central to the paradigm altering discoveries being made with increasing frequency.

Data Mining in Crystallography

by D. W. Hofmann Liudmila N. Kuleshova

An Introduction to Data Mining. - Data Bases, the Basis for Data Mining. - Data Mining and Inorganic Crystallography. - Data Mining in Organic Crystallography. - Data Mining for Protein Secondary Structure Prediction.

Data Mining in Proteomics

by Christian Stephan Martin Eisenacher Michael Hamacher

Through the rapid development of proteomics methods and technologies, an enormous amount of data was created, leading to a wide-spread rethinking of strategy design and data interpretation. In Data Mining in Proteomics: From Standards to Applications, experts in the field present these new insights within the proteomics community, taking the historical evolution as well as the most important international standardization projects into account. Along with basic and sophisticated overviews of proteomics technologies, standard data formats, and databases, the volume features chapters on data interpretation strategies including statistics, spectra interpretation, and analysis environments as well as specialized tasks such as data annotation, peak picking, phosphoproteomics, spectrum libraries, LC/MS imaging, and splice isoforms. As a part of the highly successful Methods in Molecular BiologyTM series, this work provides the kind of detailed description and implementation advice that is crucial for getting optimal results. Authoritative and cutting-edge, Data Mining in Proteomics: From Standards to Applications is a well-balanced compendium for beginners and experts, offering a broad scope of data mining topics but always focusing on the current state-of-the-art and beyond.

Data Mining Techniques for the Life Sciences

by Oliviero Carugo Frank Eisenhaber

Whereas getting exact data about living systems and sophisticated experimental procedures have primarily absorbed the minds of researchers previously, the development of high-throughput technologies has caused the weight to increasingly shift to the problem of interpreting accumulated data in terms of biological function and biomolecular mechanisms. In "Data Mining Techniques for the Life Sciences", experts in the field contribute valuable information about the sources of information and the techniques used for "mining" new insights out of databases. Beginning with a section covering the concepts and structures of important groups of databases for biomolecular mechanism research, the book then continues with sections on formal methods for analyzing biomolecular data and reviews of concepts for analyzing biomolecular sequence data in context with other experimental results that can be mapped onto genomes. As a volume of the highly successful Methods in Molecular BiologyTM series, this work provides the kind of detailed description and implementation advice that is crucial for getting optimal results. Authoritative and easy to reference, "Data Mining Techniques for the Life Sciences" seeks to aid students and researchers in the life sciences who wish to get a condensed introduction into the vital world of biological databases and their many applications.

Data Production and Analysis in Population Genomics

by Aurélie Bonin François Pompanon

Population genomics is a recently emerged discipline, which aims at understanding how evolutionary processes influence genetic variation across genomes. Today, in the era of cheaper next-generation sequencing, it is no longer as daunting to obtain whole genome data for any species of interest and population genomics is now conceivable in a wide range of fields, from medicine and pharmacology to ecology and evolutionary biology. However, because of the lack of reference genome and of enough a priori data on the polymorphism, population genomics analyses of populations will still involve higher constraints for researchers working on non-model organisms, as regards the choice of the genotyping/sequencing technique or that of the analysis methods. Therefore, Data Production and Analysis in Population Genomics purposely puts emphasis on protocols and methods that are applicable to species where genomic resources are still scarce. It is divided into three convenient sections, each one tackling one of the main challenges facing scientists setting up a population genomics study. The first section helps devising a sampling and/or experimental design suitable to address the biological question of interest. The second section addresses how to implement the best genotyping or sequencing method to obtain the required data given the time and cost constraints as well as the other genetic resources already available, Finally, the last section is about making the most of the (generally huge) dataset produced by using appropriate analysis methods in order to reach a biologically relevant conclusion. Written in the successful Methods in Molecular BiologyTM series format, chapters include introductions to their respective topics, lists of the necessary materials and reagents, step-by-step, readily reproducible protocols, advice on methodology and implementation, and notes on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls. Authoritative and easily accessible, Data Production and Analysis in Population Genomics serves a wide readership by providing guidelines to help choose and implement the best experimental or analytical strategy for a given purpose.

Showing 3,351 through 3,375 of 15,582 results


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