Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 1 through 25 of 18,971 results
Previous   Page: 1 2 3 Go to last page   Next

10,000 Days of Thunder: A History of the Vietnam War

by Philip Caputo

It was the war that lasted ten thousand days. The war that inspired scores of songs. The war that sparked dozens of riots. And in this stirring chronicle, Pulitzer Prize- winning journalist Philip Caputo writes about our country's most controversial war -- the Vietnam War -- for young readers. From the first stirrings of unrest in Vietnam under French colonial rule, to American intervention, to the battle at Hamburger Hill, to the Tet Offensive, to the fall of Saigon, 10,000 Days of Thunder explores the war that changed the lives of a generation of Americans and that still reverberates with us today. Included within 10,000 Days of Thunder are personal anecdotes from soldiers and civilians, as well as profiles and accounts of the actions of many historical luminaries, both American and Vietnamese, involved in the Vietnam War, such as Richard M. Nixon, General William C. Westmoreland, Ho Chi Minh, Joe Galloway, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Lyndon B. Johnson, and General Vo Nguyen Giap. Caputo also explores the rise of Communism in Vietnam, the roles that women played on the battlefield, the antiwar movement at home, the participation of Vietnamese villagers in the war, as well as the far-reaching impact of the war's aftermath. Caputo's dynamic narrative is highlighted by stunning photographs and key campaign and battlefield maps, making 10,000 Days of Thunder THE consummate book on the Vietnam War for kids.

The 10 Cent Chocolate Tub

by Mike Mcgann

10 Cent Chocolate Tub will take you back to the 1950's and 1960s when life was uncomplicated. There were three channels to watch on a black and white television set showing Sid Caesar, Bishop Fulton J. Sheen, Howdy Doody, Milton Berle, fifteen minutes of Nat King Cole, The Lone Ranger and The Toast of The Town. Radio stations were AM only and played Elvis Presley, Doo-Wop music, Frank Sinatra, Doris Day, Patti Page, Chubby Checker and The Four Seasons, long before The Beatles came to America. The small things in life were exciting to a city boy who grew up to be a broadcaster, a Vietnam veteran, a minor performer and a dad! Everyone has family stories, crazy relatives, funny incidents, memories of how good things were back then and dreams of how they should be. The 10 Cent Chocolate Tub gets it's name from a huge chocolate ice cream cone sold by Bard's Dairy in the 1950s in Pittsburgh at a time when a young boy, who wore rummage sale clothes and ate surplus cheese, was only allowed a nickel vanilla ice cream now and then. This is about the quest for life's finer things like ice cream anytime you want it, playing the radio loudly, crying at a sad movie, falling in love, heartbreaks, kissing your children goodnight and loving every minute of it.

10 Days: Abraham Lincoln

by David Colbert

You're about to be an eyewitness to the ten crucial days in Abraham Lincoln's life, including: A tragic loss that sets a boy on a course for greatness. A career sacrificed to protest an unjust war. A state resorting to treason to preserve slavery. A president who learns the most difficult decisions are made alone. And a promise made to every citizen that American's salves will be free.

10 Days: Anne Frank

by David Colbert

You're about to be an eyewitness to ten crucial days in Anne Frank's life, including: A wrenching decision to flee Germany, A chilling letter that sent her family into hiding, The gift of her one true confidante - her diary, A sickening betrayal to the Nazis, and a tragedy in the concentration camps just before liberation. These days and five others shook Anne's world - and yours.

10 Days: Benjamin Franklin

by David Colbert

You're about to be an eyewitness to the top ten days in Ben Franklin's life, including: A cunning escape from a cruel brother. A shrewd plan to save the colonies. A treacherous spy game in Paris. A shocking battle with a vengeful aristocrat. And a last-minute triumph that bound American together. These days and five others shook Franklin's world- and yours.

10 Days: Martin Luther King Jr.

by David Colbert

You're about to be an eyewitness to the ten crucial days in Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s life, including: His faith in peace leads to a surprising protest. Police injustice shocks the nation awake. A personal sacrifice challenges prejudice and racism. A fearless march demands rights for all Americans. And an immortal speech inspires the world.

10 Years That Shook the World: A Timeline of Events from 2001

by Loretta Napoleoni

September 11, 2001, is considered the main event, but the changes of the decade go far beyond the menace of terrorism and the war on terror. The technological revolution, the wide use of the Internet, and the advent of social media are just some of the innovations that grew to define the decade. The war on terror and its strong rhetoric hid these phenomena. The purpose of this book is to show the true patterns of change--those innovations that will influence coming decades. This is more than a timeline, it is the tale of an extraordinary decade. Within each year, Napoleoni presents events not in a strict chronology but more as we might remember them, often with the most significant events recalled first. Thus the main topics--politics, economics, people, technology, and the environment--cross over constantly, showing how they are all interlinked and how globalization is speeding up the pace of change in our world.

100 Amazing Facts About the Negro with Complete Proof

by J. A. Rogers

First published in 1934 and revised in 1962, this book gathers journalist and historian Joel Augustus Rogers' columns from the syndicated newspaper feature titled Your History. Patterned after the look of Ripley's popular Believe It or Not the multiple vignettes in each episode recount short items from Rogers's research. The feature began in the Pittsburgh Courier in November 1934 and ran through the 1960s.

100 Media Moments That Changed America

by Jim Willis

From the launching of America's first newspaper to YouTube's latest phone-videoed crime, the media has always been guilty of indulging America's obsession with controversy. This encyclopedia covers 100 events in world history from the 17th century to the present--moments that alone were major and minor, but ones that exploded in the public eye when the media stepped in. Topics covered include yellow journalism, the War of the Worlds radio broadcast, the Kennedy-Nixon debates, JFK's assassination, the Pentagon papers, and Hurricane Katrina. These are events that changed the way the media is used-not just as a tool for spreading knowledge, but as a way of shaping and influencing the opinions and reactions of America's citizens. Thanks to the media's representations of these events, history has been changed forever. From classified military plans that leaked out to the public to the first televised presidential debates to the current military tortures caught on tape, Breaking News will demonstrate not only an ever-evolving system of news reporting, but also the ways in which historical events have ignited the media to mold news in a way that resonates with America's public. This must-have reference work is ideal for journalism and history majors, as well as for interested general readers.Chapters are in chronological order, beginning with the 17th century. Each chapter starts with a brief introduction, followed by media event entries from that decade. Each entry explains the moment, and then delivers specific details regarding how the media covered the event, America's response to the coverage, and how the media changed history.

100 Women Who Shaped World History

by Gail Meyer Rolka

A comprehensive collection of one page synopses of 100 women of major importance in our history. Presents information in chronological order, contains timeline, and a trivia quiz. The book begins in 1503 BC and ends by telling the stories of women who are still making history.

1000 Years for Revenge: International Terrorism and the FBI

by Peter Lance

A journalist explores how the FBI overlooked opportunities to stop the 9-11 terrorist attacks. His conclusions are based upon interviews and declassified documents.

1001 People Who Made America

by Alan Axelrod

From the famous to the infamous, from the virtuous to the notorious, from Thomas Jefferson to Madonna, historian Axelrod profiles key figures in American politics, arts, science, business, religion, and popular culture. The brief profiles are arranged alphabetically, about three to a page, and describe each person's major contributions. The book's scope begins centuries before there was a United States and continues through the 21st century. Without a timeline, chronology, or categories, the book will probably be more comfortable on general reader's coffee tables than in students' backpacks. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

101 Myths of the Bible: How Ancient Scribes Invented Biblical History

by Gary Greenberg

Greenberg, a lawyer who's also president of the Biblical Archaeology Society of New York, explores how the myths and legends of neighboring cultures are built into the foundations of the modern monotheistic religions. He describes a long and continuous relationship between ancient Israel and Egypt, examining Old Testament stories to link Egyptian motifs and mythology to Hebrew interpretation of its earliest history. For his study, he looked for three kinds of biblical stories: those with at least two contradictory accounts; those with parallels in earlier myths and legends; and those involving incidents "that simply couldn't be true. " Annotation c. Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

101 Things You Didn't Know About Irish History

by Amy Hackney Blackwell Ryan Hackney

Discover the truth behind the myths of the Emerald Isle Forget about shamrocks, leprechans, and all that blarney;101 Things You Didn't Know about Irish Historydispels the myths and tells the true story of the Irish. Inside, you'll learn about: Lives of the ancient Celts before the British invasions Famous Irish including Michael Collins, Charles Parnell#151;and Bono! The potato famine and emigration (were there really gangs of New York?) Irish music and dance Complete with an Irish language primer and pronunciation guide,101 Things You Didn't Know about Irish Historyis an informative reference for anyone who loves the Irish.

101 Things You Didn't Know about the Civil War

by Thomas R. Turner

Do you know: Which state was the first to secede from the Union? Who the Mata Hari of the Civil War was? Which Bible passage Southerners most often used to justify slavery? You'll find the answers to these intriguing questions and more in 101 Things You Didn't Know About the Civil War. Packed with fascinating details about the people, places, and events that defined our nation's most contentious conflict, this tell-all guide reveals the inside scoop on the: Issue of slavery and its impact on the war; Great--and not-so-great--leaders and generals; Battles fought and lost--and fought again; Particular horrors of this war; Women, children, and African Americans in the war. Complete with a helpful timeline, 101 Things You Didn't Know About the Civil War is your go-to guide for facts of the war that dramatically altered the course of American history.

101 Things You Thought You Knew About the Titanic . . . but Didn't!

by Tim Maltin

April 15th, 2012, will be the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. People have an endless fascination with the Titanic, yet much of what they know today is a mixture of fact and fiction. In one hundred and one brief and engaging chapters, Tim Maltin, one of the foremost experts on the Titanic, reveals the truth behind the most common beliefs about the ship and the night it sank. From physics to photographs, lawsuits to love stories, Maltin doesn't miss one tidbit surrounding its history. Heavily researched and filled with detailed descriptions, quotes from survivors, and excerpts from the official inquiries, this book is guaranteed to make readers rethink everything they thought they knew about the legendary ship and its tragic fate.

103 Journeys, Voyages, Trips and Stuff

by Siddhartha Sarma

From ancient civilization to modern times, the experience of journeys by road, water and air is recounted by the author.

11,000 Years Lost

by Peni R. Griffin

What does it mean if you die before you were born? An eleven-year-old Texan girl finds out what it was like to live in the Ice Age in this action-packed time-travel adventure. As Esther participates in an archaeological dig in Texas, she is accidentally transported back in time. Living among the Clovis, the mammoth hunters, she learns of a very different childhood in which play is practice for survival and humans are prey for megafauna, scimitar cats, giant bears, and others. Will she ever get back to her own time? Peni R. Griffin has delivered her greatest time-travel story yet, a thrill-a-page adventure that's also an affecting look at family and what makes a home. Kids will be riveted by this richly imagined vision of prehistoric North America from a writer whose work has been called expertly plotted (Kirkus Reviews) and fascinating (Booklist). Discoveries of early American artifacts, clues to this little-known time, appear in the news frequently. The detailed bibliography in this book invites young readers to read and, like Esther, make discoveries of their own.

11 Days in December: Christmas at the Bulge 1944

by Stanley Weintraub

The Allied troops huddled and died in mist and mud, trapped in pockets by driving rain and snow. No one had expected Hitler to amass forces secretly and break through the lines of the Ardennes forest, or the fierce fighting that was to be called the Battle of the Bulge, and the Allied troops desperately lacked food, supplies, arms and ammunition. The only way to get supplies was by air. The only way to win was to conduct air strikes. If only the weather would clear. Then George S. Patton strode into a Luxembourg chapel and began a private prayer with "Sir, whose side are you on?" The weather cleared. Weintraub (arts and humanities emeritus, Pennsylvania State U. ) takes readers through some of the most harrowing days in history, giving insights from commanders, soldiers, and even prisoners of war like Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

12 Years a Slave

by Solomon Northup

One of the best and most enduring of the slave narratives, it is a frank, incisive depiction of slavery in the American south. Solomon was an African American born free in New York during the 19th century, but was kidnapped and sold into slavery in the south. Twelve Years a Slave paints a vivid picture of the horrid realities of slavery and the harrowing circumstances under which Northup was restored to freedom. It was recently adapted into a multi-Oscar winning film directed by Steve McQueen and starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Lupita Nyong'o, Michael Fassbender, and Benedict Cumberbatch. Penguin Random House Canada is proud to bring you classic works of literature in ebook form, with the highest quality production values. Find more today and rediscover books you never knew you loved.

13 Cent Killers: The 5th Marine Snipers in Vietnam

by John J. Culbertson

"It's not easy to stay alive with a $1,000 bounty on your head. " In 1967, a bullet cost thirteen cents, and no one gave Uncle Sam a bigger bang for his buck than the 5th Marine Regiment Sniper Platoon. So feared were these lethal marksmen that the Viet Cong offered huge rewards for killing them. Now noted Vietnam author John J. Culbertson, a former 5th Marine sniper himself, presents the riveting true stories of young Americans who fought with bolt rifles and bounties on their heads during the fiercest combat of the war,from 1967 through the desperate Tet battle for Hue in early '68. In spotter/shooter pairs, sniper teams accompanied battle-hardened Marine rifle companies like the 2/5 on patrols and combat missions. Whether fighting their way out of a Viet Cong "kill zone" or battling superior numbers of NVA crack troops, the sniper teams were at the cutting edge in the art of jungle warfare, showing the patience, stealth, combat marksmanship, and raw courage that made the unit the most decorated regimental sniper platoon in the Vietnam War. Harrowing and unforgettable, these accounts pay tribute to the heroes who made the greatest sacrifice of all-and leave no doubt that among 5th Marine snipers uncommon valor was truly a common virtue. From the Paperback edition.

14 Cows for America

by Carmen Agra Deedy Wilson Kimeli Naiyomah

It is June of 2002, and a very unusual ceremony begins in a far-flung village in western Kenya. An American diplomat is surrounded by hundreds of Maasai people. A gift is about to be bestowed on the men, women, and children of America, and he is there to accept it. The gift is as unsought and unexpected as it is extraordinary. A mere nine months have passed since the September 11 attacks, and hearts are raw. Tears flow freely from American and Maasai alike as these legendary warriors offer their gift to a grieving people half a world away. World of the gift will travel news wires around the globe. Many will be profoundly touched, but for Americans, this selfless gesture will have deeper meaning still. For a heartsick nation, the gift of fourteen cows emerges from the choking dust and darkness as a soft light of hope ... and friendship. [This text is listed as an example that meets Common Core Standards in English language arts in grades 2-3 at http://www.corestandards.org.]

1421: The Year China Discovered America

by Gavin Menzies

On March 8, 1421, the world's largest fleet set sail from China. When the fleet returned home in October 1423, the emperor had fallen, leaving China in political and economic chaos. The great ships were left to rot at their moorings and the records of their journeys were destroyed. Lost in the long, self-imposed isolation that followed was the knowledge that Chinese ships had reached America seventy years before Columbus and had circumnavigated the globe a century before Magellan.

1434: The Year a Chinese Fleet Sailed to Italy and Ignited the Renaissance

by Gavin Menzies

The New York Times bestselling author of 1421 offers another stunning reappraisal of history, presenting compelling new evidence that traces the roots of the European Renaissance to Chinese exploration in the fifteenth century. The brilliance of the Renaissance laid the foundation of the modern world. Textbooks tell us that it came about as a result of a rediscovery of the ideas and ideals of classical Greece and Rome. But now bestselling historian Gavin Menzies makes the startling argument that in the year 1434, China-then the world's most technologically advanced civilization-provided the spark that set the European Renaissance ablaze. From that date onward, Europeans embraced Chinese intellectual ideas, discoveries, and inventions, all of which form the basis of western civilization today. Florence and Venice of the early fifteenth century were hubs of world trade, attracting traders from across the globe. Based on years of research, this marvelous history argues that a Chinese fleet--official ambassadors of the emperor--arrived in Tuscany in 1434, where they were received by Pope Eugenius IV in Florence. The delegation presented the influential pope with a wealth of Chinese learning from a diverse range of fields: art, geography (including world maps that were passed on to Christopher Columbus and Ferdinand Magellan), astronomy, mathematics, printing, architecture, steel manufacturing, military weaponry, and more. This vast treasure trove of knowledge spread across Europe, igniting the legendary inventiveness of the Renaissance, including the work of such geniuses as da Vinci, Copernicus, Galileo, and more. In 1434, Gavin Menzies combines this long-overdue historical reexamination with the excitement of an investigative adventure. He brings the reader aboard the remarkable Chinese fleet as it sails from China to Cairo and Florence, and then back across the world. Erudite and brilliantly reasoned, 1434 will change the way we see ourselves, our history, and our world.

1491: The Americas Before Columbus

by Charles C. Mann

In this groundbreaking work of science, history, and archaeology, Charles C. Mann radically alters our understanding of the Americas before the arrival of Columbus in 1492. Contrary to what so many Americans learn in school, the pre-Columbian Indians were not sparsely settled in a pristine wilderness; rather, there were huge numbers of Indians who actively molded and influenced the land around them. The astonishing Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan had running water and immaculately clean streets, and was larger than any contemporary European city. Mexican cultures created corn in a specialized breeding process that it has been called man's first feat of genetic engineering. Indeed, Indians were not living lightly on the land but were landscaping and manipulating their world in ways that we are only now beginning to understand. Challenging and surprising, this a transformative new look at a rich and fascinating world we only thought we knew.From the Trade Paperback edition. city. Furthermore, Tenochtitlán, unlike any capital in Europe at that time, had running water, beautiful botanical gardens, and immaculately clean streets.* The earliest cities in the Western Hemisphere were thriving before the Egyptians built the great pyramids.* Pre-Columbian Indians in Mexico developed corn by a breeding process so sophisticated that the journal Science recently described it as "man's first, and perhaps the greatest, feat of genetic engineering."* Amazonian Indians learned how to farm the rain forest without destroying it-a process scientists are studying today in the hope of regaining this lost knowledge.* Native Americans transformed their land so completely that Europeans arrived in a hemisphere already massively "landscaped" by human beings.Mann sheds clarifying light on the methods used to arrive at these new visions of the pre-Columbian Americas and how they have affected our understanding of our history and our thinking about the environment. His book is an exciting and learned account of scientific inquiry and revelation.From the Hardcover edition.

Showing 1 through 25 of 18,971 results
Previous   Page: 1 2 3 Go to last page   Next

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.