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Christopher Columbus

by Ernle Bradford

Long before he made his fateful crossing of the Atlantic, Christopher Columbus learned his seamanship as a young man in the Mediterranean and then in the service of the King of Portugal. But soon his eyes turned to the ocean and what lay beyond. Opposition to his idea of finding the East by sailing west was based on differing ideas of the size--and shape--of the world. To the end of his days Columbus insisted that where his ship came aground was in the Indies, even when it became clear to his contemporaries that they were in fact in an area of the world previously unknown to Europeans. Bradford portrays Columbus's genius, stubbornness, greed and stupidity mixed with bravery and masterly navigation skills. A great book gives us a true and balanced portrait of a great explorer who forever changed the world.

Christopher Columbus

by Struan Reid

Why did Columbus sail under the flag of Spain instead that of Italy? What did he hope to find when he sailed west across Atlantic Ocean? Why isn't America named after him? The 'Groundbreakers' series explores the lives of pioneering men and women-people whose achievements and discoveries have had a lasting impact on our world. Each book tells about the experiences that inspired these amazing individuals to think in new ways and discusses how the environment they lived in affected their work. Information on their supporters, colleagues, and rivals adds to the story. Finally, a look at the person's legacy shows how their achievements and discoveries continue to affect people today.

Christopher Columbus and the Age of Exploration for Kids: With 21 Activities

by Ronald A. Reis

Taking a comprehensive, nuanced, and inclusive approach to Christopher Columbus, this illuminating biography with activities for young readers places him in the context of the explorations that came before, during, and after his lifetime. It portrays the "Admiral of the Ocean Seas" neither as hero nor heel, but as a flawed and complex man whose significance is undeniably monumental. Providing kids, parents, and teachers with a fuller picture of the seafaring life and the dangers and thrills of exploration, author Ronald Reis details all four of Columbus's voyages to the New World, not just his first, and describes the year that Columbus spent stranded on the island of Jamaica without hope of rescue. A full chapter is devoted to painting a more complete and complex portrait of the indigenous peoples of the New World and another to the consequences of Columbus's voyages--the exchange of diseases, ideas, crops, and populations between the New World and the Old. Engaging cross-curricular activities, such as taking nautical measurements, simulating a hurricane, making an ancient globe, and conducting silent trade, elucidate nautical concepts introduced and the times in which Columbus lived.

Chronicle of the Narvaez Expedition

by Ilan Stavans Harold Augenbraun Alvar Nunez de Vaca Fanny Bandelier

This riveting true story is the first major narrative detailing the exploration of North America by Spanish conquistadors (1528-1536). The author, Alvar N&uacute&ntildeez Cabeza de Vaca, was a fortune-seeking Spanish nobleman and the treasurer of an expedition sent to claim for Spain a vast area of today's southern United States. In simple, straightforward prose, Cabeza de Vaca chronicles the nine-year odyssey endured by the men after a shipwreck forced them to make a westward journey on foot from present-day Florida through Louisiana and Texas into California. In thirty-eight brief chapters, Cabeza de Vaca describes the scores of natural and human obstacles they encountered as they made their way across an unknown land. Cabeza de Vaca's gripping account offers a trove of ethnographic information, including descriptions and interpretations of native cultures, making it a powerful precursor to modern anthropology. .

Ciao, America!

by Beppe Severgnini

In the wry but affectionate tradition of Bill Bryson, Ciao, America! is a delightful look at America through the eyes of a fiercely funny guest -- one of Italy's favorite authors who spent a year in Washington, D.C.When Beppe Severgnini and his wife rented a creaky house in Georgetown they were determined to see if they could adapt to a full four seasons in a country obsessed with ice cubes, air-conditioning, recliner chairs, and, of all things, after-dinner cappuccinos. From their first encounters with cryptic rental listings to their back-to-Europe yard sale twelve months later, Beppe explores this foreign land with the self-described patience of a mildly inappropriate beachcomber, holding up a mirror to America's signature manners and mores. Succumbing to his surroundings day by day, he and his wife find themselves developing a taste for Klondike bars and Samuel Adams beer, and even that most peculiar of American institutions -- the pancake house.The realtor who waves a perfect bye-bye, the overzealous mattress salesman who bounces from bed to bed, and the plumber named Marx who deals in illegally powerful showerheads are just a few of the better-than-fiction characters the Severgninis encounter while foraging for clues to the real America. A trip to the computer store proves just as revealing as D.C.'s Fourth of July celebration, as do boisterous waiters angling for tips and no-parking signs crammed with a dozen lines of fine print. By the end of his visit, Severgnini has come to grips with life in these United States -- and written a charming, laugh-out-loud tribute.From the Hardcover edition.

Ciao, America! An Italian Discovers the U.S.

by Beppe Severgnini

In the wry but affectionate tradition of Bill Bryson, "Ciao, America!" is a delightful look at America through the eyes of a fiercely funny guest--one of Italy's favorite authors who spent a year in Washington, D.C.<P>When Beppe Severgnini and his wife rented a creaky house in Georgetown they were determined to see if they could adapt to a full four seasons in a country obsessed with ice cubes, air-conditioning, recliner chairs, and, of all things, after-dinner cappuccinos. From their first encounters with cryptic rental listings to their back-to-Europe yard sale twelve months later, Beppe explores this foreign land with the self-described patience of a mildly inappropriate beachcomber, holding up a mirror to America's signature manners and mores.<P>Succumbing to his surroundings day by day, he and his wife find themselves developing a taste for Klondike bars and Samuel Adams beer, and even that most peculiar of American institutions--the pancake house. The realtor who waves a perfect bye-bye, the overzealous mattress salesman who bounces from bed to bed, and the plumber named Marx who deals in illegally powerful showerheads are just a few of the better-than-fiction characters the Severgninis encounter while foraging for clues to the real America.<P>A trip to the computer store proves just as revealing as D.C.'s Fourth of July celebration, as do boisterous waiters angling for tips and no-parking signs crammed with a dozen lines of fine print. By the end of his visit, Severgnini has come to grips with life in these United States--and written a charming, laugh-out-loud tribute.

Cincinnati Haunted Handbook

by Michael Morris Jeff Morris

The first book in the new Haunted Handbook line within the popular America's Haunted Road Trip series, Cincinnati Haunted Handbook offers a plethora of eerie spots in the Queen City. Each of the places in Cincinnati Haunted Handbook is presented in a two-page spread that includes directions, a brief history, details about the paranormal activity, and advice on seeing it in person. Sites are organized into sections, including schoolhouses, roads and bridges, hotels and inns, and others. From the winding curves of the spooky Buffalo Ridge Road to the ghost of Music Hall, from the moans heard by the Miamitown bridge to the wispy form that flits through Spring Grove Cemetery, this book offers creepy hideaways that even Cincinnati natives don't know about. Equally suitable as a travel guide or as a diverting read for casual dipping, Cincinnati Haunted Handbook sorts out what creeps and crawls in the Ohio night.

Cinema Houston

by David Welling

Cinema Houston celebrates a vibrant century of movie theatres and moviegoing in Texas's largest city. Illustrated with more than two hundred historical photographs, newspaper clippings, and advertisements, it traces the history of Houston movie theatres from their early twentieth-century beginnings in vaudeville and nickelodeon houses to the opulent downtown theatres built in the 1920s (the Majestic, Metropolitan, Kirby, and Loew's State). It also captures the excitement of the neighborhood theatres of the 1930s and 1940s, including the Alabama, Tower, and River Oaks; the theatres of the 1950s and early 1960s, including the Windsor and its Cinerama roadshows; and the multicinemas and megaplexes that have come to dominate the movie scene since the late 1960s. While preserving the glories of Houston's lost movie palaces-only a few of these historic theatres still survive-Cinema Houston also vividly re-creates the moviegoing experience, chronicling midnight movie madness, summer nights at the drive-in, and, of course, all those tasty snacks at the concession stand. Sure to appeal to a wide audience, from movie fans to devotees of Houston's architectural history, Cinema Houston captures the bygone era of the city's movie houses, from the lowbrow to the sublime, the hi-tech sound of 70mm Dolby and THX to the crackle of a drive-in speaker on a cool spring evening.

The Circumference of Home

by Kurt Hoelting

In the spirit of Gary Snyder, one manOCOs year spent traveling by kayak, bike, and on foot in his attempt to radically simplify his life"

The Circumference of Home

by Kurt Hoelting

This much is clear to me. If I can't change my own life in response to the greatest challenge now facing our human family, who can? And if I won't make the effort to try, why should anyone else? So I've decided to start at home, and begin with myself. The question is no longer whether I must respond. The question is whether I can turn my response into an adventure. After realizing the gaping hole between his convictions about climate change and his own carbon footprint, Kurt Hoelting embarked on a yearlong experiment to rediscover the heart of his own home: He traded his car and jet travel for a kayak, a bicycle, and his own two feet, traveling a radius of 100 kilometers from his home in Puget Sound. This "circumference of home" proved more than enough. Part quest and part guidebook for change, Hoelting's journey is an inspiring reminder that what we need really is close at hand, and that the possibility for adventure lies around every bend.

The Circumference of Home

by Kurt Hoelting

This much is clear to me. If I can't change my own life in response to the greatest challenge now facing our human family, who can? And if I won't make the effort to try, why should anyone else? So I've decided to start at home, and begin with myself. The question is no longer whether I must respond. The question is whether I can turn my response into an adventure. After realizing the gaping hole between his convictions about climate change and his own carbon footprint, Kurt Hoelting embarked on a yearlong experiment to rediscover the heart of his own home: He traded his car and jet travel for a kayak, a bicycle, and his own two feet, traveling a radius of 100 kilometers from his home in Puget Sound. This "circumference of home" proved more than enough. Part quest and part guidebook for change, Hoelting's journey is an inspiring reminder that what we need really is close at hand, and that the possibility for adventure lies around every bend.

Circus Maximus

by David Starkey

What would the Son-of-Man get up to in present-day Rome? Would he wander the Galleria Borghese, loiter outside nightclubs, ride trams, tip accordionists? How would Keats feel about the neon Dior sign that flashes away above the Spanish Steps? Are there ways to avoid Vespas on the sidewalks? Rules for carving a Pietà? And exactly which painter is responsible for the ugliest Jesus in the history of Western Art?A tour of Rome like no other, the poems of Circus Maximus ask these questions and more. Join David Starkey as he shines a torch on the sights, sounds, mysteries and metaphors of the Eternal City.David Starkey is the former Poet Laureate of Santa Barbara, a senior Fulbright scholar, and a six-time nominee for the Pushcart Prize. His latest volume of poetry is A Few Things You Should Know About the Weasel (Biblioasis, 2010).

The City at Three PM

by Peter Lasalle

In "The City at Three PM," award-winning fiction writer Peter LaSalle offers 11 startlingly original personal essays dealing with his longtime quest for world travel. These literary errands range from driving recklessly across the county to seek out Saul Bellow in Chicago to settling in for long evenings at a pub in Dublin with Christy Brown, the celebrated Irish author afflicted with cerebral palsy who typed with his toes. In Buenos Aires LaSalle senses metaphysical transport while investigating Borges' work; in Cameroon he attends the wonderful opening of a small bookstore; in Hollywood he finds himself caught in a crazy mob scene while researching the work of 1930s master American novelist and screenwriter Nathanael West; in Tunisia he follows in the footsteps of Flaubert at the ruins of ancient Carthage. And those are just some of the adventures. Having first appeared in distinguished publications here and abroad, including "The Best American Travel Writing," these are beautifully crafted pieces, heartfelt, honest, observant, and often moving toward genuine transcendence. Overall they conjure up those fine moments when travel intersects with the important role of literature in our lives, in this case yielding writing entirely unique and satisfying.

A City for Children: Women, Architecture, and the Charitable Landscapes of Oakland, 1850-1950

by Marta Gutman

American cities are constantly being built and rebuilt, resulting in ever-changing skylines and neighborhoods. While the dynamic urban landscapes of New York, Boston, and Chicago have been widely studied, there is much to be gleaned from west coast cities, especially in California, where the migration boom at the end of the nineteenth century permanently changed the urban fabric of these newly diverse, plural metropolises. Ina"A City for Children," Marta Gutman focuses on the use and adaptive reuse of everyday buildings in Oakland, California, to make the city a better place for children. She introduces us to the women who were determined to mitigate the burdens placed on working-class families by an indifferent industrial capitalist economy. Often without the financial means to build from scratch, women did not tend to conceive of urban land as a blank slate to be wiped clean for development. Instead, Gutman shows how, over and over, women turned private houses in Oakland into orphanages, kindergartens, settlement houses, and day care centers, and in the process built the charitable landscapeOCoa network of places that was critical for the betterment of children, families, and public life. a The industrial landscape of Oakland, riddled with the effects of social inequalities and racial prejudices, is not a neutral backdrop in GutmanOCOs story but an active player. Spanning one hundred years of history, a"A City for Childrena"provides a compelling model for building urban institutions and demonstrates that children, women, charity, and incremental construction, renovations, alterations, additions, and repurposed structures are central to the understanding of modern cities. "

City of Darkness and Light (Molly Murphy Mystery #13)

by Rhys Bowen

[From the front dust jacket flap:] "Molly and Daniel Sullivan are settling happily into the new routines of parenthood, but their domestic bliss is shattered the night a gang retaliates against Daniel for making a big arrest. Daniel wants his family safely out of New York City as soon as possible. In shock and grieving, but knowing she needs to protect their infant son, Liam, Molly agrees to take him on the long journey to Paris to stay with her friends Sid and Gus, who are studying art in the City of Light. But upon arriving in Paris, nothing goes as planned. Sid and Gus seem to have vanished into thin air, and Molly's search to figure out what happened to them will lead her through all levels of Parisian society, from extravagant salons to the dingy cafés where starving artists linger over coffee and loud philosophical debates. And when in the course of her search she stumbles across a dead body, Molly, on her own in a foreign country, starts to wonder if she and Liam might be in even more danger in Paris than they had been at home. As Impressionism gives way to Fauvism and Cubism, and the Dreyfus Affair rocks France, Molly races through Paris to outsmart a killer in the most spectacular Molly Murphy novel yet. Catch up on all of the investigations of a feisty Irish immigrant in early twentieth century New York City. The historic atmosphere is diverse and accurate and though Molly enjoys her independence and is out to prove women are capable of running a business, she has a soft spot for Daniel, a police captain who loves her, but for some time, not reliably. Look for #0.5 The Amersham Rubies, #1 Murphy's Law, #2 Death of Riley, #3 For the Love of Mike, #4 In Like Flynn, #5 Oh Danny Boy, #6 In Dublin's Fair City, #7 Tell Me Pretty Maiden, #8 In A Gilded Cage, #9 The Last Illusion, #10 Bless the Bride, #11 Hush Now, Don't You Cry and #12 The Family Way, with more on the way.

City of Djinns

by William Dalrymple

'Could you show me a djinn?' I asked. 'Certainly, ' replied the Sufi. 'But you would run away.

City of Djinns: A Year in Delhi

by William Dalrymple

Sparkling with irrepressible wit, City of Djinns peels back the layers of Delhi's centuries-old history, revealing an extraordinary array of characters along the way--from eunuchs to descendants of great Moguls. With refreshingly open-minded curiosity, William Dalrymple explores the seven "dead" cities of Delhi as well as the eighth city--today's Delhi. Underlying his quest is the legend of the djinns, fire-formed spirits that are said to assure the city's Phoenix-like regeneration no matter how many times it is destroyed. Entertaining, fascinating, and informative, City of Djinns is an irresistible blend of research and adventure.

The City of Falling Angels: A Venice Story

by John Berendt

Venice teeters in precarious balance between endurance and decay, where narrow streets and passageways form a giant maze of mystery.

City of Promises

by Jeffrey S. Gurock Deborah Dash Moore Annie Polland Daniel Soyer Diana L. Linden Howard B. Rock

New York Jews, so visible and integral to the culture, economy and politics of America's greatest city, has eluded the grasp of historians for decades. Surprisingly, no comprehensive history of New York Jews has ever been written. City of Promises: The History of the Jews in New York, a three volume set of original research, pioneers a path-breaking interpretation of a Jewish urban community at once the largest in Jewish history and most important in the modern world. Volume I, Haven of Liberty, by historian Howard Rock, chronicles the arrival of the first Jews to New York (then New Amsterdam) in 1654and highlights their political and economic challenges. Overcoming significant barriers, colonial and republican Jews in New York laid the foundations for the development of a thriving community. Volume II, Emerging Metropolis, written by Annie Polland and Daniel Soyer, describes New York's transformation into a Jewish city. Focusing on the urban Jewish built environment--its tenements and banks, synagogues and shops, department stores and settlement houses--it conveys the extraordinary complexity of Jewish immigrant society. Volume III, Jews in Gotham, by historian Jeffrey S.Gurock, highlights neighborhood life as the city's distinctive feature. New York retained its preeminence as the capital of American Jews because of deep roots in local worlds that supported vigorous political, religious, and economic diversity. Each volume includes a "visual essay" by art historian Diana Linden interpreting aspects of life for New York's Jews from their arrival until today. These illustrated sections, many in color, illuminate Jewish material culture and feature reproductions of early colonial portraits, art, architecture, as well as everyday culture and community. Overseen by noted scholar Deborah Dash Moore, City of Promises offers the largest Jewish city in the world, in the United States, and in Jewish history its first comprehensive account.

City of Saints

by George Weigel Stephen Weigel Carrie Gress

"Karol Wojtyła, Pope John Paul II, was a man whose life was the expression of a richly textured and multidimensional soul. The many layers of that soul took on their first, mature form in Kraków." - George Weigel In this beautifully illustrated spiritual travelogue, New York Times bestselling author George Weigel leads readers through the historic streets of Kraków, Poland, introducing one of the world's great cities through the life of one of the most influential Catholic leaders of all time. "To follow Karol Wojtyła through Kraków is to follow an itinerary of sanctity while learning the story of a city." Weigel writes. "Thus, in what follows, the story of Karol Wojtyła, St. John Paul II, and the story of Kraków are interwoven in a chronological pilgrimage through the life of a saint that reveals, at the same time, the dramatic history and majestic culture of a city where a boy grew into a man, priest, a bishop--and an apostle to the world." With stunning photographs by Stephen Weigel and notes on the city's remarkable fabric by Carrie Gress, City of Saints offers an in-depth look at a man and a city that made an indelible impression on the life and thought of the Catholic Church and the 21st century world.From the Trade Paperback edition.

City of the Soul

by William Murray

"One lifetime is not enough for Rome," the famous saying goes, and anyone who's ever been there knows these words to be true. InCity of the Soul, William Murray begins to show us why. Growing up in Rome and spending much of his life in the city, William Murray is an expert guide as he takes us on an intimate walking tour of some of Rome's most glorious achievements, illuminating the history and the mythology that define the city. Murray leads us through the centro, the city's historic downtown center. He writes about the Villa Borghese, the Piazza di Spagna, and the Trevi Fountain and describes such singular attractions as the Capuchin Church of Santa Maria della Concezione, whose macabre crypt has impressed visitors from Mark Twain to the Marquis de Sade. As he walks, he reveals stories that only a longtime resident would know, capturing the sights, sounds, and flavors that make Rome a combination of the deep past and the ever-sensual present.

City Parks

by Catie Maron

City Parks illuminates the spirit and beauty of the world's most loved city parks: an extraordinary visual and poetic journey from London to Brooklyn, Calcutta to Chicago, and Paris to San Francisco, captured in breathtaking photographs and the evocative words of celebrated writers and personalities.

City Secrets Rome

by Robert Kahn

City Secrets Rome: The Essential Insider's Guide brings together the recommendations of artists, writers, historians, architects, chefs, and other experts whose passionate opinions and highly informed perspectives illuminate well-known sites as well as overlooked treasures. These expert travel companions share with you their favorite little-known places including restaurants, cafés, art, architecture, shops, outdoor markets, strolls, daytrips, as well all manner of cultural and historic landmarks. Clothbound, elegant, and pocket-sized, City Secrets Rome features a subtle, non-guidebook design and detailed maps. With over 250 contributors and 400 entries, this curated travel guide is a valuable supplement to any book more devoted to travel basics. A percentage of the proceeds will be donated to The American Academy in Rome, a center for independent study and advanced research in the arts and humanities.

City Squares: Eighteen Writers on the Spirit and Significance of Squares Around the World

by Catie Marron

In this important collection, eighteen renowned writers, including David Remnick, Zadie Smith, Rebecca Skloot, Rory Stewart, and Adam Gopnik evoke the spirit and history of some of the world's most recognized and significant city squares, accompanied by illustrations from equally distinguished photographers.Over half of the world's citizens now live in cities, and this number is rapidly growing. At the heart of these municipalities is the square--the defining urban public space since the dawn of democracy in Ancient Greece. Each square stands for a larger theme in history: cultural, geopolitical, anthropological, or architectural, and each of the eighteen luminary writers has contributed his or her own innate talent, prodigious research, and local knowledge.Divided into three parts: Culture, Geopolitics, History, headlined by Michael Kimmelman, David Remnick, and George Packer, this significant anthology shows the city square in new light. Jehane Noujaim, award-winning filmmaker, takes the reader through her return to Tahrir Square during the 2011 protest; Rory Stewart, diplomat and author, chronicles a square in Kabul which has come and gone several times over five centuries; Ari Shavit describes the dramatic changes of central Tel Aviv's Rabin Square; Rick Stengel, editor, author, and journalist, recounts the power of Mandela's choice of the Grand Parade, Cape Town, a huge market square to speak to the world right after his release from twenty-seven years in prison; while award-winning journalist Gillian Tett explores the concept of the virtual square in the age of social media.This collection is an important lesson in history, a portrait of the world we live in today, as well as an exercise in thinking about the future. Evocative and compelling, City Squares will change the way you walk through a city.Contributors include:David Adjaye on Jemma e-Fnna, Marrakech * Anne Applebaum on Red Square, Moscow and Grand Market Square, Krakow * Chrystia Freeland on Euromaiden, Kiev * Adam Gopnik on Place des Vosges, Paris * Alma Guillermoprieto on Zocalo, Mexico City * Jehane Noujaim on Tahrir Square, Cairo * Evan Osnos on Tiananmen Square, Beijing * Andrew Roberts on Residential Squares, London * Elif Shafak on Taksim Square, Istanbul * Rebecca Skloot on American Town Squares * Ari Shavit on Rabin Square, Tel Aviv * Zadie Smith on the grand piazzas of Rome and Venice * Richard Stengel on Market Square, Grand Parade, Cape Town * Rory Stewart on Murad Khane, Kabul * Plus contributions by Gillian Tett, George Packer, David Remnick, and Michael Kimmelman; illustrations and photographs from renowned photographers, including: Thomas Struth, Philip Lorca di Corcia, and Josef Koudelka

City Walks: Chicago

by Christina Henry de Tessan Bart Wright

The perfect bring-along accessory for exploring Chicago like a native.Walks include:Millennium ParkThe LoopMagnificent MileNavy Pier...And more!

Showing 951 through 975 of 6,368 results

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